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Editorial Results (free)

1. Musician, Songwriter Sykes Joins Ardent as Chief Manager -

Longtime songwriter, touring artist and studio owner Keith Sykes has joined Ardent Studios as chief manager, bringing more than 40 years’ experience in the music industry. More than 100 of Sykes’ songs have been recorded by other artists – including John Prine, Rosanne Cash and George Thorogood – and have sold more than 25 million records worldwide. In addition, he once played in Jimmy Buffett’s Coral Reefer Band and co-wrote the 1979 hit “Volcano” with Buffett.

2. Strickland, Haslam Promote Employment Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam visited several Memphis churches Sunday, April 22, as part of an “Opportunity City” awareness campaign.

3. New Lynching Memorial Evokes Terror of Victims -

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

4. UTHSC Set To Open New Training Facility -

In less than three weeks, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center will launch its new $39.7 million, 45,000-square-foot building packed with high-tech tools and a cutting-edge training environment.

5. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

6. Last Word: 'Poking The Bear,' National Walk Out Day and McQueen on Capitol Hill -

The state House’s Tuesday action cutting $250k in funding for Memphis from Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget proposal is turning into a cause back here, starting with a GoFundMe page. Elsewhere on social media, you can see the unmistakable outline of a party or parties for the cause beginning to form. This is near the end of session for the Legislature when the budget is the last action before going back to the district to run for re-election. Different timing over here, with multiple crawfish outings leading into Memphis in May.

7. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

8. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

9. Hacker Blamed for Third TNReady Computer Snafu -

Frustrated by a third year of TNReady foul-ups, this time with testing statewide disrupted by a suspected hacker, state lawmakers are set to step in and put an end to what they feel is a fiasco.

Two measures were to be considered by the House Tuesday afternoon, April 17, to put an end to mistakes in the administration of tests used to evaluate student progress and teacher effectiveness. School districts statewide were affected by the disruption this week after an outside source hit the state’s testing vendor, Questar.

10. Chemical Weapons Team in Syria Kept From Alleged Attack Site -

DOUMA, Syria (AP) — Syrian and Russian authorities prevented independent investigators from going to the scene of a suspected chemical attack, the head of the chemical watchdog group said Monday, blocking international efforts to establish what happened and who was to blame.

11. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

12. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

13. US Publishers Worry About Pricier Newsprint With New Tariffs -

MILWAUKEE (AP) – Newspaper publishers across the U.S. already strapped by years of declining revenue say they're dealing with an existential threat: Recently imposed tariffs on Canadian newsprint driving up their business costs.

14. Lawmakers Urge That Ex-President James Polk Be Exhumed Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nearly 170 years after President James K. Polk died, the Tennessee Legislature is urging that his remains be exhumed and taken to a fourth resting place – but it might take a while longer before the shovels hit the ground.

15. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

16. The Liquor Store Eatery Doubling Capacity -

One of the Broad Avenue district’s newest restaurants is about to get bigger, just in time for patio season. After the Broad Avenue Art Walk wraps this weekend, come Monday, April 16, The Liquor Store at 2655 Broad Ave. will open its patio space, almost doubling the diner’s seating capacity from 42 to 78.

17. A Memphis Show? -

Twenty-five years after its premier at Lincoln Center, “Too Hot to Handel: The Jazz-Gospel Messiah” is coming to The Orpheum Theatre with its 40-piece orchestra, 100-member choir and renowned soloists. Just the name of the show inspires a new way of thinking about what George Frideric Handel’s “Messiah” traditionally has been, but also could be.

18. Effort to Move Former President Polk's Body is Resurrected -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The body of former president James K. Polk has been moved three times since he died of cholera in 1849, and now an effort to move it again has taken on a life of its own in the Tennessee Legislature.

19. Bus System Overhaul Would Shift Balance of Service to More Frequency -

Consultants mapping a reconstruction of the city’s bus system are suggesting $30 million more a year in annual city funding for the system and a shift of bus service so that 70 percent of the routes have a higher frequency, reducing wait times during peak hours on major north-south and east-west corridors.

