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Editorial Results (free)

1. Former Cheerleader Turns Hobby Into Career -

Growing up in southern Florida, Nicole Lauchaire had a passion for school spirit early on and loved being a part of her school cheerleading team. Her summers were spent at cheer camp, and while the energy was palpable there, she never imagined she’d be able to turn it into a full-time career – especially since she admits with a laugh that her high school team wasn’t one of the top competing teams.

2. A Better Ride -

The final phase of construction on the innovative Hampline will begin this summer, with a goal of completion by the end of the year. The protected bike path completes the missing link in the Greenline between Overton Park and Tillman Street, and has been an ongoing project since 2010.

3. Last Word: The Bus to Shelby Farms, Sports Gaming In Tunica and Tom Lee's Story -

It hasn’t been this hot in 30 years … to the day. The high Monday of 93 degrees eclipsed the old record for the day of 91 degree in 1988. I’m not much of a thermometer watcher. But this did get my attention because I was imagining all of the big hair emergencies 30 years ago. Guys going to their closets to break out the Miami Vice pastel t-shirts and linen blazers. And of course California Raisins hysteria. And I do find it not entirely coincidental that we break a record from 1988 as there is talk of a remake of the movie “Willow.” We could break another record for all of this Tuesday and we’ll see what my mind does with the year of the old record if that’s the case.

4. Postal Service: More Financial Loss as Mail Delivery Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service reported another quarterly loss on Friday after an unrelenting drop in mail volume and costs of its health care and pension obligations outweighed strong gains in package deliveries.

5. AOC Sees Growth Potential In Sale to Investment Firm -

The Alpha Corp. has signed a definitive agreement with CVC Capital Partners Fund VI to be acquired, pending customary regulatory approvals.

6. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

7. AOC Sees Growth Potential In Sale to Investment Firm -

The Alpha Corp. has signed a definitive agreement with CVC Capital Partners Fund VI to be acquired, pending customary regulatory approvals.

8. New County Leaders Face Big Funding Decisions -

The new Shelby County mayor and County Commission elected in August will have some major budget decisions to make once they take office Sept. 1, including a new Regional One Health Center building that could cost more to build than the $250 million FedExForum and a permanent source of county funding for the universal prekindergarten effort.

9. Google Showcases AI Advances at its Big Conference -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) – Google put the spotlight on its artificial intelligence smarts at its annual developers conference Tuesday, where it announced new features and services imbued with machine learning.

10. Trump Announces US Will Exit Nuclear Accord With Iran -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump announced Tuesday the U.S. will pull out of the landmark nuclear accord with Iran, declaring he was making the world safer but dealing a profound blow to allies and deepening the president's isolation on the world stage.

11. Last Word: Making Memphis Easier, Strickland on Graceland and Construction Jobs -

Some of the BSMF reviews in from this past weekend are thumbs up for the way Memphis In May has ramped up what you might call its infrastructure around Uber, Lyft and little items like muddy boots for the increasing number of Memphians and visitors who are ready to go no matter what the weather is doing. And they may opt for some other way into Downtown beyond driving a car and finding a parking place and walking, especially when there’s a drop off at the northern end of the music festival. Even a fire hydrant water flow to take the mud off your boots. We can make Memphis easier with less effort than we think at the outset.

12. No Easy Path Forward for Fred’s -

Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. operates 584 company-owned stores that each stock more than 14,000 items and saw average sales of more than $3 million in 2017.

That’s one picture of the company, laid out in Fred’s just-released annual report. Another picture, though, can be found in Fred’s dismal financial performance of late – and in the fact that Wall Street has basically lost faith in the company’s prospects, which led to the price of Fred’s shares sinking 60 percent since January.

13. Just Right: Fed Official Says US Living 'Goldilocks' Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With steady growth, low unemployment and tame inflation, the U.S. is experiencing a "Goldilocks" economy: Not too hot. Not too cold. But just right.

So says a top Federal Reserve official, who on Friday suggested that the unemployment rate could fall further to 3.5 percent with inflation modestly overshooting the Fed's target for a time without raising concerns.

14. 2nd-Longest US Expansion on Record Keeps Churning Out Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy has delivered steady if only modest gains for most Americans since the Great Recession ended in 2009. It's been a frustration for many.

Yet the very sluggishness of the economic expansion helps explain why it's now the second-longest on record and why more of the country might soon benefit from higher pay.

