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Editorial Results (free)

1. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

2. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

3. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

4. The Week Ahead: Aug. 13-19 -

Good morning, Memphis! A host a government meetings and late summer movie offerings mark this week in mid-August. The Labor Day holiday weekend and start of football season isn’t too far off.

5. With Memphis Heritage’s New Store, New Life Breathed into Pieces of Old Memphis -

A train station’s bathroom door. The terra cotta trim of a medical building. An oblong sink that preservationist plucked from a now-demolished building on South Front Street.

Pieces of old Memphis get new opportunities for use at an Edge neighborhood store that once housed a body shop. Heritage Building Supply opened in November.

6. Frayser Bauhaus Draws Preview Crowd of 300 -

The investor developer of a Bauhaus-style home from the late 1940s in Frayser says the area is the “next frontier” in Memphis real estate.

“I’m super passionate about Frayser. When I came out here and saw the beautiful rolling hills, I’m like, ‘This is the next frontier,’” Dana Gabrion told a group of 300 people outside the house at 3590 Thomas St. at Floyd Avenue Thursday, July 12.

7. AutoZone Expanding Downtown, One Commerce Square Hits Market -

40 S. Main St.

Memphis, TN 38103

Property: One Commerce Square Building 

Seller: Memphis Commerce Square Partners LLC

Details: One Commerce Square, the fourth-largest building in Memphis, has hit the market.

8. Motor Museum Slated For Edge District -

A new nonprofit museum geared toward automotive history and preservation could be coming to the Memphis Medical District.

Located at 645 Marshall Ave., The Edge Motor Museum is a part of a $1.4 million renovation project Richard Vining is planning in the Edge neighborhood bordering the Medical District. Vining also owns Vining Legacy Management, a bill pay service specializing in assisting seniors and widows.

9. Motor Museum Slated For Edge District -

A new nonprofit museum geared toward automotive history and preservation could be coming to the Memphis Medical District.

Located at 645 Marshall Ave., The Edge Motor Museum is a part of a $1.4 million renovation project Richard Vining is planning in the Edge neighborhood bordering the Medical District. Vining also owns Vining Legacy Management, a bill pay service specializing in assisting seniors and widows.

10. Motor Museum Slated for Edge District -

A new non-profit museum geared towards automotive history and preservation could be coming to the Medical District.

Located at 645 Marshall Avenue, The Edge Motor Museum is a part of a $1.4 million renovation project in the Edge neighborhood by Richard Vining, who also owns Vining Legacy Management, a bill pay service specializing in assisting seniors and widows.

11. Residents React to Cooper-Young’s Tentative Historic Overlay Status -

Though the Memphis City Council on Tuesday, April 10, granted Cooper-Young the historic overlay district status it has been seeking since last year, there is still a sense of concern among many of the residents.

12. Cooper-Young Overlay OK’d With Footnote -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading will require approval of a companion ordinance further defining what can and cannot be built there or how properties can be changed so the local Landmarks Commission can properly enforce terms of the overlay district.

13. City Council Grants Historic Overlay Status to Cooper-Young -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading likely isn’t the end of the discussion about how decisions will be made by the local Landmarks Commission enforcing terms of the overlay that govern what can and cannot be built there or who it can be changed.

14. Events -

Memphis Heritage hosts Preservation Posse: After Hours at the Universal Life Insurance Building Thursday, March 1, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. (doors at 5:30 p.m.) at 480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Take a behind-the-scenes tour of the Universal Life Insurance Building led by Jimmie Tucker of Self + Tucker Architects, and learn about the history and future of this adaptive reuse project from the experts making it happen. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Visit memphisheritage.org for details and tickets.

15. Events -

Chandler Reports’ Real Estate Review seminar will be held Thursday, March 1, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Goldsmith Room at Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road. A panel of local real estate experts will provide insights on current market trends and topics, plus an outlook for the rest of 2018. Tickets are $10 for Chandler Reports subscribers and $15 for nonsubscribers and include refreshments and a post-seminar toast to celebrate Chandler Reports’ 50th anniversary. For more information or to reserve a seat, email wendy@chandlerreports.com or call 901-528-5273.