20. Editorial: Universal Life a Blueprint For Building Black Wealth -

While many of us were thinking about and remembering the turbulent events of 1968, this week brought another significant nod to the past with a commitment to the future.

The Universal Life Insurance Co. building isn’t a Pyramid, though its architecture has an Egyptian theme. It’s not the tallest building in the city, but then again, the tallest building in the city is boarded up these days.

21. Who Starts on Defense? You’ll Have to Wait -

Jeremy Pruitt hasn’t been afraid to change things around during his first spring practice as Tennessee’s head football coach.

22. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

23. Tracing Civil Rights Struggle Through Travel -

Attention is on Memphis this year with the MLK50 commemoration to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on April 4, 1968. Keeping this focused on travel, I believe it’s a good time to point out some of the newer civil rights sites across the U.S., along with a few that have been around for a while – all opportunities to honor King’s legacy while trying to better understand the struggle.

24. Local Experts To Tackle Health Care Changes -

Eight years after the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, health care can still spark contentious debates around the country, though there are nevertheless a few things people can agree on.

Costs keep going up. Insurers have continued to pull out of the individual ACA marketplace, leaving that market segment volatile and uncertain. And there’s still no widespread consensus on how to plug the gaps that still exist in the country’s health care system.

25. Lenoir: County Tax Decrease Was ‘Smoke and Mirrors’ -

With the estimate last month of an $18 million to $25 million county budget surplus for the fiscal year that ends June 30, taxes are about to become an even bigger issue in the Republican primary for Shelby County mayor.

26. Rebranded Shoemaker Insurance Expands -

Shoemaker Financial president and CEO Jim Shoemaker isn’t sure there is ever a perfect time for expansion and rebranding, but with the economy strong and his company well positioned for a transition of leadership, he could not hold off growing Shoemaker’s insurance line any longer.

27. Guilty of Gunnysacking -

THE UNITED STATES OF GUNNYSACK. So you and your spouse are having a disagreement that escalates into an argument that moves up in decibels and moves into things flying off tables and dogs fleeing the room … and your spouse is winning … so you reach deep into your shared past and come up with something smelly, or several somethings, totally unrelated to the matter at hand to counter … and now nobody wins.

28. USL Memphis Makes ‘Huge Get’ In Hiring Andrew Bell as its First Sporting Director -

Andrew Bell had come to Memphis in January to discuss the possibility of becoming the first sporting director for the new USL (United Soccer League) franchise that will begin play here in 2019. And Bell was blown away by AutoZone Park, which will be the team’s home; the venue reminded him of the stadium where the Portland Timbers of Major League Soccer play.

29. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

30. Decision to Add Citizenship Question to Census Draws Protest -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The 2020 U.S. Census will add a question about citizenship status, a move that brought swift condemnation from Democrats who said it would intimidate immigrants and discourage them from participating.

31. August Ballot Starts to Fill Out Ahead of April 5 Filing Deadline -

With contenders in the May county primaries now appearing at various campaign forums, holding their own events and going door-to-door in search of votes, there are still a few gaps to be filled on the Aug. 2 state and federal primary ballot.

32. McCann Launches Nonprofit Eating Disorders Association -

Teri Hardister McCann, founder and executive director of Fairhaven Treatment Center for Eating Disorders, has launched the Mid-South Eating Disorders Association, a nonprofit organization for treatment providers seeking to build community, access educational opportunities, and build awareness of treatment options for eating disorders. McCann serves as the founding president of MSEDA.

33. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Infrastructure Investment? -

Is investment in public infrastructure important? And should Tennessee have more dedicated revenue sources to pay for construction and maintenance of infrastructure across the state, or is the existing tax structure – primarily the state tax on fuel, and wheel taxes – sufficient to pay for what Tennessee needs to sustain and grow its economy?

34. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

35. Parkinson to Introduce Bill Phasing Out State’s Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Antonio Parkinson is set to make a push to remove Memphis schools from the state’s Achievement School District and dissolve the state district because of its failure to pull them out of Tennessee’s bottom 5 percent for performance.

