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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

2. Editorial: Back-to-School Stability Includes Unresolved Issues -

Another school year is underway in Memphis, and it’s arguably the most stable for the Shelby County Schools system in the last seven years – maybe longer. Yet, there is much about education in our community that remains unresolved.

3. Renee White Adds Purpose to Numbers -

At the end of her third-grade year, Renee White’s elementary school switched math books. Why does White – now chief financial officer of Oak Hall – remember a textbook being retired 20 years ago?

4. Inviting a New Vision for Memphis Region -

Memphis has been blessed to give birth to the modern grocery store, rock ‘n’ roll, and such corporate category leaders as Holiday Inn, FedEx and AutoZone. These native inventions became the basis of our regional economy after the slow demise of the agrarian culture when cotton was king.

5. Strong: Democrats Must Reconnect With Voters -

The new chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party says the local party has lost its voters and getting them back is the path to victory in the 2018 county elections and beyond.

Corey Strong, an attorney and special projects director for Shelby County Schools, was elected chairman of the reorganized local party Saturday, Aug. 5, following its dissolution by the Tennessee Democratic Party a year ago.

6. American Paper Optics, St. Jude Promote Safe Solar Eclipse -

In anticipation of the historic solar eclipse Aug. 21, Bartlett-based American Paper Optics (APO) is partnering with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to educate the public on safe solar eclipse viewing.

7. Tennessee Wineries, Farms Hosting Solar Eclipse Watchers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's farms and wineries are getting ready to host visitors hoping to get a glimpse of the solar eclipse in August.

Officials say the state is expected to be a prime location to watch the Aug. 21 solar eclipse. A total solar eclipse is expected to be visible across a 70-mile (113-kilometer) path through Tennessee, and the rest of the state will be treated to a minimum 90 percent eclipse experience.

8. No Place for Those Words -

“WHAT TRUMP COULD HAVE SAID.” After Trump’s narcissistic impolitic/political rant/speech at the Boy Scout National Jamboree, I didn’t know what to say. But when my daughter sent me an opinion piece from LNP in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, I realized it had already been said.

9. IRIS Orchestra Fellows Program Bridges Gap to Professional Career -

They get to play in an orchestra next to world-class musicians. They will have mentors and be mentors for children in the Shelby County Schools system. During their 10-month fellowship, they are paid a stipend and housing is provided at artist friendly Crosstown Concourse.

10. Advice to My Younger Self -

In the past week, two interesting things have happened. First, I was asked the question, “What advice would you give your younger self?” Then, I attended my high school reunion. Walking through the old halls of my high school brought back memories of where it all started. Needless to say, both moments made me think about the past and what advice I would give a young person today.

11. Last Word: Gentrification, ServiceMaster's New CEO Speaks and Gateway Resolution -

Gentrification in Binghampton? The g-word is a term that can start a real debate in Memphis these days. But those leading the hard fought redevelopment in Binghampton say a tax increment financing district there would mean an immediate capital infusion of $332,000 that would help to ward off the possibility of gentrification.

12. Sense of Purpose Drives Entrepreneurs -

Editor’s note: This column is the third in a three-part series. If you are struggling to decide if being an entrepreneur versus a person who prefers a corporation or organization, ask yourself this question: Why do you work?

13. Landmarks Commission Clears Path For Cooper-Young, VECA Historic Designations -

The path to preservation status for two Midtown neighborhoods has been cleared by the Memphis Landmarks Commission.

The applications of Cooper-Young and fellow Midtown neighborhood Vollintine-Evergreen were placed on hold until questions about the application process first raised a few months ago were resolved.

14. Lakeland Middle Opens As Leaders Eye Next One -

Lakeland’s new middle school already has some trophies in its trophy case from summer cheerleading competitions.

Teachers got set up for the school year that begins Aug. 7 with in-service training at the school Monday, July 31.

