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Editorial Results (free)

1. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

2. Last Word: TNReady Termination, NFL Draft Day and What Drove The Bible Bill -

When students in public schools take tests these days, it is about more than how they are doing and whether they know what is being taught them.

The scores play a significant role in how teachers are evaluated and rated. And both play a role in their careers and how much they will be paid. They play a role in whether the state decides to take over a school or the school system they remain in decides to essentially start over with an Innovation School model.

3. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

4. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

5. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

6. Student Loans: The Next Subprime Disaster? -

Ray’s Take: If you Google the words “student loan crisis,” millions of hits should convince you that this is a very hot topic.

According to the most recent Department of Education report released in September 2015, the federal loan default rate stands at 11.8 percent for borrowers who were required to start making payments during the 12 months prior to October 2012. While this is slightly lower than the previous report, it’s still not good. And the rate doesn't include borrowers who have been able to defer payments. Additionally, the most recent graduates will face the highest costs and will be emerging into what continues to be a very poor job market. We have every reason to believe that defaults are not only understated, but they will increase.

7. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

8. TSU President Concerned About Higher-Ed Changes -

I believe it is important to communicate and clarify TSU’s position on the FOCUS (Focus on College and University Success) Act, and dispel any misconceptions regarding our position.

As President of TSU, I am a proud supporter of Governor Bill Haslam’s initiatives, including Drive to 55 and Tennessee Promise. We are not opposed to the FOCUS Act. That is simply not true. However, we have raised some legitimate concerns regarding certain provisions in the FOCUS Act, and the unintended effects on TSU, including faculty, students, and community members. Republican Senator Mark Norris, who is carrying the legislation for the Governor, referred to us as pitiful for raising concerns. We disagree with his misguided statement. There is nothing pitiful about analyzing legislation from all angles to determine its effect on our university. It is pitiful that he would make such an inflammatory comment.

9. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

10. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

11. Agricenter President Looks Back on 15-Year Tenure -

Try putting yourself in John Charles Wilson’s dusty work boots for a moment. You’ve served as president of Agricenter International for more than 15 years. In less than six months, you will retire.

12. Creating A Culture Of Urgency -

President Lincoln once said, “Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.” What amazing insight from someone living in an era we would consider as slow-paced compared to the frenetic pace of change in society today.

13. Facing History Mural To Visualize Broader Goals -

Last year, when Facing History and Ourselves moved into its new South Main office at 115 Huling Ave., the nonprofit knew it wanted to bring its brand of socially conscious education to the broader community.

14. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

15. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

16. Luttrell: State Likely to Mandate $1B Liability -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the state of Tennessee will most likely move to require Shelby County Schools to fully fund its $1.5 billion liability for health insurance and similar employee benefits.

17. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

18. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

19. Hospital Building Boom Hits Downtown Memphis -

From a big donation to significant campus expansions and investment, the health care news was popping at a steady clip this week.

Almost as soon as word had spread about Methodist Healthcare’s plan to invest $275 million into Methodist University Hospital, the Methodist system’s flagship, came big announcements from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.

20. St. Jude Shows Off $90M Proton Therapy Center -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is now treating patients in its new proton therapy center with an advanced form of radiation technology and a system that was designed, developed and implemented in partnership with Hitachi.

21. Vanderbilt Study Compares ASD, I-Zone Achievement -

Add a new study from Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College to the local debate about the two school sets aimed specifically at turning around Tennessee’s failing educational institutions.

The study, released Tuesday, Dec. 8, looks at student achievement over the first three years of the state-run Achievement School District and the locally run Innovation Zone Schools. It finds I-Zone gains are greater than ASD gains, but there are some important caveats within the Vanderbilt researchers’ conclusions.

22. Ready for Launch -

Five hundred new companies in 10 years. That’s the idea that founded EPIcenter, short for Entrepreneurship-Powered Innovation Center, an organization looking to catalyze the entrepreneurial movement in Memphis.

23. Shelby County Schools Eyes Crosstown -

Shelby County Schools wants to open a high school at Crosstown Concourse. SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson confirmed the school district’s interest Wednesday, Nov. 18.

“We’ve spoken with some of the local funders about putting together some plan to ensure that there are some high-quality options there,” Hopson said. “There are a number of different ways that we’re thinking about it. But absolutely we would love to be a part of it.”

24. Editorial: The Authentic Success Of Whitehaven High School -

Whitehaven the community has been inseparable from Whitehaven the school for more than 100 years.

