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Editorial Results (free)

1. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Health Care in Tennessee? -

According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality, number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

2. SEC Relaxes Transfer Rules, Clearing Path for UF's Jefferson -

The Southeastern Conference has relaxed two rules regarding intra-league transfers, clearing the way for former Mississippi receiver Van Jefferson to play at Florida this fall and opening the door for Alabama offensive lineman Brandon Kennedy to be eligible for a rival school this season.

3. Last Word: Kim Kardashian's Plea, The Duran Stay and Mid-Term Moves -

A drug case from Memphis federal court in the early 1990s was the reason Kim Kardashian West was at the White House Wednesday. Kardashian West is among those pushing for a presidential pardon for Alice Marie Johnson – serving a life sentence on a federal drug and money laundering conviction. Here is the Associated Press story.

4. Ensor: Vol Baseball Has Hurdles to Overcome -

Knoxville’s Rusty Ensor still hasn’t gotten baseball out of his system.

The 1978 Bearden High School graduate was one of the best power hitters in University of Tennessee history in just two seasons after two years of baseball at Motlow State Community College.

5. Our Kids are Drowning -

LIFELINE. Almost 40 years ago, I was on the first board of the Ira Samelson Jr. Boys & Girls Club down the street from Treadwell School. We had taken over a YMCA that had a pool – the first pool in the club system. We brought kids in from all over the city to learn to swim, to keep from drowning if they got in deep water.

6. Players’ Experience -

In his piece on John Calipari at theringer.com, writer Jordan Ritter Conn makes the case that the former University of Memphis coach is the best recruiter in college basketball history. His evidence includes this statistic: Since coming to Kentucky in 2009, Calipari has landed 30 McDonald’s All-Americans and sent 33 players to the NBA.

7. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

8. Cellphones Gaining Acceptance Inside US Schools -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) – Cellphones are still absent from most U.S. schools but new data shows them steadily gaining acceptance as administrators bow to parents' wishes to keep tabs on their kids and teachers find ways to work them into lessons.

9. CSE’s Martin Helping Students Find Their Voice -

Katie Martin’s required coursework in her dual degree master’s program at the University of Texas in Austin had the Texas native walking the length of a specific dichotomy every day.

10. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

11. Managing Your Email in 4 Easy Steps -

Email changed the way we do business by making the world smaller and moving at a faster pace. This form of communication was somewhat manageable until smart phones gave us the opportunity to read and send emails at any time of the day, from anywhere in the world.

12. Sen. Lamar Alexander Talks Tax Reform, Trump, Guns -

The day before the U.S. Senate voted in December to pass a massive federal tax overhaul, FedEx founder, chairman and CEO Fred Smith called up U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and urged him to “pass that bill.”

13. Sen. Alexander Talks Tax Reform, Trump, Gun Control in Memphis -

The day before the U.S. Senate voted in December to pass a massive federal tax overhaul, FedEx founder, chairman and CEO Fred Smith called up U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and urged him to “pass that bill.”

14. Luttrell Calls For ‘High-Wage Job Growth’ in Final State of the County -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said at his last State of the County address this week that what Shelby County struggles with is “economic diversification and high-wage job growth.”

15. Last Word: Megasite Changes, Jubilee Schools to End and The Day at City Hall -

Back to the drawing board for the megasite in Haywood County. State officials have decided the wastewater flow they had planned from the site along Interstate 40 won’t empty into the Mississippi River near Randolph in Tipton County after all. It’s the latest attempt by the state to make the decade-old site set aside for industrial or manufacturing development shovel ready.

16. Pruitt’s SEC-Heavy Staff a Recruiting Coup -

It was early December, 2012, and Butch Jones stood in front of a podium after being named Tennessee’s 24th football coach.

“I can assure you,” Jones said at his introductory press conference. “We will put together the best football staff in the country. Not just in the Southeastern Conference, but the entire country.”

17. The Cutoff -

When Memphis leaders got together with suburban mayors in September at Agricenter, it was to talk about a unified countywide approach to getting Amazon’s $5 billion HQ2 project.

It was supposed to be a time for leaders of the county and its seven cities to talk about their common good, regionalism and all things they agree on, with none of what they disagree on at least for the moment.

18. Game of Thrones? UT’s Cast Not That Smart -

When he was president of the University of Tennessee in 1959-70, Andy Holt often referred to the Vols athletics program, and particularly its football program, as “the front porch of the university.”

19. Latest SEC Football Rankings: 1. Sexton. 2. Saban. -

Fourteen schools play football in the SEC. Six of them, or 42.9 percent, now have a different man coaching their football team than they had at the start of the season.