15. Local Schools Awarded Grants For Educational Food Gardens -

Tennessee Sen. Mark Norris joined United Health Foundation and Whole Kids Foundation at a kickoff event Wednesday, May 2, at Nexus STEM Academy in Memphis to announce grants totaling $81,000 to 39 Tennessee schools and youth organizations to build or expand existing vegetable gardens, salad bars or beehives, and provide educational resources about agriculture, caring for the environment and maintaining healthy lifestyles.

16. MLK-Inspired -

What today is known as the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis was born out of the city’s fallout from the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike and Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination on April 4, 1968.

17. Fed is Set to Leave Rates Alone But to Hike Later in Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is all but sure to leave interest rates unchanged this week, though steady economic growth and inflation pressures will likely keep the Fed on a path toward further rate hikes later this year.

18. Applications Open For MLK50 Grants -

The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis has unveiled MLK50: The Next Step Forward grant program. The foundation will fund organizations building on Dr. King’s platform to create real and systemic change, focused on six pillars: poverty, better jobs/higher wages, decent housing, quality education, justice and peace.

19. Richards Focused on Customers and Employees -

Chris Richards knows the value of a chance encounter.

As a 20-year-old sophomore at the University of Iowa, Richards traveled with her college roommate to Memphis, intending to stay for the summer and explore a new city.

20. Amanda Dunham Talks Changes At East Memphis’ Grove Grill -

Twenty years after The Grove Grill opened in Laurelwood Shopping Center, the restaurant is reinventing itself with modernized decor and the recently launched Third Thursday monthly tasting series. Helping drive the changes are chef Chip Dunham – the son of Grove Grill owners Jeff and Tracey Dunham – and his wife, beverage director Amanda Dunham, who both joined the restaurant after moving to Memphis last July.

21. Trump Convenes Task Force to Study US Postal Service -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After weeks of railing against online shopping giant Amazon, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday creating a task force to study the United States Postal Service.

22. The Week Ahead: April 16-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s time for Africa in April, which in the minds of many Memphians, is the seasonal kick-off for festivals. The annual Southern Hot Wing Festival comes this weekend on Tiger Lane, so get ready for good times to replace that winter weather. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

23. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

24. City Makes Changes in Approving Final Zoo Parking Plan In Overton Park -

The final design for the expansion of Memphis Zoo parking will move the entrance to zoo parking further north of where the tentative design earlier this year put it. And the final plan announced Thursday, April 12, by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will move 37 parking spaces on the north side of the Prentiss Drive entrance off McLean and create a 3-foot-high berm that eliminates any pedestrian walkway entrances between the zoo parking and the Overton Park Greensward.

25. Fed in March Discussed 'Slightly Steeper' Future Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials signaled rising confidence last month that a strong economy will lift inflation closer to its 2 percent target and that they may accelerate the Fed's pace of interest rate hikes as a result.

26. Powell Says Fed Expects to Stick With Gradual Rate Hikes -

CHICAGO (AP) – Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Friday painted a mostly sunny view of the U.S. economy and said the Fed remains committed to raising its key interest rate gradually unless events change. He said it was too soon to determine how a trade fight with China could affect the U.S. economy.

27. Study: Flood Control Engineering Likely Has Worsened Floods -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Flood control work in the Mississippi River and its tributaries has likely made floods worse in Mississippi and Louisiana, researchers say.

Using 500 years of data from tree rings and from sediment in oxbow lakes – bends that once were part of the Mississippi River but became lakes when the river changed its path slightly – they say the river has flooded more often and poured more water into those states over the past 150 years than any previous period.

28. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

29. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

30. Last Word: MLK 50 Arrives, Heritage Trail and Medical Marijuana's Comeback -

This will be a big week in the national spotlight for the city. But whenever someone with a megaphone like a newspaper or a television station says that in Memphis there is something that happens that gives me pause and I think gives a lot of other Memphians pause. Some of us start to open the floodgates of our long-held need to please at all costs.

31. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Infrastructure Investment? -

Is investment in public infrastructure important? And should Tennessee have more dedicated revenue sources to pay for construction and maintenance of infrastructure across the state, or is the existing tax structure – primarily the state tax on fuel, and wheel taxes – sufficient to pay for what Tennessee needs to sustain and grow its economy?

32. Serving Seniors -

Memphis Jewish Home and Rehab broke ground last month on a $7.5 million rehab wing. The addition will include 16 private treatment rooms, a new dining area, an aqua therapy pool, an indoor walking path and space for more exercise equipment.

