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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Graduation Day and Our Outrage, An ASD Offer In Raleigh and Fashion -

According to Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson, 15,000 people have watched the several dozen high school graduation ceremonies the school system has streamed live on its website including the 14 graduations held Saturday.

2. Pugh Takes Politically Volatile Shelter Position -

The new director of the Memphis Animal Shelter says a shelter that doesn’t euthanize animals because of time or space is a goal.

But Alexis Pugh, who starts the job next month, is quick to add that public safety is the immediate priority.

3. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

4. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

5. Joerger Lands in Sacramento; Grizzlies Casting for Replacement -

Future conversation in Sacramento between new coach Dave Joerger and franchise player DeMarcus “Boogie” Cousins:

Joerger: “DeMarcus, do you get what we’re doing here, do you know what you’re doing on this play?”

6. Brooks Renovation Shines on Overton's Busy Weekend -

The temporary metal barriers on the Overton Park Greensward are where those parking on the Greensward to attend the Memphis Zoo meet those protesting the parking on the Greensward.

But Saturday, May 7, the literal line in the park’s running two-year controversy was one of the quietest places in a park that was bursting at the seams with activity just about everywhere else except the Old Forest.

7. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

8. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

9. Bikesmith Evolving Into Community Hangout -

The Bikesmith’s grand opening next week for a patio expansion and a pump track at the 509 N. Hollywood bicycle shop is the latest reflection of Jim Steffen’s longstanding intent to make his business bigger than a place where goods are bought and sold.

10. Fed Keeps Key Rate Unchanged; No Hint on Timing of Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve kept a key interest rate unchanged Wednesday against the backdrop of a slowdown in U.S. and global growth and provided no hint of when its next rate hike may occur.

11. Farm-To-Table Restaurant For Shelby Farms -

415 E. Patriot Lake Road
Memphis, TN 38134

Permit Amount: $1 million

Owner: Shelby Farms Conservancy 

12. $1 Million Building Permit For Shelby Farms Restaurant -

Construction is soon to start on The Kitchen restaurant in Shelby Farms.

Montgomery Martin Contractors recently filed a $1 million construction permit for The Kitchen’s build-out as part of “the new core and shell building restaurant & retreat center at Shelby Farms.”

13. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

14. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

15. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

16. Genome Explorations Leads Push To Bring Personalized Medicine to Patients -

Memphis-based Genome Explorations is hoping to take 15 years of genetics and pharmacogenetics research and translate it into personalized medicine that will fundamentally change the way prolific diseases like cancer and heart disease are treated.

17. Don’t Chew With Your Mouth Full -

I am always looking for useful proverbs, adages, mottos, and the like. Especially stuff that can be easily memorized. Like “Don’t chew with your mouth full.” And “I feel a whole lot more like I do now than I did when I got here.”

18. Graduate Memphis Putting College Degrees Within Reach for More Adults -

Imagine a company coming to Memphis promising to add $140 million annually into the local payroll. This company was not asking for tax breaks or free rent, just the opportunity to come to Shelby County and pump this money into our economy and pay taxes.

19. Council Working to Build Local Manufacturing for Device Industry -

The medical device industry fuels Memphis’ backbone. With a $2.6 billion local economic impact and nearly 17,000 direct and indirect jobs, original equipment manufacturers like Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Group, Medtronic Spinal & Biologistics and Microport Orthopedics have made the Memphis area their base for products and medical devices.

20. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

21. Sports Notebook: Memphis, UT Vols Shut out of NCAA Tourney; Grizz Keep Grinding; Waino Bullish on Cards -

The University of Memphis won two American Athletic Conference Tournament games but lost to Connecticut for a third time this season in Sunday’s title game. The Tigers were close enough to the Big Dance to hear the music and smell the punch, but nowhere close to getting an at-large invitation.

22. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

23. Grammy Museum Opens in Mississippi Delta -

CLEVELAND, Miss. (AP) – The second and only official Grammy Museum outside of Los Angeles opened Saturday in the Mississippi Delta, cradle of the blues.