That’s a lot of turnover. It suggests coaching in the SEC is often a battle against personal extinction.

20. Germantown Mayor Seeks Multifamily Moratorium -

In the waning minutes of a Germantown Planning Commission meeting this week, Mayor Mike Palazzolo proposed a moratorium on all new standalone multifamily developments in the suburb’s Smart Code zoning districts.

21. Germantown Mayor Calls for Multifamily Moratorium -

In the waning minutes of the Germantown Planning Commission’s Tuesday, Dec. 5, meeting, Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo proposed a moratorium on all new standalone multifamily developments in the suburb’s Smart Code zoning districts.

22. Last Word: 'Seismic Shift,' Mason Village and Running A Store From A Cloud -

It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to drive through the old town part of Cordova near its one-time train station and see the potential. Now word of a new restaurant opening later this month in what is known as Farley House. The old town is an interesting mix of new development and old development including an iconic country Baptist church that not too long ago turned 100 years old. And then there is the trail head for the Shelby Farms Greenline that runs near the train station.

23. Colleges Offering Legal Tips, Hotlines Amid DACA Uncertainty -

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) – Mixed signals from Washington over a possible agreement to preserve protections for young immigrants are increasing anxiety and confusion on college campuses, where the stakes are high.

24. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

25. Kim Cherry Invests in Culture and Community -

What do you want to be when you grow up? It’s a question commonly asked of children, with a slate of common answers: doctor, teacher, astronaut.

Ask Kim Cherry, executive vice president of corporate communications at First Tennessee Bank, what she wanted to be when she grew up, and the answer is a bit less standard.

26. Honor Your Muse, Part 1 -

Editor’s note: Part one in a three-part series. Recently, more and more people ask me about launching their own business. They see something liberating about leaping into the unknown, owning their own destiny and not having to make compromises they are forced to make in their current situation.

27. Chamber Names 2017 Young Memphian Winners -

The Greater Memphis Chamber has announced its official 2017 Young Memphians list, which will be featured in the summer issue of Memphis Crossroads Magazine.

Nominations for the Young Memphians award were submitted via the chamber’s website, social media outlets and email. All nominees must be under 40 and a member of the Greater Memphis Chamber.

28. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

29. Sit-In Protests Get First Historical Marker -

Nobody kept count until Jet magazine came to Memphis in 1965 to feature a group of seven sisters the influential magazine billed as “the most arrested family” in the country.

With a picture of the seven Lee sisters, the magazine said Lee family members have “been arrested 17 times for civil rights activities.”

30. Redbirds, MLB Donate To Memphis Schools -

The Memphis Redbirds Community Fund, in conjunction with Major League Baseball, has made a $25,0000 donation to Pitch In For Baseball to benefit Memphis public schools.

The donation, which was part of MLB’s biennial RBI (Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities) Institute held last week in Memphis, will provide baseball and softball equipment to help 460 students get on the field, benefiting 24 baseball and softball teams at 16 schools in the Memphis area.

31. Football Recruiting: Memphis, Mississippi State Move Forward -

The top of the college football recruiting period looks like it usually does. Alabama pulled in the consensus No. 1 recruiting class for 2017 for the fifth time in six years and coach Nick Saban said the kind of ridiculous things that a guy presiding over a football factory says.

32. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

33. Saban Dominance Bad for SEC? Not Buying It -

I keep reading that Nick Saban is ruining SEC football because his Alabama program is so dominant.

And I just don’t get it.

The misguided Saban-as-Satan logic goes this way:

34. Tennessee Lawmakers Could Raise, Lower Taxes This Session -

The 110th General Assembly is set to convene on Jan. 10 with unfinished business from previous sessions likely to dominate debate.

Here’s a look at some of the hottest topics expected to arise.

35. Mayor’s Young Professionals Council Grows -

The Young Professional Council that advises Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has added 10 new members for 2017, a new crop that will join 15 current members in meeting regularly and working to connect, represent and support the interests of young professionals in the area.

36. Tigers to Face Western Kentucky in Boca Raton Bowl -

The bad news for University of Memphis football fans? The Tigers’ bowl destination is a really, really long drive.

The good news? It’s the Boca Raton Bowl in Florida and not a return trip to the Birmingham Bowl, where last year the Tigers lost to Auburn after coach Justin Fuente had left for Virginia Tech.

37. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

38. College Football Programs are Trending Toward Younger Hires -

When searching for a new head football coach, schools have been showing more willingness to hire an up-and-comer like Tom Herman or P.J. Fleck, rather than a veteran with a long track record of success such as Les Miles.