16. Christine Staples Joins Buckman As VP of Water Technologies -

Christine Staples recently joined Memphis-based Buckman as global vice president of water technologies. She comes to Buckman from Ecolab, where she held a number of executive leadership positions in both the water and energy industries.

17. Staples Joins Buckman As VP of Water Technologies -

Christine Staples recently joined Memphis-based Buckman as global vice president of water technologies. She comes to Buckman from Ecolab, where she held a number of executive leadership positions in both the water and energy industries.

18. DMC Wants Benchmark Hotel Declared Nuisance -

The Downtown Memphis Commission is seeking to have the Benchmark Hotel property at 164 Union Ave. declared a public nuisance.

The Shelby County Environmental Court will hold a hearing Thursday, Feb. 1, at 1:30 p.m. to determine whether the blighted hotel, located on the north side of Union west of South B.B. King Boulevard, should be considered a public nuisance under the Tennessee Neighborhood Preservation Act.

19. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

20. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

21. City's Tentative Fairgrounds Plan Confirms Separating Coliseum from Youth Sports -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s tentative plan for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds, presented Monday, Nov. 6, included a renovation of old Melrose High School in neighboring Orange Mound and a confirmation that the city administration doesn’t think the Mid-South Coliseum should be part of a youth sports tournament complex.

22. Making the List -

With black-and-white images from Memphis in conflict circa 1968 projected larger than life on a video screen behind him, Kirk Whalum stood in the sanctuary of Clayborn Temple earlier this week talking about growing up in Memphis in that era.

23. Crosstown Crossroads -

For the past 90 years, Crosstown has seen its share of ups and downs. In the beginning, it was a shining beacon for the city’s eastward expansion; at its height, it anchored several vibrant and diverse neighborhoods; and at its lowest, Crosstown became the poster child for once-great inner-city areas of Memphis that had deteriorated.

24. Rotary Club Moves Weekly Lunch to Clayborn Temple -

The Memphis Rotary Club is moving its weekly luncheon meetings to Clayborn Temple starting next month after being held for several years at the University Club.

The service organization, chartered in 1914, announced its decision Wednesday, Aug. 16, after a debate and vote by the club’s board.

25. Remaking Crosstown -

As he was leading tours through Crosstown Concourse this month, Todd Richardson took a small group to a set of windows for a balcony view of an addition being constructed on the north side of the property.

26. Memphis Rotary Moves Meetings To Clayborn Temple -

The Memphis Rotary Club is moving its weekly luncheon meetings to Clayborn Temple starting next month after several years at the University Club.

The service organization, chartered in 1914, announced its decision Wednesday, Aug. 16, after a debate and vote by the club’s board.

27. Crosstown Concourse Debuts: Aug. 19 Opening Day Begins Test of Larger Goals -

A relatively recent urban legend, as urban legends go, is that the large elevated tract of land along Bellevue Boulevard by the interstate wall is some kind of Indian mound.

It’s not. It is an area elevated in anticipation of the route federal officials in the 1960s had planned for Interstate 40 to take through Crosstown and then through Midtown. Those plans were stopped in a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case.

28. Rotary Moves Meetings to Clayborn Temple -

The Memphis Rotary Club is moving its weekly luncheon meetings to Clayborn Temple starting next month after several years at the University Club.

The service organization, chartered in 1914, announced its decision Wednesday, Aug. 16, after a debate and vote by the club’s board.

29. Landmarks Commission Clears Path For Cooper-Young, VECA Historic Designations -

The path to preservation status for two Midtown neighborhoods has been cleared by the Memphis Landmarks Commission.

The applications of Cooper-Young and fellow Midtown neighborhood Vollintine-Evergreen were placed on hold until questions about the application process first raised a few months ago were resolved.

30. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

31. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

32. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

33. Cooper-Young Residents Seek Historic Designation -

In many ways, the intersection of Cooper Street and Young Avenue operates as the cultural heart of Midtown. But while it certainly possesses the eclectic mix of bohemian overtones, century-old homes and vibrant entertainment centers that define Midtown, there is one element that separates the historically hip neighborhood from sister subdivisions – historical preservation status from the Memphis Landmarks Commission.