Organizers chose Cleveland, Mississippi – two hours north of the state capital Jackson – for the nearly $20 million project and promise one of the most advanced museums in the country. It's a smaller but updated version of its sister museum in California and employs high-definition touchscreens and interactive technology to chronicle American music history from before the first Grammy Awards in 1959 to the present.

24. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

25. New Regime Begins Rebuild at NFL Combine -

The sports nation’s eyes are rarely fixed on the Tennessee Titans. The upcoming season will be the franchise’s 20th year in the state of Tennessee, and except for their Super Bowl run in 1999 and a couple of playoff years where they were the No. 1 seed, the Titans haven’t really commanded the full attention of the football world.

26. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

27. Lockdown: Apple Could Make It Even Tougher to Hack Phones -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Suppose the FBI wins its court battle and forces Apple to help unlock an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino killers. That could open all iPhones up to potential government scrutiny – but it's not the end of the story.

28. Callahan Breaks Down UT’s 'Pretty Impressive' Recruiting Class -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones keeps his pulse on recruiting year-around, along with his SEC counterparts and other FBS coaches.

Chasing recruits is an endless cycle, the lifeblood of championship football teams.

29. NAWBO’s Dixon Using Experience To Help Other Women in Business -

Dianne Dixon, president of the Memphis chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners, has spent her life and career earning a seat at the table for herself, and now she’s holding the door open for a new generation of women business owners.

30. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

31. Last Word: The Trade, Hardaway-Todd Grudge Match and Tomato Aspic -

Jeff Green leaves the Grizzlies for the Clippers and Lance Stephenson leaves the Clippers for the Grizzlies.
That was the trade at the NBA’s Thursday afternoon deadline that caused much of Thursday’s deadline buzz as well as lots of social media reaction.
Some of the reaction was tempered by the other part, a protected lottery pick for the Grizz as well.

32. State Senate: OK to Deny Counseling Due to Religious Beliefs -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Therapists and counselors in Tennessee could decline to treat patients on the basis of "sincerely held religious beliefs" under a bill passed by the state Senate on Wednesday.

33. Last Word: 901Fest, First Tennessee Sues Pinnacle and EDGE Responds -

U of M Tigers 73 – UCF Knights 56 at FedExForum and on ESPN Wednesday evening.

As that was underway, Vice President Joe Biden was on his way out of the Memphis area after a visit to the Norfolk Southern intermodal facility in Rossville.
Here’s the basic web story account from Wednesday evening of Biden’s visit which comes on the seventh anniversary of the enactment of the federal stimulus act.
More on the larger themes in the visit and three-city tour by Biden in the print version that hits online Thursday afternoon.

34. Interactive Solutions Inc. Prepares to Celebrate 20 Years -

Anniversaries can be perfunctory milestones in the life of a business, mile markers along the road to longevity that represent a cause for reflection on the past and future.

There’s a simple reason why for Jay Myers, preparing to celebrate the 20th anniversary of his videoconference technology company Interactive Solutions Inc., the milestone he’ll be celebrating is more momentous than that.

35. Last Word: Clinton in Whitehaven, Changes to Parkside and The Replacements Book -

The Presidential primary caravan has arrived.
Former President Bill Clinton was in Whitehaven Thursday evening to campaign for his wife, former Secretary of State and U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton.
And it was a reminder of his political potency as well as his popularity in a city that went for Barack Obama over his wife in the 2008 Tennessee Presidential primary but which was solidly behind him in both of his successful bids for the White House in the 1990s.
Clinton spoke in a packed Whitehaven High gymnasium to more than 700 people for almost an hour and then worked the crowd that gathered near the podium for another 25 minutes before sprinting out a door to a waiting car.
We’ll be busy this weekend with the opening of the local Bernie Sanders campaign headquarters and we’re still waiting on that promised Donald Trump Memphis appearance.
And we expect to encounter lots of Republican presidential partisans at the local GOP's annual Lincoln Day Gala on the 20th.

36. Burger King's Next Conquest: Hot Dog King -

NEW YORK (AP) — Burger King is looking for a new crown: Hot Dog King.