15. Last Word: 'Secular Stagnationists', CRE's Big Year in Memphis and Lakeland Prep -

Protests over the weekend in Martyr’s Park and at the federal prison facility in Mason, Tennessee for those rounded up in the ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement -- raids here in Memphis that began a week ago. Latino Memphis is also offering legal advice to those who believe they may be caught up in the new push. There are also several efforts to support families that find mothers and/or fathers in federal custody in the sweeps. And over the weekend, Memphis Police issued an arrest warrant for a bounty hunter who turned up on YouTube video in an apartment complex with a large Latino tenant base wearing some kind of badge and vest.

16. Marching Band to NFL: Vanderbilt Doctor’s Unlikely Path -

When the NFL sought a worthy selection for the first chief medical officer in league history, it turned its eyes to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

In hiring Dr. Allen Sills earlier this year, the league brought on a whirlwind of intelligence and energy with a lengthy curriculum vitae.

17. Big River Crossing to Hold Half-Marathon, 5K -

Big River Crossing will mark its first anniversary this fall with the Big River Crossing Half Marathon and 5K, benefiting the Peer Power Foundation.

Set for Oct. 21, the half-marathon will be the first to allow participants to cross the Arkansas-Tennessee state line via the Big River Crossing, a pedestrian bridge above the Mississippi River. Half-marathon runners also will traverse the Big River Trail’s Loop, a 7-mile, paved path through the Arkansas floodplains that is scheduled to open to the public by the end of the summer.

18. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

19. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

20. Last Word: More Intermodals, 20 Years After the Oilers In Memphis and New Path -

The "skinny" repeal of Obamacare comes up short in the U.S. Senate in an after midnight Friday vote in D.C. And it appears U.S. Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee voted for the repeal measure that came up short. Here are the basics early Friday morning from The New York Times.

21. Boyd Says Luttrell Endorsement is ‘Partnership’ -

Republican contender for Tennessee governor Randy Boyd says his endorsement this week by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is more like a partnership.

22. Herenton's New Path -

Dan Michael is not the first Juvenile Court judge former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has talked to about educating juvenile offenders in custody.

23. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

24. Text of the Fed's Statement After Its Meeting Wednesday -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Below is the statement the Fed released Wednesday after its policy meeting ended:

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in June indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen and that economic activity has been rising moderately so far this year. Job gains have been solid, on average, since the beginning of the year, and the unemployment rate has declined.

25. Big River Crossing to Hold Half-Marathon, 5K -

Big River Crossing will mark its first anniversary this fall with the Big River Crossing Half Marathon and 5K, benefiting the Peer Power Foundation.

Set for Oct. 21, the half-marathon will be the first to allow participants to cross the Arkansas-Tennessee state line via the Big River Crossing, a pedestrian bridge above the Mississippi River. Half-marathon runners also will traverse the Big River Trail’s Loop, a 7-mile, paved path through the Arkansas floodplains that is scheduled to open to the public by the end of the summer.

26. Last Word: Alexander and Corker Differ, Instant Runoff React and Kroger On Hold -

Tennessee’s two U.S. Senators split their votes Tuesday in Washington on the vote that followed the vote to open debate on a repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both voted yes on the debate motion. But then Corker was one of the nine Republican Senate votes that killed the Obamacare replacement plan known as BCRA, while Alexander voted for it.

27. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

28. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

29. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

30. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

31. Sterigenics Triples Plant Capacity in West Memphis -

Sterigenics International LLC recently wrapped up a $16.8 million expansion to its West Memphis facility, nearly tripling the site’s gamma sterilization capacity. The company is a global provider of contract sterilization, lab services, gamma technologies and medical isotopes.

32. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

33. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

34. Environmental Report on Pipeline Favorable for Developers -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Atlantic Coast Pipeline intended to carry natural gas across West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina would have some adverse environmental effects, including impacts on water resources, forest and other habitats, but most could be reduced to insignificant levels, an assessment by federal regulators found.

35. Bioworks, ZeroTo510 Team with Smith & Nephew -

The Memphis Bioworks Foundation and its ZeroTo510 medical device accelerator, have teamed up with Smith & Nephew to create a new executive-in-residence program for the medical device startup accelerator.

36. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

37. Sterigenics Triples Capacity At Its West Memphis Sterilization Facility -

Sterigenics International LLC recently wrapped up a $16.8 million expansion to its West Memphis facility, nearly tripling the site’s gamma sterilization capacity. The company is a global provider of contract sterilization, lab services, gamma technologies and medical isotopes.

38. Editorial: Take the Riverfront Plan From Concept to Action -

The Riverfront concept plan now in the hands of the Mayor’s Riverfront Task Force is easy to be cynical about if you have even a casual acquaintance with the dozen or more riverfront studies the city and others have conducted since 1980.

39. Wall Street's Goldman Sachs Moves Quietly Into Main Street -

NEW YORK (AP) – More homeowner, less hedge fund titan. Goldman Sachs, long known for its super-rich clients and well-connected executives, is starting to act a lot more like a neighborhood bank.

40. Bioworks, ZeroTo510 Team With Smith & Nephew -

The Memphis Bioworks Foundation and its ZeroTo510 medical device accelerator, have teamed up with Smith & Nephew to create a new executive-in-residence program for the medical device startup accelerator.

41. After-School Job Not For Everyone -

A reader recently wrote to me with an interesting question. He was seeking advice on how his teenage daughter might find an after-school job for her high school years. His logic makes sense. He wants her to learn discipline and to gain a work ethic. These are great qualities for a young student to develop. Although I respect this method of getting there, I also suggested an alternative path.

42. Political Differences Endure After $4.11 Shelby County Tax Rate Compromise -

Shelby County commissioners were still calculating Monday, July 17, after they passed a compromised, $4.11 county property tax rate that appears will stay put long enough for the commission to take a final vote Wednesday at a special meeting.

43. US to Create Independent Military Cyber Command -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

44. Honor Your Muse, Part 2 -

Editor’s note: This is the second in a three-part series. Full of fear my friend stares into the unknown, wondering whether or not to launch her own business. Only dark silence answers her unvoiced pleas. Like so many professionals in a monolithic system, she yearns for meaning and purpose in her daily work, which is lacking for her in health care social work.

45. How to Avoid Digging With Spoons -

Legend has it that well-known 20th-century economist Milton Friedman once visited a canal-building site in China where thousands of people were digging with shovels to complete the project. Friedman asked the foreman why they didn’t bring in heavy equipment to get the job done better and faster. The foreman told him that would put a lot of people out of work. “In that case, why not have them dig with spoons?” Friedman said.

46. Bullying 2.0: The Mean Co-Worker -

Growing up, it seemed like one of the perks of being an adult was a lack of bullies. After all, bullying stops after high school graduation, right? Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. A few bullies sneak through life without giving up their bullying ways. Often, these meanies resurface at work, making your eight hours there much less rewarding.

47. Haslam Opens Alternative High School Equivalency Program -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has opened an alternative residential program operated by the Tennessee National Guard that gives some teens a chance to earn a high school equivalency diploma outside a traditional school setting.

48. Confluence Park Takes Shape On Former Mud Island ‘Trash Dump’ -

Before her knee surgery, Sara Yarrow ran anywhere from five to 10 miles a week, often near her Mud Island home.

That’s why she’s looking forward to the planned opening of Confluence Park on Mud Island, at the corner where Island Drive becomes North Mud Island Road.

49. Fed Debating When to Unwind $4.5 Trillion in Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is figuring out when to start unloading much of its $4.5 trillion in bond holdings – a major turning point for an economy still healing from the 2008 financial crisis.

50. Analyst: Fred’s Not Seen as Viable Buyer of Rite Aid Stores -

Nick Mitchell, managing director and research analyst with Northcoast Research, didn’t have to do much work or analysis in the wake of news that Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has been cut out of a deal between Walgreens and Rite Aid.

51. ‘Great Streets’ Experiment Opens Between River and FedExForum -

The sun umbrellas are on the way for the tables and chairs on the northern side of Peabody Place between Front and Main streets, and so is a temporary mural wall and some kiosks for a marketplace.

