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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Starry Nights at Shelby Farms Park will be open nightly Friday, Nov. 24, through Tuesday, Dec. 29 (closed Nov. 27). Drive through the annual holiday light display, then stop by Mistletoe Village to meet Santa, visit the Starry Petting Zoo, shop local artisans, enjoy live holiday music, and more. Visit shelbyfarmspark.org/starrynights for hours, details and tickets. 

2. Apocalypse Not -

Much has been said about the so-called “Retail Apocalypse,” a frightening term that conjures images of a desolate landscape littered with boarded-up malls and shopping centers representing the death of American capitalism. 

3. Events -

Starry Nights at Shelby Farms Park will be open nightly Friday, Nov. 24, through Tuesday, Dec. 29 (closed Nov. 27). Drive through the annual holiday light display, then stop by Mistletoe Village to meet Santa, visit the Starry Petting Zoo, shop local artisans, enjoy live holiday music, and more. Visit shelbyfarmspark.org/starrynights for hours, details and tickets. 

4. Hillsboro’s Phillips Playing for Bragging Rights -

Tennessee’s football team and interim head coach Brady Hoke will try to avoid a historically bad season Saturday.

If the Vols (4-7, 0-7 SEC) lose to Vanderbilt (4-7, 0-7), it would be the first team in program history to lose eight games and go winless in the conference. Kickoff is 3 p.m. CST at Neyland Stadium (TV: SEC Network).

5. Tigers' New Basketball Facility a Palatial Recruiting Tool -

When you donate $10 million toward the construction of new basketball practice facility that bears your name, you are entitled to make a joke. So former Tiger Bill Laurie, who played on the 1972-73 Memphis State team that was NCAA runner-up, went for the laugh at the recent ribbon cutting ceremony for the University of Memphis’ $21 million Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center on south campus named after Laurie and his wife, Nancy Walton Laurie.

6. Council Moves Toward Alcohol on Main Street -

Memphis City Council members delayed a final vote Tuesday, Nov. 21, on an ordinance that sets out options for the removal of statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis in city parks, but moved forward on a proposal to allow open alcohol containers and consumption on Main Street.

7. Events -

Starry Nights at Shelby Farms Park will be open nightly Friday, Nov. 24, through Tuesday, Dec. 29 (closed Nov. 27). Drive through the annual holiday light display, then stop by Mistletoe Village to meet Santa, visit the Starry Petting Zoo, shop local artisans, enjoy live holiday music, and more. Visit shelbyfarmspark.org for hours, details and tickets.

8. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

9. Bush Administration Alums Rising in Trump's Orbit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For all the lingering tensions between President Donald Trump and former President George W. Bush, Trump's White House shares one thing in common with his Republican predecessor's: People.

10. Events -

Elmwood Cemetery will hold a Harvest History Hunt, a self-guided scavenger hunt through Saturday, Nov. 25, at 824 S. Dudley St. Groups of any size can pick up a $20 packet in the Elmwood office through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. Use the map and clues to find chosen historical sites, fill out the answer sheet and drop it off at the office. Those with correct answers will be entered to win a $50 Visa gift card and other prizes. Visit elmwoodcemetery.org or call 901-774-3212 for details.

11. Events -

Elmwood Cemetery will hold a Harvest History Hunt, a self-guided scavenger hunt, Monday through Saturday, Nov. 20-25, at 824 S. Dudley St. Groups of any size can pick up a $20 packet in the Elmwood office Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. Use the map and clues to find chosen historical sites, fill out the answer sheet and drop it off at the office. Those with correct answers will be entered to win a $50 Visa gift card and other prizes. Visit elmwoodcemetery.org or call 901-774-3212 for details.

12. Monsanto Asks Arkansas Judge to Halt State's Herbicide Ban -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A major agribusiness company asked an Arkansas judge Friday to halt the state's plan to ban an herbicide that's drawn complaints from farmers across several states who say the weed killer has drifted onto their fields and caused widespread damage.

13. Ranked-Choice Voting Not Likely, Given State’s Opinion -

A move to ranked-choice voting in the 2019 Memphis elections is still being explored by the Shelby County Election Commission.

