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Editorial Results (free)

1. Blight Fight Takes Root Near Carnes Elementary -

Some of Mary Baker’s friends like to joke that she will eventually reclaim the whole city of Memphis, but just one lot at a time. “I say, what’s wrong with that?” Baker replied.

2. Titaned Up: Success Found In Big Moves, Smallest Details -

Most critics of last year’s Tennessee Titans saw unsettled ownership, a revolving door of coaches and a lack of talent at key positions.

Jon Robinson saw weeds.

3. Growing Number of Americans are Retiring Outside the US -

Newly widowed, Kay McCowen quit her job, sold her house, applied for Social Security and retired to Mexico. It was a move she and her husband, Mel, had discussed before he passed away in 2012.

"I wanted to find a place where I could afford to live off my Social Security," she said. "The weather here is so perfect, and it's a beautiful place."

4. Last Word: Beale's Status Quo, The ASD and Change and Tri-State Bank's Big Year -

Here comes the AutoZone Liberty Bowl … specifically the pre-game festivities. The day after Christmas will find both teams – Georgia and TCU – at Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid for some food and some entertainment and probably some shopping. The game itself is Friday at 11 a.m.

5. Kafkaesqueness and Such -

Paul Greenberg, editorial page editor emeritus of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, likes to write about Franz Kafka (1883-1924) and the word coined for his name, Kafkaesque.

6. Start Co. Accepting Applications for 2017 Accelerators -

The Start Co. organization in Memphis is once again looking for a few good startups.

The entity that oversees a collection of startup accelerators is taking applications now for the next 100-day program that kicks off May 1 and runs through Aug. 10.

7. Chairman’s Circle Celebrates Successes While Keeping an Eye on the Future -

Since the Greater Memphis Chamber launched the Chairman’s Circle in 2012, long-term goals have always been the driving force behind their ambitions.

And now that the Circle is about to enter its fifth year, some of those goals are already being met, while others are just beginning.

8. Gov't Proposal Envisions Phone Calls on Airline Flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines could let passengers make in-flight phone calls using Wi-Fi under a proposal from federal regulators.

Flight attendants and others have complained that the calls could be disruptive. But the Department of Transportation said Thursday that it envisioned allowing the calls if airlines tell all customers about the policy when they buy their tickets.

9. FedEx's Smith Critical of Trump Opposition to NAFTA, TPP -

FedEx Corp. founder Fred Smith says withdrawing from the North American Free Trade Agreement, as advocated by President-elect Donald Trump repeatedly in the 2016 presidential campaign, would be “catastrophic for the U.S. economy” and “have massive economic repercussions.”

10. Events -

The Fourth Bluff Ice Rink will open Saturday, Dec. 10, at Mississippi River Park (Riverside Drive next to the Tennessee Welcome Center) and will remain open through January. Hours on Sundays are noon to 6 p.m.; Tuesdays-Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Fridays from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m.; and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. The rink is closed on Mondays. Admission is $10 and includes skate rental. For details, visit memphisriverfront.com.

11. Crittenden County Deposit Leader Fidelity National Bank Turns 50 -

Fidelity National Bank in West Memphis is enjoying its 50th year in business, and through the decades the bank has become a fixture of the local community.

12. Events -

Ballet Memphis and the Memphis Symphony Orchestra will perform “Nutcracker” Friday through Sunday, Dec. 9-11, at The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main St. Performances start at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. each day. This annual holiday production features a cast of nearly 100 professional dancers, local children, musicians and vocalists. Buy tickets at balletmemphis.org.

13. Events -

Ballet Memphis and the Memphis Symphony Orchestra will perform “The Nutcracker” Friday through Sunday, Dec. 9-11, at The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main St. Performances start at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. each day. This annual production features a cast of nearly 100 professional dancers, local children, musicians and vocalists. Buy tickets at balletmemphis.org.

14. GCT Promotes Asher To Artistic Director -

Justin Asher has been promoted to artistic director of Germantown Community Theatre. Asher joined GCT in January 2015 as technical director. He was promoted to associate producer in July 2016 and has assisted in the productions of the titles in GCT’s 45th season.

15. The Week Ahead: December 5-11 -

Good morning, Memphis! December has arrived, which mean holiday happenings are officially underway – from tours of decked-out historic Collierville homes to shopping all things local at the Holiday Farmer’s Market. Oh, and did we mention Jerry Springer’s in town? Here’s the 411 on this week’s need-to-know events…

16. Platform for Property -

Airbnb is revolutionizing the hospitality industry causing legislators worldwide to scramble to regulate it, but the Memphis City Council is gaining state and national attention for its hands-off attitude.