36. Officials: Woman to Fill Senate Vacancy in Mississippi -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The state's governor will appoint Mississippi's first female member of Congress to fill the Senate vacancy that will soon be created when veteran Sen. Thad Cochran retires, three state Republicans told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

37. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

38. Fed Set to Raise Rates As Powell Gives 1st News Conference -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve's first meeting under Jerome Powell's leadership will likely end Wednesday with an announcement that the Fed will resume its modest interest rate hikes.

39. Dean: ‘It’s Kind of Our Turn’ in Governor’s Race -

Democratic contender for governor Karl Dean is pushing hard the idea that Democrats can win one of the two statewide races on the Tennessee ballot this year.

40. Strickland Unveils Pre-K Funding Plan Without Tax Hike or Referendum -

The city has a plan to provide $6 million of the $16 million needed to fully fund prekindergarten in Memphis for 8,500 children starting when a federal grant that currently funds 1,000 of the existing 7,000 seats runs out in 2019.

41. Small Cell Legislation Advancing, But Rural Options More Limited -

NASHVILLE – Unable to get cell-phone service at a football game in Nashville or Knoxville? Can’t send a text from a Broadway honky tonk or Beale Street blues bar? Wondering how autonomous cars will ever work?

42. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input on several topics as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

43. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present “James and the Giant Peach” Friday, March 16, through April 8 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

44. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

45. The 2018 NBA Draft Might be Deep, But It’s Not Mistake-Proof for Grizzlies -

In one analysis before the 2009 NBA Draft, nbadraftnet.com decided the pro player most comparable to Connecticut big man Hasheem Thabeet was Dikembe Mutombo. Each of them was at least 7-foot-2. Each played basketball. That’s where the similarities ended.

46. Nashville Restaurateur Flies Back To Memphis with Food Truck -

Come September, Jesse McDonald will be serving wings out of his new food truck, New Wing Order, with a menu that includes wings, Buffalo chicken tacos and barbecue nachos.

47. Smith Out as Tigers Basketball Coach, No Word on Replacement -

As expected, the University of Memphis and head men’s basketball coach Tubby Smith parted ways on Wednesday, March 14.

The University of Memphis issued a brief statement Wednesday, but provided no information on Smith’s possible replacement.

48. FedEx Investing $1 Billion in Memphis Hub Modernization -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. will spend $1 billion on a modernization of its Memphis hub over a six-year period, company founder, chairman and CEO Fred Smith announced Wednesday, March 14.

49. Last Word: Nichols Out at Playhouse, Sickle Cell Research and Heels 4 Healing -

Tubby Smith's meeting with the University of Memphis take two is Wednesday after some waiting by reporters Tuesday. There was a false alarm later in the evening around a rumor that Smith and U of M President David Rudd were meeting that sent a few folks with cameras scrambling. But nothing there either.

50. AP: Pentagon Often Fails Young Sex Assault Victims on Bases -

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) – A decade after the Pentagon began confronting rape in the ranks, the U.S. military frequently fails to protect or provide justice to the children of service members when they are sexually assaulted by other children on base, an Associated Press investigation has found.

51. Sewer Problems, Policies Test City’s ‘Brilliant at the Basics’ Resolve -

When Jim Strickland ran for Memphis mayor in 2015 on a campaign that would be “brilliant at the basics,” he probably didn’t have in mind the recent attention that sewers – the most basic of city services – have gotten in recent months.

52. Last Word: River Crests, Tigers Post-Season and Library Shift -

The slow fall of the Mississippi River begins. The river at Memphis crested at 39.2 feet over the weekend. By Friday it should be below flood stage, which at Memphis is 34 feet. The high river season here was marked mostly by a lot of watching by Memphis public works and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as the river and its tributaries moved into the bottom land it usually occupies at this time of the year.

53. US May Tie NATO Contributions to Tariff Exemptions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. allies seeking to avoid the steel and aluminum tariffs approved by President Donald Trump might be asked to step up their financial commitments to NATO.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin told CNBC in a Friday interview that the president will consider national security, noting that Trump wants to be sure that NATO gets more funding from European allies who Trump has previously criticized for not contributing enough.