But it isn’t likely to happen, based on a September letter to local elections administrator Linda Phillips from state election coordinator Mark Goins that his office says is the final word on the matter.

14. Last Word: 2018 Head Start, Tax Reform Bill Votes and Tigers Basketball in Decline -

Can you smell the paper? Friday is the first day that candidates in the 2018 elections can start picking up qualifying petitions for their place on the ballot – in this case the May county primary elections in Shelby County. Here is the scene setter.

15. Lewan Pines For His Desert Dirt-Biker Days -

Motocross’ loss is apparently the NFL and the Tennessee Titans’ gain.

As unlikely as it sounds, Titans left tackle Taylor Lewan’s football career almost didn’t take off, because of his love for another endeavor – dirt bike riding.

16. Last Word: The Year of Tyreke Evans, Opioid Ruling and Installing a Jumper -

The Tigers basketball home opener is a come from behind win Tuesday at the Forum over Little Rock 70-62. Still not enough to determine where this new team in so many ways is bound. But that won’t stop the early speculation … or the later speculation starting with the New Orleans game at the Forum in another week. The Grizz take their turn Wednesday with the Pacers kicking off a Grizz home stand followed by the Rockets Saturday for the third time in this young season, Trail Blazers Monday and Mavericks Wednesday. But let’s not get too far ahead here.

17. The Grizzlies’ $3.3 Million Steal, Tyreke Evans, Playing Toward a Payday -

The Grizzlies didn’t quite score enough points in losing 110-103 in Milwaukee to finish 2-3 on a five-game road stretch. But not because Tyreke Evans didn’t try to carry the Grizzlies to victory yet again.

18. State Elections Coordinator Says Ranked-Choice Voting Not Permissible -

The Tennessee elections coordinator has told Shelby County election officials that it is illegal to use ranked-choice voting in an election because there are no state guidelines and procedures in place for counting second- and third-preference votes.

19. Trump Choosing White Men as Judges, Highest Rate in Decades -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is nominating white men to America's federal courts at a rate not seen in nearly 30 years, threatening to reverse a slow transformation toward a judiciary that reflects the nation's diversity.

20. Sports Betting Isn't Legal, But Firms are Jockeying Already -

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) – Some gambling technology companies expect the U.S. Supreme Court to legalize sports betting and are jockeying for position in the new industry months before a decision is even rendered.

21. Tigers Easily Tamed by No. 25 Alabama in Opener -

They weren’t very good from the free-throw line (22 of 36 for 61.1 percent) and they were abysmal from 3-point range (2 of 17 for 11.8 percent). None of the players, with the exception of guard Kareem Brewton (13 points), could consistently create his own shot and they collectively finished with seven assists and 17 turnovers.

22. Do The Hustle -

A lot can change in six years. Consider: In early November of 2011 the NBA was in the midst of a lockout. Rudy Gay, then a Memphis Grizzlies player, put together a charity game at what was then known as the DeSoto Civic Center.

23. Upset at Missouri Vital to Bowl Hopes for Tennessee Vols -

Tennessee’s football program remains in limbo as the Vols pursue bowl eligibility under fifth-year coach Butch Jones.

Jones is hanging onto his job as the Vols (4-5, 0-5 SEC) play their final three games of the season, starting with Saturday night’s 7:30 ET game (SEC Network) against Missouri (4-5, 1-4 SEC) in Columbia.

24. Senate Bill to Delay Corporate Tax Cut, Undo Local Deduction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans prepared to unveil sweeping tax legislation Thursday that would delay a corporate tax cut for one year despite strident opposition from some Republicans and the White House. The emerging bill would leave the mortgage interest deduction untouched for homeowners in a concession to the powerful real estate lobby but ignore a House compromise on the hot-button issue of state and local tax deductions.

25. Last Word: Rape Kits Deposition, Pre-K Kickoff and Parkside Gets Company -

A retired Memphis Police Lieutenant was deposed Wednesday in East Memphis as part of the ongoing civil lawsuit in Circuit Court over the city’s 12,000 untested rape kits. Cody Wilkerson had been a detective in the police sex crimes unit and said Wednesday in the deposition that police brass, including Col. Marcus Worthy – his supervisor in sex crimes – oversaw cases in which rape kits were routinely shelved and forgotten about.