17. Cox Release Sends Message: Get Better or Goodbye -

As the Tennessee Titans headed out the door for some long-overdue bye week days off, one veteran got more than he expected – the rest of the season off.

Perrish Cox was hardly the only member of the Titans secondary to have struggled this year, but his play, particularly in the past two games, was plenty suspect, and the guess here is that when he fell down on a first-and-goal play – bailed out only when Bears receiver Josh Bellamy inexplicably dropped a game-winning touchdown – that that was the final straw for Coach Mike Mularkey and general manager Jon Robinson.

18. United Way, MIFA Leaders Work Toward Ending Poverty -

Nearly two years into his tenure as the president and CEO of United Way of the Mid-South, Dr. Kenneth Robinson says the funder of 79 nonprofit organizations in the region continues to work toward a new basic goal – ending poverty.

19. 'We are Seeing a War for Talent’ -

Despite a daily influx of new Middle Tennessee residents, companies looking to hire workers for the upcoming holiday season may have a tougher time than usual filling those spots.

That’s because Davidson County’s unemployment rate was 3.8 percent in August, according to the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development, the lowest urban figure in the state and well below the state’s 4.4 percent rate.

20. Six-Point Plan to Help Vols Coach Stick Around Longer -

On that day in December 2012 when Butch Jones was introduced as Tennessee’s head football coach, he told Vol Nation that he had a template for fixing everything.

He said: “The plan is infallible if the players buy in.”

21. Why is It So Difficult for Tennessee To Oust Indicted Politicians? -

Tennessee is lagging much of the nation when it comes to the ability to remove scoundrels from public office.

And, make no mistake, the Volunteer State has had its fair share of ne’er-do-well politicians who would likely have been thrown out of office if the proper procedures had been in place. 

22. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

23. Cubs’ World Series Victory The Start of a New Narrative -

You can buy into the goat, into the black cat that walked in front of Ron Santo in 1969, into infamous Steve Bartman and, well, into the whole notion that the Cubs were cursed for 108 years, if you wish. 

24. Fixin’ To Lose -

RED STATES. RED HERRINGS. Earlier this year, I wrote about laws our state Legislature passed in their last session to solve problems that didn’t exist.

Statistically, you and I are much more likely to be struck by lightning while in the next door bathroom stall to a transgender person who just committed voter fraud, or sitting between an outraged counselor or therapist and a same-sex couple carrying concealed weapons in a college chapel pew than we are to fall victim to anything the Legislature has proposed or passed laws to protect us against.

25. What’s Expected of Dedric Lawson This Season? More Versatility, Fewer Hot Wings -

Dedric Lawson’s accomplishments last season are well-documented. Tied Keith Lee’s University of Memphis record for doubles-doubles by a freshman with 17. Averaged 15.8 points and 9.3 rebounds per game. Blocked 55 shots.

26. $92M Graceland Hotel Expected to Be a Catalyst for Whitehaven -

The Heartbreak Hotel on Elvis Presley Boulevard was full Wednesday, Oct. 26 – its final night as a hotel.

By the time the $92 million, 450-room Guest House at Graceland resort opened across the boulevard Thursday morning, many of the doors at the Heartbreak Hotel were missing their room numbers – taken as souvenirs by guests who filled the circa-1980s hotel in its final days.

27. Fizdale Gets First Win as Grizzlies' Coach the Hard Way -

The night before his first game as an NBA head coach, David Fizdale received a surprise when he went to his front door.

“I thought I had a delivery,” the Grizzlies’ new coach said. “It turned out to be my mom. We had a great moment last night just talking about what (this first game) meant to us and our family.”

28. Momentum in Memphis Medical District Bringing More Banks -

The past year has seen financial institutions like Iberiabank and BancorpSouth head to the Memphis Medical District to open new branches, a trend that picked up steam this week with yet another bank following suit.

29. Frustration Runs Deep for Customers Forced to Change Marketplace Plans -

Andrea Schankman’s three-year relationship with her insurer, Coventry Health Care of Missouri, has been contentious, with disputes over what treatments it would pay for. Nonetheless, like other Missourians, Schankman was unnerved to receive a notice from Coventry last month informing her that her policy was not being offered in 2017.

30. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award ceremony will be held Thursday, Oct. 20, at 6 p.m. at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main St. Themed “And Justice for All,” the award ceremony will honor six individuals for their contributions to civil and human rights in the U.S. and worldwide, and will be followed by a gala celebration. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org or call 901-525-3214 for details and tickets.

31. Words From Church -

FAITH IN THE FUNNY. As you could tell from last week’s column, this campaign is wearing on me and, I suspect, on you. Words don’t appear to matter. Truth is ignored and lies are embraced.

32. Could This Be the Year the Crimson Tide Rolls Out With a Loss at Tennessee? -

Tennessee defensive end LaTroy Lewis was raised in Akron, Ohio, and recalls a special Saturday of football each fall when he was a youth: Ohio State vs. Michigan.

“That’s what I was taught my whole life,” Lewis says, “and then I got down here in the South, and it was kind of like: ‘Is there any other game beside Tennessee and Alabama?’”

33. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

34. Last Word: Pot Passes, Stein's Stop in Crosstown and The Problem With Parking -

The city pot ordinance – the one that allows cops the option to write a ticket with a $50 fine for a half ounce or less of marijuana – is on the books.

The Tuesday vote by the Memphis City Council on third and final reading was 7-6 in favor – close, in other words -- without a vote to spare.

35. Infrastructure, Attitude Shifts Could Decrease Medical District Parking Needs -

The Memphis Medical District has 16,000 employees, 8,000 students – and 250 acres of surface parking lots. National experts say the district’s parking footprint could hinder further growth.

36. Last Word: The Debate, Arnold Palmer and an Analysts' Poll on First Horizon -

Monday evening is the first of the Trump-Clinton Presidential debates and it will probably be watched very closely for a number of reasons – not the least of which is vigorous fact-checking of both candidates and the unique nature of this campaign between the two major contenders who are by several standards the most unpopular Presidential candidates to run against each other in our lifetimes.

37. Historic Mansion Being Restored Into Exclusive French-Asian Restaurant -

The Nineteenth Century Club, one of the last great mansions of Union Avenue, was slated to become a strip mall. Next door to the 107-year-old building is a Taco Bell, which stands on the site of the Nineteenth Century Club’s former ballroom.

38. With Economic Outlook Hazy, Fed Likely to Leave Rates Alone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Again and again in recent months, the Federal Reserve has signaled that it's edging closer to resuming the interest-rate hikes it began in December.

It just doesn't seem to be there quite yet.

39. The Week Ahead: September 19-25 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! September is rolling right along, and you can get rolling too with a pair of scenic bike rides (and you might learn something too). Details on those, plus Repair Days, Mid-South Pride Festival, and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead…

40. Grizzlies and Civil Rights Museum Create ‘A Bridge of Opportunity’ -

Fifteen years ago, the Memphis Grizzlies were about to start their first season as the city’s NBA team. The run-up to the season had been bumpy with next-door neighbors displaying “NBA NOW” and “NBA NO” signs. The latter were first created with a little editing to the “NBA NOW” signs as the “w” was erased or covered over.

41. Back in Business -

There are a lot of common words and phrases in which back is an integral part. And many of them have significant application in the autumn of the year.

Welcome back is a common greeting from schools, churches, and other facilities. Interestingly, though, this phrase doesn’t really have dictionary support as a stand-alone. I would define it in two ways, if I were a lexicographer:

42. Curb Market to Open in Crosstown Concourse -

Locally owned grocery The Curb Market is returning to its midcentury roots with its plan to locate a new, larger store in Crosstown Concourse.

Curb Market founder Peter Schutt said he named the current store at 596 S. Cooper St. after the original location on Cleveland that he visited as a child.

43. Downtown Kooky Canuck Preparing to Move -

Kooky Canuck is moving next door. Montgomery Martin Contractors recently filed a $689,000 building permit to convert the ground floor of 87 S. Second St. By October, Kooky Canuck will vacate its home of 11 years at 97 S. Second St.

44. Cordova’s Parkway Place Sells in Foreclosure -

1250 N. Germantown Parkway

Cordova, TN 38016

Sale Amount: $19.6 million

Sale Date: Aug. 24, 2016

45. Downtown Kooky Canuck Preparing to Move -

Kooky Canuck is moving next door. Montgomery Martin Contractors recently filed a $689,000 building permit to convert the ground floor of 87 S. Second St. By October, Kooky Canuck will vacate its home of 11 years at 97 S. Second St.

46. The World at your Doorstep -

There is nothing you can’t get delivered these days. If you can imagine owning it, it’s only a matter of time before it can be in your possession, brought to your front door within minutes, hours or days from the first moment you even conjured the thought of having it.

