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Editorial Results (free)

1. Where the Jobs Are -

Out of more than 15,000 Shelby County Schools students who took some kind of career and technical education, or CTE, courses in the 2015-2016 academic year, only 1 percent – roughly 150 – completed those classes to get some kind of work certification.

2. Financial Literacy and Adults -

Ray’s Take: Can you explain what risk diversification is? Can you identify the effects of inflation? Do you know how to calculate interest? If you answered yes to these three questions, you are better off than 43 percent of Americans and a whopping two-thirds of the world’s population, according to Maggie McGrath in an article written for Forbes Magazine about the results from the first-ever S&P Global FinLit Survey.

3. New 529 Plans Buy Education Options -

Ray’s Take: Did you know that back in 1870 you could attend Harvard for a mere $150 per year, and for half that amount, you could attend Brown University? According to Best Colleges, college costs began to rise in the 1970s at a rate much higher than inflation, and this hasn’t slowed down.

4. Blockchain Tech ‘is the Shiny New Penny’ -

During the General Assembly session that just ended legislators debated a number of hot-button issues: guns, abortion, Confederate statues and medical marijuana.

But tucked among the headline-grabbers was a brief bill, less than 300 words long, that attracted no controversy whatsoever.

5. If Only Legislators Could Focus on Important Issues -

A year-old law enabling Tennessee colleges and universities to keep secret the “proprietary” fees they pay money managers for handling risky investments is likely to be reviewed this year.

6. Hopson’s Schools Budget Features $12.7M Gap for County to Consider -

The school year that ends Thursday, May 24, marks five years since the historic change in public education kicked off in August 2013.

First was the one-year merger of city and county schools, followed by the demerger into seven public school systems within Shelby County.

7. Hopson's Schools Budget Features $12.9 Million Gap For County To Consider -

The school year that ends Thursday, May 24, marks five school years since the historic change in public education kicked off in August 2013 with the one-year merger of city and county schools followed by the demerger into seven public school systems within the county.

8. Copenhagen Provides Good Example Of Bike Safety -

While there may be something rotten in Denmark, as Shakespeare wrote in “Hamlet,” it sure isn’t in the bicycling realm. And as Memphis embarks on its new Explore Bike Share initiative, a look at the Scandinavian country of 5.7 million people certainly offers a positive tale of cycling safety.

9. Rural Tennessee Fighting for Its Prosperity -

For many Tennesseans the pain and financial loss of the 2008 recession has faded.

The state’s unemployment rate is the lowest in the Southeast United States, 3.4 percent in March. Household income and the state’s gross domestic product are at their highest points, and Tennessee continues to attract “high-quality” jobs. (“High-quality” jobs are those that pay higher than the county median wage.)

10. GPAC Renames Black Box Theater -

Germantown Performing Arts Center has renamed its black box theater the Watkins Studio Theater to honor longtime supporters and Germantown residents Jeanette and William H. Watkins Jr.

William Watkins Jr. has served on the GPAC board, and together the couple and their family have supported GPAC and community arts education for more than 20 years.

11. GPAC Renames Black Box Theater -

Germantown Performing Arts Center has renamed its black box theater the Watkins Studio Theater to honor longtime supporters and Germantown residents Jeanette and William H. Watkins Jr.

William Watkins Jr. has served on the GPAC board, and together the couple and their family have supported GPAC and community arts education for more than 20 years.

12. MLK-Inspired -

What today is known as the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis was born out of the city’s fallout from the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike and Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination on April 4, 1968.

13. CDC Chief Asks For, And Gets, Cut to His Record $375K Pay -

NEW YORK (AP) – The new head of the top U.S. public health agency has asked for – and will receive – a cut to his record-setting pay, federal officials said Monday.

Dr. Robert Redfield Jr.'s new salary was not revealed.

14. RegionSmart Summit To Focus On Fourth Bluff -

Since its inception, Memphis and The Fourth Chickasaw Bluff on the Mississippi River have been bound together.