26. Grab a Gun, Go See Your State Representative -

When legislative leaders started to allow guns in the Legislative Plaza nearly two years ago, the Sierra Club’s Scott Banbury had his daughter take pictures of him wearing his holstered Ruger and lobbyist ID card to put on lawmakers’ desks with the question: “Is this what you want?”

27. Texas Massacre is Seized on by Both Sides in Gun Debate -

Gun-rights supporters have seized on the Texas church massacre as proof of the well-worn saying that the best answer to a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. Gun-control advocates, meanwhile, say the tragedy shows once more that it is too easy to get a weapon in the U.S.

28. Folk’s Folly’s Kauker Named Tenn. Restaurant Manager of Year -

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House general manager Diane Kauker has won the Tennessee Hospitality & Tourism Association’s 2017 Restaurant Manager of the Year Award, which honors a manager who has demonstrated exceptional leadership, service, and community and civic involvement. The judges noted Kauker’s outstanding performance beyond her normal job duties, including providing excellent service to Folk’s Folly guests and the greater community.

29. Memphis Flexes Its Strengths In Improving Real Estate Market -

The evolution of e-commerce and its transformative effects on the real estate market are not just limited to the retail sector, and while many trends and topics were discussed at The Daily News’ annual Commercial Real Estate Review & Forecast Seminar on Nov. 2, this was one of the overarching themes.

30. Last Word: The Run, 70 Million Gallons a Day and More Shipping Containers -

This will be another busy week on the political front with more candidates declaring their intentions in advance of Thanksgiving. Meanwhile, Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd ends his run across the state Tuesday morning on Mud Island – a variation on Lamar Alexander’s walk across the state in the 1978 Republican primary for Governor that remains a part of the state’s political folklore almost 40 years later.

31. City’s Maxson Plant Upgrade Offers Cutting Edge Water Treatment -

“Everything has a life,” city Public Works Division director Robert Knecht said last week as he stood at the western edge of the wastewater treatment plant that processes 70 million gallons of wastewater a day from the southern part of the city.

32. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

33. University of Memphis Moves Ahead With Campus Changes -

After completing the Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center practice facility on its Park Avenue campus, the University of Memphis recently pulled a $33.5 million permit to start construction on the parking garage and land bridge over the Southern Avenue railroad tracks – the most-immediate indication of changes on the main campus in the next three to five years.

34. Women in Memphis Higher Ed Detail Common Challenges, Goals -

In less than three years, women have taken the top leadership posts at three of Memphis’ largest higher education institutions. Southwest Tennessee Community College president Tracy Hall, Rhodes College president Marjorie Hass and LeMoyne-Owen College president Andrea Miller lead a diverse mix of institutions with different missions, but they share common thoughts about the challenges and opportunities facing higher education today.

35. Univ. of Memphis’ Lambuth Campus Thriving, With More Growth Expected -

The university, and the history, might have been lost. Six years ago, with the after-effects of a slowed economy still making an impact, Lambuth University in Jackson, Tennessee, was forced to shut down.

36. Under Pressure, Social Media Giants Acknowledge Meddling -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In three exhaustive hearings this week, executives from Facebook, Twitter and Google acknowledged that their platforms were used by Russia to try and create division over such disparate issues as immigration, gun control and politics. House investigators released a trove of Facebook and Twitter ads that showed just how extraordinary the cyber intrusion was.

37. Idled Chemical Plant Keeps Workers on Board After Explosion -

CHARLESTON, Tenn. (AP) – A chemical plant in Tennessee that will likely stay idle until next year has maintained its staff of almost 700 workers as it recovers from an explosion there in September.

38. Estate Planning for Blended Families -

Ray’s Take: Estate planning has undergone a lot of changes over the years, and one of the most significant doesn’t have anything to do with the tax laws. It is the change in family relationships. Chances are, you or someone you know is part of a blended family. This was once an uncommon situation, but in today’s world fully 42 percent of adults have some kind of step-relationship, according to Pew Research.

39. City Fairgrounds Plan Keeps Coliseum on Hold -

When it unveils a general plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment Monday, Nov. 6, the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will put the emphasis on setting the stage for a fuller redevelopment.