A Times Square-meets-Broad Avenue experiment at the southern end of Downtown’s Main Street Mall got underway this week with reggae music, popsicles and, of course, bicycles.

52. South Korean Leader Aims to Reconcile Differences with Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — South Korea's new leader, on a four-day visit to Washington, was aiming to reconcile differences with President Donald Trump after advocating a softer approach to North Korea and delaying U.S. plans for the full deployment of a missile defense system in his country.

53. Breaking The Rules And Finding Your Perfect Job -

Sometimes in your career, things don’t always work out the way you plan them. For me, the first time I learned this lesson, I was in college. I went to one of those fancy, private schools to study computer engineering in the late ’90s. I knew that an investment in such a great degree would guarantee me a job when I graduated. Not only that, it would guarantee me a great paying job.

54. ‘Desire to be the Best’ Prompts Coleman’s Jump to Pros -

Three years after starting his Tennessee career, Christian Coleman has reached the pinnacle of collegiate sprinting and is ready for his next challenge.

55. Riar Connects Memphis via Radio Waves -

Ask Kiran Riar – settling in for a rainy Sunday afternoon shift on the air at Q107.5 – what got her into the radio business, and the answer might surprise you.

Her path to this radio booth spans decades and continents – and Indira Gandhi has a cameo role. Kiran Riar’s grandmother in New Delhi had been widowed young when she propelled herself to a career supporting herself and her two infants. That career was at All India Radio, India’s public broadcasting station.

56. Memphis NAACP Marks Centennial With Challenge -

When the Memphis Branch NAACP holds its annual Freedom Fund Luncheon Saturday, June 24, there will be a lot of memories and a lot of history.

The Memphis Branch’s largest annual event this year marks the centennial of an organization founded in the wake of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons. James Weldon Johnson, the NAACP national office’s investigator who came to the city to gather facts on the incident, encouraged Robert Church Jr. to start a local chapter.

57. Last Word: Cyber Attacks, Second Farmers Market Downtown and The Council Way -

It’s on. Shelby County commissioners coming out Wednesday in committee against the idea of ending Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. And the discussion was, as always, an interesting one including not only critics like commissioner Van Turner but commissioner Terry Roland and County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

58. Called To Faithfulness, Not Success -

If there was ever anyone who had a saintly solution to the ordinary trials of life, however grave, it was Mother Teresa.

“God has called us not to be successful, but to be faithful,” she said.

59. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

60. Marketing Folks Should Try Thinking Like a CEO -

Many marketing professionals have found themselves at odds with their CEO, whether they are not on the same page, have competing priorities or have a different version of success. The same often holds true for marketing agencies and their clients’ leadership teams. The divide can be painful and, for some, impossible to bridge.

61. Council to Shore Up Budget Loose Ends, Talk Beale Street, DROP and UrbanArt -

Memphis City Council members have done most of the heavy lifting and taken votes on the major items that end the budget season at City Hall.

But they still have a few loose ends to wrap at their Tuesday, June 20, session.

62. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

63. Match Game: Employer Matching Funds -

Ray’s Take: I am amazed at how many times when I ask people how much they are contributing to their 401(k) the answer comes back, “Whatever the match my company gives is – I love free money!” There’s a much better way to make that decision, but that is a topic for another column. There are a number of reasons companies offer some form of match and they may not all be charitable.

64. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

65. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

66. Last Word: The Jazz Cornerstone, Council Day and 100 Items at Brooks -

In Elmwood Cemetery Tuesday morning, a wreath laying ceremony at the grave of Jimmie Lunceford, the Memphis jazz giant who formed and taught the Manassas High School band known as the Chickasaw Syncopators who went professional in the jazz age of the 1920s and played The Cotton Club during the Harlem renaissance. Lunceford was the cornerstone of Memphis jazz and Manassas was its bedrock. And the story of his high school students going professional is but an early chapter in a much longer narrative of gifted musicians and artists at times literally walking out of a graduation ceremony and onto a tour bus.

