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Editorial Results (free)

1. The Tipping Point -

Going to Harvard is a big deal no matter who you are. But going to Harvard when you’re a poor kid from Cameroon? That’s a home run. That’s what Gabriel Fotsing did. He grew up in Douala, moved to Houston and taught himself how to apply to college.

2. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

3. Focus On Qualities When Hiring Leaders -

If you know what you’re searching for, then look where you’re most likely to find it. That sounds too simple to be good advice, but it is.

When something is that simple, instead of just doing it, sometimes we want to complicate it, make it more difficult, or just plain mess it up by looking everywhere. I see it all the time when it comes to executive searches, especially those “national” ones.

4. Computer As Driver? 'Yes' From Feds Boosts Self-Driving Cars -

DETROIT (AP) — Computers that control cars of the future can be considered drivers just like humans, the federal government's highway safety agency has decided.

The redefinition of "driver" by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is an important break for Google, which is developing self-driving cars that get around without steering wheels, pedals — or even the need for a person to be inside.

5. Innovation: A Journey Of Discovery -

Innovation gets defined so many ways that it can be confusing. While there is a repeatable framework for creating new value, the iterative nature of front end discovery work can perplex those who believe that work should be linear.

6. Cannon Wright Blount Senior Tax Manager Answers Questions -

The busy time of the year is fast approaching for Dan Walker, senior tax manager with Cannon Wright Blount.

7. Ariel Hearn Goes Where No Tiger Has Gone Before -

Keith Lee owns the University of Memphis records for career points and rebounds. Yet he didn’t do this.

Andre Turner is the Tigers’ career assists leader. But he couldn’t pull this off.

8. Time Running Short as Tigers Host UConn and Cincinnati -

The Tigers have lost three of their last four games, including that “bad” home loss to East Carolina and a less-than-competitive effort at then-No. 13 SMU last Saturday.

So the University of Memphis isn’t exactly riding a wave of momentum into an important two-game homestand against American Athletic Conference foes Connecticut (8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 4) and Cincinnati (11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 6). Both games will air on ESPN2.

9. Airlines Restore Tiny Perks, Like Pretzels, to Pacify Fliers -

NEW YORK (AP) — After 15 years of near austerity, U.S. airlines are restoring some small perks for passengers crammed into coach.

Don't expect ample legroom or free checked bags. But fliers will find improved snacks, a larger selection of free movies and — on a few select routes — the return of free meals.

10. Planetarium Rings in New Era at Pink Palace -

When the AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium reopened to the public Saturday, Jan. 30, it was an important step in the transformation of the Pink Palace Family of Museums’ campus.

The museum, 3050 Central Ave., is undergoing a multi-year master plan that saw work begin in 2013. When complete in 2021, the property will be transformed with a completely renovated museum building and mansion to go along with other features.

11. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

12. History Lesson -

A HISTORY LESSON TAUGHT, NOT LEARNED.

When I first wrote about attempts to steamroll Overton Park, a friend told me a great story. He was in his parents’ living room one afternoon in the late ’60s listening to his father go on and on about the battle to keep I-40 out of Overton Park ... too late to stop it, who are these silly protestors anyway, yadda yadda ... when they turned on the local news.

13. Last Word: Out of Time, Brian Collins and Fear of Heights & A Different No Gang Zone -

I have a confession. Hillary Clinton is not happy with me.
I’ve seen the signs in recent weeks but didn’t want to accept the truth.
Then Wednesday evening, as I was about to put this column together, I got an email from the former First Lady and Secretary of State and Democratic presidential contender.
The subject line cut to the chase: “We’re running out of time, Bill.”
The message itself, on a backdrop of Blue State blue read:

14. Complex Path to Higher-Ed Reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

15. HUD Funds Mid-South Greenprint With $60 Million Grant -

One of the largest federal grants ever awarded to Shelby County government will fund efforts to avoid some of the flooding the Memphis area saw in 2011.

The federal department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced Thursday, Jan. 21, the $60 million grant to fund the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan.

16. Walmart Foundation Seeks Tennessee Grant Applicants -

The Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program is now accepting applications from Tennessee nonprofits with programs that focus on hunger relief, healthy eating or career opportunities. Grants through the program begin at $25,000 and can go up to $200,000.

17. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

18. Walmart Foundation Seeks Tennessee Grant Applicants -

The Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program is now accepting applications from Tennessee nonprofits with programs that focus on hunger relief, healthy eating or career opportunities. Grants through the program begin at $25,000 and can go up to $200,000.

