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Editorial Results (free)

1. ServiceMaster Lends Helping Hand with Annual We Care Day -

For ServiceMaster employee Betsy Vincent, there’s a special emotion associated with giving back to her local community. Vincent and nearly 700 other local ServiceMaster employees spent Friday assisting 22 local organizations with projects like neighborhood beautification efforts, delivering/preparing school supplies and food along with working with patients and disadvantaged children.

2. Long, Winding Road -

Considered by many to be the main artery of Memphis’ robust logistical and distribution network, the Lamar Avenue Corridor has long been clogged by its own narrow lanes and outdated capacity. 

3. Camp Aims to Build Confidence in Those Who Stutter -

The Orpheum Theatre is partnering with a New York-based nonprofit to bring a two-day camp to Memphis this fall for kids and teens who stutter. “Camp SAY Across the USA: Memphis” is part of a pilot program to extend the programming of the Stuttering Association for the Young (SAY), and will be held at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts and Education in November.

4. Back in Memphis, Alice Johnson Thanks Trump for ‘Mercy’ in Commuting Sentence -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A woman whose life sentence was commuted by President Donald Trump thanked him on Thursday for "having mercy" and said reality TV star Kim Kardashian West saved her life.

5. Banks Team Up for Saturday Event to Help Memphians Improve Credit -

In an effort to support credit and financial counseling of Memphis residents, more than a dozen local banks that banded together last year to form the Memphis Area Community Reinvestment Act Association are preparing to host their first collective event this weekend.

6. Trump Commutes Sentence for Drug Offender in Memphis Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump commuted the sentence Wednesday of a woman serving a life sentence in a Memphis drug case whose cause was championed by reality TV star Kim Kardashian West in a recent visit to the White House.

7. Q&A: MMDC’s Abby Miller Talks New Position, Future of Medical District -

When the Memphis Medical District Collaborative started in February of 2016 there were only two employees: Abby Miller and current president Tommy Pacello.

In the two years since, their operation has grown five-fold, freeing up Miller, who was previously serving as the program and data director, to take on a larger role as the organization’s vice president.

8. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

9. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

10. Buffett Says Stocks Remain Best Investment Option for Most -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Billionaire Warren Buffett recommends that investors stick with simple stock index funds – not bonds and especially not bitcoins.

Buffett discussed a variety of topics during an interview on CNBC Monday after he spent Saturday answering questions before thousands of Berkshire Hathaway shareholders.

11. RegionSmart Summit To Focus On Fourth Bluff -

Since its inception, Memphis and The Fourth Chickasaw Bluff on the Mississippi River have been bound together.

So as Memphis is going through its latest growth spurt, so too is the Fourth Bluff as it was selected to be a part of a $40 million national initiative known as Reimagining the Civic Commons.

12. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

13. Southwest Airlines Pilot Pushed Navy Boundaries for Flying -

BOERNE, Texas (AP) — Tammie Jo Shults was determined to "break into the club" of male military aviators.

One of the first female fighter pilots in the U.S. Navy, Shults flew training missions as an enemy pilot during Operation Desert Storm, while working with other women to see a rule excluding them from combat flights repealed.

14. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

15. Third Annual RegionSmart Summit to Be Held April 26 -

More than 300 government, economic development and community leaders will gather at the third annual RegionSmart Summit this month to discuss some of the Mid-South’s biggest planning issues.

Hosted by the Mid-South Mayors’ Council and the Urban Land Institute’s local affiliate, ULI Memphis, the April 26 summit at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education will tackle topics such as the future of workforce development, transportation and land use.

16. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

17. Jubilee Schools Closing After 20 Years -

The Catholic Diocese of Memphis is ending its operation of nine Jubilee Schools and St. Michael School at the end of the 2018-2019 school year and is working with a charter organization to form a network of charter schools to replace them.

18. Catholic Diocese Ending Jubilee Schools After 2018-2019 School Year -

The Catholic Diocese of Memphis is ending its operation of a set of nine Jubilee schools and St. Michael School at the end of the 2018-2019 school year and appears to be working with a charter organization forming a network of charter schools.

19. In a Milestone Year, Gene Therapy Finds a Place in Medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

20. Fall Creek Falls: Sound Plan or Political Payback -

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Now go find a job. That’s the message the state of Tennessee is sending nearly 60 employees at Fall Creek Falls State Park this joyous holiday season.

21. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

22. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

23. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

24. Novel Evokes Memories of Davis-Kidd, With a Few Updates -

If you turn your head and squint your eyes just right, you can almost believe that Davis-Kidd Booksellers is back.