The Miami-based chain says it plans to put hot dogs on its menu nationally for the first time starting Feb. 23. It may seem like a jarring addition for those who know the chain for its Whoppers. But Burger King says its ability to flame-grill meat makes hot dogs a natural fit on its menu.

37. A Bit More Super -

CARE ABOUT THE GAME. I’m a homer. I can’t watch a sporting event for the beauty of the game, the spirit of the competition, the skill displayed on both sides. I want somebody’s butt kicked and for good reason.

38. History Lesson -

A HISTORY LESSON TAUGHT, NOT LEARNED.

When I first wrote about attempts to steamroll Overton Park, a friend told me a great story. He was in his parents’ living room one afternoon in the late ’60s listening to his father go on and on about the battle to keep I-40 out of Overton Park ... too late to stop it, who are these silly protestors anyway, yadda yadda ... when they turned on the local news.

39. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

40. Olymbec Compiling Airport-Area Office Park -

Olymbec USA LLC is gaining critical mass near Memphis International Airport with the planned purchase of a 133,600-square-foot office building at 2600 Nonconnah Blvd.

41. Daush Eyes Next Career Chapter -

On one hand, a long journey in the education profession will come to an end this spring for Barbara Daush.

Daush is president of St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School, a role she has served since 1994. She’ll retire at the end of this school year but it’s a short retirement; Daush begins work in fundraising at the University of Mississippi July 5.

42. From the High-Flying to the Practical: CES 2016 in Brief -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – This year's CES gadget show, like ones before it, showed off a mix of the dreamy and the practical in technology. Gadget prototypes promised us fully autonomous vehicles carrying commuters on the streets and in the sky, while gizmos went on sale that aimed to solve daily problems like restocking your fridge.

43. Memphis Banking Officials Brace for Changes In New Year -

As he chatted about the Memphis banking market with a few guests in a conference room at his bank’s headquarters on Quail Hollow Road back in 2010, Magna Bank chairman, president and CEO Kirk Bailey looked into the future and imagined how local mergers must surely be on the way.

44. Almost Gone: Kobe, Carter and an Era -

There were moments. For the great ones, for the future Hall-of-Famers, there are always moments.

So yes, Kobe Bryant can still occasionally cross somebody over and run toward the rim. Sunday night at FedExForum, he even did it to Tony Allen.

45. Competition for Jones Lang Lasalle in Tennessee -

Amid debate about privatization within state government, legislators are glad to see Tennessee seeking competition in its building leasing program.

“To me, when you’ve got competition, you’ve got people who may do something for next to nothing just to get their foot in the door,” says state Rep. Mike Sparks, who raised questions about the state’s leasing program and contract with Jones Lang Lasalle, which started charging commissions when it got involved in 2012.

46. Feast On: Looking Back at Busy 2015 for Memphis Restaurants -

Belly Acres co-owner Ben McLean can hardly believe it’s been a year since his farm-to-table burger restaurant in Overton Square first opened its doors.

47. The Week Ahead: Nov. 30, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from snow and sledding at the Levitt Shell to orientation for members of the new Memphis City Council...

48. Memphis Guitar Spa Carves Unique Place in City -

In a city known for music and a hard-working, gritty vibe, Memphis Guitar Spa in the heart of the Broad Avenue Arts District personifies that attitude.

Owner Kevin Ferner opened the business in 2013 at 2561 Broad, where he and partner Hans Hilboldt are luthiers, specializing in guitar repairs, custom builds and custom finishes. The shop’s repair and restoration department handles everything from broken tops to finish work and broken necks. While there are other technicians in town, Ferner said Memphis Guitar Spa is a rarity in that it also provides complete reconstruction of acoustic and electric guitars, including working on finished instruments.

49. Painful thought: Will the Titans ever be good again? -

As the Tennessee Titans head down the backstretch of another unproductive season, it might be time to ponder a scary question: Will the Titans ever be good again?

How much longer will they be an NFL’s bottom feeder, swimming the same muddy waters as the Raiders, Browns, Lions and Jaguars?

50. Ready for Launch -

Five hundred new companies in 10 years. That’s the idea that founded EPIcenter, short for Entrepreneurship-Powered Innovation Center, an organization looking to catalyze the entrepreneurial movement in Memphis.