67. Gladney’s Career Path Leads to New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

68. Gladney’s Career Path Leads Her To New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

69. Financial Federal Hits $500M in Assets -

Financial Federal has hit a milestone in recent weeks – reaching $500 million in assets – that bank president William Tayloe said confirms the plan the bank is following to achieve organic growth is working.

70. Wal-Mart Works to Close Gap Between Itself and Amazon -

HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) – Even after an online spending spree, it may be hard for Wal-Mart to escape the Amazon in the room.

Wal-Mart's acquisition of Jet.com and brands that appeal to younger shoppers have given it an e-commerce boost as it works to close the gap between itself and the online leader. The world's largest retailer is betting on essentials like cereal and diapers, and has adjusted its shipping strategy to better compete with Amazon's Prime program.

71. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

72. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

73. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

74. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

75. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

UPDATE: As of 9 a.m. Monday, May 29, 125,000 Memphis Light Gas and Water Division customers were without power. And 32 people were staying at the Red Cross shelter at the Orange Mound Community Center. City Public Works has hired more contractors to help clear downed trees and other debris from roads.

76. 10 Nonprofits to Receive GiVE 365 Grants -

GiVE 365, The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program, has announced grants totaling $60,000 to 10 nonprofit organizations. This year’s grant cycle is themed “Foundations for the Future: programs that help youth meet their potential.”

77. Memphis-Based MAA Thriving As Demand for Rental Housing Grows -

Since it was founded by George Cates in 1977, real estate investment trust MAA has grown from an upstart local business into a S&P 500 company with more than 100,000 units and total market capitalization of $16 billion.

78. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

79. Ryan: Lawmakers Will Meet New Debt Deadline -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan is assuring investors that Congress will meet a new deadline to increase the government's borrowing authority and avert an economy-quaking default on U.S. obligations.

80. Beale Street Cover Charge Cut, Larger Debate Remains -

The Saturday night summer cover charge on Beale Street is going from $10 to $5 next month. But the discussion about the Beale Street Bucks program is hardly over. And the crowd control measure is certain to raise longer-term questions about who controls the city-owned district.

81. Present Day Issues Surface in Centennial of Persons Lynching -

The interfaith prayer ceremony Sunday, May 21, marking the centennial of the lynching of Ell Persons included several mentions of the removal of Confederate monuments in the last month in New Orleans.

82. Former St. Benedict, U of M Pitcher Sam Moll One Step Away From the Bigs -

Lefthander Sam Moll was good as a freshman and sophomore pitching at the University of Memphis. But as a junior in 2013, the St. Benedict at Auburndale High School product was something beyond dominant.

83. Editorial: Addressing Memphis' Most Important Crime Issue -

If Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings could snap his fingers and suddenly have a police force of 2,500 officers, that in and of itself probably wouldn’t have stopped what happened the night of May 12 in Midtown or a day later in Whitehaven.

84. Dream a Baseball Dream -

Memphis is Hoops City, a hotbed of premier basketball talent. That’s why University of Memphis basketball coach Tubby Smith is under pressure. The best of those hometown players on his team, Dedric Lawson, has transferred to the University of Kansas and everyone’s worried Smith won’t get the elite local talent going forward.

85. Burr is Building a Prison-to-Opportunity Pipeline -

The first time Mahal Burr walked into the Shelby County Jail, she was planning to meet with prison officials. Instead, to her surprise, she was shown into a room with 18 incarcerated kids.

“The sheriff’s office rep said, ‘This is Mahal and Evan from BRIDGES, and they’re going to do an activity with you around youth leadership,’” recalls Burr.

86. U of M to Participate In Pathways to Success Summit -

On June 22, the University of Memphis will participate in the Pathways to Success: Boys and Young Men of Color Opportunity Summit hosted by My Brother’s Keeper Alliance at Memphis Cook Convention Center.

87. Innova, AgLaunch Partner On New Innovation Fund -

The venture capital firm Innova Memphis will include the venture development organization and accelerator AgLaunch in a new $31 million agriculture innovation fund.

The fund, which is Innova’s fourth since it was founded 10 years ago by Memphis Bioworks, is certified and licensed by the USDA’s Rural Business Investment Program as a rural business investment company.