47. We Know, We Know -

THE MORE YOU KNOW, THE BETTER. There’s a guy crawling around my house with something called a moisture meter. Whatever it finds is measured in money. There’s another one sanding my living room down to raw wood. Cha-ching. My dogs are going nuts not knowing which of them to bark at next or which sound to run from or toward. Please shut up.

48. French Truck Coffee Making Splash in Memphis -

Jimmy Lewis said that when he agreed to move his Relevant Roasters concept into Crosstown Concourse, he was taking a risk. His coffee-roasting operation is only 2 years old, and the in-house coffee shop element at 584 Tillman St. is even newer.

49. Pera’s Ubiquiti Networks at Pivotal Moment -

Big tech companies like Google and Facebook have been generating news headlines and public interest for a while now over their plans to bring internet connectivity to the large swaths of the world that still don’t have it, or that need a better offering of some kind.

50. Matlock the ‘Truth,’ ‘Justice’ Candidate For Tennessee House Speaker -

Republican state Rep. Jimmy Matlock insists his quest for the House Speaker’s post is not a challenge of Beth Harwell’s leadership.

But it’s clear he sees a need for change.

51. Virtual Fun: VR Technology Comes to Rec Room -

The Broad Avenue arcade bar Rec Room already boasts a suite of video game consoles for players to essentially rent, everything from old school Nintendo to Xbox and Playstation consoles whose games can be projected onto the space’s giant walls.

52. Boyle Completing Key Quadrant At Schilling Farms, Eyeing More Retail -

Boyle Investment Co. is wrapping up construction on a critical corner of Schilling Farms that will bring more retail and encourage more office users to consider the development. The three adjacent projects fill in the southern quadrant of Schilling Boulevard and Winchester Road, a small part of the sprawling 443-acre, city-within-a-city in Collierville.

53. Jones Teaches Tech to Underrepresented Minorities -

On a blistering Friday in early July, in a colorful classroom at Lester Community Center, 25 middle-schoolers are getting a crash course in data encryption. “Who can tell me the difference between a black-hat hacker and a white-hat hacker?” asks Audrey Jones, standing at the front of the room.

54. We Are They -

THERE IS NO OTHER, OTHER THAN US. They came for them. They came for us.

You may not have heard of Martin Niemöller, a Protestant pastor in 1930s Germany, but you’ve probably heard him quoted, beginning, “First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out – because I was not a Socialist.” You may have heard or seen some variation of the original referencing Communists or Catholics or Mexicans or Muslims or African-Americans or whatever other, but you got the point because the original and every version concludes, “Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out – because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me – and there was no one left to speak for me.”

55. Businesses Welcome Elvis Presley Birthplace Trail Completion -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – No more orange barrels to drive around, no more lane shifts, no more trouble getting in and out of parking spaces.

"Hallelujah," said Pam Fair, a co-owner of Sparrows on Main, a boutique on East Main Street that opened in May 2014. Four months later, work began on the Elvis Presley Birthplace Trail.

56. Frayser Landfill Owner Pulls Expansion Application, But Plans to Return -

Amid public opposition, Memphis Wrecking Co. has withdrawn its application to expand its landfill near Whitney Elementary School in Frayser. This is the second consecutive time the company withdrawn its application with the Land Use Control Board before the board could consider the request.

57. Does Tennessee Have its Swagger Back? Vols Say it Never Left -

HOOVER, Ala. – This spring, senior linebacker Jalen Reeves-Maybin walked into the office of Tennessee head coach Butch Jones and asked permission to show the team a video he put together.

Jones didn’t even ask to preview the video, just gave Reeves-Maybin the go-ahead to run his 25-point presentation. Reeves-Maybin easily could have made this a highlight reel of himself. After all, he led the team with 105 tackles and 14 tackles for loss, plus had six sacks and forced and recovered two fumbles.

58. Hattiloo’s Bandele: ‘It’s a Supply and Demand Thing’ -

When you see Ekundayo Bandele in his sleek, contemporary Midtown office, dressed sharp in a tie and freshly shined shoes, phone dinging constantly, you might think he was born to be a theater impresario. 

59. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 4 -

In the past three columns, I’ve told how, in February 2002, I had a major reminiscence of my role in saving the life of a heart attack victim-in-denial 20 years earlier. In March I received annoying emails about how to survive a heart attack while alone. In early April I dreamed of my heartland being under attack.

