» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'REP Memphis' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:2
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

2. Speaker Harwell's Health Care Task Force Holds First Meeting -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Members of a health care task force assigned with proposing alternatives to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's Insure Tennessee plan on Tuesday stressed their desire to include "circuit breakers" to prevent out-of-control costs.

3. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

4. Legislature Votes to Reduce, Eventually Eliminate Hall Tax -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Legislature on Friday passed a measure that would reduce and eventually eliminate the Hall tax on investment income.

The Hall tax imposes a general levy of 6 percent on investment income, with some exceptions. Lawmakers agreed to reduce it down to 5 percent before eliminating it completely. They intend to pass future legislation reducing it by 1% each year before eliminating it completely by 2022.

5. This Week in Memphis History: April 22-28 -

2011: The Mississippi River at Memphis hits 48 feet on the river gauge on its way to the second-highest level ever recorded.

1995: Cranberries at the Mud Island amphitheater.

1990: U.S. District Judge Odell Horton rejects word from the jury in the bank fraud trial of U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Sr. that it is hopelessly deadlocked and sends them back for more deliberations. Horton is upset that the jury foreman also blurted out the vote count on the panel before Horton stopped him. Horton soon would declare a mistrial, citing problems with the jury that included a juror who slept beneath a table in the jury room during deliberations. The FBI also investigates the jury’s conduct but no charges are ever filed in connection with it.
Ford and his co-defendants would be tried a second time and acquitted of all charges.

6. City Council Approves Parkside Development -

The Memphis City Council has approved the concept of Parkside at Shelby Farms Park, a $200 million mixed-use development on the northern border of Shelby Farms Park.

7. The Opportunity of a Learning Lifetime -

The opportunity of a tuition-free community college education for every Tennessee high school graduate who wants it is one of our state’s boldest initiatives. That’s what the Tennessee Promise program represents.

8. Football Tigers Readying For Friday Nights Stripes -

The University of Memphis football team spring practice seasons culminates Friday, April 22, with Friday Night Stripes at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. The Tiger Lane Block Party will kick off the evening’s events, running from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

9. Most Political Hopefuls Follow Through in August Elections -

Shelby County election commissioners meet Tuesday, April 19, to set the ballot for the Aug. 4 state and federal primaries and county general elections.

Of 99 qualifying petitions for the ballot pulled in Shelby County, some by the same citizen pondering multiple races, 65 were filed by the April 7 qualifying deadline and four of those 65 petitions had been withdrawn by the April 14 withdrawal deadline.

10. No New ASD Schools Added in 2017-2018 School Year -

The state-run Achievement School District will not add any new schools in the 2017-2018 school year, Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Friday, April 15.

ASD leaders said the decision isn’t a moratorium, but an extension of the state department’s decision to allow teachers to not have TNReady achievement test scores from this year used in their evaluations.

11. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

12. Three Decades In, Africa in April Maintains Cultural Focus -

It was 30 years ago that David and Yvonne Acey answered a dilemma from an educators’ conference about levels of learning among African-American students compared to white students.

13. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

14. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

15. Last Word: Off and Running, Lawson Sticks and Downtown Office Space -

Now that you’ve had time to behold the large field of contenders in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District – all 13 – they are on the road campaigning on the way to the Aug. 4 election day.
And it’s quite a road with a lot of different scenery.
Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff is one of the seven contenders in the race from Shelby County. He hit the road Monday for three days of stops in each one of the 15 counties in the district.

16. Bill Seeks to Halt Gun Carry Permits for Ex-Police With DUIs -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State Rep. Curry Todd, a retired Memphis police officer who has pleaded guilty to drunken driving and gun charges, is speaking out against Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to keep retired law enforcement officers with DUI convictions from being able to carry firearms in public.

17. Greensward Controversy Shows Complex Mix of Groups -

No one from the Memphis Zoo or City Hall showed up for the Greensward box luncheon Saturday, April 9, despite the invitations sent out by Citizens to Preserve Overton Park.

CPOP leaders nevertheless gathered on the other side of the metal parking barrier in place on the Greensward for the second weekend. They dutifully stacked the box lunches and set a vase of flowers on another table near plastic cups and a glass pitcher of water.

18. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

19. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

20. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

21. Spence Wilson To Keynote Dunavant Awards May 11 -

Spence Wilson, chairman of the board of Kemmons Wilson Companies, is the keynote speaker for the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be held May 11 at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis.

22. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

23. Doctors Applaud End of Tennessee's Fetal Assault Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Brittany Hudson was pregnant, addicted to painkillers and afraid of a Tennessee law that calls for the arrest of mothers of drug-dependent babies. She eventually gave birth without medical help, on the side of a road in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains.

24. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

25. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

26. Juvenile Life-Sentence Bill Dies in Tennessee Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would have allowed juvenile offenders to have shorter life-in-prison sentences has died in the Tennessee Legislature.

Under Tennessee law, any person who is currently sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole must serve an automatic 51 years behind bars before being eligible to be paroled. The bill would have allowed juveniles who are tried as adults to become eligible for parole after serving 30 years. It would have applied to juveniles convicted of first-degree murder.

27. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

28. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

29. House Passes Haslam's Shakeup of Tennessee College Boards -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to remove four-year public universities from the Board of Regents system and give them their own boards won approval Thursday in the Tennessee House.

30. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

31. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

32. Last Word: Confirming The Spike, Methodist Changes and The Honorary Miamian -

Lots of Memphians spending the week in Nashville in the name of bringing down the de-annexation proposal that’s already cleared the state House and is residing for now in a state Senate committee.

33. Transgender Bathroom Bill Dies in Subcommittee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth has failed.

The bill died in a House Education Administration and Planning Committee meeting Tuesday that was packed with transgender youth who opposed the measure.

34. The Week Ahead: March 21-27 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first Great River Indoor Food Truck Festival to a celebration of late Memphis wrestler Sputnik Monroe.

35. Harris, Towns Hope to Delay Monday De-Annexation Vote -

Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature are hoping to delay a scheduled Monday, March 21, state Senate floor vote on a deannexation bill that cleared the state House a week ago.

“This train is moving very fast,” Democratic Sen. Lee Harris said Friday, March 18. “The city of Memphis has never made a significant presentation about the city of Memphis’ finances to the relevant committees or to the Senate members,” he added. “Minimally, we need to send this back to committee so that we can have some airing out of what the facts are and what the known consequences are. … Minimally, if you are going to devastate a city, you should know exactly what that means and what you are doing.”

36. Editorial: We Don’t Need Forgiveness For Past Annexations -

The normal bait and switch and head fake that is par for the course in Nashville is underway again.

That’s why we will dispense with the cautionary statements from the state Senate expressing doubts about the deannexation bill on its way to the upper chamber at press time.

37. Free Speech Bill Withdrawn After Islamic State Comments -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker on Thursday defended his comments that free speech rights on Tennessee college campuses should apply to everyone – even recruiters for the Islamic State group.

38. Bill Would Require Students to Use Bathroom of Birth Sex -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth is gaining momentum in the Tennessee legislature after passing in a House subcommittee.

39. Potential Revenue Loss Stirs Deannexation Options -

As a potentially damaging deannexation bill moves to the state Senate for a possible vote soon, city officials are considering options to combat the expected loss of revenue should the bill pass.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland estimates the state deannexation law could cost City Hall $27.7 million on the low end but as much as $80 million if all Memphis annexations dating back to 1998 were negated by voters in those areas.

40. Sparks Fly In Nashville Over Deannexation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s debate about a proposed deannexation law isn’t a case of Memphis against the rest of the state.

It’s a debate within the Shelby County legislative delegation and with a few exceptions, most of the critics of the measure that would allow referendums to undo annexations that are in some cases 18 years old are Memphis legislators.

41. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

42. Finances Will Be in Focus at City Council -

The list of financial surprises that Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presented to Memphis City Council members two weeks ago tops council discussions Tuesday, March 15.

43. This Week in Memphis History: March 11-17 -

2015: Formal groundbreaking for the Tanger Outlets development at I-55 and Church Road in Southaven, with an ambitious opening date of Nov. 19 for the start of the 2015 holiday shopping season.

44. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

45. Airport-Area Industrial Sells for $1.2 Million -

1525 Three Place, 3365-3378 One Place
Memphis, TN 38116

Sale Amount: $1.2 million

Buyer: Gregory Realty

Seller: One Place Associates

46. Director of Memphis VA Center Replaced, Relocated -

Diane Knight, director of the Memphis Veterans Administration Medical Center, was replaced Thursday, Feb. 25, and relocated to the Nashville VA.

47. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

48. Head of Memphis VA Center Replaced -

Diane Knight, director of the Memphis Veterans Administration Medical Center, was replaced Thursday, Feb. 25, and relocated to the Nashville VA.

49. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

50. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

51. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

52. Zika Virus Roundtable Planned for Monday -

Government and health care officials will gather in Memphis on Monday, Feb. 22, to discuss the Zika virus and other threats to infant health.

The roundtable discussion, which is part of U.S. Rep Steve Cohen’s “Building a Healthier Memphis” series, will feature representatives from Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Regional One Health, the Shelby County Health Department and the Tennessee Department of Health discussing strategies to protect expectant mothers from the Zika virus.

53. Cohen Urges Memphis Clinton Supporters To Speak No Ill of Sanders -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen told a group of 70 supporters of Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton that they should avoid attacking Bernie Sanders, her rival for the Democratic nomination.

54. Last Word: The Trade, Hardaway-Todd Grudge Match and Tomato Aspic -

Jeff Green leaves the Grizzlies for the Clippers and Lance Stephenson leaves the Clippers for the Grizzlies.
That was the trade at the NBA’s Thursday afternoon deadline that caused much of Thursday’s deadline buzz as well as lots of social media reaction.
Some of the reaction was tempered by the other part, a protected lottery pick for the Grizz as well.

55. Cohen Urges Clinton Supporters To Speak No Ill Of Sanders -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen told a group of 70 supporters of Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton that they should avoid attacking Bernie Sanders, her rival for the Democratic nomination.

56. Biden Praises Benefits of 2009 Stimulus Package at Rail Yard -

For 36 years Vice President Joe Biden was an Amtrak train commuter, traveling an estimated 2 million miles in his daily trips to Washington D.C. as a U.S. senator from Delaware.

So when he arrived at the Memphis Regional Intermodal Facility in Rossville Wednesday, Feb. 17, Biden’s photo-op with workers at the Norfolk Southern rail yard before his speech became a long walk to the podium.

57. Biden Touts Stimulus In Stop At Rossville Intermodal Facility -

Vice President Joe Biden came to the Norfolk Southern intermodal yard in Rossville Wednesday, Feb. 17, to tout the seven-year old economic stimulus act and push for continued public investment in roads as well as railways.

58. Clinton Rallies 700 in Whitehaven on Second Day of Early Voting -

Former President Bill Clinton rallied the Democratic base in Whitehaven Thursday, Feb. 11, with a standing room only speech of nearly an hour in the gymnasium of Whitehaven High School.

59. School Voucher Bill Stalls in House Amid Flagging Support -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A proposal to create a school voucher program stalled in the House on Thursday despite efforts to drum up support among wary rural lawmakers by limiting the areas of Tennessee where parents could receive state money to pay for private school tuition.

60. Roland Passes on 8th District Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

61. Tigers Win Game, Larger Story Remains the Same -

After a much-needed victory, the embattled Tigers head coach opened the door and walked into the media room for his post-game press conference. Seated in the first row and sporting a blue University of Memphis cap was U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, who offered up a grin and polite applause.

62. Resurrection Health Opens Frayser Center -

Resurrection Health is cutting the ribbon next week in Frayser on its fourth health center.

The location is 2574 Frayser Blvd. A ribbon cutting ceremony is set for Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 10 a.m., with keynote remarks from U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, and Dr. Jimmy Young, senior pastor at Grace Evangelical Church.

63. Resurrection Health Opens Frayser Center -

Resurrection Health is cutting the ribbon next week in Frayser on its fourth health center.

The location is 2574 Frayser Blvd. A ribbon cutting ceremony is set for Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 10 a.m., with keynote remarks from U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, and Dr. Jimmy Young, senior pastor at Grace Evangelical Church.

64. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

65. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

66. Contenders Emerge for Fincher’s Seat -

The line for the 8th Congressional District seat began forming within half an hour of incumbent Stephen Fincher’s announcement Monday, Feb. 1, that he would not seek re-election in the August primaries.

67. Council Probes Police Body Camera Delay -

Memphis City Council members talk Tuesday, Feb. 2, about when police body cameras might be ready for action.

And there will probably be questions at the 11 a.m. executive session about whether a limited test use of the cameras recorded any of last week’s fatal police shooting of Johnathan Bratcher in South Memphis.

68. Stephen Fincher Won't Seek Re-Election -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher announced Monday, Feb. 1, that he will not run for re-election in Tennessee’s 8th Congressional District.

The seventh-generation agribusiness leader from Frog Jump, Tenn., said in an email that he “never intended to become a career politician.”

69. New Superintendent Says ASD Not Monolithic -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District says critics of the district for the state’s lowest-performing schools don’t understand that the organization doesn’t operation conventionally.

70. Last Word: Groundhog Day's Long Shadow, Minority Percentage & The Value of Sports -

After the January into February weekend we had with its outbreak of spring fever, you might wonder if groundhogs are allowed to change their minds or if shadows that are the result of television lights count as a prediction on the winter’s length.
Or maybe it would be appropriate to have a weather map that includes the Groundhog Day immunity zones – areas where the long shadow of the groundhog does not venture.
Note to television meteorologists: This would in no way interfere with your right to declare large parts of your viewing areas as places of "potentially severe weather" far into the future. But you will need a different color for the Groundhog Immunity Zones.

71. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

72. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

73. Harris Passes On Challenging Cohen For House Seat -

A surprise January dalliance by Tennessee Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis with a challenge of U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the August primaries didn’t make it quite to the end of the month.

74. Last Word: Out of Time, Brian Collins and Fear of Heights & A Different No Gang Zone -

I have a confession. Hillary Clinton is not happy with me.
I’ve seen the signs in recent weeks but didn’t want to accept the truth.
Then Wednesday evening, as I was about to put this column together, I got an email from the former First Lady and Secretary of State and Democratic presidential contender.
The subject line cut to the chase: “We’re running out of time, Bill.”
The message itself, on a backdrop of Blue State blue read:

75. Last Word: A Turn Away From Mud Island, Capitol Hill Soap & Collierville Keeps FedEx -

Sometimes you get another story when you are pursuing a different story.

In this case, the quest was a simple one. Get a good basic idea of what the five companies interested in redeveloping Mud Island River Park are telling the Riverfront Development Corp. of their still-forming plans.
While going through the submissions, we had a talk with RDC president Benny Lendermon about the process and the interview moved pretty effortlessly into the Pyramid’s relationship to Mud Island.
It’s a natural follow-up given the history of past efforts to link up the two landmarks on different sides of the city harbor and the decidedly mixed results of those attempts. I might have been charitable there in describing the results as mixed.
That context led to a discussion about how the Pyramid is faring eight months into Bass Pro Shops' long-term lease in the reconfigured Pyramid.
When Lendermon said, “This probably isn’t a politically correct thing to say,” the interview turned topics and we followed it.
The result is, I think, at least something to consider and probably pretty provocative.
Judge for yourself.

76. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

77. HUD Funds Mid-South Greenprint With $60 Million Grant -

One of the largest federal grants ever awarded to Shelby County government will fund efforts to avoid some of the flooding the Memphis area saw in 2011.

The federal department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced Thursday, Jan. 21, the $60 million grant to fund the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan.

78. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

79. Black Caucus Demanding Change To Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Legislature’s Black Caucus, led by Memphis members, has its sights set squarely on the Achievement School District, either eliminating it or putting it on hold until major improvements are made.

80. Last Word: The View Across The Harbor, Crosstown Undercurrents and Bonnaroo -

The fishing puns are overpowering as Bass Pro Shops expresses its interest in redeveloping Mud Island River Park, on the other side of the city harbor from the Pyramid Bass Pro Shops opened at just this past May.
Bass Pro Shops is one of five companies to express interest in Mud Island as part of the process by the Riverfront Development Corporation to go a different way with the park.
The RDC released the names of the companies Thursday.
Earlier this month, we outlined the RVC Outdoor Destinations proposal.
We don’t know nearly as much about what Bass Pro Shops has in mind or the other three firms.
All five now head for what amounts to a second round in which they submit specific plans to a search committee of the RDC including how they will pay for their plans.