51. Lawyers for Stewart's Family Want Special Prosecutor -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The top prosecutor in Memphis took more than two months to review an 800-page investigative report by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on the shooting death of a black teen by a white police officer. Then she recommended that a grand jury charge the policeman with voluntary manslaughter.

52. Others might join Whisenhunt before it’s over -

The clock is ticking for Mike Mularkey, just as it is for most of the organization’s management team.

As the Tennessee Titans new interim coach, Mularkey has nine games now to prove himself worthy of being the team’s head coach beyond just the remainder of the team’s wrecked 2015 season.

53. Conference Aims to Spark Positive Change, One ZIP Code at a Time -

The world can be a big place, even within one city or a single ZIP code. But the world also can be made smaller when the right kinds of lines are crossed.

Steve Nash founded nonprofit Advance Memphis in 1999, beginning an ambitious project without end. His goal: bring economic sustainability to the people living in and around the Cleaborn/Foote Homes public housing developments in South Memphis’ 38126 ZIP code, the poorest urban ZIP in Tennessee.

54. SEC Opens Door to Startup Investing For All -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new form of crowdfunding is coming soon that will allow startups to raise money by selling stock to Main Street investors.

The Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday adopted rules implementing a 2012 law that opened the door to securities crowdfunding. The vote was 3-1 at a public meeting.

55. Traits That Lead to Better Finances -

Ray’s Take Saving money isn’t all about whether or not you know how to score the bargain of the century every time. It has more to do with your habits and attitude toward money. Understanding the impact of personal traits on finances is essential for building wealth.

56. Halloween Benefit Set For Church Health Center -

A Halloween bash to benefit the Church Health Center is set for Stop 345 at 345 Madison Ave. Oct. 31.

57. Together Again -

To look ahead to next season, we must first go back to last season. To that heady time when the Grizzlies held a 2-1 series lead over the Golden State Warriors in the NBA’s Western Conference semifinals.

58. Around Here, You Hear Belz -

BELZ IS AT IT AGAIN. AND THAT’S A GOOD THING.

If you think you know Memphis, and you don’t know about him, you don’t know Jack.

Following his father Phillip as patriarch to the Belz family, Jack Belz led Belz Enterprises for decades, a company close to or at the top of Tennessee property owners for all that time. A quiet philanthropist and quiet pioneer in the concepts of city gateway centers and discount malls, Belz went very public with the world-class renovation and reopening of The Peabody.

59. Halloween Benefit Set For Church Health Center -

A Halloween bash to benefit the Church Health Center is set for Stop 345 at 345 Madison Ave. Oct. 31.

60. Students Find Options via Tennessee Promise -

Siegel High School graduate Davione Williamson wasn’t quite sure he was college material when he entered Motlow State Community College in Smyrna this August on a Tennessee Promise scholarship.

61. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story in Memphis Election -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

62. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

63. Third-Party Ads Attacking Wharton, Strickland Surface -

An Alexandria, Va., political action committee is behind an attack ad targeting incumbent A C Wharton in the upcoming Memphis mayor's race.

The Neighborhood Alliance PAC, which formed a month ago, isn’t endorsing any candidate in the Oct. 8 elections, but it has turned out some yard signs and other literature built around the format of a report card that gives Wharton failing grades.

64. Sales Teams Create Advocates -

Now more than ever, the line between the marketing department and the sales team has been blurred. Marketing teams are connecting tech-savvy customers with the information they most want to know about your brand, essentially taking on those crucial, early phases of the client lifecycle.

65. Haslam Opens Door to Gas Tax Delay but Warns of Backlog -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is opening the door to putting off a gas tax increase in an election year, but warns that officials need to stop "kidding ourselves" about Tennessee's growing list of unfunded road projects.

66. School Changes Fuel Door-to-Door Advocacy -

Since its launch in July, the group Memphis Lift says it has contacted 14,000 families in Memphis to tell them where the schools in their community stand in terms of student achievement.

The group marked the end of its summer push Wednesday, Sept. 23, at Dave Wells Community Center in North Memphis, next to Caldwell-Guthrie Elementary. It’s one of several low-performing schools the state-run Achievement School District is considering taking over in 2016-2017.