54. Mississippi Passes Law Banning Abortion After 15 Weeks -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi lawmakers on Thursday passed what is likely to be the nation's most restrictive abortion law, making the procedure illegal after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

55. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

56. Tubby Time -

At various points in his life, Guffrie Smith was a soldier, a barber, a farmer, and a school bus driver. These are not jobs that reward impatience. If you’re inpatient in those occupations, you or someone else gets hurt.

57. Olympus Opens Expanded Bartlett Campus -

Medical device manufacturer Olympus celebrated the grand opening of its $12 million expanded Bartlett campus at 2937 Appling Road on Tuesday, March 6. The state-of-the-art facility expands Olympus’ existing R&D and surgical manufacturing building on Appling Road, which has operated in Bartlett since 1984.

58. One Last Play? -

American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco was talking about the league being on an upswing, having three certain NCAA Tournament teams in regular season champion Cincinnati, and Wichita State and Houston. With the conference tournament then just a few days away – it starts on Thursday, March 8, in Orlando, Florida, – Aresco noted that the league could be even better if traditionally strong programs such as Memphis, Connecticut and Temple also took steps forward.

59. Payday Lenders, Watchdog Agency Exhibit Cozier Relationship -

NEW YORK (AP) – The former CEO of a payday lending company that had been under investigation by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has asked to be considered for the top job at the watchdog agency, The Associated Press has learned.

60. 3 Elite Teams Favorites in AAC Tournament -

The American Athletic Conference Tournament tips off on Thursday, March 8, In Orlando, Florida, and the field will include two teams in the Associated Press Top 15 and a third in Top 25.

Yet, the mantra before play begins is that while there is separation between No. 8 Cincinnati, No. 11 Wichita State and No. 21 Houston from the other nine teams in the conference, upsets are possible.

61. AgLaunch Finds Traction In Intersection of Startups, Investors and Farmers -

Jan Bouten, a partner in Innova, the local early stage investment capital group, has some basic standards when deciding on startup companies to invest in.

He looks for “a solid team with a lot of experience in business” and the founders of AgriSync, an Iowa ag tech startup, checked that box.

62. Trey Carter Honored Among Top 35 Millennial Influencers -

Patrick “Trey” Carter III has been named one of the Top 35 Millennial Influencers in the Country by the Next Big Thing Movement, a global network of more than 20,000 young professionals and creatives. Carter, president of Olympic Career Training Institute and an active community volunteer, is the only Tennessean to be included on the list. He will be honored Saturday, March 10, at NBTM’s Forward Conference in New York City alongside other influencers, including “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, Teen Vogue editor Elaine Welteroth and YouTube vlogger Tyler Oakley.

63. Last Word: Forrest and Slavery, The Tariff Blitz and Angus McEachran -

The report on poverty in Memphis over the last 50 years is on its way to a Greater Memphis Chamber breakfast meeting Thursday. And Terri Lee Freeman, the president of the National Civil Rights Museum and Elena Delavega, the University of Memphis lead researcher of the report, say their message is that as goes Memphis in this regard so goes the nation. And if employers start with lower pay at hiring with percentage raises across the board they feed the racial income gap and bonuses do as well.

64. Plaques at Ole Miss Acknowledge Its Historic Ties to Slavery -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The University of Mississippi is acknowledging its historical connections to slave labor, slave owners and officials who set policies that stripped African-Americans of voting rights after the Civil War.

65. Tigers Take Care of ECU, Face USF in AAC Tourney -

The Memphis Tigers wrapped up the No. 5 seed in this week’s American Athletic Conference Tournament by thumping East Carolina 90-70 Sunday afternoon at FedExForum.

“We owed them,” junior Mike Parks Jr. said, referring to the University of Memphis losing at ECU earlier in the season.

66. Tigers Finish Regular Season with Win over ECU -

The Memphis Tigers wrapped up the No. 5 seed in this week’s American Athletic Conference Tournament by thumping East Carolina 90-70 Sunday afternoon at FedExForum.

“We owed them,” junior Mike Parks Jr. said, referring to the University of Memphis losing at ECU earlier in the season.

67. Council and Commission Talk Pre-K and Workforce Development -

When 20 of the 26 Memphis City Council members and Shelby County Commissioners got together Thursday, March 1, at Beale Street Landing, the idea of county government providing funds to expand access to prekindergarten got resistance on the county side.