That beloved Memphis institution closed in 2011 after more than 25 years in operation. The store was soon renamed the Booksellers at Laurelwood, but while it had the same location and the same employees, it wasn’t quite the same as its predecessor. Then, after barely six years in business, that store also closed down in February, leaving a gaping hole in the city for readers who still liked to visit bookstores.

25. New Academic Year Brings Changes, Familiar Issues -

The school year for most students in Shelby County begins Monday, Aug. 7. But teachers and school administrators mentally remain at least a few weeks ahead, if not more – a permanent condition for educators.

26. Kelly Wins Praise Across The Aisle, But Bigger Task is Ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Raised voices could be heard through the thick door to the Oval Office as John Kelly – then secretary of Homeland Security – offered some tough talk to President Donald Trump.

27. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

28. Memphis Announces Grants for Remaining 1968 Sanitation Workers -

A group of 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 – four still working for the city and 10 who are retired – will be getting $50,000 grants from the city, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced Thursday, July 6.

29. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

30. Council Hears Railgarten Dispute in 2 Weeks, Appoints Impasse Panels -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of the approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

31. Last Word: Popovich's Tip, Strickland's Budget and Haslam's Jump Start on Roads -

Game 5 goes to the Spurs in San Antonio 116-103 over the Grizz who are back here Thursday. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is not effusive in his comments to the media, which is fun to watch, but it does make tracking down and veryifying this next story a bit difficult. A credit card receipt showed up on Redditt that appears to show Popovich left a $5,000 tip on an $815.73 bill at McEwen’s Friday night between the two Memphis-based playoff games.

32. First Horizon CEO: Bank on Right Course -

During a pause in remarks from its CEO, a familiar voice broke the silence in the auditorium of First Tennessee Bank’s Downtown headquarters Tuesday, April 25, during the annual meeting for shareholders of the bank’s parent company.

33. Events -

The Super Chevy Show auto show kicks of its 2017 national tour Friday through Sunday, April 7-9, at Memphis International Raceway, 5500 Victory Lane in Millington. The show will feature drag racing, a professionally judged car show, a nonjudged “Show ‘n’ Shine,” an automotive swap meet, a pro show with jet cars and wheelstanders, and more. Visit superchevy.com/show for hours and tickets.

34. Events -

The Metal Museum will kick off its 2017 Whet Thursday series April 6 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can tour the museum and grounds, watch a metalsmithing demonstration, and enjoy food trucks, cash bar and live music. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

35. Events -

A Memphis International Airport job fair will be held Wednesday, April 5, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the airport’s Project Center, 4225 Airways Blvd. Attendees can learn about job openings and complete applications for a variety of positions with at least 15 airport employers; some may also conduct on-site interviews. Visit flymemphis.com. 

36. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

37. Marker Commemorates King’s Final Flight to Memphis -

John Hope Bryant has come through Memphis International Airport many times on business. The founder of the financial literacy nonprofit “Operation HOPE” was always aware the airport was Martin Luther King’s last arrival point on the way to his assassination in 1968.

38. Historical Marker to Commemorate MLK’s Final Flight -

A historical marker commemorating the final flight of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. will be dedicat-ed at Memphis International Airport on Monday, April 3.

39. First Tenn. Essay Contest Targets Literacy, Finance -

To help raise awareness of financial literacy month in April, First Tennessee Bank is sponsoring its annual essay contest to encourage young people to make wise choices and improve money management skills.

40. First Tennessee Opens Fourth HOPE Inside Office -

First Tennessee Bank is set to open its fourth HOPE Inside office Thursday, March 23, at 3 p.m. at the First Tennessee branch at 3391 N. Watkins in Frayser.

41. First Tennessee Opens Fourth HOPE Inside Office -

First Tennessee Bank is set to open its fourth HOPE Inside office Thursday, March 23, at 3 p.m. at the First Tennessee branch at 3391 N. Watkins in Frayser.

42. First Tennessee Essay Contest Encourages Literacy, Finance -

To help raise awareness of financial literacy month in April, First Tennessee Bank is sponsoring its annual essay contest to encourage young people to make wise choices and improve money management skills.

43. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

44. Events -

WKNO Gallery Ten Ninety One will exhibit “Autobiography: Works by Martha Kelly” Thursday, March 2, through March 31 in the WKNO Digital Media Center, 7151 Cherry Farms Road. A closing reception will be held March 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Call 901-458-2521 or visit wkno.org.