67. Socially Conscious Lesouque Curates Global, Ethical Designs -

Gokben Yamandag recalls fond childhood memories visiting open markets for hours on Saturdays in her native Turkey.

These bazaars, called souks, were the biggest entertainment going for children on a Saturday. Imagine a farmers market, only a hundred times bigger, with clothing, scarves and numerous other unique items.

68. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

69. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

70. Indie Memphis Taps Watt as Executive Director -

This year keeps shaping up to be a milestone for the Indie Memphis Film Festival, which has tapped local filmmaker Ryan Watt to serve as its new executive director following the departure of Erik Jambor earlier this year.

71. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

72. Magna Bank Prepares for New Memphis Identity -

Magna Bank in Memphis isn't set to open for business with a new name above the door for a couple more months, now that its acquisition by Nashville-based Pinnacle Financial Partners has officially closed.

73. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

74. ‘Black Wednesday’ Inspires Commission Run -

For a military man and dedicated physician, Richard Briggs has found time for a variety of pastimes and experiences with more adventure trips on the horizon.

75. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

76. Whiskey-Stained and Market-Bound -

Remember the old Levi’s plant off Magnolia? Marcus Hall does, and he’s taken a family history that involves clothing-factory work, fashion sense and a can-do attitude to stitch and rivet together a denim line that’s scooping up local awards and garnering national attention.

77. Indie Memphis Doubles Length, Adds Downtown -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival will extend its presence back Downtown this year – for the first time since 2006 – with a series of events scheduled on top of its Midtown offerings.

This year’s festival, set for Nov. 3-10, will also be bigger – up from four days in previous years. In addition to hosting screenings and events in Overton Square, this year’s festival will offer programs Downtown at the new Halloran Centre for Perfoming Arts & Education next door to the Orpheum Theatre.

78. Scheduled Good Times: The Next Grizzlies Season -

Turns out, Marc Gasol was wrong.

“I don’t think LeBron is coming through that door anytime soon,” Gasol said after the end of last season.

But in fact LeBron James, albeit wearing a Cleveland Cavaliers uniform, will come through the doors at FedExForum for the 2015-16 season opener on Wednesday, Oct. 28.

79. County Commission Chairmanship Given, Taken Back -

For a while Monday, Aug. 10, it looked like the Shelby County Commission had shaken off several years of political conflict in the annual selection of its chairman.

As was the case the three previous years, a commission chairman had been elected with most of his or her votes coming from commissioners of the other party. The body currently is made up of seven Democrats and six Republicans.

80. Baseball’s Missed Chances -

It is said that success in sports sometimes comes down to a matter of inches.

And in sports hero worship, the saying is apropos.

Back in 1991, I was a 14-year-old kid making my first visit to a Major League Baseball game. It was in Arlington Stadium, the dump of a home park of my favorite team, the Texas Rangers.

81. Indie Memphis Doubles Length, Adds Downtown Presence -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival will extend its presence back Downtown this year – for the first time since 2006 – with a series of events scheduled on top of its Midtown offerings.

This year’s festival, set for Nov. 3-10, will also be bigger – up from four days in previous years. In addition to hosting screenings and events in Overton Square, this year’s festival will offer programs Downtown at the new Halloran Centre for Perfoming Arts & Education next door to the Orpheum Theatre.

82. In the Digital Race, There Is No Finish Line -

Recently, the American Marketing Association’s Memphis chapter conducted a member survey to find out the topics of greatest interest.

“Digital was the No. 1 topic people wanted to talk about,” chapter president Melissa Thomson said.

83. Crosstown Concourse Taps Retail Leasing Agent -

Crosstown Concourse has added another member to its growing team: The Shopping Center Group LLC will be the exclusive retail leasing agent for the massive project.

84. Crosstown Concourse Taps Retail Leasing Agent -

Crosstown Concourse has added another member to its growing team: The Shopping Center Group LLC will be the exclusive retail leasing agent for the massive project.