40. Medical Marijuana Might Finally Get Past Objections -

Medical marijuana legislation is evolving, not to ease people’s debilitating pain but to help it pass the General Assembly, where it’s giving some lawmakers heartburn.

State Rep. Jeremy Faison, an East Tennessee Republican ferrying the bill through the House, is offering several changes to a bill he is sponsoring with Sen. Steve Dickerson, a Nashville Republican, to soothe the nerves of state bureaucrats and lawmakers who get shaky when the word marijuana is mentioned.

41. Goodin Joins Hagwood Adelman As Memphis Managing Attorney -

Michael T. Goodin has joined Hagwood Adelman Tipton PC as managing attorney of the Memphis office. In that role, he provides legal services to HAT’s clients in matters such as medical malpractice and senior housing litigation for health care providers along the continuum of care, including skilled nursing, assisted living, behavioral health, home health and hospice litigation. In addition, he assists in supervising the attorney and paraprofessional teams.

42. Last Word: Cohen on Manafort, Collierville's Growth and The Quiet Jackson -

A close one for the best team in the NBA Monday evening at the Forum but the Grizz lose only their second game of the young season to the Hornets 104 – 99. Some of you went. Some of you watched. Still others opted for the Edgar Allen Poe biography on “American Masters” while getting your costume together and then made a late run for candy. You know who you are.

43. Justice Department Drops Some But Not All Juvenile Court Oversight -

The U.S. Justice Department has dropped more but not all of the measures it put in place five years ago at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court.

The reforms and monitoring in the 2012 settlement agreement between the Justice Department and the court, Shelby County government and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office covered a wide range of areas in a scathing review of court practices, particularly in due process issues and a racial disparity in how the court treats African-American children in the court for the same offenses or problems as white children.

44. Last Word: Weekend Plans, Leaving Home and the Clown Show Turns a Corner -

Grizz win at the Forum 96 – 91 against the Mavericks Thursday, a night after losing to the Mavericks in Dallas. And off we go into a busy weekend starting with Friday’s University of Memphis football game at the Liberty Bowl against Tulane and into Saturday’s Race for the Cure through Downtown followed closely by day two of the River Arts Fest in South Main, which begins its three-day run Friday evening.

45. UT Motivation? Bowl Game, Saving Jones’ Job -

Butch Jones will be Tennessee’s football coach Saturday night against Kentucky in Lexington.

It could be his last as the Vols’ coach.

Jones is on a sizzling hot seat after the Vols (3-4, 0-4 SEC) were dominated by No. 1-ranked Alabama 45-7 last Saturday. Speculation is rampant Jones will be fired or already is on his way out.

46. New Screenings to Start for All US-Bound Airline Passengers -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — All incoming flights to the United States will be subject to new security screening procedures before takeoff, including both American citizens and foreigners possibly facing security interviews from airline employees, the U.S. government said Wednesday.

47. Last Word: Corker's Quest, Overton Park Transition and The Two Amazons -

The basic political differences between President Donald Trump and U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee returned to the top of the news cycle Tuesday with an extraordinary airing by the two leaders that went beyond Twitter, at least for Corker. Here is the basic account from Associated Press of what was a story that unfolded over the course of a work day in the Beltway. It was a day that included Trump going to Capitol Hill for a meeting with Republican Senators, including Corker.

48. Mayor Stands By Decision On Sewer Connections -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says if he had it to do over again, he would probably give more advance notice that the city was ending city sewer connections for developments outside the limits of Memphis.

49. Last Word: The Bucc Falls, Lakeland Demolition and Crossing The Year Mark -

Late word Sunday that Bernal Smith II, the president and publisher of the New Tri-State Defender, died at his home Sunday. Smith was a part of the reporters roundtables we do from time to time on "Behind The Headlines." He brought back the city's legacy African-American-owned newspaper and in that role over the last seven years was a big voice in the reshaping of Memphis as a media market. He put reporters back on the streets of this city to cover Memphis and its issues in an independent way that make this a much richer and more competitive media market than it has been in quite some time. Editorially, he was a strong voice on numerous issues and he spoke from the experience of growing up in this city. He was 45 years old and here at The Daily News, those of us who came to know him and work with him on the show express our condolences to his family.