19. Sledge Joins Paragon Private Banking Team -

Julia Sledge has joined Paragon Bank as portfolio manager in private banking. Sledge has more than 30 years of experience in the banking industry, holding leadership positions at both Union Planters Bank and Cadence Bank. In her new role, she’ll provide service and support to Paragon’s private banking team.

20. Peyton’s Post-Career Place? So Many Options -

At the age of 39 and after 18 seasons in the NFL, Peyton Manning is approaching a crossroads. What does the future hold for him? Here are the most likely possibilities:

Continue playing: Despite growing injury concerns (a torn plantar fascia in his left foot kept him out of six games this season), Manning might want to play at least one more season. He is on a team that has a strong defense so he no longer has to put up huge offensive numbers in order to win, unlike the situation during most of his pro career.

21. Chancellor Steps Aside, Avoids Fight -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education didn’t take long to shake up the hierarchy.

It led to the early retirement of Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan, who blasted the proposal in a letter to the governor, before legislation even hit the printing press. The longtime state official said he would rather step down than support a plan he feels will be detrimental to colleges and universities.

22. Innova’s Bouten Talks Growing Health Care Hub -

When Jan Bouten looks out his office window at 20 S. Dudley St., he can count no less than five medical institutions in his field of view.

23. Holistic Care Finally Finding Mainstream Acceptance -

Jean Wilhoite’s private practice as a holistic nurse in Knoxville is thriving even though she rarely actively advertises her services.

Clients often reach out to her when they’re at wit’s end because of chronic stress-related conditions. They find her by word of mouth or referral.

24. Fed's Bullard to Address Economic Club of Memphis -

Only a few weeks after the Federal Reserve decided to raise interest rates after keeping them near zero for years, a key Fed official will be in Memphis later this month to talk about the economy and what lies ahead.

25. Greensward Controversy Revived With New Year’s Eve Legal Opinion -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says a New Year’s Eve legal opinion on the use of the Overton Park greensward does not speak for his administration.

26. US Sues VW Over Emissions-Cheating Software in Diesel Cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department sued Volkswagen on Monday over emissions-cheating software found in nearly 600,000 vehicles sold in the United States.

The civil complaint against the German automaker, filed on behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency in U.S. District Court in Detroit, alleges the company illegally installed software designed to make its diesel engines pass federal emissions standards while undergoing laboratory testing. The vehicles then switched off those measures to boost performance in real-world driving conditions, resulting in greenhouse gas emissions up to 40 times greater than federal environmental standards.

27. Last Word: The River, The New Mayor and Explaining Boll Weevils -

Hello, 2016. What’s your hurry?

First things first – the Mississippi River at our doorstep is above flood stage. But the crest is now predicted to come Friday and will be just over 40 feet – lower than predicted last week.
We will be posting web stories on the forecasts and other announcement from the county’s Office of Preparedness each evening to work with their schedule for summarizing where we are.
Floods are a slower moving cause for concern because we know what is happening upriver from us where the river is narrower. But this is also the Mississippi River, which is the definition of unpredictable.

28. Last Word: Out With the Old, In With The River -

We end 2015 with an eye on the Mississippi River as the city marks the New Year with three major New Year’s Eve outdoor celebrations – one on Beale Street, another in the newly-awakened Overton Square and yet another in the Broad Avenue Arts District.
Two come with lots of memories of past New Year’s eves – with soon-to-be memories.
Overton Square’s comeback as a theater district has been a big story of the last two years.
But Beale Street at the end of 2015 is an institution that has also seen a lot of change in the last year with the move to a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority at year’s end.
Broad is a different story with a different context. The context is a diversified Memphis whose crowd is likely to be at least slightly more local than the mix in Overton Square and on Beale Street.
It's example could very well show us the path to a New Year's eve with public celebrations from Whitehaven to Frayser.

29. iBank Tower Sells for $19.2 Million -

The iBank Tower, located at 5050 Poplar Ave., has sold for $19.2 million, and for the first time, the same owner controls both the iBank Tower and the nearby Clark Tower at 5100 Poplar Ave.

30. New Year, New You -

Happy New Year! With the holiday season coming to a close, 2016 is upon us. It’s such an exciting time, full of hopes and dreams for the future. One of the first things we often do is create resolutions for the upcoming year.