So as Memphis is going through its latest growth spurt, so too is the Fourth Bluff as it was selected to be a part of a $40 million national initiative known as Reimagining the Civic Commons.

15. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

16. Opioid Abuse is Taking Tennesseans’ Lives -

The 2018 elections are shaping up. The filing deadlines have passed, and most candidates are busy raising money and spending what they have already raised and/or borrowed to tell Tennesseans why they should vote for them and why they shouldn’t vote for those other folks.

17. Luttrell Says County Pre-K Funding Source Likely to Differ From City’s -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell probably won’t follow the city’s blueprint for funding universal prekindergarten in Shelby County.

18. Annual WFGM Awards Celebrate Contributions of Local Women -

Three Memphis women who have dedicated their lives to improving life in the city they call home will be honored for their contributions this week.

The Rev. Sonia Louden Walker, Anita S. Vaughn and Fredrika “Freddi” Felt will be the recipients at this year’s Legends Awards sponsored by the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis (WFGM).

19. McCann Launches Nonprofit Eating Disorders Association -

Teri Hardister McCann, founder and executive director of Fairhaven Treatment Center for Eating Disorders, has launched the Mid-South Eating Disorders Association, a nonprofit organization for treatment providers seeking to build community, access educational opportunities, and build awareness of treatment options for eating disorders. McCann serves as the founding president of MSEDA.

20. Children’s Central -

The first career choice a child has in mind isn’t always the right one. Stephanie Butler, who today is the new executive director of the Children’s Museum of Memphis, thought she wanted to be a doctor.

21. MERI Rebrands With Genesis Legacy Donor Program -

Following years of significant growth for its whole-body donor program, the Medical Education and Research Institute (MERI) and Genesis Legacy of Life are rolling out a comprehensive rebrand of their services and spaces.

22. Strickland Unveils Pre-K Funding Plan Without Tax Hike or Referendum -

The city has a plan to provide $6 million of the $16 million needed to fully fund prekindergarten in Memphis for 8,500 children starting when a federal grant that currently funds 1,000 of the existing 7,000 seats runs out in 2019.

23. Why So Few Female Fund Managers? It's Not Their Performance -

NEW YORK (AP) – Why is just one of every 10 managers at the helm of U.S. mutual funds a woman?

Many reasons may be behind the disparity, but researchers at Morningstar say they have disqualified one as a possibility: performance. After measuring how 11,272 funds have fared since 2003, the researchers found no big, statistically significant difference in performance between those led by men, women or teams of mixed genders.

24. Children’s Museum Names New Executive Director -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis has announced the appointment of Stephanie Butler as its new executive director.

Butler will direct all facets of the museum, including education, community relations, operations and development. This will encompass raising funds for the museum’s recent expansion, which includes the restored Memphis Grand Carousel.

25. Children’s Museum Names New Executive Director -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis has announced the appointment of Stephanie Butler as its new executive director.

26. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

27. RBG Promotes Callicutt To Audit Partner -

Accounting firm Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck PLC recently promoted Joseph D. Callicutt Jr. to audit partner from the position of senior audit manager. Callicutt, a certified public accountant and 10-year RBG employee, works exclusively in the financial institutions industry niche and oversees audit, tax and consulting services, including outsourced internal audit, interest rate risk management, bank profitability and efficiency, and strategic planning facilitation for RBG’s financial institution clients. 

28. Local Political Partisans Begin Looking Beyond Trump -

The founder of one of the city’s Trump “resistance” groups is among those looking for something beyond the resistance.

“We don’t want to resist Trump forever,” Emily Fulmer, the founder of Indivisible Memphis, told a gathering of 50 Friday, Feb. 23, at the National Civil Rights Museum under the “Take Back Tennessee” banner. “The goal is not to be in a state of resistance forever.”

29. The Church Health Way -

One of the easiest ways to tell that Scott Morris is not your typical prescription-writing family doctor – and that the health care organization he founded, Church Health, is no ordinary medical practice – is when he starts talking about softer concepts like joy and happiness and spirituality.