50. Tigers Basketball Picked 9th in AAC -

American Athletic Conference coaches don’t expect the University of Memphis men’s basketball team to be much of a factor this season, based on results of the preseason coaches’ poll released Monday, Oct. 16, at AAC Media Days in Philadelphia.

51. Events -

The Big River Crossing Half Marathon and 5K, benefiting Peer Power Foundation, will be held Saturday, Oct. 21. The half-marathon will be the first to allow participants to cross the Arkansas-Tennessee state line via the Big River Crossing, while the 5K will run a course through Downtown Memphis. Both races with start at Tom Lee Park, with the 5K beginning at 8 a.m. and the half-marathon at 8:30 a.m. Visit runsignup.com/Race/TN/Memphis/BigRiverCrossing for details and registration.

52. Events -

The Big River Crossing Half Marathon and 5K, benefiting Peer Power Foundation, will be held Saturday, Oct. 21. The half-marathon will be the first to allow participants to cross the Arkansas-Tennessee state line via the Big River Crossing, while the 5K will run a course through Downtown Memphis. Both races with start at Tom Lee Park, with the 5K beginning at 8 a.m. and the half-marathon at 8:30 a.m. Visit runsignup.com/Race/TN/Memphis/BigRiverCrossing for details and registration.

53. Fix This Ticket -

HARD MADE HARDER, THAT’S THE TICKET. Growing up, I felt deprived because I occasionally had to ride the bus. In college, I felt deprived because I didn’t have a car. When I got married, I felt deprived because we had only one.

54. Not Worried About Bama? Just Wait Until Kickoff -

Tennessee’s football team will make history Saturday against No. 1-ranked Alabama (7-0, 4-0 SEC), no matter what happens with the game.

The Vols (3-3, 0-3 SEC) were 34-point underdogs early in the week for the 3:30 EDT game (TV: CBS) in Tuscaloosa. The 34-point spread is the largest ever in the UT-Alabama series.

55. Uncertainty Reigns Ahead of New Health Care Sign-Up Period -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – Jason Sanford has heard so many rumors about the changing health care landscape that every few weeks he dials a local information desk, seeking just a rough estimate of what his diabetes medication will soon cost him.

56. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

57. Fincher ‘Very Close’ to Entering Race for Corker’s Senate Seat -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

58. City Lays Out Numerous Paths to Statue Removal -

City officials laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

59. Fincher Says 'Very Close' To Senate Run -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up starting with the 2018 Republican primary.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

60. Medicare Open Enrollment Season is Here -

If you are a Medicare enrollee, you should know that open enrollment takes place from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2017. Any changes you make to your coverage will take effect on Jan. 1, 2018. Since your health care priorities are likely to change over time, you might find it beneficial to review and make alterations to how you structure your Medicare solution.

61. Last Word: Bredesen's Note, Serious Sewer Talks and Protest Vs. Process -

Another lively week in state politics as former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen says he is considering a run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up. This came Monday in a note to the Associated Press in which Bredesen said he will make his decision quickly about an entry into the Democratic primary.

62. Tigers Basketball Picked 9th in AAC -

American Athletic Conference coaches don’t expect the University of Memphis men’s basketball team to be much of a factor this season, based on results of the preseason coaches’ poll released Monday, Oct. 16, at AAC Media Days in Philadelphia.

63. Sewer Cut-Off Aligns With Developing Densely -

When the city decided in August to end all new connections to the sewer system by developments outside of the Memphis city limits effective immediately, it was about much more than the sewer system.

64. Last Word: Tigers Make Top 25, Pfizer's Next Tax Break and Shepherds Creek -

The Tigers make the top 25 ESPN Power Rankings for college football with the Liberty Bowl victory Saturday over Navy 30 – 27. And Tigers coach Mike Norvell responds to the pre-game arrest of a player on a rape charge.

65. Cory Christmas Gives Access to Opportunities -

Cory Christmas describes himself as risk-averse. But while he was growing up on the Gulf Coast, in Mobile, Alabama, he dreamed of being the sort of news reporter who broadcasts live during a hurricane.

66. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

67. School Board in Tennessee Votes to Keep LGBT Protections -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee county's school board has voted to keep protections for LGBT students and employees in place.

News outlets report Knox County school board members who were to vote Wednesday on a proposal to eliminate specific protections for gender identity and sexual orientation instead passed a substitute motion to keep existing language.

68. Events -

The Ben F. Jones Chapter of the National Bar Association will host a continuing legal education seminar titled “Celebrating 51 Years of the Ben F. Jones Chapter of the National Bar Association” Thursday, Oct. 12, from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St. The CLE will examine the state of the bar by analyzing cases handled by Ben F. Jones Chapter members from 1966 to the present. Expert panel discussions include “How to Maintain Your Law License” and “How to Save Your Reputation.” Tickets are $85 in advance or $100 at the event. Register at eventbrite.com.

69. Trump’s Bluster Cascades Through State Politics -

The chaos emanating from President Donald Trump’s administration is changing the landscape of Tennessee politics, setting the stage for upheaval within the dominant Republican Party.

“This is a really big moment for the Tennessee Republican Party,” with the Trump wing or far-right wing “firmly in control,” says Kent Syler, Middle Tennessee State University political science professor.

70. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

71. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

72. UT QBs, Receivers, Coaches Struggling So Far -

Tennessee’s football players are on fall break this weekend during the open date. You’ve got to wonder how many players fifth-year UT coach Butch Jones will get back after the break.

Fallout from last Saturday’s 41-0 loss to No. 5 Georgia is massive. Fans were leaving Neyland Stadium by halftime with the Vols trailing 24-0. Jones took a beating from fans on social media and sports talk radio all week.

73. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

74. Memphis Readies Red Carpet to Land Amazon -

With 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in capital expenditures at stake, it stands to reason that cities hoping to land Amazon.com’s second U.S. headquarters will do whatever it takes to close the “once-in-a-lifetime” deal.

75. Memphis Officials Lay Out Initial Pitch for Amazon HQ -

With 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in capital expenditures at stake, it stands to reason that cities hoping to land Amazon.com’s second U.S. headquarters will do whatever it takes to close the “once-in-a-lifetime” deal.

76. Gay Marriage Advocates Want Mississippi Law Struck Down -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Advocates of same-sex marriage said Monday that they will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a Mississippi law that lets government workers and business people cite their own religious objections to refuse services to gay couples.

77. Paying Beale Street Security Costs Raises Lease Questions -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, on whether the city should start using some of the $378,000 in Beale Street cover charge funds the Downtown Memphis Commission has been holding in two bank accounts since June.

78. Last Word: Corker on Meet The Press, Summer School and Crosstown Cautions -

The Slider Inn’s second location to come in South Main is an indication that investment and other activity just below the radar continue to come to the surface in an area known for lots of apartment construction recently. The second location is in a brick building that was a place to store and service vintage cars. Look for a public art element and a back patio as well. All of those plans recently clearing the Landmarks Commission.

79. Corker Says He 'Struggled' With Decision To Leave Senate -

No further clues from U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee about his political plans after he leaves the Senate, during an interview Sunday, Oct. 1, on “Meet The Press.”

But Corker said on the NBC news program that he “struggled” since January with the decision on whether or not to go for a third term in the Senate.

80. Week Ahead: Oct. 2-9 -

Hey, Memphis! Prepare to rock out this week as the Mempho Music Festival hits Shelby Farms Park and Wilco plays The Orpheum. Plus, Beale Street memorializes one of its own, Memphis legal pros discuss the Confederate monuments issue, and much more in The Week Ahead…

81. Shaky Start Exposes Raw Nerves as Dawgs Roll In -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones had more than Georgia on his mind this week. Rumors on message boards and reports on sports talk radio flamed the fires around Jones and the Vols after last Saturday’s 17-13 victory over Massachusetts at Neyland Stadium.

82. Haslam Less Clear Than Usual On Run for US Senate -

Gov. Bill Haslam usually gives an answer to every question, even if his subjects and verbs don’t agree. But when it comes to a potential run for the U.S. Senate, he stumbles.

In fact, his response was almost inaudible just a week before his pal U.S. Sen. Bob Corker said he wouldn’t seek another term at the end of 2018.