34. Kresge Foundation Awards $1.3 Million in Grants -

The Kresge Foundation has announced that 10 local organizations will receive a total of $1.3 million in grant support to boost opportunity for Memphis residents.

The grants range in size from $25,000 to $150,000 per year and are expected to provide support over 12-24 months.

35. Kresge Foundation Awards $1.3 Million in Grants -

The Kresge Foundation has announced that 10 local organizations will receive a total of $1.3 million in grant support to boost opportunity for Memphis residents.

The grants range in size from $25,000 to $150,000 per year and are expected to provide support over 12-24 months.

36. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

37. Last Word: Halfway Point, The Cancer-Influenza Connection and Wade Baldwin's Way -

Monday was the day that Memphis Light Gas and Water Division reached the halfway point in restoring power. There were 90,384 customers without power Monday evening, compared to 188,000 without power at the outset Saturday evening at 11 p.m. There were 126 utility crews working by Monday evening.

38. Editorial: We Must Stand Together To Fight Memphis Blight -

The saying is you can’t see the forest for the trees. And at times that is what Memphis’ seemingly eternal battle with blight feels like.

Before you can address properties that have become eyesores in once-proud communities, you must sort through the red tape and bureaucracy that protects these monuments to neglect.

39. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

40. 'War' on Blight -

Attorney Steve Barlow has been working on blight issues for 20 years, which is to say he’s been working for two decades almost exclusively on the maze of rules, regulations and procedures that make blight possible and sustainable.

41. Blight Summit to Mark Progress, Challenges -

When the leaders of the city’s anti-blight effort gather at Clayborn Temple for their second annual summit Wednesday, May 17, on the next block south of the church will be an example of work still to be done.

42. Neighborhood Preservation Awards $10K to MLK Prep -

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. has awarded Frayser Community Schools, the charter school company that operates Martin Luther King Jr. College Preparatory High School in Frayser, a $10,000 grant to improve the baseball field and other athletic and recreational facilities on the high school’s campus, 1530 Dellwood Ave.

43. Neighborhood Preservation Awards $10K to MLK Prep -

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. has awarded Frayser Community Schools, the charter school company that operates Martin Luther King Jr. College Preparatory High School in Frayser, a $10,000 grant to improve the baseball field and other athletic and recreational facilities on the high school’s campus, 1530 Dellwood Ave.

44. City of Memphis, Partners Urge Small Developers to Step Up -

With once seemingly impossible projects coming to fruition like the Crosstown Concourse and ServiceMaster converting the former Peabody Place mall into its new corporate headquarters, there’s a feeling in the city that no project is too big to tackle.

45. Memphis Mayor's Office to Help Save Franklin's Birthplace -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – The Memphis mayor's office is pitching in to help figure out the future of the dilapidated house where soul singer Aretha Franklin was born, a lawyer said Thursday.

46. Expanded Uptown TIF May Offer Needed Relief for Blighted Areas -

The announcement of last week’s blockbuster proposal to expand the Uptown Tax Increment Financing area and extend the applications of Downtown’s Tourism Development Zone may have been headlined by the reimagined convention center and multibillion-dollar improvements to the area’s medical facilities, but some of the most significant changes may end up occurring at the neighborhood level.

47. Blight Fight Takes Root Near Carnes Elementary -

Some of Mary Baker’s friends like to joke that she will eventually reclaim the whole city of Memphis, but just one lot at a time. “I say, what’s wrong with that?” Baker replied.

48. Growing Pains -

In many ways, Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe in 1971 shaped the way Midtown Memphis looks today, so it’s only fitting that the park continues to inspire citizens to fight for what they feel is right.

49. Platform for Property -

Airbnb is revolutionizing the hospitality industry causing legislators worldwide to scramble to regulate it, but the Memphis City Council is gaining state and national attention for its hands-off attitude.

50. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Nov. 30, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the University of Phoenix’s Memphis campus, 65 Germantown Court, first floor. Blight Authority of Memphis executive director Sheila Jordan Cunningham and Neighborhood Preservation Inc. president Steve Barlow will present “Fighting Blight in Memphis.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz or call Jo Garner at 901-482-0354.