33. Plan to Expand Pre-K Would Leverage Private Funds -

After voters defeated two ballot questions in two years for sales tax increases – city and county – to fund an expansion of prekindergarten classrooms primarily in Memphis, the effort is back with a momentum that seemed unlikely five years ago.

34. Fed Raises Key Rate, Foresees 2 More Hikes This Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is raising its key interest rate and signaling confidence in the U.S. economy's durability but plans to continue a gradual approach to rate hikes for 2018 under its new chairman, Jerome Powell.

35. Starting a Digital Marketing Career -

Digital marketing is a hot field. It has been hot for more than 10 years. I rarely share much about how to move into the field of digital marketing. However, I get many questions about it because a large part of my career was spent as a digital marketer.

36. The Right Note -

The IRIS Orchestra is trying something new for its just-announced 2018-19 concert season. As the resident orchestra of the Germantown Performing Arts Center, the IRIS Orchestra’s normal Saturday evening concerts will continue to be held at GPAC, with a new start time of 7:30 p.m.

37. Dean: ‘It’s Kind of Our Turn’ in Governor’s Race -

Democratic contender for governor Karl Dean is pushing hard the idea that Democrats can win one of the two statewide races on the Tennessee ballot this year.

38. LL Bean: No Bonus After Tough Year, More Jobs to Be Cut -

FREEPORT, Maine (AP) – L.L. Bean's sales dipped slightly over the past year, forcing the elimination of worker bonuses for the first time since 2008, but the CEO told workers on Friday that changes adopted in recent months are putting the company on a "path to a more prosperous future."

39. Children’s Museum Names New Executive Director -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis has announced the appointment of Stephanie Butler as its new executive director.

Butler will direct all facets of the museum, including education, community relations, operations and development. This will encompass raising funds for the museum’s recent expansion, which includes the restored Memphis Grand Carousel.

40. Children’s Museum Names New Executive Director -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis has announced the appointment of Stephanie Butler as its new executive director.

41. Smart Travel Planning -

Ray’s Take: It’s been a long, cold, rainy winter here in the Bluff City, and everyone is looking forward to Spring Break, sunshine, warmer weather and possibly making plans for a summer vacation.

42. Trump Picks Camera-Proven Kudlow as Top Economic Aide -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has chosen Larry Kudlow to be his top economic aide, elevating the influence of a long-time fixture on the CNBC business news network who previously served in the Reagan administration and has emerged as a leading evangelist for tax cuts and a smaller government.

43. No Luck Investing -

Ray’s Take: A rabbit’s foot on a string. A silver dollar. A four-leaf clover. A lucky penny. These are all lyrics from a 1961 song by our very own Memphis legend, Elvis Presley, titled “Good Luck Charm.”

44. Finding God In the Midst Of Cancer -

Anthony Maranise walked into my office to take over my job that day. He was 8 years old and had been battling cancer for the past three years of his young life. He carried an attaché case almost half his size and had a smile as wide as his face.

45. Monuments Bill Would Establish Felony Charge for Some Votes -

NASHVILLE – A state legislator is set to seek the attorney general’s advice on legislation enabling the state to charge local elected officials with a felony for “knowingly” casting votes in conflict with state law.

46. What’s Best for State, Education or Punishment? -

Carlos Reyes, a graduate of Murfreesboro Oakland High School’s Class of 2017, would be in his second semester at MTSU majoring in business administration – if he could afford it.

47. AgLaunch Finds Traction In Intersection of Startups, Investors and Farmers -

Jan Bouten, a partner in Innova, the local early stage investment capital group, has some basic standards when deciding on startup companies to invest in.

He looks for “a solid team with a lot of experience in business” and the founders of AgriSync, an Iowa ag tech startup, checked that box.

48. Freeman: Wide Income, Poverty Gaps Persist in Shelby County -

The president of the National Civil Rights Museum says the national attention that comes with the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers strike and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination can be a guide for the nation as well as Memphis.

49. Pre-K Expansion Faces Resistance in Push for Sunday Wine Sales -

NASHVILLE – Legislation sending revenue from Sunday wine sales to prekindergarten expansion faces a battle on several fronts when it reaches a committee in early March.

The bill sponsored by state Sen. Lee Harris is designed to take the state tax dollars from the sale of wine on Sundays, if that separate bill passes this session, and divert it to a fund designed to increase access for low-income children to prekindergarten classrooms in Tennessee. The bill is set to be heard March 6 in the Senate State and Local Government Committee.

