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Editorial Results (free)

1. Yellen: Banks Play Vital Economic Role in Poor Communities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that U.S. banks must do all they can to promote economic development in low-income areas where high unemployment has persisted despite the overall job market's significant gains.

2. Events -

The Midtown Memphis Development Corp. will host the 2017 Mojo of Midtown Awards Bash Wednesday, March 29, at 6 p.m. at Circuit Playhouse, 51 S. Cooper St. The awards honor six individuals and organizations for their “mojo” in making significant contributions to Midtown. 
Ticket are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. Visit facebook.com/MidtownMemphis.MMDC for details.

3. Events -

The second series of Memphis 3.0 public meetings continues this week at these locations: 
• Tuesday, March 28, 5:30 p.m.: Hollywood Community Center, 1560 N. Hollywood St.
• Thursday, March 30, 5:30 p.m.: Glenview Community Center, 1141 S. Barksdale St.
The comprehensive planning team will share research that has been conducted since the first set of rallies, which generated more than 10,000 comments, and seek input on specific topics to help shape priorities and goals. Visit memphis3point0.com for a schedule of upcoming meetings.

4. Last Word: 'Ono Poke and the Ghost of The Luau, Council Day and $3 Concerts -

The ghost of the Luau lives on. Loeb has a new tenant for the Shops of Chickasaw Gardens called ‘Ono Poke that features Hawaiian cuisine. And the restaurant will be just about on the other side of Poplar Avenue from where the Luau used to stand with its large concrete Easter Island head, Polynesian dishes and Hawaii Five-O era architecture – not the remake, the real Five-O and the real McGarrett.

5. Strickland and Luttrell Mark Different Points in Mayoral Tenures -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was 13 months and nine days in office when he delivered his second State of the City address last week at a Frayser church.

6. Repeal of Health Law Could Mean Women Pay More for Less -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From a return to higher premiums based on gender, to gaps in coverage for birth control and breast pumps, experts say women could end up paying more for less if the Obama-era health care law is repealed.

7. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

8. Teach901 Releases Results Of Priority Teacher Survey -

Teach901 has released the results of its 2016 Priority School Teacher Survey, marking the fourth year the organization has interviewed priority school teachers from Shelby County Schools and its Innovation Zone, the Achievement School District and the Memphis Education Fund.

9. Ossei-Anto Lifts Up Memphis Kids -

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, Theo Ossei-Anto knew he wanted to make a difference in education – but he says coming to Memphis was an unexpected adventure.

“It’s an amazing place,” he reflects. “I have learned so much about teaching here. I love my kids and have become very committed to them.”

10. Adapt To Survive -

According to Charles Darwin, it’s not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change. In my experience, that’s a true assessment not only for human beings, but also for businesses, regardless of the focus of the business.

11. Ugwueke Takes Reins as Methodist Healthcare CEO -

Michael Ugwueke’s first day on the job as CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, a post he assumed Jan. 1, included a round of meeting the troops.

The new chief executive of the Methodist organization visited all six of its hospitals, meeting employees and front-line staff and sharing his appreciation that they were there on New Year’s Day, a holiday for many people.

12. Grizzlies’ MLK Game Changed, but Mission Remains the Same -

While the NBA moved the Grizzlies’ 15th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Game to Sunday night, Jan. 15, the game against the Chicago Bulls will be televised on ESPN and the team will use Monday to offer service to the community.

13. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

14. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

15. Change Defines Education Landscape in 2016 -

By the time Rhodes College trustees made their choice in December of Marjorie Hass as the college’s new president, higher education in Memphis had been through quite a few changes.

Hass succeeds William Troutt, president of Rhodes for the last 18 years.

16. Infectious Disease Specialist Blatz Joins Resurrection Health -

Infectious disease specialist Dr. Peter Blatz recently joined the staff of Resurrection Health. In his new role, Blatz provides expert consultation on a variety of infectious diseases in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Currently he is focusing on providing HIV and hepatitis C care as well as teaching Resurrection’s family medicine resident physicians. 