51. Events -

Southwest Tennessee Community College and Arkansas State University Mid-South will hold a process technology career fair Tuesday, Nov. 29, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the Nabors Auditorium on STCC’s Macon Cove campus, 5983 Macon Cove. Employers including Hershey, Valero, Blues City Brewery and Lucite will be on hand. Visit southwest.tn.edu.

52. Orange Mound Designated By Michelle Obama -

Orange Mound, the nation’s first subdivision designed specifically for African-Americans, has been designated by First Lady Michelle Obama as a Preserve America Community.

Orange Mound in Memphis becomes the 905th such community nationwide. The program recognizes a select group of communities that use their heritage resources in sustainable ways and share the myriad benefits of historic preservation with residents and visitors.

53. Orange Mound Gets Rare Designation From First Lady -

Orange Mound, the nation’s first subdivision designed specifically for African-Americans, has been designated by First Lady Michelle Obama as a Preserve America Community.

Orange Mound in Memphis becomes the 905th such community nationwide. The program recognizes a select group of communities that use their heritage resources in sustainable ways and share the myriad benefits of historic preservation with residents and visitors.

54. Historic Mansion Being Restored Into Exclusive French-Asian Restaurant -

The Nineteenth Century Club, one of the last great mansions of Union Avenue, was slated to become a strip mall. Next door to the 107-year-old building is a Taco Bell, which stands on the site of the Nineteenth Century Club’s former ballroom.

55. Radio Station Plan Emerges for Aretha Franklin’s Birth Home -

Aretha’s Franklin’s childhood home received another reprieve in Environmental Court.

The decrepit structure at 406 Lucy Ave. in South Memphis has been boarded up and left vacant for years. But reinvigorated development plans to save the house from a demolition order, by turning it into either a museum or a radio station, need more time.

56. Malco Theatres Project Lands $125K Grant -

Malco Theatres hopes to start construction next month on its boutique movie theater Downtown thanks to a hefty grant from the CCDC.

At its Aug. 17 meeting, the Center City Development Corp. approved a $125,000 grant for the “high-impact” project. The grant amount soars past what the CCDC, an affiliate board of the Downtown Memphis Commission, has awarded in the past. Most of the storefront improvement grants over the past few years have come in below $30,000.

57. Hotel Napoleon Joins Growing List of Unique Downtown Lodging -

A Downtown property’s ample windows, turn-of-the century architecture and an interesting backstory attracted hotel developer Suna Investments to the historic Winchester Building at 179 Madison Ave.

58. Memphis Property Hub Using Micro-Level Data to Drive Solutions -

The effects of blight, like boarded-up windows and overgrown lawns, are clear to see. While the methods used to track blight are less apparent, an effort is underway to streamline property data so that government agencies and community development groups can tailor solutions at a neighborhood level.

59. Frayser Landfill Owner Pulls Expansion Application, But Plans to Return -

Amid public opposition, Memphis Wrecking Co. has withdrawn its application to expand its landfill near Whitney Elementary School in Frayser. This is the second consecutive time the company withdrawn its application with the Land Use Control Board before the board could consider the request.

60. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

61. Frayser Targeted as Pilot Area for Citywide Fight Against Blight -

Last week, a wrecking team demolished a single-family home in the Washington Heights neighborhood in South Memphis. The effort, organized by United Housing Inc. and backed by the U.S. Department of Treasury, was the first of its kind to take place.

62. City Hires Neighborhood Preservation Fellow -

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law and the city of Memphis have hired Brittany Williams as city’s first Neighborhood Preservation fellow.

63. Memphis, U of M Law School Hire First Neighborhood Preservation Fellow -

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law and the city of Memphis have hired Brittany Williams as city’s first Neighborhood Preservation fellow.

64. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

65. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

66. Blight Fight Touts New Pathway, Partnerships -

The local effort to fight blight has been in recent years a machete-like action to cut through bureaucratic red tape and get possession of the most blighted properties.

So there have been a lot of press conferences where bulldozers are featured prominently to demolish the targeted property.