Whether it was Whitehaven Academy in the 19th century or Neel High School or the current Whitehaven High, the community and its hallmark educational institution always have been intertwined.

25. Artspace Lands Grant, Seeks Design Approval -

Developers of the South Main Artspace Lofts are clearing major hurdles this week with final approval for the building design, a crucial tax incentive decision and a grant from a new-to-Memphis donor.

26. The Week Ahead: Nov. 2, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here's our first weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the Indie Memphis Film Festival to Mississippi elections...

If you love the outdoors and good weather, these are the days you’ve been missing. And few things are as “fall” as a fall festival, and the kickoff of Miss Cordelia’s Saturday Market series this weekend seems like one more thing worth adding to the list of things to do in Memphis. There’ll be a growler station, local food and beer sampling, pop-up retail and food specials.

27. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

28. Memphians Feed the Body and the Soul With Outreach -

Hunger is a problem that we don’t often connect with living in Memphis, yet food hardship is significant in our city. Memphis ranked eighth in the nation in food hardship in the 2014 Gallup Poll.

29. Bass, Berry & Sims Launches Nonprofit Practice Group -

The nonprofit sector represents a sizable chunk of the Memphis-area economy – some 8 percent of total employment, with almost 45,000 jobs.

That’s according to former Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper, citing figures from the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence to explain why the law firm Cooper is back practicing with, Bass, Berry & Sims PLC, has started a practice group focused on nonprofits. Cooper has been tapped to lead that group, following his service as the state’s attorney general from 2006 to 2014.

30. Study Examines Effectiveness Of Tennessee’s Pre-K Program -

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he’s still supportive of Tennessee’s pre-kindergarten program despite a study that shows academic gains made by some of the children enrolled fade in early elementary grades.

31. Study Examines Effectiveness of Tennessee's Pre-K Program -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he's still supportive of Tennessee's pre-kindergarten program despite a study that shows academic gains made by some of the children enrolled fade in early elementary grades.

32. Novel Plan to Curb Drug Costs Seeks Candidates' Attention -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer-friendly ratings of the benefits of new drugs. Limits on what patients pay. Requiring drug companies to disclose how much they actually spend on research.

With the public concerned about the high cost of new medications, these are some of the proposals offered Friday by a policy center often aligned with the Obama administration.

33. Indie Memphis Taps Watt as Executive Director -

This year keeps shaping up to be a milestone for the Indie Memphis Film Festival, which has tapped local filmmaker Ryan Watt to serve as its new executive director following the departure of Erik Jambor earlier this year.

34. Indie Memphis Doubles Length, Adds Downtown -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival will extend its presence back Downtown this year – for the first time since 2006 – with a series of events scheduled on top of its Midtown offerings.

This year’s festival, set for Nov. 3-10, will also be bigger – up from four days in previous years. In addition to hosting screenings and events in Overton Square, this year’s festival will offer programs Downtown at the new Halloran Centre for Perfoming Arts & Education next door to the Orpheum Theatre.

35. Indie Memphis Doubles Length, Adds Downtown Presence -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival will extend its presence back Downtown this year – for the first time since 2006 – with a series of events scheduled on top of its Midtown offerings.

This year’s festival, set for Nov. 3-10, will also be bigger – up from four days in previous years. In addition to hosting screenings and events in Overton Square, this year’s festival will offer programs Downtown at the new Halloran Centre for Perfoming Arts & Education next door to the Orpheum Theatre.

36. Baby Budget -

About $245,000. That’s the estimated cost for raising one child from birth through age 18.

And that figure surprised young women who attended a recent workshop funded by a grant from GiVE 365, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program.

37. Improving Access -

With Hispanics expected to make up 31 percent of the nation’s population by 2060, Christian Brothers University is investing in its growing community by pledging $12.5 million to go toward scholarships for immigrant students whose legal residency status may be in question.

38. 'En Fuego' -

When Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite took office in June 2013, one of the first tasks that landed on his desk was a long-planned regional outlet mall.

The outlet mall, planned for a roughly 33-acre site at Church Road and Interstate 55 in the DeSoto County city, had been on the drawing board for some time, but the recession and its aftermath caused developers and Mississippi officials to put it on hold.

39. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

40. Report: More Tennessee Children Living in Poverty -

A new report says more than one-fourth of Tennessee children are living in poverty, up from a few years ago when the country was in a recession.

The Tennessean reports the review shows more than a third of children are living with insecurely employed parents.

41. Varsity Spirit Honored With American Tradition Award -

The National Federation of State High School Associations has selected Memphis-based Varsity Spirit as the 2015 recipient of the American Tradition Award.