31. Corefire App Could Bring Real Change to Memphis -

The numbers are startling: Only 43 percent of African-American males in Memphis graduate from high school, and the city’s poverty rate for families with children younger than 18 is 44.3 percent, double the national average.

32. Last Word: Recovery in North Mississippi, Opera in 2016 and Uptown North of Chelsea -

It’s been a holiday season of challenged hopes and muted emotions in our corner of the world.
The beginning of the series of storms and tornadoes they spawned killed eight people in North Mississippi where recovery is still a fact of life in this last week of 2015.
This will be a week of funerals and damage assessments for federal disaster aid throughout our region.
And you will hear more stories of escapes and new beginnings after losing everything of any material value.
But even in our spared city, our thoughts will return instinctively to the young lives taken so suddenly and so close to the family gatherings in which our youngest give so much more in the way of hope than they will realize at this tender age.

33. US Economy Grew at 2 Pct. Rate Over Summer; A Pickup Is Seen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a slightly slower pace over the summer than the government had previously estimated. Most economists foresee a slight acceleration in the current quarter and stronger growth in the first half of 2016.

34. Last Word: More Medical Expansions, Norris & Harris and Christmas In Hell's Kitchen -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

35. Sheffield, College Initiative Students Get Help on Path to Higher Ed -

Torisha Williams was an elementary school educator for six years. So when she began her position in August as a counselor at Sheffield High School, she brought some grade-school culture to the job of helping her students find a way to college.

36. Don’t Look for Peyton Manning to Rescue This Struggling Franchise -

With Tennessee Vols legend Peyton Manning likely in his final season as an NFL player, there has been speculation that he will be pursued by the Titans for a front-office position with the organization.

37. Departing City Council Members Remembered at Last Session -

Before the Memphis City Council’s final session of 2015 on Tuesday, Dec. 15, the 13 council members got around to something they should have done four years ago: take a group picture in the Hall of Mayors at City Hall.

38. Sister Pact Aims to Raise Breast Cancer Awareness for Black Women -

Debra Melton did just about the best thing a young African-American woman in Memphis – or anywhere – can do in the fight against breast cancer.

39. As Rate Hike Nears, Fed's Hints on Future to be Scrutinized -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not about what it will do. It's about what it will say.

The worst-kept secret in the financial world is that the Federal Reserve is all but sure Wednesday to raise interest rates from record lows by a modest quarter point.

40. No Bids Submitted in Haslam's Parks Privatization Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's effort to outsource hospitality operations at 11 state parks has failed to draw any interest from private vendors.

Haslam has long cited the operation of park services like restaurants, golf courses, inns and marinas as prime examples of areas where private vendors could do a better — and cheaper — job than state government.

41. AutoZone Liberty Bowl Brings Snyder, Bielema Back Together -

In their last game of the regular season, the Kansas State Wildcats were sitting on five wins and down 10 points at halftime. They rallied to defeat West Virginia 24-23.

And all it took was the usual 97-yard kick return for a touchdown, courtesy of senior Morgan Burns.

42. Stewart File To Go Public No Later Than Next Week -

District Attorney General Amy Weirich is preparing to make public the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation file on the fatal police shooting of Darrius Stewart no later than Tuesday, Dec. 15. And the file will include videos.

43. Autonomy Comes With Risk for State’s Universities -

Tennessee officials are lauding Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education in an effort to meet his goals for the Drive to 55.

The FOCUS Act proposed recently by the Republican governor to make sure 55 percent of Tennesseans hold a degree or postsecondary certificate by 2025 promises to launch a new era for the state’s colleges and universities.

44. Wharton Touts Memphis’ Emergence in Exit Interview -

He didn’t win re-election, but A C Wharton says he did change the city’s politics in his six years as mayor.

“It would be the epitome of naivete to say that there are not some folks who still try to thrive politically on dividing us. I guess that will always be,” Mayor Wharton said in a Tuesday, Dec. 8, exit interview with The Daily News. “But by and large, I am convinced that most people are set on saying, ‘Let’s get along.’ It’s tough enough out there with us working together. Imagine what it will look like if we don’t. … I believe we are on our way.”

45. Expand Sales Team Reach Without Headcount -

This column is the fourth in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Check back for the remainder of the series and a deep dive into each of these trends.

There is perhaps no shorter path to increased sales than shortening the sales cycle or improving your close ratio with prospects already interested in your brand. Recent tech advancements offer marketers a host of marketing automation tools that can do this heavy lifting for you.