67. Numerous Benefits to Cleaning Up Blight -

I grew up in Memphis, but like so many young people, moved away for college and lived in a few other cities before returning in 2012. I always missed my hometown and when I had the opportunity to choose where I wanted to build my career, Memphis was the only choice in my heart.

68. Klondike Wants Plan To Stave Off Gentrification -

With multimillion-dollar investments growing up around it in the Crosstown and Uptown neighborhoods, the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp. is working with the University of Memphis on a grassroots action plan to stave off gentrification.

69. Blight Authority of Memphis Convenes to Tackle Problem Properties -

“This is historic,” attorney Steve Barlow said at the inaugural meeting of the Blight Authority of Memphis, held Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Downtown Memphis Commission’s office.

70. Urban Planning Practice Shows How Design Can Combat Crime -

What if, instead of piling on security guards and higher fences, developers combatted crime through design?

That’s the theory behind Crime Prevention through Environmental Design, an urban planning practice that studies how the built environment impacts social behavior.

71. The Week Ahead: Nov. 9, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from revenge on the Warriors to crime reduction through urban planning…

It’s still election season in 70 percent of the city, which sounds like a weather forecast – part warning and part advisory.
But the seven-day outlook calls for an increased chance of political engagement this week. Early voting in the set of five Memphis City Council runoff races continues this week at eight satellite locations as well as the Downtown site, 157 Poplar Ave.
The runoff elections in council districts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 will determine the identity of a council that will have at least six, possibly seven new members. Super District council members Philip Spinosa and Martavius Jones, the two confirmed new faces on the council, were elected outright on Oct. 8.

72. Events -

Germantown Neighborhood Preservation Commission will hold the free Neighborhood Summit on Tuesday, Oct. 27, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The Great Hall & Conference Center, 1900 S. Germantown Road. Mayor Mike Palazzolo is the keynote speaker. For details, email saharris@germantown-tn.gov or call 901-757-7203.

73. Events -

University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law and Tennessee Alliance for Legal Services will host an OnlineTNJustice virtual clinic Monday, Oct. 26. Volunteer attorneys and law students will help answer civil legal questions from vulnerable Tennesseans during this Pro Bono Month event. To volunteer, attorneys must be registered with onlinetnjustice.org. Visit tals.org/otjcalendar for details.

74. Historic Clayborn Temple to be Restored -

Clayborn Temple, the home base for the sanitation worker strikes of 1968, is on its way to restoration after decades of neglect and four years on the market. Nonprofit Neighborhood Preservation Inc. is taking over what is expected to be a multimillion-dollar project to return the church to religious, educational and community uses.

75. Long-Vacant Union Avenue Properties Get Another Day -

The city of Memphis and the Downtown Memphis Commission are negotiating with the owners of two vacant buildings in the 600 block of Union Avenue in an effort to avoid General Sessions Environmental Court declaring the properties a public nuisance.

76. Problem Properties -

Memphis has a crippling issue with blight, and one nonprofit is front and center with changing the culture that led to the city’s inundation of abandoned properties and lots.

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. was founded in 2012 as a court-appointed receiver of properties taken away from neglectful owners. Over the years, it has evolved to become a robust advocate for stronger legislation and development tools to deal with problem properties.

77. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

78. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

79. ULI Fairgrounds Panel Has Busy Schedule -

A team of eight out-of-town planning experts has a busy week ahead as it wades into the simmering local debate about plans to recast the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

And the first hard copy of something the Urban Land Institute-assembled group is likely to get are the comments from four town hall meetings held in different parts of Memphis over two evenings last week.

80. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

81. Full-Time Job -

For years, Judge Larry E. Potter has had to juggle a challenging court docket that included thousands of traffic citations and animal abuse cases along with the blight and neglect cases typically associated with the court.

82. Taking Action -

The windows on the old Executive Inn on Airways Boulevard where Brooks Road dead ends had been busted out for several years, leaving the curtains in its long-empty rooms fluttering in the wind.

But in January, demolition crews began ripping away at the blighted property at 3222 Airways, providing relief to residents and business owners whose own property values suffered because of the neglected property in that corner of Whitehaven.