39. Meet Olli -

With deep and well-funded resources such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, the Knoxville region is no stranger to innovation in science and technology.

But a new kid on the block, Local Motors, has the potential to spark a whole new era of manufacturing innovation and make Knoxville a hotbed for a technology sector widely considered to be truly revolutionary – self-driving cars.

40. Germantown Moves on New School Site South of Poplar -

The city of Germantown is moving toward a contract on 33 acres of land south of Poplar Avenue for a new elementary school.

The Germantown Board of Mayor and Aldermen vote Monday, Sept. 12, on putting up $33,000 in earnest money toward the purchase of the property, which is on Winchester Road east of Forest Hill-Irene Road, from Regency Homebuilders LLC. The land abuts homes on the east side of Crestwyn Drive.

41. Looks Like 10-2, SEC Title Game, Orange Bowl for UT -

Editor’s note: Nashville sports correspondent Dave Link has been accurate in predicting season outcomes for the Tennessee Vols in recent years. His 2016 season predictions, released just before press time, culminates with an SEC Championship appearance. Here’s his take on the season…

42. Farrow: ‘You Really Have to Listen to People’ -

It was a defining moment: When Hardy Farrow was a student at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., he became an intern with Teach for America. One day in a D.C. classroom, a fourth-grader asked him about where he went to college, and they began talking. 

43. Crosstown High, 4 Other Charter Schools Win Approval -

Shelby County Schools board members approved a new Crosstown High charter school Tuesday, Aug. 23, for the Crosstown Concourse development and four other new charters for the 2017-2018 school year.

44. SCS Board Approves Crosstown, Four Other Charters, Rejects Three -

Shelby County Schools board members approved a new Crosstown High charter school Tuesday, Aug. 23, for the Crosstown Concourse development and four other new charters for the 2017-2018 school year.

45. SCS Board Approves Crosstown, Four Other Charters, Rejects Three -

Shelby County Schools board members approved a new Crosstown High charter school Tuesday, Aug. 23, for the Crosstown Concourse development and four other new charters for the 2017-2018 school year.

46. Last Word: The Elvis Bubble, Global Entry At MEM and ARC at the Rec Room -

Elvis Week is with us. If you are on Elvis Presley Boulevard every day you know that the Elvis Week landscape is very different this year with the Guest House at Graceland hotel going up and well underway at this point – 90 percent complete toward a late October opening we were told during a media tour on Wednesday.

47. Safe to Scorching: SEC Coaches Feel the Burn -

There are two kinds of football coaches in the Southeastern Conference: those that have gotten fired and those that haven’t gotten fired – yet.

This is a conference in a constant state of flux for football. The average tenure at their current schools of the 14 SEC coaches is 3.57 years. That’s right: Just making it through a full four-year recruiting cycle is tough.

48. Too Big To Ignore: The SEC and Its Ever-Growing Football Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – The SEC football preseason always has been loud. More than 30 years ago, the noise came via the Skywriters Tour and the rattle and roar of a DC-3 propeller plane carrying rumpled, hardworking – and often hard-drinking – sports writers to the 10 Southeastern Conference campuses for essentially unfettered access to the league’s coaches and players.

49. Kevin Dean Leaves Legacy at Literacy Mid-South for ‘New Adventure’ -

After five years of leading the charge for building a stronger community of skilled readers, Thursday, June 30, is Kevin Dean’s last day as executive director of Literacy Mid-South. He leaves behind a legacy of milestones he orchestrated for the nonprofit organization, which aims to provide literary resources to all backgrounds and ages.

50. The Week Ahead: June 13-19 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from decisions about ServiceMaster incentives to the ultimate dodgeball tournament.

51. Family Planning – Beyond the Diaper Fund -

Ray’s Take: So, you’re planning to start your family. Have you considered the finances involved beyond painting a room and knowing it’s going to take a lot of diapers? Three can certainly live as cheaply as two – as long as one of them doesn’t eat or wear clothes.

52. Latest 'High Gear' Book Maps Success for College Grads, Millennials -

The 21 million U.S. students enrolled in postsecondary schools grew up with technology and the hourly clock of life ticking ever faster. Yet this has not always translated into a generation of young people ready to attack a world that waits for no one.

53. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

54. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

55. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

56. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

57. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

58. Crocker Repairing Urban Child Institute’s Reputation, Reviving Mission -

As a vice president for Bank of America, Jill Crocker has witnessed the upheaval that can occur when one financial institution takes over another.