60. Appreciation: Pat Summitt Used the Sport to Empower Women -

Needing yet another men's basketball coach, Tennessee officials turned to the one person they thought would be perfect to take over the Volunteers program.

Pat Summitt said no.

She wasn't interested in the job in 1994 after Wade Houston was forced out, and she turned it down again when Jerry Green quit in March 2001. A Tennessee governor once joked he wouldn't have his job if Summitt ever wanted to run her home state.

61. The Kitchen Restaurant at Shelby Farms Hiring -

The Kitchen Restaurant is hiring full and part-time staff for its upcoming restaurant at Shelby Farms Park.

62. The Kitchen Restaurant at Shelby Farms Hiring -

The Kitchen Restaurant is hiring full- and part-time staff for its upcoming restaurant at Shelby Farms Park.

63. Same Name, No Relation -

THE NAME OF WHAT WE ONCE HOPED TO BE AND WHAT WE’VE ACTUALLY BECOME.

Andy Holt.

The late Andy Holt from Milan, a schoolteacher, a coach, and once the principal of what is now Campus School in Memphis, the national president of the National Education Association and president of the University of Tennessee. His Columbia doctoral dissertation was about the struggle for public support of education in Tennessee.

64. Is There Room for ‘Fair’ at Work? -

One of the worst things that can happen to any employee is to find out they aren’t being treated the same as their co-workers. We’ve all been there. Perhaps you didn’t realize the person who sits next to you gets a week more of vacation. Or, maybe they have special permission to leave early every day. Or, they make more money than you do. Perhaps their mobile phone is paid for.

65. Volkswagen to Launch More Electric Cars After Diesel Scandal -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) – German automaker Volkswagen plans to ramp up its offerings of electric vehicles as it fights to bounce back from a scandal over diesel cars rigged to cheat on emissions tests.

66. Martha Stewart Gets Into Meal Kit Business -

NEW YORK (AP) – Cooking like Martha Stewart is about to get easier.

The home goods mogul and cookbook author is getting into the fast-growing meal kit business. Subscribers will get a box shipped to their door with Stewart's recipes and all the ingredients needed to cook up the dishes at home, including pre-measured raw meat, fish, vegetables and spices.

67. On Stage at the Halloran Centre’ Series Unveiled -

Details of the inaugural “On Stage at the Halloran Centre” series lineup have been announced.

Ten music acts are slated to appear over 2016-2017 inside the Halloran Centre’s 361-seat auditorium starting in September, for a concert series that offers everything from a slice of Americana to Grammy winners.

68. Show Time -

For the first time in years, the Peabody Place mall was packed. On June 3, hundreds of ServiceMaster employees and a handful of business and government leaders ushered in One ServiceMaster Center, a multimillion-dollar headquarters for Memphis’ fourth-largest public company.

69. ‘On Stage at the Halloran Centre’ Series Unveiled -

Details of the inaugural “On Stage at the Halloran Centre” series lineup have been announced.

Ten music acts are slated to appear over 2016-2017 inside the Halloran Centre’s 361-seat auditorium starting in September, for a concert series that offers everything from a slice of Americana to Grammy winners.

70. Last Word: Graduation Day and Our Outrage, An ASD Offer In Raleigh and Fashion -

According to Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson, 15,000 people have watched the several dozen high school graduation ceremonies the school system has streamed live on its website including the 14 graduations held Saturday.

71. Pugh Takes Politically Volatile Shelter Position -

The new director of the Memphis Animal Shelter says a shelter that doesn’t euthanize animals because of time or space is a goal.

But Alexis Pugh, who starts the job next month, is quick to add that public safety is the immediate priority.

72. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

73. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

74. Joerger Lands in Sacramento; Grizzlies Casting for Replacement -

Future conversation in Sacramento between new coach Dave Joerger and franchise player DeMarcus “Boogie” Cousins:

Joerger: “DeMarcus, do you get what we’re doing here, do you know what you’re doing on this play?”

75. Brooks Renovation Shines on Overton's Busy Weekend -

The temporary metal barriers on the Overton Park Greensward are where those parking on the Greensward to attend the Memphis Zoo meet those protesting the parking on the Greensward.

But Saturday, May 7, the literal line in the park’s running two-year controversy was one of the quietest places in a park that was bursting at the seams with activity just about everywhere else except the Old Forest.

76. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

77. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

78. Bikesmith Evolving Into Community Hangout -

The Bikesmith’s grand opening next week for a patio expansion and a pump track at the 509 N. Hollywood bicycle shop is the latest reflection of Jim Steffen’s longstanding intent to make his business bigger than a place where goods are bought and sold.