30. Getting to the Top -

An attorney, a physician and a college president. Three success stories. Three women who made it. They had different challenges, yes, but they also shared obstacles that are ever the same.

Dr. Marjorie Hass, Rhodes College president, recently spoke at a breakfast on campus for female students and alumni. Her message to the young women about to set out on their careers was wrapped in truth. She was encouraging, yes, but she also was not going to make promises that life can’t keep.

31. Friedman Talks of Tribalism in Global Digitization -

At the end of his talk this week to a group of 250 at a Greater Memphis Chamber gathering, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman said all he has written about the Middle East and had supported for the region didn’t happen.

32. Agency-By-Agency Highlights of Trump's 2019 Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Here are highlights from President Donald Trump's budget for fiscal year 2019...

___

DEFENSE

Trump's budget for 2019 shows the administration's concern about the threat from North Korea and its missile program.

33. Martin Meets Latest Challenge With ‘Umph’ -

It has been said that the difference between try and triumph is that little “umph.” If there was ever anyone that shows just what a difference that makes, it is Jay Martin, president of Juice Plus. He puts that “umph” in everything he does.

34. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

35. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

36. Last Word: Brunch Overload, Grade-Changing Misdemeanor and Sports Rebirth -

What happens when Memphians have been home and/or work bound for about two weeks between a national flu outbreak and snow and ice that hangs tough in below freezing temperatures and the temperature Sunday under sunny skies is almost 60? The correct answer is brunch overload.

37. CW/CA Adds Fenton As Marketing, Research Director -

Laura Fenton has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as director of marketing and research. CW/CA’s Marketing & Research department serves as the commercial real estate firm’s in-house agency for brokers and clients, and in her role, Fenton leads strategic communication, marketing and research for business development initiatives, marketing on behalf of clients, public relations, advertising, internal communications, social media and community involvement. 

38. Crosstown Concourse Earns Prestigious LEED Design Award -

Crosstown Concourse has won a significant design award – Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification, with Crosstown believed to be the largest such historic adaptive reuse project anywhere to win this certification.

39. AWA to Honor Haltom at Annual Event -

After 30 years working with Shelby County government as a practicing attorney and a Juvenile Court judge, the Honorable Claudia Haltom retired and turned her focus to creating something that would make a difference.

40. Monuments Moment Spans Generational Lines -

Van Turner Sr. celebrated his 73rd birthday Wednesday, Dec. 20, as his son, county commissioner Van Turner Jr., was somewhere near the epicenter of the most significant chapter of the city’s long-running controversy over Confederate monuments.

41. Fall Creek Falls: Sound Plan or Political Payback -

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Now go find a job. That’s the message the state of Tennessee is sending nearly 60 employees at Fall Creek Falls State Park this joyous holiday season.

42. To Be or Not to Be: Tennessee Shakespeare Company Expanding With New Facility -

Dan McCleary is the founder of the Tennessee Shakespeare Company. But that hasn’t obscured his view of reality, of the fact that many people were first introduced to Shakespeare in a high school classroom in a less than engaging way.

43. Crosstown Concourse On Prestigious Award List -

Crosstown Concourse has made a shortlist of 15 outstanding adaptive reuse projects from across the world and is the only U.S. project on the list chosen by panel of judges from The Architectural Review.

44. Crosstown Concourse Makes Prestigious AR Awards List -

Crosstown Concourse has made a shortlist of 15 outstanding adaptive reuse projects from across the world and is the only U.S. project on the list chosen by panel of judges from The Architectural Review.

45. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

46. Empathy Drives Growth of Andrews’ Senior-Care Business -

“My friends and I still talk about my grandmother,” Rico Andrews shares one afternoon in his office at Always Best Care Senior Services. “We’d all go over to her house after school and hang out – 17-, 18-year-old dudes hanging out with someone’s grandma.”

47. Repeal of Health Insurance Mandate Would Remake Market for Consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions are expected to forgo coverage if Congress repeals the unpopular requirement that Americans get health insurance, gambling that they won't get sick and boosting premiums for others in a sharp break with the idea that everyone should contribute toward health care.