The NFHS is the national leadership organization for high school sports and performing arts activities, and presents the American Tradition Award to an individual, organization or company that has supported high school activities on a national level. Varsity Spirit executives accepted the award July 1 during the organization’s summer meeting in New Orleans.

42. Varsity Spirit Honored With American Tradition Award -

The National Federation of State High School Associations has selected Memphis-based Varsity Spirit as the 2015 recipient of the American Tradition Award.

The NFHS is the national leadership organization for high school sports and performing arts activities, and presents the American Tradition Award to an individual, organization or company that has supported high school activities on a national level. Varsity Spirit executives accepted the award July 1 during the organization’s summer meeting in New Orleans.

43. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

44. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

45. Study Finds Merit In Youth Villages' Transitional Program -

Youth Villages’ 17-year-old transition program for children aging out of the foster care system at age 18 improved participants’ outcomes in housing stability, economic well-being, and employment and earnings, according to a new clinical study by nonprofit research organization MDRC.

46. Test Score Results Show Gains in All High School Subjects -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State education officials say they're taking steps to address reading test scores that have remained relatively flat in early grade levels over the past five years.

47. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

48. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

49. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

50. Snapshot: Memphis-Based Public Companies -

Here's a look at what's going on at the dozen public companies headquartered in Memphis:

AutoZone Inc.

AutoZone Inc. is one of the largest auto parts retailers and distributors in the U.S., with a store count of 5,476 as of Feb. 14. Since 1998, the company has repurchased $15.7 billion worth of its own shares. At the end of March, AutoZone continued its share buyback program with the authorization to buy back another $750 million in company stock. The company followed that news with plans to pursue a $650 million debt offering to be used for “general corporate purposes.” – Andy Meek

51. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

52. Deloitte Promotes Vince DeGutis -

Vince DeGutis, a partner in Deloitte Tax LLP, has been named Deloitte’s Memphis managing partner.
In his new role, DeGutis is responsible for overseeing the Memphis office, enhancing Deloitte’s brand and reputation in the business and civic community, and facilitating revenue growth by advancing targeting and growth activities. He is also responsible for the development and implementation strategies to attract and retain the next generation of leaders within Deloitte.

53. Study Finds 3-1 Shortfall of Women in STEM Careers -

Women in the United States have made great strides in education and entry in the workplace over the past 50 years, yet they continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math, referred to collectively as STEM disciplines.

54. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

55. Addressing the Needs of Memphis’ Aging Population -

It is certain, absolutely everyone is doing it. Everyone is aging. The uniqueness of the individual process has created the new tipping point for the separation of the way it was, and the way it will be.

56. Kiesewetter Joins Fisher Phillips Law Firm -

Jay W. Kiesewetter has joined the Memphis office of Fisher & Phillips LLP as senior counsel. In his new role, Kiesewetter advises clients on issues related to union organizing and elections, arbitrations, negotiations, strikes, lockouts and Labor Board charges.

57. Memphis Civil Rights Map Broadens History’s Reach -

The civil rights history of the Memphis area is so rich and so deep that a new GIS map of historic sites by the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change will probably be a work in progress for some time.

58. Five of the Nation’s Finest -

Each year the U.S. Chamber of Commerce recognizes the contribution of small business to the national economy with the Blue Ribbon Small Business Awards. Five from Knoxville’s business community – The Tomato Head, Management Solutions LLC, Design Innovation Architects Inc., Visionary Solutions LLC and AMS Corp. – have been chosen for inclusion in the annual program.

59. Rice Moves 3-Day Divorce Conference to Beale -

After several years in Tunica, divorce attorney Larry Rice is bringing his three-day conference for family law attorneys back to Memphis and to Beale Street.

60. Eliminating Hall Income Tax Raises New Problems -

Republican lawmakers are lining up legislation to reduce or phase out Tennessee’s Hall income tax on investments, even though Gov. Bill Haslam is concerned about losing revenue amid the state’s economic ups and downs.

61. The Big, Red Heart of Memphis -

Whether intentional or the result of a collection of individual decisions, a skyline defines the unique characteristics of a city and the people who live there.

It is made up of landmarks that tell an ever changing story of a city, and its vision for the future. Memphis is easily identified by its Pyramid and lighted bridge, but it is the big, red heart in the sky, hovering above Memphis, that speaks to me about the Memphis I know. That landmark heart captures the essence of what we are really all about. Regardless of politics or problems, it says, “Memphis cares.”