83. Flinn Rumor Could Impact Multiple City Council Races -

Even before Shea Flinn gave a “no comment” last week to a persistent rumor that he would resign from the Memphis City Council, there were potential candidates eyeing his super district seat.

84. Flinn Rumor Could Impact Multiple City Council Races -

Even before Shea Flinn gave a “no comment” last week to a persistent rumor that he would resign from the Memphis City Council, there were potential candidates eyeing his super district seat.

With no qualifying petitions issued for the October ballot until next month, there is stealthy speculation about who is running for council and which seats may be sought.

85. 100 North Main Seeks Historic Designation -

An effort to redevelop a Downtown skyscraper may have received a boost this week. A state board is recommending that the tower at 100 N. Main St. be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that could allow the owner to seek tax credits and grants to redevelop the building.

86. 100 N. Main Recommended for Historic Register, Pinch Decision Delayed -

A state board is recommending that the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. Downtown be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that could allow the owner to seek tax credits and grants to redevelop the building.

87. Center of Attention -

The Pinch District, one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods and commercial centers, will receive some much-needed tender loving care in advance of Bass Pro Shops opening its massive store at The Pyramid May 1.

88. Mapping a Path to Success -

Like many other things on paper, maps have largely become extinct as interactive, digital versions have taken over.

But for students of history, as well as those with a keen interest in the neighborhoods and boundaries within cities, the paper map is an irreplaceable document.

89. Victorian Village Homes See Demand -

A new single-family residential project in the heart of Victorian Village is doing very well, thank you very much.

Five of the eights lots inside Planters Row II, a unique master planned community on Jefferson Avenue in Victorian Village between the Medical Center and Downtown core, are already optioned or under contract after the first day of sales, according to Scott Blake, president of Design 500 Inc.

90. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

91. Downtown Knoxville Tourism Finally Finds its Stride -

When Kim Trent moved to Knoxville in 1990, she could stand along Gay Street on a Sunday and be the only soul in sight. Today, she’s a face in the crowd.

92. Viability of Black Creative Districts Explored -

Several weeks ago, Eric Robertson, the president of the neighborhood revitalization intermediary Community LIFT, was showing a group of visitors around the city’s various creative and entertainment districts.

93. Tennessee Steps Up the Fight Against Blight -

While the national economy is still rebounding from the 2008 housing crisis, foreclosures, vacant homes and blighted properties are a lingering issue many markets throughout the country have to address.

94. Coalition Works to Preserve Nashville's Music Row -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With development squeezing Nashville's famous Music Row, some in the music industry say time is running out to preserve the district's character and the studios where the Music City's iconic sounds were born.

95. Midtown Corner Could See Turnaround -

While Midtown as a whole is experiencing a resurgence, two properties at the key intersection of Union Avenue and McLean Boulevard remain vacant, decaying eyesores.

But a real estate agent representing the owner of the vacant office building and hotel at the southwest corner of Union and McLean says both properties are under contract to be sold.

96. Blueprint for the Future -

It was 1992, and architect Joey Hagan was searching high and low for space for his own office.

He turned to his friend David Schuermann – the two had previously worked together at Bologna and Associates – whose firm at the time, DMS Architects, had an office at 88 Union Center Downtown.

97. Grizzlies Promote Wexler to Business Operations President -

The Memphis Grizzlies have promoted Jason Wexler to president of business operations of the team and FedExForum.

The new position gives Wexler primary leadership responsibility for all aspects of the business, including ticket sales and service, arena operations, corporate partnerships, marketing communications and broadcast, community investment and general operations.

98. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

99. New Nonprofit Charts Role in Blight Fight -

The bulldozer went straight for the leasing office of the former Spanish Oaks apartments on Cazassa Road near Memphis International Airport.

Meanwhile another bulldozer across the two-lane road was deep into demolishing a set of buildings in the old Winchester Park apartments.

100. New Housing Option Comes to Victorian Village -

Florence Hervery had been thinking about the next phase of her life for some time.

The 55-year-old Whitehaven resident had been mulling over a move Downtown, but she wanted a home, not a condominium or apartment, and was hesitant to move into the bustling Downtown core.