48. Trump Names Former Drug Exec as New Health Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Turning to an industry he's rebuked, President Donald Trump on Monday picked a former top pharmaceutical and government executive to be his health and human services secretary, overseeing a $1 trillion department responsible for major health insurance programs, medical research, food and drug safety, and public health.

49. Women in Memphis Higher Ed Detail Common Challenges, Goals -

In less than three years, women have taken the top leadership posts at three of Memphis’ largest higher education institutions. Southwest Tennessee Community College president Tracy Hall, Rhodes College president Marjorie Hass and LeMoyne-Owen College president Andrea Miller lead a diverse mix of institutions with different missions, but they share common thoughts about the challenges and opportunities facing higher education today.

50. Run Women Run -

In 2018, Shelby County voters will be presented with a long ballot as candidates compete for most county offices, many school board and suburban government positions and congressional and legislative seats.

51. Consortium Seeks Breast Cancer Policy Reforms -

Two-time breast cancer survivor Dr. Debra Bartelli and members of the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium are pushing to increase awareness of breast cancer in Memphis because they know first-hand that early detection and treatment will lead to higher survival rates.

52. FedEx Holiday Hiring in Full Swing -

As Black Friday and the holiday shopping season approaches, FedEx is preparing to add more than 50,000 employees throughout its network, including 2,600 people locally.

More than 1,000 jobs will be available at the company’s global hub at 2781 Democrat Road, including permanent part-time and seasonal package handlers and other support positions.

53. Last Word: Grit & Grind As A Mindset, Sewer Retaliation and MUS & Hutchison -

More than a few bread crumbs on the direction the Fairgrounds redevelopment proposal is … well, developing after the second of three very important public forums last week by City Hall. The signs indicate a water park or surf park is highly unlikely, the gym at Maxine Smith STEAM Academy would go to open up Central Avenue frontage and a new gym built behind Kroc Center, a hotel by the Children’s Museum and the high school football field and track oval move from Central to where Libertyland used to be. And the city says none of this is set in stone even if it does show up on a tentative site plan among the exhibits last week.

54. Last Word: Pantographs & Catenaries, Grizz Uncertainty and Tuesdays Without Morrie -

After three years off the rails, the first significant indications that the trolleys are about to return. It was just a two-block ride that includes the Memphis Area Transit Authority trolley barn on North Main and one very new trolley. But it is a start through what is a very technical and bureaucratic process involving lots of safety vests, clipboards and video cameras.

55. Memphis Independent Schools Offer Varied Approaches to Early Childhood Learning -

Research has shown show early childhood education sets the foundation for academic success in elementary school, and Memphis’ independent schools boast a number of high-quality preschool programs with expert educators, innovative approaches and state-of-the-art technology.

56. Are Achievement Schools a Problem or the Solution? -

Forgiveness or farewell: What should be the fate of the Achievement School District?

Among Memphis legislators, it just depends.

State Rep. Mark White calls the task to pull Shelby County’s poorest performing schools out of the state’s bottom 5 percent a “heavy lift.”

57. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

58. Cohen Criticizes, Kustoff Commends 6-Month DACA Wind-Down -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis termed President Donald Trump’s decision Tuesday, Sept. 5, to wind down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program over the next six months “heartless, illogical and un-American.”

59. US Clears First 'Living Drug' for Tough Childhood Leukemia -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia.

60. Rhodes’ Wigginton Shaping Campus Culture in New Role -

Rhodes College has appointed Russell Wigginton vice president of student life and dean of students. In his newly created role, he will provide leadership for student success and help shape the campus culture for a diverse and inclusive student body.

61. Last Word: Crosstown & Forrest, Eclipse Day and The Problem With Day Care -

As an organizer of Saturday’s “Take Them Down” rally at Health Sciences Park walked toward Union Avenue where Memphis Police had taken one of the protesters arrested there, he looked at another organizer and said, “It’s time to make the call.” The call was bail money for the five, soon to be six people arrested. These were the first arrests of the last week of new momentum for an issue that has risen and subsided for decades now in our city.