17. Chairman's Circle Moon Missions Are Taking Flight -

Although the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle and its Moon Missions are designed to bring change on a long-term scale, some of the missions are already having a tangible effect on the community.

18. Last Word: Epping Way, Conley's Return and 'Ascend' -

What is the encore after a year that has included the opening of Big River Crossing, the eastward expansion of the Shelby Farms Greenline across Germantown Parkway to the old town part of Cordova and the opening of Shelby Farms Park’s Heart of the Park renovation? Two words: Epping Way.

19. TNReady Report Cards Dip With New Test -

Shelby County Schools leaders have a math literacy program that will rollout in phases starting next year. The plan was already in the works before new state test results were released Tuesday, Dec. 13, for school districts across the state.

20. SCS TNReady Scores Dip Particularly In Math -

Shelby County Schools leaders have a math literacy program that will rollout in phases starting next year.

The plan was already in the works before new state test results were released Tuesday, Dec. 13, for school districts across the state.

21. Bibbs Empowers Teachers for Student Success -

Miska Clay Bibbs never planned to pursue a career in education. But no matter where life takes her, she always ends up coming back to it.

22. U of M To Hold Winter Commencement Dec. 11 -

The University of Memphis will award a total of 1,693 degrees, including 55 doctorates, in two commencement ceremonies Dec. 11 at FedExForum.

At the 11 a.m. ceremony, students in the College of Arts & Sciences, College of Communication and Fine Arts, University College and School of Law will receive degrees. At the 3:30 p.m. session, degrees will be awarded to students from the Fogelman College of Business & Economics, College of Education, School of Health Studies, Herff College of Engineering, Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality and Resort Management, Loewenberg College of Nursing, School of Public Health and School of Communication Sciences and Disorders.

23. U of M To Hold Winter Commencement Dec. 11 -

The University of Memphis will award a total of 1,693 degrees, including 55 doctorates, in two commencement ceremonies Dec. 11 at FedExForum.

At the 11 a.m. ceremony, students in the College of Arts & Sciences, College of Communication and Fine Arts, University College and School of Law will receive degrees. At the 3:30 p.m. session, degrees will be awarded to students from the Fogelman College of Business & Economics, College of Education, School of Health Studies, Herff College of Engineering, Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality and Resort Management, Loewenberg College of Nursing, School of Public Health and School of Communication Sciences and Disorders.

24. Memphis Infant Mortality Rate Reaches Record Low -

The infant mortality rate in Memphis has hit a record low, marking an important milestone in the city’s fight to improve a key measure of its overall health.

Shelby County, which includes Memphis, last year saw its lowest rate on record of babies who died before their first birthday, the county health department reported Monday. The 2015 rate of 8.2 out of 1,000 live births represents a drop from 9.6 in 2014, and a significant reduction from 2003, when the rate was nearly 15 baby deaths per 1,000 live births.

25. Fewer Babies Dying in Memphis, But Rate Still Higher Than US -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – The infant mortality rate in Memphis has hit a record low, marking an important milestone in the city's fight to improve a key measure of its overall health.

Shelby County, which includes Memphis, last year saw its lowest rate on record of babies who died before their first birthday, the county health department reported Monday. The 2015 rate of 8.2 out of 1,000 live births represents a drop from 9.6 in 2014, and a significant reduction from 2003, when the rate was nearly 15 baby deaths per 1,000 live births.

26. Broke and Broken: Democrats Lose More Ground in State Legislature -

Tennessee House Democrats will have to start calling themselves the “Fighting 25,” down from the “Fighting 26,” after dropping a district in the battle to regain relevance statewide.

27. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

28. Expanding Care -

With the arrival of the holiday shopping season, dozens of major retailers – brands from Best Buy to Williams-Sonoma to Brooks Brothers and New York & Co. – as well as the consumers who patronize them will also be turning their attention to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

29. TD Ameritrade to Buy Scottrade in $4B Cash-and-Stock Deal -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Online brokerage TD Ameritrade is buying Scottrade in a $4 billion cash-and-stock deal that would significantly expand its branch network at a time when many financial firms are expanding automated adviser programs.