68. City & State Stretches Its Reach -

The team behind the Broad Avenue coffee-and-retail concept City & State has exported it to Midtown, with an iteration that co-owner Lisa Toro describes as not quite a second location, more of a “1.5.” The cafe space inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is now being managed by City & State. It’s an expansion of a partnership between the museum and Toro, who led the redesign and launch of the Brooks Museum Store in November. The museum’s cafe is now Cafe Brooks by City & State.

69. Council and Commission Talk Pre-K and Workforce By The River -

When 20 of the 26 Memphis City Council members and Shelby County Commissioners got together Thursday, March 1, at Beale Street Landing, the idea of some kind of county government funding for expanding access to pre-kindergarten ran into some resistance on the county side.

70. Tigers Hit Home Stretch With Confidence, Inspired to Prove Doubters Wrong -

This much is beyond question: Tubby Smith never would have made it as a sports talk radio host. He does not really trade in hot takes. More like tepid takes.

But that’s not a bad thing if you’re a college basketball coach. When the Tigers were 5-7 in the American Athletic Conference and reeling, social media and sports talk radio were on fire. Just like they’re supposed to be in 2018.

71. White House Downgrades Kushner's Security Clearance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The security clearance of White House senior adviser and presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner has been downgraded, significantly reducing his access to classified information, according to two people informed of the decision.

72. Defying the NRA, Dick's Takes a Harder Line Against Guns -

NEW YORK (AP) – Dick's Sporting Goods will immediately stop selling assault-style rifles and ban the sale of all guns to anyone under 21, the company said Wednesday, as its CEO took on the National Rifle Association by demanding tougher gun laws after the massacre in Florida.

73. Local Political Partisans Begin Looking Beyond Trump -

The founder of one of the city’s Trump “resistance” groups is among those looking for something beyond the resistance.

“We don’t want to resist Trump forever,” Emily Fulmer, the founder of Indivisible Memphis, told a gathering of 50 Friday, Feb. 23, at the National Civil Rights Museum under the “Take Back Tennessee” banner. “The goal is not to be in a state of resistance forever.”

74. Arkansas Casino Measure Would Expand Gambling at Tracks -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A proposal to legalize casinos in Arkansas has been revised to allow expanded gambling at a greyhound track and horse track that already offer video poker and other electronic games.

75. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

76. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

77. The Invisible Problem -

If we are serious about addressing violence in our community, then we must be courageous enough to acknowledge a pervasive reality that most of us would prefer not to see: Violence often starts inside the home.

78. Woodruff Settles into Dream Job With Vols -

Knoxville native Chris Woodruff was at a crossroads in life when he retired from professional tennis in 2002.

79. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

80. The Latest: Florida Shooting Suspect in Brief Court Hearing -

PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the deadly Florida high school shooting (all times local):

1:30 p.m.

Florida school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz has appeared in court for a procedural hearing.

81. Last Word: Looking In The Lookout, Women in Business and The Race for Governor -

What would bring a Memphian on his own to The Lookout – the restaurant and bar at the top of the Pyramid? The view, of course. So after the obligatory walk outside to the views south along the riverfront and west across the river, I settled in Sunday for the view from within. I lined up with both of the tree stumps in the round fish tank in the center of the Pyramid’s apex, a steampunk frog watching from above.

82. Last Word: Post Parkland, May County Primary Ballot and Friedman on the Mid East -

In the wake of the Parkland, Florida school massacre, local school systems here are talking about their preparations for such instances. And for those who don’t have a child in schools currently, it is something of a commentary about the times many of our children live in. The Shelby County Schools statement Thursday includes the following safety measures already in place:

83. Agency-By-Agency Highlights of Trump's 2019 Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Here are highlights from President Donald Trump's budget for fiscal year 2019...

___

DEFENSE

Trump's budget for 2019 shows the administration's concern about the threat from North Korea and its missile program.

84. Tigers Lose for Fifth Time in Six Games -

Former Memphis Tiger Antonio Anderson hasn’t been shy about voicing his concerns over the current state of the men’s basketball program under coach Tubby Smith. But after the Tigers dropped their third straight game on Sunday, Feb. 11, a 68-64 loss to UCF at FedExForum, Smith was asked directly about Anderson’s recent comment that he might not be the right man for the job.