59. NAWBO’s Dixon Using Experience To Help Other Women in Business -

Dianne Dixon, president of the Memphis chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners, has spent her life and career earning a seat at the table for herself, and now she’s holding the door open for a new generation of women business owners.

60. Trust Fund Mentioned as Possible $1.1B Solution on School Benefits Liability -

A trust fund is one possibility that has surfaced early in the formal discussions of the Shelby County School system’s $1.1 billion benefits liability.

The first meeting of the ad hoc committee on the matter last week drew nine of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners, the administration of Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and two of nine Shelby County Schools board members.

61. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

62. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

63. University of Memphis Institutes Team Up for Biologistics Partnership -

Two research institutes at the University of Memphis – the FedEx Institute of Technology and the Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute – have teamed up to launch a biologistics partnership.

The FedEx institute is referring to partnerships like the new one around biologistics as “clusters,” research areas around which the institute wants to collect projects, research efforts and programming. It’s part of a push by the institute to try and put itself at the center of innovation in the city, according to Cody Behles, the institute’s manager of innovation and research support.

64. After First Meeting, Personality of New Council Emerges -

The judgments began early for the new Memphis City Council, which met for the first time Tuesday, Jan. 5, at City Hall.

State Sen. Lee Harris, on hand to be honored as a former city council member, called the group the “Kumbaya Council,” as it approved 13 appointees by Mayor Jim Strickland, 11 of them with unanimous votes.

65. Students Get Leadership Lessons With Sonima Tour -

Memphis-area students are getting a lesson in how to become tomorrow’s leaders with the Live Sonima Tour, a collaboration with the Sonima Foundation that allows young people to access the tools and inspiration necessary to become better students, leaders and individuals.

66. What’s Next? -

When Steven Baldwin started his freshman year at Austin Peay State University in 2012, he had a smart, carefully considered plan for his future.

67. What Business Leaders Can Learn From Improv Actors -

Take a moment to think of someone you know who is confident and fast to adapt in the moment, someone who routinely performs well under pressure and who has an uncanny ability to deftly counterbalance risks and rewards in an instant to make a smart decision.

68. Kelly, Berry Battle for Safety Spot in Legacy Showdown -

Todd Kelly Jr. concludes his first spring practice with Tennessee’s football team this week in a heated competition for a safety job.

69. Sea You in Three Months -

If someone approached you and suggested you try living in an underwater habitat the size of a college dorm for three months, would you do it?

Aquanauts Bruce Cantrell and Jessica Fain jumped at the chance and even ended up breaking a world record while they were at it.

70. Vols’ Dobbs Embraces the Role of ‘CEO Quarterback’ -

Joshua Dobbs enters his junior season as Tennessee’s undisputed No. 1 quarterback and team leader, the player most responsible for the Vols’ relevance again in SEC football.

71. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

72. Smart Play: NFL Player Chooses Brain Over Bank -

His feet were killing him. That’s why former Ole Miss linebacker Patrick Willis recently walked away from the NFL at age 30.

73. Fresh Off Medicaid Loss, Haslam Pivots to Common Core Fight -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Fresh off his failed effort to persuade fellow Republicans in the Legislature that he wasn't peddling "Obamacare," Gov. Bill Haslam is pivoting to another tough fight over what he describes as the ruined brand of Common Core education standards.

74. Murfreesboro, Nashville Players Get Jump on UT Careers -

KNOXVILLE – Jack Jones didn’t want to waste any time getting started with his football career at the University of Tennessee, so he graduated in December from Murfreesboro Oakland High School.

75. Pink Palace Secret -

The Memphis Pink Palace Museum’s 3-D digital theater opened this past March and its upgraded planetarium is to open in June.

And planning is already underway for a $4 million publicly and privately funded renovation and new exhibits in the pink marble mansion itself on Central Avenue that has been the heart of the museum since it was donated to the city in 1930.

76. Regions Launches Digital Financial Education Game -

Regions Bank has started the new year by adding something new to its collection of financial advice, guidance and educational materials for consumers.

77. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

78. NCAA Contenders Include the 'Little Guys' -

Every March they become the nation's darlings.

This year, a host of stalwarts aren't waiting nearly that long to establish themselves as contenders – either for their own, non-power conferences or possibly the Final Four after another round of realignment.

79. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

80. New Lawmakers Trace Likely Abortion Legislation -

The two newest state legislators from Shelby County say they hope to find ways to work across party lines and even with the Shelby County Commission and the Memphis City Council.

“We may not be in the majority, but there is a lot we can do,” said incoming state Sen. Sara Kyle, who will be one of five Democrats in the 33-member Senate when next year’s legislative session in Nashville begins.