62. Editorial: Creating Jobs Isn't the End, It's Just the Beginning -

The best way to raise the pay and other benefits from new jobs coming to the Memphis area is through a better-trained workforce.

That in turn should help to begin to raise the quality of life for many of Memphis’ working poor – a substantial and critical part of our historically high poverty rates.

63. Totty Joins Gateway Group Personnel -

Justin Totty has joined Gateway Group Personnel as a research associate in the company’s executive search division. In his new role, Totty focuses on sourcing the best candidates for clients across numerous fields and industries, specifically targeting accounting, finance and engineering.

64. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

65. School Transitions -

In the uniquely timed world of education, a year can be defined several ways, and while one of those years is underway, planning for the next one has already begun.

By the calendar year, 2014 has been a dizzying array of historic moments and transitions.

66. St. Louis Fed Memphis Executive Stepping Down -

After getting her master’s degree in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, Martha Perine Beard joined the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis as a management trainee in 1971.

67. Education Commissioner Leaving for Private Sector -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Education Department Commissioner Kevin Huffman said Thursday that the scrutiny he received during his nearly four turbulent years at the helm of the state's schools didn't influence his decision to leave for the private sector.

68. Lottery Champion Cohen Not Pleased With Haslam's ‘Game-Changer’ -

To say Congressman Steve Cohen is unenthusiastic about the Tennessee Promise is an understatement.

69. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

70. Hill to Lead MIFA’s COOL Program -

Andrea Hill has been named manager of Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association’s COOL (College Offers Opportunities for Life) program, which provides higher education counseling, life skills training and mentorship opportunities to 11th- and 12th-graders from G.W. Carver and Booker T. Washington High Schools. Hill previously worked as director of volunteer services for Cool Girls Inc. in Atlanta.

71. Real Estate Rally -

Commercial real estate can offer insight into the strength of the local economy. Through the office, retail, industrial and apartment developments that mark the region the economy at work in the real world can be seen.

72. Yellen: Awareness of Economists' Diversity Needed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen says she wants to raise awareness of the need for diversity among economists, with relatively few women and minorities still choosing to major in economics in college.

73. Process Outlined to Review State Academic Standards -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam on Wednesday laid out a process for a public review of the state's K-12 academic standards in English and math amid continuing discussion about Common Core.

74. Incentive Applications Lag Previous Years -

Until a spate of activity this month, Memphis and Shelby County were on pace to tie a record-low for the number of payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreements granted to companies in a year.

Through September, the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine, the primary business incentive body in Memphis and Shelby County, had awarded just four PILOTs, tied with 2006 for the lowest amount of PILOTs issued in a year since 2002.

75. Yellen: Greatly Concerned By Widening Inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sounded an alarm Friday about widening economic inequality in the United States, suggesting that America's longstanding identity as a land of opportunity was at stake.

76. McManus Joins Patrick Accounting -

Michelle McManus, a Memphis native and certified public accountant, has joined Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC as manager. In her new role, McManus will supervise and review the monthly accounting process for a section of clients. She will also prepare and review tax returns and work closely with clients, assisting them with ongoing tax planning.

77. Johnson Named Memphis Law School Registrar -

Jamie M. Johnson has joined the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law as law school registrar.

In her new role, Johnson will have direct oversight of the registrar’s office and duties relating to enrollment verification, managing student’s academic records, and ensuring the accuracy, integrity, maintenance and delivery of all law school institutional data. Johnson will also work closely with the dean of academic affairs to administer exams, determine class rank and report grades.

78. Ritualizing Your Parenthood -

We are people of ceremony and ritual. Every occasion of transition is cause for celebration. A prescribed formula marks our rite of passage from one status to another.

Significant milestones are pronounced by traditional words stating our readiness to take on the new responsibility. Marriage, membership initiations, military inductions, oaths of office, graduations, even citizenship, are all marked by ritual.

79. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

80. US Wealth Gap Putting the Squeeze on State Revenue -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Income inequality is taking a toll on state governments.

The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has been matched by a slowdown in state tax revenue, according to a report being released Monday by Standard & Poor's.

81. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

82. Huckabee: 'Stop the Fight' Over Common Core -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conservatives should "stop the fight" over Common Core and instead consider the benefits that the academic standards offer students in struggling schools, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Friday. The position puts him at odds with a significant bloc of Republicans.

83. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

84. Apple's Tech Jobs Held Mostly By White, Asian Men -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple primarily relies on white and Asian men for its top-paying technology jobs, feeding the perception that Silicon Valley's economic boom is largely excluding women, blacks and Hispanics.