45. Events -

The city of Memphis Office of Business Diversity & Compliance Outreach will host “Diversity Programs 301: Certification Registration Rally: Getting on the OBDC Registry” Wednesday, March 1, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave., room L50. Gain a more in-depth understanding of the city’s Supplier Diversity programs and how to leverage them to grow your business. Also, register your certifications on site with access to standby assistance. Cost is free. Register at eventbrite.com. 

46. CRE Brokers Speculate on Future of Commercial Appeal Headquarters -

When USA Today Network executive and president of The Tennessean newspaper Laura Hollingsworth came into town the day after The Commercial Appeal announced printing operations will be moving to Jackson, Tennessee, she told the staff that while no immediate plans were in place, selling the daily paper’s iconic building was certainly a possibility down the road.

47. Secrets to Passionate Leadership -

Some leaders have charisma, that ability to engage others. They reach out and touch your heart and soul. Others are quiet with a passion that reveals itself more slowly but is equally compelling. These leaders know what they are talking about, and they know how to connect with people.

48. COGIC, First Tennessee Open Financial Center -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at the historic Mason Temple in Memphis is now home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small-business leaders and entrepreneurs, thanks to a partnership with First Tennessee Bank.

49. COGIC, First Tennessee Open Financial Center -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at the historic Mason Temple in Memphis is now home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small-business leaders and entrepreneurs, thanks to a partnership with First Tennessee Bank.

50. Memphis Adopts Version of Ceasefire -

A gun and gang violence program pioneered in Boston 20 years ago is coming to Memphis in the wake of a record year for homicides.

What is known nationally as Operation Ceasefire will be called the “Group Violence Initiative” in Memphis, said Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president Bill Gibbons on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

51. Medical District Begins Buy Local Program -

Nine hospitals and universities within the Memphis Medical District are inviting Memphis-based innovators, entrepreneurs and existing companies to help solve operational challenges within their supply chain.

52. Events -

Paychecks for Patriots, a hiring event for Tennessee veterans and their family members, will be held Tuesday, Oct. 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the American Job Center, 3040 Walnut Grove Road. More than three dozen employers will be on hand, with many conducting on-site interviews. Attendees should bring resumes and dress for an interview. Job seekers may register in advance at tn.gov/paychecks4patriots or at the door.

53. Events -

Southwest Tennessee Community College and Operation Hope will host a “Take Your Life Back” credit and money-management workshop Tuesday, Oct. 18, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Whitehaven Center, 1234 Finley Road. Topics include saving money, understanding your credit score, settling accounts, consumer rights and disputing inaccurate information. Free and open to the public. RSVP to nlashford@southwest.tn.edu or 901-333-4287.

54. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award ceremony will be held Thursday, Oct. 20, at 6 p.m. at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main St. Themed “And Justice for All,” the award ceremony will honor six individuals for their contributions to civil and human rights in the U.S. and worldwide, and will be followed by a gala celebration. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org or call 901-525-3214 for details and tickets.

55. Last Word: T-STEM At East High, Casinos Off the Ballot and Dylan Gets A Nobel -

About six years ago, the current cycle of change in public education within Shelby County starting moving. And the changes have been nothing short of historic. Since then at least one piece of a very complex mechanism driving the change has been whirring away. The hope in the last year or so has been that all of this is at a place where some long term plans can start to emerge that are more than reaction to what another cog in the system is doing.

56. Study: Memphis Metro Home to Large Unbanked Population -

The U.S. is home to a little less than 10 million so-called unbanked households – those in which no member has a bank account.

That’s according to new research from the financial website NerdWallet, which not only found that low-income homes tend to get hit hardest by that reality, through things like higher fees associated with alternative financial products like payday loans. What’s more: the site’s research shows that the Memphis metropolitan area carries the unfortunate distinction of having the highest percentage of unbanked households (19.5 percent) in the country.

57. First Tennessee Steps Up Financial Literacy Efforts -

Along with making loans, offering mortgages and the other banking basics that First Tennessee Bank stays busy with from one day to the next, the Memphis-based institution is in the process of stepping up its financial literacy offerings in a major way.

58. COGIC, First Tennessee To Offer Financial Counseling -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at Mason Temple in Memphis will soon be home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small business leaders and entrepreneurs, courtesy of First Tennessee Bank.

59. COGIC, First Tennessee To Offer Financial Counseling -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at Mason Temple in Memphis will soon be home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small business leaders and entrepreneurs, courtesy of First Tennessee Bank.

60. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “Dirty Dancing – The Classic Story on Stage” Tuesday through Sunday, Sept. 13-18, at 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for times and tickets.

61. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “Dirty Dancing – The Classic Story on Stage” Tuesday through Sunday, Sept. 13-18, at 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for times and tick-ets.

62. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will kick off the inaugural On Stage at the Halloran Centre series with Booker T. Jones in concert Saturday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 p.m. at the Halloran Centre, 225 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for tickets and a series schedule.

63. In a Sign of Broader Ambitions, Facebook Opens Hardware Lab -

MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP) – Facebook built its fortune on the internet, that non-physical space where people share updates and digital videos with friends. But deep inside its Silicon Valley headquarters, engineers have stocked a new lab with computerized lathes, industrial mills and tools for making physical goods.

64. Left Turns at Union and McLean Debut -

Traffic signals aren’t normally an event. But then again, Union Avenue traffic can be its own event on a daily basis.

Last week in an anonymous one-story city government building in South Memphis, City Traffic Engineer Randall Tatum took reporters to a workroom in the maintenance shop dominated by traffic signal lights to show off the city’s newest equipment.

65. How safe is our food? -

It’s not easy being a food inspector in Tennessee, dealing with an updated statewide food code to protect the public from foodborne illnesses and educating restaurateurs, many with their own ideas about their cuisine, on following the rules.

66. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

67. Investigator: FDA Still Taking Months to Recall Tainted Food -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal health officials failed to force a recall of peanut butter and almond products for three months after advanced DNA testing confirmed salmonella contamination, government investigators reported Thursday.

68. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

69. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

70. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

71. Hollahan Named Daily News Managing Editor -

Terry Hollahan, a veteran journalist with nearly 30 years in the newspaper industry, has joined The Daily News and The Memphis News as managing editor.

Hollahan, 55, will oversee business and government news coverage for both publications as well as the website, memphisdailynews.com.

72. First Horizon Chairman Joins Operation HOPE Board -

First Horizon National Corp. chairman, president and CEO Bryan Jordan has joined the board of Operation HOPE, which promotes financial literacy and educational tools in underserved communities.

73. First Horizon Chairman Joins Operation HOPE Board -

First Horizon National Corp. chairman, president and CEO Bryan Jordan has joined the board of Operation HOPE, which promotes financial literacy and educational tools in underserved communities.

74. Muller: Memphis On Strong Footing, With Bright Future -

A key Greater Memphis Chamber official is preparing to retire this week after 15 years, at a time when he thinks the city of Memphis is on strong footing, and with a bright future that abounds with potential.

75. Chattanooga Nonprofit's Store Filled With Items From Africa -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – The delicate Nativity scene made from banana leaves folded origami style, the sparkling jewelry, clothes and art in Chattanooga's Amani ya Juu store are created by women in Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda.

76. Harbor of Health Hints at Industry’s Changing Focus -

Hospitals are transitioning more services to ambulatory care models in an effort to bring health care closer to communities where patients live and work.

Regional One Health’s ambulatory strategy includes embedding services in communities where it is designing practices that meet basic medical services. That strategy includes operation of Harbor of Health in Harbor Town, part of Regional One’s long-term goal to offer convenient services in different parts of the city that are away from the main campus in the Medical District. The location in Harbor Town and its extended hours from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. make it convenient for Downtown residents and employees.

77. Transplant Gives New Face, Scalp to Burned Senatobia Firefighter -

NEW YORK (AP) — A volunteer firefighter badly burned in a 2001 blaze has received the most extensive face transplant ever, covering his skull and much of his neck, a New York hospital announced Monday.

78. Authorities Investigate After Nashville Councilman Shot -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Metro councilman was in the hospital Thursday after authorities say he was shot multiple times in west Nashville.

Media outlets report the incident happened at a Marathon gas station on Wednesday night. Police say Loniel Greene Jr. was shot three times. The wounds he suffered were non-life-threatening.

79. Good Shepherd Health in Memphis Charts Different Pharmacy Path With New Model -

It quickly becomes apparent that Dr. Philip Baker, a pharmacist and founder of Good Shepherd Health in Memphis, runs a different kind of pharmacy operation out of his base in the Hickory Ridge Mall when he rattles off figures like this one.

80. Memphis Catholic Puts Education To Work -

Milestones are an important part of life that remind us of something that matters.