30. Financial Accounts and College Fees -

Ray’s Take We are now seeing total undergraduate degree costs well in excess of the cost of a new home. We could talk about whether it’s worth it, but that’s another column. Today we want to discuss ways to save for it. First thing–start immediately. You should get going the moment you have a social security number for your child. Second–run the numbers honestly. It’s not realistic to assume scholarships before potty training. A multi-faceted plan will probably work best.

31. Green Dot Charter Appeal Approved by State -

The Tennessee Board of Education approved Friday, Oct. 14, a Memphis charter school application rejected by the Shelby County Schools board.

And the decision on the appeal sets the stage for the state to directly oversee a charter school outside the Achievement School District for the first time.

32. SCS May Still Pursue East High T-STEM After Missing Out on Grant -

Although Shelby County Schools didn’t get a federal grant for a new optional school program at East High, the school system is still likely to continue with the ambitious plan.

The SCS grant application to the U.S Department of Education for the Magnet Schools Assistant Program calls for a T-STEM – transportation, science, technology, engineering and math – optional or magnet school at East to replace the engineering optional program that has been in place since 1984.

33. Civil Rights Milestones Among Tennessee Items Facing Cuts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Major milestones in the civil rights movements for minorities and women are among a slew of Tennessee historical events, names and places that would no longer be required learning under a proposed overhaul of the social studies curriculum.

34. Memphis Nonprofits are Sharing What They Know About Students, and the Shift is Seen as Paying Off -

The local conversation about how to help students succeed got a boost last week as hundreds of people invested in that question descended on Memphis to learn how to work together better.

More than 400 people attended a national conference hosted by StriveTogether, a group working to get nonprofits in the same cities to share their knowledge, and Seeding Success, which is leading that work locally.

35. Commission Eyes Bolton High as Ag Career Center -

When Wade Bolton was shot and fatally wounded in Court Square in 1869 by a former partner in a slave trading firm, it continued a long-running feud across several years in which eight people altogether would die violently.

36. Toast to the Achievement School District -

Somebody forgot to tell the Achievement School District it had to follow a few simple rules when the Legislature formed it a few years ago to save failing schools: Primarily, don’t party with the money.

37. SCS Board To Vote on Crosstown High Charter Application -

Shelby County Schools board members vote Tuesday, Aug. 23, at a special school board meeting on a proposed Crosstown High charter school in the Crosstown Concourse development.

And the SCS administration is recommending the school board approve the application along with those of four other charter schools and deny charter applications from three other charter organizations.

38. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

39. Blue-Collar High School -

For all of the changes in public education Memphis has seen in the past six years, there is at least one more big one still on the way.

And it is coming from the city’s post-recession economic development effort.

40. Commission Sets Tax Rate, Debate Remains -

Shelby County Commissioners made it official Wednesday, July 27, keeping the county property tax rate the same – at $4.37 per $100 of assessed value.

But the vote didn’t end the debate among commissioners about the future trajectory of the tax rate.

41. Last Word: The Sound of Dominoes, Brexit Anxiety and Schilling Farms Backstory -

The Memphis Newspaper Guild makes it official – filing grievances against Gannett, the new owner of The Commercial Appeal, over the first significant changes in how the paper is put out. Those changes involve abolishing copy editing positions and making them part of the new job of digital producers.

42. How safe is our food? -

It’s not easy being a food inspector in Tennessee, dealing with an updated statewide food code to protect the public from foodborne illnesses and educating restaurateurs, many with their own ideas about their cuisine, on following the rules.

43. Former Titan Dyson Finally Reaching His Goal -

When is it too late to go back to school and prepare for a new career? Most experts and older students who’ve returned to school at 30, 40, 50 – or even 60 and beyond – will tell you there’s really no limit as long as an older student is motivated and focused.

44. Memphis Design Firm Tapped to Convert NASA Station Into Science Resort -

Memphis-based Haizlip Studio has been hired to help reimagine a former NASA satellite tracking station and Cold War outpost in western North Carolina into a full-service, $40 million science resort complete with an independent research facility and lodging.