46. Central Station Lease Approved, Clearing Path to Redevelopment -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Dec. 1, the 99-year lease of Central Station by private developers from the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The group plans to develop the property – including the train station – into a mixed-use project to include a movie theater, expanded market place, apartments and a hotel.

47. Central Station Lease Approved, Clearing Path to Redevelopment -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Dec. 1, the 99-year lease of Central Station by private developers from the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The group plans to develop the property – including the train station – into a mixed-use project to include a movie theater, expanded market place, apartments and a hotel.

48. Central Station Lease Approved, Clearing Path to Redevelopment -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Dec. 1, the 99-year lease of Central Station by private developers from the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The group plans to develop the property – including the train station – into a mixed-use project to include a movie theater, expanded market place, apartments and a hotel.

49. Yellen Confident in Economy Ahead of Expected Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Wednesday indicated that the U.S. economy is on track for an interest rate hike this month, but she said the Fed will need to review incoming data before making a final decision.

50. Juvenile Court Reforms Changing System Slowly, Leaders Say -

Two years into reforms of the local juvenile justice system, three leaders in those reforms say there has to be more contact with teenagers before and after they go through Juvenile Court.

And those leaders warn against a reliance on programs once a child is in custody as a total solution to juvenile crime.

51. AP Interview: Coke Exec on 'Adversarial' Ties With Critics -

NEW YORK (AP) — Coke says it wants to mend relations with critics of its sugary drinks.

Sandy Douglas, president of Coke North America, said in an interview with The Associated Press that Coke is hoping to change its "adversarial" relationship with public health advocates.

52. The Key to Success is Innovation -

“Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around for a while, you could miss it.” – Ferris Bueller

If you’ve ever seen Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, you know that this quote sums up Ferris’ outlook on life. And he’s not wrong. Slowing down, taking a breath and taking a break will help stave off burnout – and it’s more enjoyable, too. But how does this apply to business? Balance is important, but it’s also essential to use “slowdown” time to take a bird’s eye view of your company so you don’t miss the next big thing.

53. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

54. Hoops & Dreams -

They were but a few words, yet they seemed to capture the mindset of the University of Memphis basketball program’s high-expectation fan base.

“Get back to like it was,” said former Tigers guard Jeremy Hunt.

55. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

56. Below the Waterline -

As of the end of October, the S&P 500 index had gained 2.59%. Unfortunately, for diversified investors, there is more to the story. The S&P 500 is a market capitalization weighted index, meaning the largest of the 500 companies have the largest influence over index performance.

57. FDA Clears First New Tobacco Products Under Federal Pathway -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the first new tobacco products for the U.S. market, under a system authorized more than 5 years ago.

The agency on Tuesday cleared the sale of eight varieties of snus, or teabag-like pouches of loose tobacco, from Swedish Match. Snus are popular in Scandinavian countries and are a growing part of the U.S. smokeless tobacco market.

58. Crosstown Developer: Complicated Projects Can Be Transformative -

The Memphis-area commercial real estate market continues to trend upward, industry leaders say. All asset classes are trending toward pre-Recession levels, and Memphis is taking on more complicated projects like the Crosstown Concourse redevelopment.

59. Strategic Foresight For Key Projects -

Here are notes from the back end of Innovation conference 2015, in San Jose, California. These tips come from a workshop led by Tamara Carleton, Innovation Leadership Board LLC.

60. Caissa Public Strategy Works Behind The Scenes for Clients -

The word public, by its definition, seems to say out in the open.

For Caissa Public Strategy, that’s not how it works. In fact, the Memphis-based firm likes to work in the shadows, so to speak, where the agency helps its clients grow and protect reputations.

61. Client Compassion Drives Clay & Land’s Cook -

Kathryn Cook finds her profession rewarding. But building a successful career in an industry that doesn’t have many female producers hasn’t been easy, particularly for the single mother of a special-needs child.

62. Long-Awaited Artesian Opens on Riverside -

Despite being unfinished and empty for six years, the 16-story building at the corner of Riverside and Channel 3 drives has remained a landmark in the Downtown skyline.

And finally, the lights are coming on.

63. New Website for Memphis Workforce Alliance -

The Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce has launched a new website, gmacw.com.

The site will function as a resource for employers to connect with skilled workers and for workers to find training programs. It also will keep the public up to date with the GMAC Workforce’s impact.

64. Music Legacy -

When Barbara Newman took over as president and CEO of The Blues Foundation, it was her first job in the music industry.