50. Grizzlies’ Rookies Ivan Rabb, Kobi Simmons Getting On-The-Job Training -

Back in late January, the San Antonio Spurs dropped by FedExForum to give the Grizzlies a 108-85 butt-kicking. But for one young Grizzlies rookie, there was associated value. Because if you’re paying attention, a loss like that is less a trip to the woodshed and more real-time tutoring with a little embarrassment added in so you don’t forget.

51. Zoo Parking Plan Draws Questions, Skepticism -

The first audience for the Memphis Zoo parking plan Wednesday, Feb. 21, was tough. The crowd of more than 200 at the Memphis Pink Palace museum, many wearing green “Save The Greensward” T-shirts and some carrying banners with the slogan, expressed some skepticism that the zoo would abide by a ban on parking on the Overton Park Greensward once the new parking area is completed.

52. Fed Officials: Stronger Economy Boosts Chance for Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials at their January meeting believed that a brightening global economic picture and the effects of recently passed tax cuts had raised the prospect for solid growth and continued interest rate increases.

53. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

54. Last Word: Murals and IRV at City Hall, Alexander on Trump and Schools Standoff -

Sometimes when you look at the Election Commission filings in an election season and no one has so much as pulled a petition let alone filed one, your thoughts tend to be along the lines of what is there to focus on beyond the day-to-day activity. And then you get a press release by email that really makes you remember the volatility of this whole business of running for elected office.

55. Bredesen: U.S. Senate Win Possible For Democrats -

The last Democrat to win statewide elected office in Tennessee eight years ago acknowledges times have changed.

“The Democratic brand is damaged in Tennessee,” former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen said last week in Memphis. “The Republican percentage has stayed the same over the last decade. What’s changed is people have abandoned the Democrats and started calling themselves independents.”

56. Week Ahead: Feb.19-25 -

It seems the only thing consistent about this hot again, cold again weather is the rain. As we enter another week of the waning winter, there are plenty of events to keep you entertained. But don’t forget the umbrellas, Memphis!

57. Getting to the Top -

An attorney, a physician and a college president. Three success stories. Three women who made it. They had different challenges, yes, but they also shared obstacles that are ever the same.

Dr. Marjorie Hass, Rhodes College president, recently spoke at a breakfast on campus for female students and alumni. Her message to the young women about to set out on their careers was wrapped in truth. She was encouraging, yes, but she also was not going to make promises that life can’t keep.

58. If You Play the Games, Will They Still Come? -

The other day the NCAA released attendance figures for the 2017 college football season and for the fourth straight year FBS attendance dropped. Yes, fans still pack the giant stadiums around the SEC, which despite having a decrease in average attendance by 2,433 per game, easily had the highest average attendance in the country with 75,074 fans per four quarters of life-and-death football.

59. Details Slow Plan to Shrink UT’s Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure the University of Tennessee board of trustees appears to be a work in progress.

Timing is critical, too, with the 2018 session of the General Assembly moving at a snail’s pace and UT President Joe DiPietro’s contract set to run out in mid-2019.

60. Tough Love -

For the Honorable Tim Dwyer, helping people who stumble get back on their feet and have a second chance is a trademark of his distinguished career. Dwyer is recipient of this year’s Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards for an elected official. He and the non-elected award winner, Shelby County Chief Administrative Officer Harvey Kennedy, will be honored at the 15th annual Dunavant Awards luncheon on Feb. 28 at the Holiday Inn-University of Memphis on Central Avenue.

61. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

62. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

63. How the Market's Turmoil Could Affect Fed's Rate Decisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wall Street has thrown a rather sour welcoming party for Jerome Powell.

64. Serious Diversion -

ZEN FOR CYNICS. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me for the path is narrow. In fact, just buzz off and leave me alone.

65. Last Word: MLGW Rate Hike, The May Ballot So Far and Old Dominick's Taxes -

The Tobacco Corner, a Poplar Corridor landmark, is closing in April. There was once a set of Tobacco Corners that look like the one at Poplar and Mendenhall and they included “newsrooms” – places to buy magazines, sometimes adult, and newspapers -- after buying tobacco. In almost 50 years, none of those product lines are what they once were. And the legacy of a homegrown business is disapperaring, too. 

66. Commission Seeks Path For Elected County Utility Board -

Shelby County commissioners approved Monday, Feb. 5, a first step toward providing county sewer services with a resolution supporting state legislation that would allow for an elected county utility board.