88. Science Behind Empathy and Storytelling -

A talk by Tim Urmston, Seek Co. founder and CEO, from the Front End of Innovation Conference 2017. Connecting brands with people they serve through insights, story, ideas and strategy – this is what supercharges a project.

89. AT&T Invested $225M in Memphis Over Past 3 Years -

AT&T reports it spent more than $225 million on its Memphis wireless and wired networks between 2014 and 2016.

Those investments, the company says, “enhance reliability, coverage, speed and overall performance for residents and businesses,” among other benefits. The company says it’s also speeding its wired and wireless buildout plans in Tennessee, allocating “hundreds of millions of dollars” to improve its network, paving the path for 5G mobile services in the coming years.

90. Losses at JC Penney Double, Sales Slide, As Do Shares -

PLANO, Texas (AP) – Losses at J.C Penney doubled in the first quarter and sales at established stores fell again, capping a terrible week for retailers.

Though the loss at first did not appear as bad as many industry analysts had expected, many soured on even that after a closer look.

91. The Week Ahead: May 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! This week, Downtown welcomes barbecue teams from around the world coming to compete in the Super Bowl of Swine. Plus, we’ve got details on the remembrance of a somber moment in Memphis history; a reading festival for kids of all ages; and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

92. Le Bonheur Pulmonology Chief Wants to Expand Programs, Care -

Dr. Patricia Dubin’s mother was a pediatric emergency department nurse. Her father was a general pediatrician.

Growing up in a family like that, steeped in pediatrics, helped likewise set Dubin on a path into the same field. Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital hired her at the end of 2016 as the new chief of its pediatric pulmonology and sleep medicine efforts, and Dubin has ambitions to expand the hospital’s programs in those and similar areas this year.

93. Southwest Tennessee Community College Moves Toward Change -

Kenyatta Lovett, the executive director of the nonprofit education advocacy group Complete Tennessee, says there is an old joke in higher education that sometimes comes to the surface when change is promised or pledged.

94. 7 Skills For Workplace Success -

For those seeking upward mobility in their careers, there is a plethora of books, articles and even a Broadway musical filled with advice on how to succeed in business, with or without trying. 

95. Kemmons Wilson Cos. Continues in the Spirit of its Founder -

McLean T. Wilson has a statistic he likes to keep top of mind: 94 percent of third-generations businesses fail. Kemmons Wilson Cos. (KWC), the enterprise founded by McLean’s grandfather, Kemmons Wilson, is in the other 6 percent.

96. GOP-Led House Panel Votes to Overhaul Dodd-Frank -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans took a major step toward their long-promised goal of unwinding the stricter financial rules created after the 2008 crisis, pushing forward sweeping legislation that would undo much of President Barack Obama's landmark banking law.

97. Forum to Riverfront Corridor Debuts In June -

The area between FedExForum and the Mississippi River is getting a network of protected bike lanes and pedestrian plazas next month as part of a year-long pilot project.

The Great Streets Pilot Project has a one-year trial period for the commissioned art, painted crosswalks, barriers and planters as well as the lane changes.

98. Memphis May Day March Points To Deeper, Sustained Involvement -

Three months after a Downtown march protesting the first of President Donald Trump’s two immigration travel ban orders, the turnout was smaller Monday, May 1, along the same route between Clayborn Temple and the National Civil Rights Museum.

99. Hundreds March In Memphis Day Without Immigrants Event -

Several hundred people marched Monday, May 1, from Clayborn Temple to the National Civil Rights Museum Monday in a local Day Without Immigrants Rally.

The Memphis march was one of numerous May Day protests and marches across the country and the latest local event to protest President Donald Trump’s immigration policies and plans for a wall at the U.S. border with Mexico.

100. Groups Prepare for Persons’ Lynching Centennial -

When a pair of new historical markers on Summer Avenue are unveiled later this month, it will be the latest milestone in current discussions about what happened long ago in Memphis.

The markers will be unveiled at and near the site where Ell Persons was burned by a lynch mob 100 years ago this month.