65. Editorial: Connect Cooper-Young to Keep Midtown Momentum Going -

If you went to the Cooper-Young Festival a decade ago and compared it to what you saw this year, you would notice a difference.

And it would be more than just the size of the crowd.

You’d see different businesses, a different mix of restaurants and retail – and those would be just the immediately apparent changes.

66. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

67. Groups Want More Memphians to Discover River’s Front Yard -

Once upon a time it was called the “promenade.” In 1828, two years after the city of Memphis was incorporated, the city’s founders and their successors put it in writing.

The statement – signed by the men who owned 5,000 acres where the Wolf and Mississippi rivers meet – read: “In relation to the piece of ground laid off and called the Promenade, said proprietors say that it was their original intention, is now and forever will be that the same should be public ground for use only as the word imports.”

68. For 1st Time, MIT's Free Online Classes Can Lead to Degree -

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has offered free online courses for the last four years with one major downside: They didn't count toward a degree. That's about to change.

69. Haslam: Long-term Plan Needed for Road Project Backlog -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Tuesday that a long-term revenue plan is needed to address Tennessee's growing list of unfunded road projects, and that one-time money won't fix the problem.

70. Raleigh’s Kennedy Park is ‘the Heart’ of Wolf River Greenway -

Charles Flink, the design consultant for the Wolf River Greenway, calls it “a season of construction” – seven segments of the 20-mile Wolf River Greenway in Shelby County are wrapping up their design work and set to begin a three-year construction phase.

71. Good Shepherd Health in Memphis Charts Different Pharmacy Path With New Model -

It quickly becomes apparent that Dr. Philip Baker, a pharmacist and founder of Good Shepherd Health in Memphis, runs a different kind of pharmacy operation out of his base in the Hickory Ridge Mall when he rattles off figures like this one.

72. Cossitt Library’s October Events Designed to Activate Riverfront -

Far from Tiger Lane, University of Memphis football fans will have a new place to tailgate Friday, Oct. 2, as the Tigers play the University of Southern Florida in Tampa.

It’s also the kickoff of a month of events to call attention to one of the best views of the Mississippi River on what was once known as the “promenade.”

73. ‘Set It and Forget It’ Investing -

Ray’s Take: Creating a retirement plan is a very personal thing because no one but you knows what you want for your future. But a plan is a must-have for everyone, and there are numerous ways to create a retirement plan as individual as you are.

74. Editorial: Memphis’ Direction and Your Choices for Mayor -

Fhe Oct. 8 Memphis mayor’s race is about where the city is and where it is going.

A C Wharton’s six-year mayoral tenure has been a mixed bag. There's been a genuine effort to change the nature of local government but also a wandering focus in which slogans are a kind of political fodder.

75. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

76. Mathes Takes Helm at Community Legal Center -

Longtime attorney Anne Mathes has been named executive director of the nonprofit Community Legal Center, which has been providing civil legal services to lower-income Memphians for more than 20 years. In addition to civil cases and divorces, the CLC collaborates with other agencies to serve victims of domestic violence and elder abuse. They also take some immigration cases.

77. Roland Claims Shelby County Commission Chairmanship -

After Terry Roland took the chairman’s seat at the Monday, Sept. 14, Shelby County Commission meeting, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell congratulated him and pledged to work with him.

78. Small-Business Tips: Research, Network and Have Cash -

Small business ideas – dreams, if you will – take time. To create, to develop, to implement and to sustain.

Until recently, Jennifer McCullough’s entrepreneurial dream was just starting to heat up. She had not yet become the successful seafood brand now known as Chef Jenn that spans 18 products in about 1,200 mostly Kroger and Wal-Mart stores.

79. Editorial: Small Business is Big in Importance, Impact -

No one considers the business they create to be a small business. Listen to the stories of their struggles, triumphs and ambition and you will quickly realize success is a big commitment – one that requires more than a bit of fair-weather persistence.

80. Family Force -

Pugh’s Flowers came first. Landscaping as Pugh’s Earthworks and then Lickety Split Couriers followed. And now the latest venture – Rosie’s Pest Control – has become its own entity.

81. ‘Bigger Than Ballet’ -

As a child growing up in Frayser with an unstable home life, Briana Brown latched on to dance classes at the New Ballet Ensemble & School as a source of stability.

Sitting at her University of Memphis dorm surrounded by psychology textbooks, she is ready to leap into the path built on 11 years of educational and professional development provided by her support system at New Ballet Ensemble.