81. Palazzolo Prepares to Lead Germantown -

Germantown Mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo was surprised that the mayor’s race became as hard-fought as it was.

But after beating former city division director George Brogdon last week, Palazzolo prepares to take the oath of office Dec. 15, assemble his administration and start work on a new economic development plan.

82. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

83. Goodpasture Celebrates 50th Anniversary -

Aijalon Carter, 15, still remembers her first day as a timid 3-year-old at Goodpasture Christian School. Crying and scared, she was greeted by Miss Jill, her new preschool teacher and immediately felt better.

84. NashvilleNext Planners Move to Next Step -

As the city shifts into fall, planners are gearing up for the final phase of NashvilleNext, a three-year long planning process that will have a major impact on growth and development patterns in Davidson County over the next 25 years.

85. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

86. Mason: Vanderbilt Success More Than Defeating UT -

Coach Derek Mason is determined to put his own mark of toughness on the Vanderbilt University football program as it continues its climb into the ranks of conference heavyweights.

87. Vanderbilt Students Find Happiness in Music City -

As the Class of 2018 begins to poke around the Vanderbilt University campus, the newest Commodores will be met with the highest of expectations.

“This class is projected to have the highest academic quality in our history as measured by high school class rank and SAT scores,’’ says Doug Christiansen, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions.

88. Start Co. Graduates Newest Batch of Startups -

This week’s Start Co. Demo Day, which brought together more than 500 people involved in the local ecosystem including entrepreneurs, mentors and investors, saw teams presenting their startup ideas in the hopes of securing funding and taking their concepts to the next level.

89. Brogdon Joins Race for Germantown Mayor -

With about a week left to the filing deadline for candidates, Germantown has a race for mayor.

George Brogdon, the recently retired director of community services for the city of Germantown, filed his petition Monday, Aug. 11, in the Nov. 4 election to succeed Sharon Goldsworthy as mayor of Germantown.

90. A Funder’s View of Sustainability -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

As the Mid-South’s philanthropic partner since 1969, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis is clearly here to stay. That’s why we are interested in initiatives that make our area more livable and connected right now and for future generations.

91. End of Windows XP Support Spells Trouble for Some -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and with an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger.

92. Breaking Through -

If it was just an abstraction or a mere theory, it wouldn’t have a definition in the dictionary or a website. It would simply be another urban myth.

But with a few keystrokes you can go right to www.glassceiling.com. And the dictionary definition of “glass ceiling” is tangible – “an unfair system or set of attitudes that prevents some people (such as women or people of a certain race) from getting the most powerful jobs.” In fact, you can almost see a woman stuck in middle management, briefcase in hand, staring up at that glass ceiling and wondering: Where do I find the ladder that gets me from here to there?

93. Council Committee Looks Broadly at Council Rules -

A trio of Memphis City Council members weighing possible changes to the council’s way of conducting business has more questions at the outset than answers about what kind of conduct is allowed and what shouldn’t be on the elected body.

94. Smith Finds Design Passion in Helping Communities -

When reflecting on why he chose to become an architect, Stewart Smith tells a story of his father who could draw and had an industrial design background.

95. Martin’s Program Keeps Girls Engaged in STEM Fields -

Girls Inc. is a national nonprofit providing girls ages 6-18 with after-school and summer programs, field trips and college tours.

96. Council Debates Restoring MATA Service -

A day before the board of the Memphis Area Transit Authority votes on significant cuts in bus and trolley service, the Memphis City Council will review $2.1 million in capital spending for the authority.

97. Rosen Donates Books to ‘Leverage Power of Library’ -

The CEO of New York-based Rosen Publishing Co. could have given away the 10,000 books he donated to the Memphis Public Library and Information Center last week any number of ways.

98. Perfect Harmony: MBA and MFA Mindsets -

Business needs to bridge two universes together: the scientific process taught in schools that offer a Master of Business Administration degree and the creative process taught in Master of Fine Arts degree programs.

99. School Board Considers Funding Shifts -

When countywide school board members begin considering changes Thursday, May 16, to the $1.18 billion budget proposal before them, there will be few easy choices.

First reactions and questions from school board members Tuesday at the first of three board sessions this week revolved around ways to shift funding in order to expand pre-kindergarten to more schools.

100. School Board Examines Budget Fine Print -

The funding gap for the still tentative schools merger stands at an even $35 million in new funding.

The new total came Tuesday, May 14, after interim schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson told countywide school board members he and his staff had eliminated a “district initiative department” that would have cost $737,366.