81. Cohen, Ford Pull Petitions For August Primaries -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has pulled a qualifying petition to run for another term in Congress starting with the Aug. 4 Democratic primary.

82. Luttrell, Strickland Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland both attended the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

83. Chancellor Steps Aside, Avoids Fight -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education didn’t take long to shake up the hierarchy.

It led to the early retirement of Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan, who blasted the proposal in a letter to the governor, before legislation even hit the printing press. The longtime state official said he would rather step down than support a plan he feels will be detrimental to colleges and universities.

84. Crime-Ridden, Neglected Apartments Come Under Fire -

Several Memphis apartment complexes with long records of neglect and crime issues are the targets of a renewed political and bureaucratic push to improve conditions.

The efforts are a new front in the recent city movement to tackle Memphis’ blight problem. And it’s a front that invites skepticism.

85. Last Word: SOTU React, OPEB Comeback and NFL Nostalgia -

The day after the last State of the Union address by President Barack Obama here's a breakdown of the reaction from our delegation to Washington.
Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen emphasized Obama's references to criminal justice reform.
"I know he is also committed to criminal justice reform and I hope my colleagues will work together to put meaningful reform on his desk," Cohen said.
Republican U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher tweeted, "We need a plan to keep America safe and make America strong. I did not hear that from the President tonight."
Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander: "If Pres. Obama focuses on what he agrees on with Congress instead of what we disagree on, there's quite a bit we could get done in 2016."
Republican U.S. Senator Bob Corker urged the "swift release" of U.S sailors being held overnight by Iran in a border dispute just before the speech.

86. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

87. Tennessee Lawmaker Facing Ouster Benefited From '2nd Chance' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When Republican members of the Tennessee House gather Tuesday to decide whether to oust embattled Rep. Jeremy Durham from his leadership post, it won't be the first time that two-term lawmaker has had to answer for questionable behavior.

88. Luttrell, Strickland To Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will both be attending the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

89. Candidates Already Gearing Up For August Elections -

The ballot for the March 1 Tennessee presidential primaries and county primaries for General Sessions Court Clerk was set while many voters were focused on the holidays and preparations for the new city leaders taking office in January.

90. Memphis Legislators Sound Off On State-Run School District -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

91. Harris Weighs Cohen Challenge -

Tennessee state Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris is considering a challenge of U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the August Democratic Congressional primary.

92. Lowery’s Prayer Breakfast Marks 22nd Year -

Myron Lowery is leaving the Memphis City Council as of New Year’s Day.

But the outgoing council chairman will still be hosting a New Year’s Day Prayer Breakfast Friday, Jan. 1, at 9 a.m. on his first day out of office in 24 years.

93. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

94. Lowery’s Prayer Breakfast Marks 25th Year -

Though Myron Lowery’s 24-year tenure on the Memphis City Council ended Dec. 31, he planned to start 2016 with a familiar tradition: his New Year’s Day Prayer Breakfast.

95. Strickland to Replace Memphis Animal Shelter Director -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland confirmed Tuesday, Dec. 29, that James Rogers will not be reappointed as director of the Memphis Animal Shelter.

96. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

97. ASD, I-Zone Competition Becoming Heated Debate -

Before winter break, Vanderbilt University released a study on achievement test results for students in the state-run Achievement Schools District and locally operated Innovation Zone schools, and the study has created a tipping point in an increasingly heated education debate.

98. School Choice Bills to Highlight Next Legislative Session -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Supporters of school choice say they plan to push for proposals that they argue allow parents to play a stronger role in how their children are educated in the legislative session that begins in January.

99. Norris: Gas Tax Proposal Not Happening in 2016 -

Don’t look for a gas tax hike in the 2016 session of the Tennessee legislature, says the state Senate majority leader.

“We’re not going to do a gas tax in 2016,” Rep. Mark Norris of Collierville said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We are going to have to address it soon enough and these conversations are very important.”

100. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.