62. Science Says: DNA Test Results May Not Change Health Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy?

You'd quit smoking, eat better, ramp up your exercise, or do whatever else it took to improve your odds of avoiding maladies like obesity, diabetes, heart disease or cancer, right?

63. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

64. St. Jude Names Thomas VP Of Clinical Trials Operations -

Tangie Thomas has joined St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as vice president of clinical trials operations. In that role, Thomas will lead support for clinical research at St. Jude and its affiliate sites, with duties that include implementing strategic goals, overseeing recruitment efforts and determining how resources are allocated for offices that support clinical research. Thomas previously served as director of clinical affairs at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville.

65. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

66. Many Businesses Not Prepared for Cyber Attacks -

While most local businesses believe a cyber attack or hack could significantly impact their bottom lines, many are not adequately prepared, according to a recent survey by SunTrust Bank.

67. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

68. 3-Attorney Panel to Review Mackin's Allegations Against Shelby County Schools -

A panel of three attorneys, including former U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton are investigating allegations of a cover-up, sexual harassment, theft and widespread grade tampering made last week by former Trezevant High School principal Ronnie Mackin.

69. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

70. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

71. Luttrell: Mend Issues That Divide Region -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says his hope for a more civil national political discourse may be “a little Alice in Wonderland.” And there are times when he sees local discussions veering in the direction of “Nashville and Washington,” he told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, May 16.

72. Last Word: Deeper on Beale, End of Session and Johnny Mathis -

Beale Street keeps its cover charge on Saturday nights during its Memphis In May peak. But the district has some complex questions to resolve about its future and who controls that future. If that wasn’t evident before, it became apparent at City Hall Tuesday. It wasn’t the council action on the Beale Street Bucks program that was significant as much as it was the council’s discussion.

73. Beyond Tax Bottom Line, County Budget Goes Deep -

On a sunny and clear opening weekend for the Memphis In May International Festival, Shelby County commissioners were in a conference room with a lake view at Shelby Farms Park crunching budget numbers.

74. ASD Loses 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in running the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant ever for the ASD, which takes over state schools in the bottom 5 percent in terms of academic achievement.

75. ASD Sheds 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in the direct running of the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant change to the district for the bottom 5 percent of public schools in the state in terms of academic achievement.

76. Thompson Securing Funds For Ballet Memphis’ Future -

Amelia Thompson has joined Ballet Memphis as development associate. In her new role, she works on the administrative side of the organization to generate and secure funding for Ballet Memphis’ daily annual operating budget as well as its capital campaigns.

77. Lawmakers Settle on $1T Plan to Avoid US Gov't Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Lawmakers on Monday unveiled a huge $1 trillion-plus spending bill that would fund most government operations through September but would deny President Donald Trump money for a border wall and rejects his proposed cuts to popular domestic programs.

78. $250M K-12 Education Fund Hits Legislative Hurdle -

NASHVILLE – Legislation by Tennessee House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh seeking to create a $250 million education fund may have to fit through the eye of a needle to get into Gov. Bill Haslam’s $37 billion budget plan.

79. Proposed $250M K-12 Education Fund Hits Legislative Hurdle -

Legislation by Tennessee House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh seeking to create a $250 million education fund may have to fit through the eye of a needle to get into Gov. Bill Haslam’s $37 billion budget plan.

80. Parkinson Calls for Elimination of Achievement School District -

State Rep. Antonio Parkinson is renewing his call for an end to the Achievement School District amid revelations a charter school operator hired a convicted felon to run Lester Prep.

81. UTHSC Leads Diabetes-Focused Study -

Working with a coalition of Memphis-area primary care doctors, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is gearing up for a program that tests a novel idea for helping African-American adults diagnosed with diabetes better manage their disease.

82. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

83. Lenoir Calls for Property Tax Cut Beyond New Certified Tax Rate From Reappraisal -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says there should be a cut in the county property tax rate beyond the new certified property tax rate to be set as a result of the 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

84. Transit Options Vital to Regions, Expert Says -

Establishing mode share in a region – the percentage of travelers using a certain a mode of transportation – is one the first and most important baselines for a region to establish on the way to improving transportation as a whole.