82. Shelby County Schools Files Suit Over State Education Funding -

Shelby County Schools leaders announced Monday, Aug. 31, that the system has filed its own lawsuit against Tennessee state government over public education funding.

The school system filed its lawsuit Monday in Davidson County Chancery Court in Nashville.

83. ‘Chef Jenn’ To Serve Up Small-Biz Tips -

Her brand name, “Chef Jenn,” suggests she is running a restaurant. So does her background.

Jennifer McCullough not only graduated from the University of Texas with a bachelor’s degree and the University of Colorado Denver with a Master of Arts, but also from the Culinary School of the Rockies. And sure enough, the Memphis native worked three months in a fancy French restaurant in Denver – and she hated it.

84. Shelby County Budget Summit Call Begins With Different Priorities -

Shelby County government’s financial needs have changed in the nearly two months since the new fiscal year began.

And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county trustee David Lenoir to explore the new budget realities.

85. Budget Report Sees Shrinking Deficits, But Only For Now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unforeseen flood of revenue is shrinking federal deficits to the lowest level of President Barack Obama's tenure, Congress' nonpartisan budget adviser said Tuesday. But in a report that will fuel both parties in their autumn clash over spending, the analysts also warned that perilously high shortfalls will roar back unless lawmakers act.

86. Luttrell Calls For County Budget Summit In Economic Growth Climate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county Trustee David Lenoir to look at new budget realities.

87. Confederate Parks Renaming Court Ruling Charts Path of Controversy -

The Tennessee Court of Appeals concluded last week that the city of Memphis was involved in the placement of a concrete marker in what used to be Forrest Park that set off an ongoing chain of events.

88. Editorial: The Triumphant Return of Tigers Football -

Fifty years after the University of Memphis’ first season at the Liberty Bowl, and 52 years since the 1963 undefeated season, the annual return of Tigers football feels triumphant.

Maybe you don’t completely trust the tide from last year’s winning season – the first since 2007, the first conference championship since 1971 and the first bowl appearance since 2008. Your head tells you to assert your confidence in Tigers football. But in your heart, it feels like this may be at the expense of Tigers basketball.

89. Alabama Still Team to Beat, Tennessee On the Rise in 2015 Football Season -

Dak Prescott, the best returning quarterback in the Southeastern Conference, isn’t buying the national narrative that the league is “down” because the first College Football Playoff title game featured Ohio State beating Oregon.

90. Armstrong Finds Voice In Volatile Times -

Four years ago, when Toney Armstrong became the youngest Memphis Police director from the ranks since the position was created in the 1970s, critics were quick to point out that the one-time homicide detective had a lot to learn about the job’s public face.

91. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

92. Redbirds Manager Shildt Understands the Job -

The best part of being a Triple-A manager is obvious: You get to tell players they are going up to the major leagues.

First-year Redbirds skipper Mike Shildt has had the privilege of doing that many times this season. He says it’s never sweeter than telling a player, for the first time, that he’s going up to the St. Louis Cardinals.

93. Haunted History, A Story Retold -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story – one I shared first in a 2013 column – it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary.

94. Departing Thoughts from Asia -

This entry will be my last submission penned while living in Asia, so rather than discuss the market’s recent wiggles, I thought I would share some top of mind takeaways as I prepare to depart Hong Kong.

95. Tax Revenue Reopens Budget Wounds -

The largest portion of $22 million in extra tax revenue collected by Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will go to local public education, county commissioners said Monday, July 27.

96. Memphis Sole -

The football field measurements are perhaps inevitable in describing just how big Nike’s Northridge distribution center in Frayser is after its $301 million expansion.

The 2.8 million-square-foot facility – the equivalent of 49 football fields – is Nike Inc.’s largest distribution center in the world.

97. Social Security Disability Fund Projected to Run Dry in 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The 11 million people who receive Social Security disability face steep benefit cuts next year — unless Congress acts, the government said Wednesday.

The trustees that oversee Social Security said the disability trust fund will run out of money in late 2016, right in the middle of a presidential campaign. That would trigger an automatic 19 percent cut in benefits.

98. Televised Memphis Mayoral Forum Set for September -

There could be a lot of candidates for Memphis Mayor in the Oct. 8 city elections. And much of the attention in the run up to active campaigning has focused on the field’s size.

But as campaigning begins the focus will shift to issues at play in the mayor’s race, from the city’s path to economic growth and the efficiency and fiscal health of city government to the perennial issues of crime and blight.

99. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

100. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.