85. Withers’ Home Will Be Dedicated as Historic Site -

Photojournalist Ernest C. Withers’ southwest Memphis home is being dedicated as a historic site.

The home at 480 W. Brooks Road will be dedicated at a ceremony Saturday, Feb. 10, at 10 a.m., during which a historical marker will be unveiled.

86. Beale Crowd Control Consultant Has Early Ideas -

The head of the crowd-control consulting firm hired to study and make recommendations on crowds in the Beale Street Entertainment District already has tentative ideas.

Peter Ashwin of Event Risk Management Solutions of Boise, Idaho, met with the Beale Street Task Force last week to map out the study’s course, with a final report due May 21.

87. Editorial: Leadership Should Come With More Dialogue -

When two groups agree on a general goal but not the way to accomplish that goal, the differences can be overcome. When the two groups question the motives of each other, it becomes much more difficult.

88. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

89. How the Market's Turmoil Could Affect Fed's Rate Decisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wall Street has thrown a rather sour welcoming party for Jerome Powell.

90. Slip Sliding Away … Tubby’s Tigers And Season On Downward Plane -

After his Tigers had suffered the ignominy of losing a college basketball game to East Carolina, Tubby Smith questioned his players’ sanity.

“We probably need some psychological help,” Smith had said after the 88-85 overtime loss at ECU on Saturday, Feb. 3. “Really, I’m serious. There’s some strange things.”

91. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

92. NCRM to Install ‘I Am A Man’ VR Experience -

The back of a garbage truck looms, foreboding, in the foreground. The cluster of red lights gets larger as you walk tentatively toward it. In another moment, when you look down, your dark, worn hands come into view.

93. Last Word: Welders & Machinists, MLGW & Trust and Blockchain -

A new report shows jobs in demand in the Memphis area at a time when we are again talking about which expansions and new businesses should be getting incentives and how to get better paying jobs. The annual report by CERT – Center for Economic Research in Tennessee – shows high employer demand for information technology, health care, engineering, business and financial operations and welding.

94. Customer-Focused Government Not Always a Pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

95. Memphis a Hot Bed for High-Demand Jobs -

Each year the Center for Economic Research in Tennessee puts together its Labor and Education Alignment Program report detailing which jobs are most in demand statewide and for each of the state’s nine economic and community development regions.

96. Filing, Fundraising Pace Quickens in County Elections -

Two of the five major contenders for Shelby County mayor in the May 1 primaries have six-figure campaign war chests and a third is just a few thousand dollars away.

That’s according to campaign finance statements filed last week with the Shelby County Election Commission for the period July 1, 2017, to the end of 2017.

97. Last Word: Fred's Troubles, Indigo Comeback and Selling MCA -

During Monday’s record Wall Street drop, Memphis-based Fred’s was among those taking it on the chin. But the retailer’s stock was already taking a beating from more turmoil since it got cut-out of a purchase of Rite Aid stores by Walgreens in 2017. Fred’s third chief financial officer in seven months is getting a $100,000 hiring bonus.

98. US Begins Reducing Troops in Iraq After Victory Over IS -

AL-ASAD AIRBASE, Iraq (AP) – The U.S. has started to reduce the number of its troops in Iraq following Baghdad's declaration of victory over the Islamic State group last year, an Iraqi government spokesman and Western contractors said Monday.

99. Withers’ Home to Be Dedicated as Historic Site -

Photojournalist Ernest C. Withers’ southwest Memphis home is being dedicated as a historic site.

The home at 480 W. Brooks Road will be dedicated at a ceremony Saturday, Feb. 10, at 10 a.m., during which a historical marker will be unveiled.

100. Governor’s Race Mixes Political Culture With Nuts-and-Bolts Policy -

As most of the other major contenders for Tennessee governor were on the same stage in Nashville last week, Republican Diane Black was in East Memphis meeting with a group of 15 local homebuilders. It was one in a set of meetings with small groups of potential supporters Black held in and around Memphis.