85. Car2Go to Offer Car-Share Service in Nashville -

The Austin-based car-sharing company Car2Go plans to drive into the Nashville market next year, offering residents in the downtown core yet another way of getting around.

Company officials haven’t given an exact timeline, but an ordinance sponsored by Belmont-Hillsboro Council member Burkley Allen, which passed at Metro Council’s July session, opens the door for Car2Go and other car-sharing companies.

86. Haunted History, A Story Retold -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story – one I shared first in a 2013 column – it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary.

87. A General Invitation, Revisited -

COME ON BACK TO ELMWOOD, GENERAL FORREST. I first issued that invitation in 2013 and while we haven’t yet heard from the General, we’ve heard from just about everybody else. The invitation stands because – as it has been for some time – it’s past time.

88. Clark Tower to Get $6 Million in Capital Improvements -

The venerable Clark Tower is getting an infusion of cash for capital improvements.

In-Rel Properties, which owns the East Memphis skyscraper, has executed an agreement with the building’s lender paving the way for a $6 million capital improvement project that will begin immediately.

89. Young Ben’s Start -

Next January will mark the 310th birthday of Benjamin Franklin. Thinker, inventor, scientist, diplomat, politician, writer. Founding parent of a great nation. A non-president with his face on a bit of paper currency. As Independence Day is just past us, it’s hardly an inappropriate time to revisit the life and times of this noted early patriot.

90. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

91. Martin, Wilson Travel Parallel Paths to Success -

Pitmaster Pat Martin of Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint and Chef Tandy Wilson of City House didn’t know one another in early 2007. Yet they’d soon have more than a few things in common.

92. Sea Isle Principal Prepares ‘The Island’ for New School Year -

Cardboard letters on the cinderblock wall just inside the entrance to Sea Isle Elementary School in East Memphis welcome students to “the island” – a much quieter place in these summer days but not a deserted island.

93. Need Reason to Pay By Phone? Apple, Google Add New Features -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry has been saying for years that smartphones would make traditional wallets obsolete. But most people still use cash or plastic when they shop in stores.

94. Fast Growth for Knoxville Diocese -

For the smallest Catholic diocese in the U.S., the Knoxville diocese knows how to draw a crowd of movers and shakers.

At the April 19 groundbreaking for the new $25 million cathedral, the lineup of both secular and non-secular dignitaries attending a weekend of events was impressive.

95. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

96. Sales Volume Raises Risk of Closing Snafus -

The Greater Nashville Association of Realtors’ May sales data show sales continuing to rise.

There were 3,558 closings, up 15.6 percent from last May. In comparison, there were 1,783 closings in May 2009. So closings have almost doubled since the Recession. And, as everyone knows, inventory has dropped dramatically.

97. Tennessee State Employees Slighted by 'Voluntary' Buyout -

More and more, Tennessee’s state employees are feeling the same harsh realities of those working – or formerly working – in corporate America.

On the heels of 1,500 buyouts under the Bredesen administration in 2008 and 850 layoffs in 2010, Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 2,000 employees in the executive branch.

98. Memphis Restaurants ‘Love Their Patios’ -

The warm weather means it's that time of year again for Memphis diners.

Patios have begun filling up around the city as restaurant patrons flock to outdoor dining settings where they can people-watch, enjoy drinks and nosh on smaller, simpler menu items.

99. New Memphis Institute's Annual Summer Experience Connecting Young Professionals -

Hundreds of interns working at Memphis companies this summer are getting a taste of what the Bluff City has to offer them, should they choose to put down roots here.

The New Memphis Institute’s annual Summer Experience slate of events is intended to connect young professionals working in the city with their peers; to establish movers and shakers; and to give them an up-close look at Memphis. The goal: capture their attention at a formative stage in their life, when they’re poised to make plans about whatever city they’ll ultimately call home.

100. Germantown Dental Group Celebrates 40th Anniversary -

Germantown Dental Group holds its 40th anniversary celebration next week.

The business – founded in 1975 by Dr. Mickey Bernstein which has grown into a major cosmetic and restorative care practice – will hold its event June 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot at 2165 West Street. The party will include food, inflatables and face painting for children, as well as live music and door prizes.