45. CHC Eyes Crosstown Move, Won’t Rush to Fill Sheehan’s Post -

The Church Health Center is gearing up to move into and begin seeing patients at the renovated Crosstown Concourse early next year, with no immediate plans to fill the vacant president’s position following the departure of Antony Sheehan last month.

46. Last Word: Graduation Day, St. Jude's New Office Tower and Another Bike Map -

The chances are pretty good that you encountered someone in a cap and gown this weekend.

It is graduation season and Shelby County Schools kicked it off Saturday with 14 high school graduations – that’s in one day.

47. County Commission Debates Body Cam Compromise, Minority Business Contracts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 9, three temporary positions for the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office toward the roll out of Memphis Police Department body cameras.

48. County Commission Debates Body Cam Compromise, Minority Business Contracts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 9, three temporary positions for the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office toward the roll out of Memphis Police Department body cameras.

49. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

50. Last Word: TNReady Termination, NFL Draft Day and What Drove The Bible Bill -

When students in public schools take tests these days, it is about more than how they are doing and whether they know what is being taught them.

The scores play a significant role in how teachers are evaluated and rated. And both play a role in their careers and how much they will be paid. They play a role in whether the state decides to take over a school or the school system they remain in decides to essentially start over with an Innovation School model.

51. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

52. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

53. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

54. Student Loans: The Next Subprime Disaster? -

Ray’s Take: If you Google the words “student loan crisis,” millions of hits should convince you that this is a very hot topic.

According to the most recent Department of Education report released in September 2015, the federal loan default rate stands at 11.8 percent for borrowers who were required to start making payments during the 12 months prior to October 2012. While this is slightly lower than the previous report, it’s still not good. And the rate doesn't include borrowers who have been able to defer payments. Additionally, the most recent graduates will face the highest costs and will be emerging into what continues to be a very poor job market. We have every reason to believe that defaults are not only understated, but they will increase.

55. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

56. TSU President Concerned About Higher-Ed Changes -

I believe it is important to communicate and clarify TSU’s position on the FOCUS (Focus on College and University Success) Act, and dispel any misconceptions regarding our position.

As President of TSU, I am a proud supporter of Governor Bill Haslam’s initiatives, including Drive to 55 and Tennessee Promise. We are not opposed to the FOCUS Act. That is simply not true. However, we have raised some legitimate concerns regarding certain provisions in the FOCUS Act, and the unintended effects on TSU, including faculty, students, and community members. Republican Senator Mark Norris, who is carrying the legislation for the Governor, referred to us as pitiful for raising concerns. We disagree with his misguided statement. There is nothing pitiful about analyzing legislation from all angles to determine its effect on our university. It is pitiful that he would make such an inflammatory comment.

57. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

58. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

59. Agricenter President Looks Back on 15-Year Tenure -

Try putting yourself in John Charles Wilson’s dusty work boots for a moment. You’ve served as president of Agricenter International for more than 15 years. In less than six months, you will retire.

60. Creating A Culture Of Urgency -

President Lincoln once said, “Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.” What amazing insight from someone living in an era we would consider as slow-paced compared to the frenetic pace of change in society today.

61. Facing History Mural To Visualize Broader Goals -

Last year, when Facing History and Ourselves moved into its new South Main office at 115 Huling Ave., the nonprofit knew it wanted to bring its brand of socially conscious education to the broader community.

62. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

63. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

64. Luttrell: State Likely to Mandate $1B Liability -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the state of Tennessee will most likely move to require Shelby County Schools to fully fund its $1.5 billion liability for health insurance and similar employee benefits.

65. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

66. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

67. Hospital Building Boom Hits Downtown Memphis -

From a big donation to significant campus expansions and investment, the health care news was popping at a steady clip this week.

Almost as soon as word had spread about Methodist Healthcare’s plan to invest $275 million into Methodist University Hospital, the Methodist system’s flagship, came big announcements from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.

68. St. Jude Shows Off $90M Proton Therapy Center -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is now treating patients in its new proton therapy center with an advanced form of radiation technology and a system that was designed, developed and implemented in partnership with Hitachi.