It’s a needed pause that says, “Look how far we’ve come, and we’re not finished yet.” That’s exactly what Memphis Catholic High School’s Education That Works program is doing this year as it marks its 10th year of operation.

81. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

82. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

83. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

84. Less Invasive Heart Treatment Now Available in Memphis -

A groundbreaking treatment that serves as a minimally invasive alternative for patients too old, sick or weak to endure open heart surgery is now being offered in Memphis.

A pair of Stern Cardiovascular doctors, working with the valve team at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis, has begun treating patients suffering from mitral regurgitation, in which a faulty valve causes blood to leak back in the heart. The first examples of using what’s called a MitraClip device were completed at Baptist Memphis, where the Stern doctors worked in special operating rooms to attach what are basically metal clips used to shut the problem area.

85. Baby Budget -

About $245,000. That’s the estimated cost for raising one child from birth through age 18.

And that figure surprised young women who attended a recent workshop funded by a grant from GiVE 365, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program.

86. Moving Slowly, Growing Quickly -

Time was, crossing Lower Broadway safely only meant dodging woozy country music fans, speeding cabs and the occasional errant tour bus.

They’re all still there, but they’ve been joined by a wide and growing variety of small-motor or human-powered vehicles shuttling residents and tourists in and around downtown Nashville.

87. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

88. Harold Ford Sr. Returns to Memphis Funeral Business With New Concept -

In his years as a political force in Memphis, Harold Ford Sr. was known for his attention to detail.

The former Congressman would brush past campaign workers and climb a ladder to level a campaign banner or change the layout of “the Ford ballot,” sought by everyone from presidential candidates to court clerks.

89. Major Changes -

Aside from Christmas bells for its annual red kettle campaign, The Salvation Army historically has had a “quiet presence” in Memphis, according to Ellen Westbook, director of community relations and development.

90. Leaving a Life They Love at Nashville Farmers’ Market -

Charles Hardy needs help loading a huge piece of his life: a massive white refrigerator that was part of the Nashville Farmers’ Market home he’s leaving – likely for good – after almost a half-century.

91. City Officials Ponder Macy’s Whitehaven Exit -

Memphis officials say they were blindsided by the announcement from Macy’s that it was closing its store at Southland Mall in Whitehaven and hope they can prevent more retailers from closing inner city locations.

92. Brewing Opportunity -

When Memphians like Jimmy Lewis are leaving established careers to remake themselves as coffee roasters, it’s one sign that coffee culture in Memphis is abundant with opportunity and steadily coming into its own.

93. Program Launched to Grow State’s Small Businesses -

Because many small businesses might still find access to credit tight, and because putting new capital to work in small businesses can give the economy a jolt through the creation of jobs, a pair of organizations has launched a new lending program with those factors in mind.

94. Former FedEx Headquarters Up for Auction -

This week you can acquire a sizeable piece of Memphis business history at a deep discount.

The Commerce Center complex on Lamar Avenue – former home to Memphis-based corporate titans Holiday Inn and FedEx – is on the auction block.

95. Bigger LIFT -

The former Cadence Bank branch on Court Avenue Downtown is the new and bigger home for Community LIFT, the local intermediary with community development corporations founded by a coalition of nonprofits and the city of Memphis four years ago.

96. Incentive Applications Lag Previous Years -

Until a spate of activity this month, Memphis and Shelby County were on pace to tie a record-low for the number of payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreements granted to companies in a year.

Through September, the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine, the primary business incentive body in Memphis and Shelby County, had awarded just four PILOTs, tied with 2006 for the lowest amount of PILOTs issued in a year since 2002.

97. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

98. Women of Hope CEO Fights Ebola in Sierra Leone -

A war does not occur in a vacuum, and neither does a health crisis, such as the Ebola virus now spreading through West Africa. Kim Kargbo knows this too well.

Kargbo, 47, president and CEO of Memphis-based Women of Hope International, is to leave for Sierra Leone on Tuesday, Aug. 26. Kargbo was raised there by parents serving as missionaries, and she also worked there in the 1990s and 2000s amid the country’s decade-long civil war.

99. Editorial: Recent Events Underscore Unraveling in Memphis -

There are times when it feels like Memphis is unraveling. And this is one of those times.

A sense of powerlessness returns in what has been a resurgence in hope and good vibrations about our city in recent years.

100. New Partners Sign On to Tennessee Brewery Effort -

This weekend, volunteers will return to the Tennessee Brewery property to continue getting it ready for Tennessee Brewery Untapped, a six-week series of community events that will run April 24 through June 1.