85. Pew: Split Views on Robots' Employment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In 2025, self-driving cars could be the norm, people could have more leisure time and goods could become cheaper. Or, there could be chronic unemployment and an even wider income gap, human interaction could become a luxury and the wealthy could live in walled cities with robots serving as labor.

86. US Job Growth Eases but Tops 200,000 for a Sixth Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sixth straight month of solid 200,000-plus job growth in July reinforced growing evidence that the U.S. economy is accelerating after five years of sluggish expansion.

87. Visible College Basement Opens New Opportunities -

There was a time, in the years surrounding the bankruptcy of the Stax Records label decades ago, when the vault of the old C&I Bank Building Downtown housed masters from the label.

88. Nurse-Family Partnership Benefits Mothers, Children -

At one level, the results of a clinical trial that studied low-income families in Memphis for more than 20 years delivered about what was expected.

“I don’t think it was a surprise to anyone that some of the families living in our impoverished areas, the young moms, were not prepared for parenthood and rarely understood how best to care for their (young children),” said Meri Armour, president and CEO of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.

89. GOP Lawmakers Demand Education Chief's Resignation -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's office is dismissing as a "political stunt" a letter signed by 15 Republican lawmakers demanding the resignation of Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman.

90. Departing PDS Head Says Education Needs ‘Disruption’ -

The departing headmaster of Presbyterian Day School says American education needs more of a revolution than evolution.

Lee Burns is leaving the East Memphis private school to become head of school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tenn., after 14 years in Memphis. He was the keynote speaker Wednesday, June 11, for the second day of the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence’s two-day summer conference on the PDS campus.

91. Obama Moves to Extend Student Loan Payment Relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to alleviate the burden of student loan debt, President Barack Obama expanded a program Monday that lets borrowers pay no more than 10 percent of their income every month, and threw his support behind more sweeping Senate legislation targeting the issue.

92. Regions Partners in Inner-City Business Program -

To use a metaphor to illustrate the purpose of a new program to help inner-city businesses in Memphis grow, the program represents the difference between focusing on rowing your boat and scouting the horizon for a new port to direct your boat toward.

93. Life’s Many Graduations -

Delivering a commencement speech is the easy part. Writing one is more difficult. It take years, if not decades, to understand what it take to survive, to succeed, to thrive, to find your passion, to encourage others, and to understand that the things that go wrong often lead to the things that go right.

94. RNC Changes Debate Rules for 2016 -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Lunging for control of the GOP ahead of high-stakes elections, the Republican National Committee on Friday took steps to end free-for-all presidential debates and vowed to punish potential contenders who participate in rogue forums.

95. Technology Keeps Hatcher’s Landscape Business Booming -

Whether it was pagers, two-way radios, fax machines or the Internet, Michael Hatcher has always been quick to embrace technological advances as a way to help grow his small business, the landscaping firm Michael Hatcher & Associates Inc.

96. Massey Looks to Grow CCIM Reach -

Shawn Massey is a commercial real estate broker by trade, but he has a burning passion for education.

Massey has co-founded a business-focused charter school in Frayser called Memphis Business Academy and he teaches a master’s level real estate class at the University of Memphis.

97. Paying for the College Dream -

Ray’s Take: Education is one of the greatest gifts you can give, and the value is clearly calculable. It’s also something that deserves a serious conversation.

Per Sallie Mae’s article “How Americans Save for College 2014,” roughly 50 percent of families are saving for college. Of those not saving, 22 percent expect their children to obtain financial aid or scholarships to pay for college and 16 percent believe it is their children’s responsibility to pay. So should parents pay for college, or should the kids “have some skin in the game” and pay for part or all of it?

98. The Business Case for Investing in Green Space -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

During 2013 the Greater Memphis Chamber formed the Chairman’s Circle, a group of over 100 Memphis business leaders organized to push for action on key issues to accelerate the regional economy. Early in the life of the organization we created “moon missions,” which are coordinated efforts to truly transform our community.

99. Victory University to Close in May -

For the 1,879 students at Victory University, the last day of the spring semester, May 2, will also be the end of the 73-year-old institution that began as Mid-South Bible College.

University officials announced abruptly last week that the university will close at the end of the spring semester because of financial problems.

100. Victory University To Close in May -

For the 1,879 student at Victory University, the last day of the spring semester, May 2, will also be the end of the 73-year-old institution that began as Mid-South Bible College.

University officials announced abruptly last week that the university will close at the end of the spring semester because of financial problems.