67. The Day After -

There is perhaps no greater scrutiny that a brand faces than during the biggest U.S. sporting event of the year. Courageous brands bet big that their ad will win hearts and minds, but alas, only 36 percent of Super Bowl ads earned favorable ratings from our team of advertising professionals, likely making for some uncomfortable ad execs on the hot seat Monday morning.

68. The Week Ahead: Feb. 5-11, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! If you’re looking for a legit reason to “space out” this week, The Orpheum’s got you covered with two out-of-this-world events. Meanwhile, LeMoyne-Owen College honors Black History Month and a pair of local nonprofits celebrate the hope and heart of the city. And that’s just a taste of what’s on tap in The Week Ahead.

69. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

70. 5 Things: What Yellen's Fed Tenure Will Be Remembered For -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When Janet Yellen leaves the Federal Reserve this weekend after four years as chair, her legacy will include having shattered a social barrier: She is the first woman to have led the world's most powerful central bank, a position that carries enormous sway over the global economy.

71. Vrabel Will Face Vastly Improved AFC South -

In case you haven’t noticed, the stakes have been raised considerably in the AFC South for 2018.

While new Tennessee Titans coach Mike Vrabel is busy trying to put a staff together, the group he assembles will have to hit the ground running just to keep up in a division that suddenly looks much improved from past seasons.

72. In State of Union, Trump to Make His Case on Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking to move past the shadow of the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump intends to use his first State of the Union address to cite economic progress under his watch while pushing for bipartisanship with Democrats on issues such as rebuilding roads and bridges.

73. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

74. Harris, Clemmons File Net Neutrality Bill -

In the wake of the FCC’s recent vote to end net neutrality, state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis and Rep. John Ray Clemmons, D-Nashville, have introduced the “Tennessee Net Neutrality and Internet Consumer Protection Act” to enact and enforce net neutrality rules at the state level.

75. Back to School -

Third grade math is still all about multiplication and division, which may be learned through memorization or through applying addition and subtraction. But it is always about understanding the concept.

76. Harris, Clemmons File Net Neutrality Bill -

In the wake of the FCC’s recent vote to end net neutrality, state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis and Rep. John Ray Clemmons, D-Nashville, have introduced the “Tennessee Net Neutrality and Internet Consumer Protection Act” to enact and enforce net neutrality rules at the state level.

77. Shelby County Joins Memphis in Landfill Moratorium -

Shelby County commissioners approved a six-month moratorium on any new construction landfills in unincorporated Shelby County on Monday, Jan. 22.

The resolution is the companion to a Memphis City Council resolution passed earlier this month that imposed a six-month moratorium on such landfills within the city of Memphis.

78. Commission Adds County Landfill Moratorium to City Ban -

Shelby County commissioners approved a six month moratorium Monday, Jan. 22, on any new construction landfills in unincorporated Shelby County. The resolution is the companion to a Memphis City Council resolution passed earlier this month that imposed a six-month moratorium on such landfills within the city of Memphis.

79. Last Word: Brunch Overload, Grade-Changing Misdemeanor and Sports Rebirth -

What happens when Memphians have been home and/or work bound for about two weeks between a national flu outbreak and snow and ice that hangs tough in below freezing temperatures and the temperature Sunday under sunny skies is almost 60? The correct answer is brunch overload.

80. Parkinson’s Grade-Changing Bill Faces Opposition From Education Association -

NASHVILLE – With a grade-changing scandal at Trezevant High rocking Shelby County Schools, Rep. Antonio Parkinson is pushing legislation designed to put a harsh “deterrent” on illicit transcript changes: criminal prosecution.

81. Sports Notebook: Z-Bo returns, Memphis FB adds four, Jeremiah Martin hurt in loss -

After the Grizzlies decided not to bring back Zach Randolph for this season, one thing was sure: When he returned to FedExForum in another uniform he would get a rousing reception.

The fans did not disappoint as Randolph came back with the Sacramento Kings last Friday night. They gave Z-Bo a standing ovation, the Grizzlies offered up a well-done video tribute, and Randolph hugged everybody from Marc Gasol and Mike Conley to arena workers.

82. SPORTS NOTEBOOK -

After the Grizzlies decided not to bring back Zach Randolph for this season, one thing was sure: When he returned to FedExForum in another uniform he would get a rousing reception.

The fans did not disappoint as Randolph came back with the Sacramento Kings last Friday night. They gave Z-Bo a standing ovation, the Grizzlies offered up a well-done video tribute, and Randolph hugged everybody from Marc Gasol and Mike Conley to arena workers.