79. Fed Keeps Key Rate Unchanged; No Hint on Timing of Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve kept a key interest rate unchanged Wednesday against the backdrop of a slowdown in U.S. and global growth and provided no hint of when its next rate hike may occur.

80. Farm-To-Table Restaurant For Shelby Farms -

415 E. Patriot Lake Road
Memphis, TN 38134

Permit Amount: $1 million

Owner: Shelby Farms Conservancy 

81. $1 Million Building Permit For Shelby Farms Restaurant -

Construction is soon to start on The Kitchen restaurant in Shelby Farms.

Montgomery Martin Contractors recently filed a $1 million construction permit for The Kitchen’s build-out as part of “the new core and shell building restaurant & retreat center at Shelby Farms.”

82. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

83. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

84. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

85. Genome Explorations Leads Push To Bring Personalized Medicine to Patients -

Memphis-based Genome Explorations is hoping to take 15 years of genetics and pharmacogenetics research and translate it into personalized medicine that will fundamentally change the way prolific diseases like cancer and heart disease are treated.

86. Don’t Chew With Your Mouth Full -

I am always looking for useful proverbs, adages, mottos, and the like. Especially stuff that can be easily memorized. Like “Don’t chew with your mouth full.” And “I feel a whole lot more like I do now than I did when I got here.”

87. Graduate Memphis Putting College Degrees Within Reach for More Adults -

Imagine a company coming to Memphis promising to add $140 million annually into the local payroll. This company was not asking for tax breaks or free rent, just the opportunity to come to Shelby County and pump this money into our economy and pay taxes.

88. Council Working to Build Local Manufacturing for Device Industry -

The medical device industry fuels Memphis’ backbone. With a $2.6 billion local economic impact and nearly 17,000 direct and indirect jobs, original equipment manufacturers like Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Group, Medtronic Spinal & Biologistics and Microport Orthopedics have made the Memphis area their base for products and medical devices.

89. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

90. Sports Notebook: Memphis, UT Vols Shut out of NCAA Tourney; Grizz Keep Grinding; Waino Bullish on Cards -

The University of Memphis won two American Athletic Conference Tournament games but lost to Connecticut for a third time this season in Sunday’s title game. The Tigers were close enough to the Big Dance to hear the music and smell the punch, but nowhere close to getting an at-large invitation.

91. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

92. Grammy Museum Opens in Mississippi Delta -

CLEVELAND, Miss. (AP) – The second and only official Grammy Museum outside of Los Angeles opened Saturday in the Mississippi Delta, cradle of the blues.

Organizers chose Cleveland, Mississippi – two hours north of the state capital Jackson – for the nearly $20 million project and promise one of the most advanced museums in the country. It's a smaller but updated version of its sister museum in California and employs high-definition touchscreens and interactive technology to chronicle American music history from before the first Grammy Awards in 1959 to the present.

93. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

94. New Regime Begins Rebuild at NFL Combine -

The sports nation’s eyes are rarely fixed on the Tennessee Titans. The upcoming season will be the franchise’s 20th year in the state of Tennessee, and except for their Super Bowl run in 1999 and a couple of playoff years where they were the No. 1 seed, the Titans haven’t really commanded the full attention of the football world.

95. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

96. Lockdown: Apple Could Make It Even Tougher to Hack Phones -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Suppose the FBI wins its court battle and forces Apple to help unlock an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino killers. That could open all iPhones up to potential government scrutiny – but it's not the end of the story.

97. Callahan Breaks Down UT’s 'Pretty Impressive' Recruiting Class -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones keeps his pulse on recruiting year-around, along with his SEC counterparts and other FBS coaches.

Chasing recruits is an endless cycle, the lifeblood of championship football teams.

98. NAWBO’s Dixon Using Experience To Help Other Women in Business -

Dianne Dixon, president of the Memphis chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners, has spent her life and career earning a seat at the table for herself, and now she’s holding the door open for a new generation of women business owners.

99. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

100. Last Word: The Trade, Hardaway-Todd Grudge Match and Tomato Aspic -

Jeff Green leaves the Grizzlies for the Clippers and Lance Stephenson leaves the Clippers for the Grizzlies.
That was the trade at the NBA’s Thursday afternoon deadline that caused much of Thursday’s deadline buzz as well as lots of social media reaction.
Some of the reaction was tempered by the other part, a protected lottery pick for the Grizz as well.