85. Davis to Lead Next Phase of Development at Active Implants -

Ted Davis was happy to be able to stay in Memphis when he took over his newest leadership role as president and chief executive officer of medical device company Active Implants Corp.

86. Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner Says Political Path Kept Calling -

Before he ever ran for anything in Collierville, Stan Joyner spent a dozen years on the town’s planning commission. And he was an elected alderman for another 12 years before he ran for and was elected mayor of the town of 48,000 people.

87. Yellen: Banks Play Vital Economic Role in Poor Communities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that U.S. banks must do all they can to promote economic development in low-income areas where high unemployment has persisted despite the overall job market's significant gains.

88. Events -

The Midtown Memphis Development Corp. will host the 2017 Mojo of Midtown Awards Bash Wednesday, March 29, at 6 p.m. at Circuit Playhouse, 51 S. Cooper St. The awards honor six individuals and organizations for their “mojo” in making significant contributions to Midtown. 
Ticket are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. Visit facebook.com/MidtownMemphis.MMDC for details.

89. Events -

The second series of Memphis 3.0 public meetings continues this week at these locations: 
• Tuesday, March 28, 5:30 p.m.: Hollywood Community Center, 1560 N. Hollywood St.
• Thursday, March 30, 5:30 p.m.: Glenview Community Center, 1141 S. Barksdale St.
The comprehensive planning team will share research that has been conducted since the first set of rallies, which generated more than 10,000 comments, and seek input on specific topics to help shape priorities and goals. Visit memphis3point0.com for a schedule of upcoming meetings.

90. Last Word: 'Ono Poke and the Ghost of The Luau, Council Day and $3 Concerts -

The ghost of the Luau lives on. Loeb has a new tenant for the Shops of Chickasaw Gardens called ‘Ono Poke that features Hawaiian cuisine. And the restaurant will be just about on the other side of Poplar Avenue from where the Luau used to stand with its large concrete Easter Island head, Polynesian dishes and Hawaii Five-O era architecture – not the remake, the real Five-O and the real McGarrett.

91. Strickland and Luttrell Mark Different Points in Mayoral Tenures -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was 13 months and nine days in office when he delivered his second State of the City address last week at a Frayser church.

92. Repeal of Health Law Could Mean Women Pay More for Less -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From a return to higher premiums based on gender, to gaps in coverage for birth control and breast pumps, experts say women could end up paying more for less if the Obama-era health care law is repealed.

93. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

94. Teach901 Releases Results Of Priority Teacher Survey -

Teach901 has released the results of its 2016 Priority School Teacher Survey, marking the fourth year the organization has interviewed priority school teachers from Shelby County Schools and its Innovation Zone, the Achievement School District and the Memphis Education Fund.

95. Ossei-Anto Lifts Up Memphis Kids -

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, Theo Ossei-Anto knew he wanted to make a difference in education – but he says coming to Memphis was an unexpected adventure.

“It’s an amazing place,” he reflects. “I have learned so much about teaching here. I love my kids and have become very committed to them.”

96. Adapt To Survive -

According to Charles Darwin, it’s not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change. In my experience, that’s a true assessment not only for human beings, but also for businesses, regardless of the focus of the business.

97. Ugwueke Takes Reins as Methodist Healthcare CEO -

Michael Ugwueke’s first day on the job as CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, a post he assumed Jan. 1, included a round of meeting the troops.

The new chief executive of the Methodist organization visited all six of its hospitals, meeting employees and front-line staff and sharing his appreciation that they were there on New Year’s Day, a holiday for many people.

98. Grizzlies’ MLK Game Changed, but Mission Remains the Same -

While the NBA moved the Grizzlies’ 15th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Game to Sunday night, Jan. 15, the game against the Chicago Bulls will be televised on ESPN and the team will use Monday to offer service to the community.

99. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

100. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.