83. Midlife Look at Insurance Needs -

Ray’s Take: Life insurance is an important part of most overall financial plans. Replacing the capital value of the significant providers is critical should they not be able to provide. Owning the right insurance for the right price at the right time in your life is a crucial element to your financial well-being.

84. Shelby County Prekindergarten Push Remains in General Terms for Now -

Nearly six years after voters defeated two ballot questions in as many years that would have provided a tax revenue steam for universal prekindergarten, the pre-K quest is back.

The return of a coordinated civic and political push for pre-K comes about five years after a combination of state and federal funding as well as a shift of county government’s early childhood Head Start contract to Shelby County Schools.

85. Tennessee House Speaker Proposes Medicaid Work Requirements -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell has filed legislation to pursue TennCare work requirements for able-bodied adults without young children.

86. Trump Suggests 2-Phase Immigration Deal for 'Dreamers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking a bipartisan compromise to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that an immigration deal could be reached in two phases – first by addressing young immigrants and border security with what he called a "bill of love," then by making comprehensive changes that have long eluded Congress.

87. CW/CA Adds Fenton As Marketing, Research Director -

Laura Fenton has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as director of marketing and research. CW/CA’s Marketing & Research department serves as the commercial real estate firm’s in-house agency for brokers and clients, and in her role, Fenton leads strategic communication, marketing and research for business development initiatives, marketing on behalf of clients, public relations, advertising, internal communications, social media and community involvement. 

88. Getting Shovel Ready -

Candidates for various state-level offices up for grabs in the 2018 elections used the Southwest Tennessee Development District’s annual legislative luncheon in Jackson, Tennessee, last week to share their West Tennessee-centric campaign promises.

89. Blackburn, Fincher to Report Money Raised in US Senate Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn says she raised $2 million in the last quarter of 2017 in her bid to succeed U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, while former U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher says he raised $1.45 million in about two months.

90. Legislators Can’t Get Past Threat of Medical Weed -

Heading into the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Jeremy Faison is looking to send a message about his medical marijuana bill: Tennessee won’t open the door to recreational pot without General Assembly action.

91. Candidates in August State and Federal Primaries Start Pulling Petitions Friday -

Contenders for the May Shelby County primaries are still coming out of the political woodwork. And starting Friday, Jan. 5, candidates in the August state and federal primaries can begin pulling qualifying petitions for the second of three elections in 2018.

92. NBC Names Hoda Kotb as Lauer Replacement on 'Today' -

NEW YORK (AP) – NBC News opened the new year Tuesday by appointing Hoda Kotb as co-anchor of the "Today" show's first two hours with Savannah Guthrie, replacing Matt Lauer following his firing on sexual misconduct charges in late November.

93. Edmunds Sizes Up New Car-Safety Technology -

We are in a new era of car safety: The focus has shifted from reducing death and injury in a vehicle collision to preventing a crash from happening in the first place. Safety features designed to avoid accidents are becoming increasingly common in new cars.

94. In a Milestone Year, Gene Therapy Finds a Place in Medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

95. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

96. City, County Governments on Different Paths -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the city council members are half way through their four-year terms of office with the new year.

97. His Way: Tubby Smith Figured Out Who He Was Long Ago and He’s Not Changing -

When his visitor was about to leave, Orlando Tubby Smith had one more story. About a time his father had given him an assignment on the family farm in Maryland. 

Tubby was one of 17 children. He had older siblings and younger siblings. He also, at age 12 or 13, already had a sense for what it was to lead and manage.

98. Congress Rushes to Avoid Shutdown, Punts Issues to January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conflict-weary lawmakers eyed the U.S. Capitol exits Thursday as the Republican-led Congress rushed to approve a temporary spending bill to avoid a government shutdown and then sprint home for the holidays.

99. Top Stories Of 2017 in Travel -

It’s been a big year for travel news, and that doesn’t even include the recent shutdown of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport or American Airlines’ disaster averted with a potential pilot shortage over the holidays.

100. Council Delays MLGW Rate Hike Vote to Wednesday -

Memphis City Council members meet again Wednesday, Dec. 20, to vote on Memphis Light Gas and Water Divisions proposals to raise water, gas and electricity rates starting next month.

The council was debating the 1.05 percent water rate hike proposal at its regularly scheduled Tuesday session when chairman Berlin Boyd announced the meeting would recess until 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall. It came as council members had a lot of questions about possible alternatives to the rate hikes across all three sectors of the publicly-owned utility.