69. Vanderbilt Study Compares ASD, I-Zone Achievement -

Add a new study from Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College to the local debate about the two school sets aimed specifically at turning around Tennessee’s failing educational institutions.

The study, released Tuesday, Dec. 8, looks at student achievement over the first three years of the state-run Achievement School District and the locally run Innovation Zone Schools. It finds I-Zone gains are greater than ASD gains, but there are some important caveats within the Vanderbilt researchers’ conclusions.

70. Ready for Launch -

Five hundred new companies in 10 years. That’s the idea that founded EPIcenter, short for Entrepreneurship-Powered Innovation Center, an organization looking to catalyze the entrepreneurial movement in Memphis.

71. Shelby County Schools Eyes Crosstown -

Shelby County Schools wants to open a high school at Crosstown Concourse. SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson confirmed the school district’s interest Wednesday, Nov. 18.

“We’ve spoken with some of the local funders about putting together some plan to ensure that there are some high-quality options there,” Hopson said. “There are a number of different ways that we’re thinking about it. But absolutely we would love to be a part of it.”

72. Editorial: The Authentic Success Of Whitehaven High School -

Whitehaven the community has been inseparable from Whitehaven the school for more than 100 years.

Whether it was Whitehaven Academy in the 19th century or Neel High School or the current Whitehaven High, the community and its hallmark educational institution always have been intertwined.

73. Artspace Lands Grant, Seeks Design Approval -

Developers of the South Main Artspace Lofts are clearing major hurdles this week with final approval for the building design, a crucial tax incentive decision and a grant from a new-to-Memphis donor.

74. The Week Ahead: Nov. 2, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here's our first weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the Indie Memphis Film Festival to Mississippi elections...

If you love the outdoors and good weather, these are the days you’ve been missing. And few things are as “fall” as a fall festival, and the kickoff of Miss Cordelia’s Saturday Market series this weekend seems like one more thing worth adding to the list of things to do in Memphis. There’ll be a growler station, local food and beer sampling, pop-up retail and food specials.

75. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

76. Memphians Feed the Body and the Soul With Outreach -

Hunger is a problem that we don’t often connect with living in Memphis, yet food hardship is significant in our city. Memphis ranked eighth in the nation in food hardship in the 2014 Gallup Poll.

77. Bass, Berry & Sims Launches Nonprofit Practice Group -

The nonprofit sector represents a sizable chunk of the Memphis-area economy – some 8 percent of total employment, with almost 45,000 jobs.

That’s according to former Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper, citing figures from the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence to explain why the law firm Cooper is back practicing with, Bass, Berry & Sims PLC, has started a practice group focused on nonprofits. Cooper has been tapped to lead that group, following his service as the state’s attorney general from 2006 to 2014.

78. Study Examines Effectiveness Of Tennessee’s Pre-K Program -

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he’s still supportive of Tennessee’s pre-kindergarten program despite a study that shows academic gains made by some of the children enrolled fade in early elementary grades.

79. Study Examines Effectiveness of Tennessee's Pre-K Program -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he's still supportive of Tennessee's pre-kindergarten program despite a study that shows academic gains made by some of the children enrolled fade in early elementary grades.

80. Novel Plan to Curb Drug Costs Seeks Candidates' Attention -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer-friendly ratings of the benefits of new drugs. Limits on what patients pay. Requiring drug companies to disclose how much they actually spend on research.

With the public concerned about the high cost of new medications, these are some of the proposals offered Friday by a policy center often aligned with the Obama administration.

81. Indie Memphis Taps Watt as Executive Director -

This year keeps shaping up to be a milestone for the Indie Memphis Film Festival, which has tapped local filmmaker Ryan Watt to serve as its new executive director following the departure of Erik Jambor earlier this year.

82. Indie Memphis Doubles Length, Adds Downtown -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival will extend its presence back Downtown this year – for the first time since 2006 – with a series of events scheduled on top of its Midtown offerings.