83. City’s Legal Path to Statue Removal Complex -

The administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is setting the stage for a critical Tennessee Historical Commission hearing next month in its bid to remove a statue of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest from a city park.

84. Memphis Independent Schools Offer Varied Approaches to Early Childhood Learning -

Research has shown show early childhood education sets the foundation for academic success in elementary school, and Memphis’ independent schools boast a number of high-quality preschool programs with expert educators, innovative approaches and state-of-the-art technology.

85. New Headmasters Take the Helm At Hutchison, Memphis University School -

Kristen Ring, the new head of school at Hutchison School, dispels the notion that data on student achievement is only a function of state and federal requirements for public school systems.

86. Enhanced Athletic Facilities Significant Part of Independent School Draw -

Over the last decade or so, Memphis-area independent schools have made major improvements in their athletic facilities – to the point it sometimes looks like an athletics arms race mimicking what is happening across college campuses.

87. Inside Voice -

The advertisement moves fast, even for 30 seconds. It’s got hip-hop artist Marco Pave with Grammy Award-winning producer Carlos Broady. And the message is to the point as the camera comes in close on the face of a man who says emphatically, “Don’t lose your head, use your head.”

88. Epidemic at Work? Businesses Forced to Deal With Drug Abuse -

NEW YORK (AP) – After a troubled youth himself, Phillip Cohen made it a practice to hire people at his woodworking business who have also struggled with addiction and mental health issues. But when an employee died from a drug overdose, he adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

89. Are Achievement Schools a Problem or the Solution? -

Forgiveness or farewell: What should be the fate of the Achievement School District?

Among Memphis legislators, it just depends.

State Rep. Mark White calls the task to pull Shelby County’s poorest performing schools out of the state’s bottom 5 percent a “heavy lift.”

90. New Gannett Cuts Eliminate Two More Commercial Appeal Employees -

The effects of another companywide restructuring at newspaper publisher Gannett Co. Inc. – which owns USA Today as well as The Commercial Appeal – have touched the newsroom in Memphis, following an even deeper round of local cuts earlier this year.

91. Gannett Cost-Cutting Again Trims Commercial Appeal Headcount -

The effects of another companywide restructuring at newspaper publisher Gannett Co. Inc. – which owns USA Today as well as The Commercial Appeal – have touched the newsroom in Memphis, following an even deeper round of local cuts earlier this year.

92. Last Word: Doubling Down at City Hall, Karl Dean in Collierville & Your Credit Report -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd doubling down right at the start of a Monday morning meeting of the Beale Street Task Force on that conflict of interest issue involving his company’s contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association. Meanwhile, it is council day at City Hall Tuesday and lots to discuss on several fronts including the Bicentennial Gateway and Convention Center projects and the move of Golden India just off Overton Square.

93. Dean: Economic Development More Difficult in Memphis -

It’s a story that former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean tells just about every place in the state he goes in his campaign to be the state’s next governor.

94. Juvenile Court Outcomes Still Questioned -

Rev. Keith Norman says just about every time federal monitors in the settlement agreement with Juvenile Court come to Memphis they meet with him and want to hear from a broad cross section of Memphians with no filtering of those they encounter.

95. The Week Ahead: Sept. 18-24 -

Hello, Memphis! Autumn officially arrives this Friday, and it’s bringing along a spate of happenings this week – from the Metal Museum’s Repair Days to the Memphis Japan Festival and the Mid-South Fair. Check out our top event picks and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

96. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

97. Equifax Victims May Face Another Hassle in Buying an iPhone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple fans who froze their credit after the Equifax data breach may end up with another hassle on their hands if they try to get one of the new iPhones that can cost more than $1,000. People who did so and want to make any big purchase may find the same.

98. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

99. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

100. Opioid Committee on Right Track, Obstacles Remain -

Smyrna Police Chief Kevin Arnold can remember the first time his detectives brought a heroin case to him three or four years ago.

“Of course, my reaction immediately was, ‘I thought that went away in the late 70s.’ But we’re seeing it. In fact, we are averaging approximately five heroin overdoses a month just in the town of Smyrna,” adds Arnold, whose city about 10 miles southeast of Nashville has a population of nearly 48,600.