This year’s festival, set for Nov. 3-10, will also be bigger – up from four days in previous years. In addition to hosting screenings and events in Overton Square, this year’s festival will offer programs Downtown at the new Halloran Centre for Perfoming Arts & Education next door to the Orpheum Theatre.

83. Indie Memphis Doubles Length, Adds Downtown Presence -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival will extend its presence back Downtown this year – for the first time since 2006 – with a series of events scheduled on top of its Midtown offerings.

This year’s festival, set for Nov. 3-10, will also be bigger – up from four days in previous years. In addition to hosting screenings and events in Overton Square, this year’s festival will offer programs Downtown at the new Halloran Centre for Perfoming Arts & Education next door to the Orpheum Theatre.

84. Baby Budget -

About $245,000. That’s the estimated cost for raising one child from birth through age 18.

And that figure surprised young women who attended a recent workshop funded by a grant from GiVE 365, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program.

85. Improving Access -

With Hispanics expected to make up 31 percent of the nation’s population by 2060, Christian Brothers University is investing in its growing community by pledging $12.5 million to go toward scholarships for immigrant students whose legal residency status may be in question.

86. 'En Fuego' -

When Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite took office in June 2013, one of the first tasks that landed on his desk was a long-planned regional outlet mall.

The outlet mall, planned for a roughly 33-acre site at Church Road and Interstate 55 in the DeSoto County city, had been on the drawing board for some time, but the recession and its aftermath caused developers and Mississippi officials to put it on hold.

87. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

88. Report: More Tennessee Children Living in Poverty -

A new report says more than one-fourth of Tennessee children are living in poverty, up from a few years ago when the country was in a recession.

The Tennessean reports the review shows more than a third of children are living with insecurely employed parents.

89. Varsity Spirit Honored With American Tradition Award -

The National Federation of State High School Associations has selected Memphis-based Varsity Spirit as the 2015 recipient of the American Tradition Award.

The NFHS is the national leadership organization for high school sports and performing arts activities, and presents the American Tradition Award to an individual, organization or company that has supported high school activities on a national level. Varsity Spirit executives accepted the award July 1 during the organization’s summer meeting in New Orleans.

90. Varsity Spirit Honored With American Tradition Award -

The National Federation of State High School Associations has selected Memphis-based Varsity Spirit as the 2015 recipient of the American Tradition Award.

The NFHS is the national leadership organization for high school sports and performing arts activities, and presents the American Tradition Award to an individual, organization or company that has supported high school activities on a national level. Varsity Spirit executives accepted the award July 1 during the organization’s summer meeting in New Orleans.

91. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

92. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

93. Study Finds Merit In Youth Villages' Transitional Program -

Youth Villages’ 17-year-old transition program for children aging out of the foster care system at age 18 improved participants’ outcomes in housing stability, economic well-being, and employment and earnings, according to a new clinical study by nonprofit research organization MDRC.

94. Test Score Results Show Gains in All High School Subjects -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State education officials say they're taking steps to address reading test scores that have remained relatively flat in early grade levels over the past five years.

95. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

96. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

97. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

98. Snapshot: Memphis-Based Public Companies -

Here's a look at what's going on at the dozen public companies headquartered in Memphis:

AutoZone Inc.

AutoZone Inc. is one of the largest auto parts retailers and distributors in the U.S., with a store count of 5,476 as of Feb. 14. Since 1998, the company has repurchased $15.7 billion worth of its own shares. At the end of March, AutoZone continued its share buyback program with the authorization to buy back another $750 million in company stock. The company followed that news with plans to pursue a $650 million debt offering to be used for “general corporate purposes.” – Andy Meek

99. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

100. Deloitte Promotes Vince DeGutis -

Vince DeGutis, a partner in Deloitte Tax LLP, has been named Deloitte’s Memphis managing partner.
In his new role, DeGutis is responsible for overseeing the Memphis office, enhancing Deloitte’s brand and reputation in the business and civic community, and facilitating revenue growth by advancing targeting and growth activities. He is also responsible for the development and implementation strategies to attract and retain the next generation of leaders within Deloitte.