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Editorial Results (free)

1. Downtown Home Sales Prices Improving -

Average home sales prices in downtown Memphis have seen significant improvements the past several years as we slowly crawled our way out of the worst housing crisis in recent history.

Through the first eight months of this year, average prices downtown have reached just over $275,000, up 6% from the same period of 2016. While downtown’s home sales only comprise 4% of the total home sales in the city of Memphis, average prices downtown are 129% higher than the city’s average of $120,298, which is up 3% from last year.

2. South City Redevelopment Activity Heating Up -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

3. South City Redevelopment Heats Up With Renovations, New Construction -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

4. Binghampton, Uptown Redevelopment Efforts Move Forward While Waiting for the CRA -

If Binghampton can get a proposal for tax increment financing (TIF) approved by the end of the year, it would mean an immediate $332,000 in capital and an estimated $26 million over the 30-year life of the TIF zone to sustain and further grow commercial and residential development in the area.

5. Fully Loaded -

It’s almost like the first half of 2017 was a decade in the making, at least when it comes to commercial real estate. Throughout all four major sectors of the Memphis-area commercial real estate market – industrial, office, retail and multifamily – figures are consistently reaching or exceeding pre-recession marks.

6. City Master Plan Development Aims To Reverse Random Development -

Not too far past a new generation of civic plans is the filter of reality – what is possible by a business bottom line.

At the outset of the still-forming Memphis 3.0 master development plan, the reality without a plan is striking.

7. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Look To Lift Communities -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

8. Last Word: ICE Raids, Who's Buying Afton Grove and Malco Powerhouse Plans -

A protest Sunday evening at the Prescott Place Apartments after federal ICE agents – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – took people into custody there and at Emerald Ridge and Corner Park apartments Sunday morning. The group of organizations protesting the federal action – Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Cosecha and SURJ Memphis -- say Memphis Police assisted in the immigration operation. Memphis Police deny they were involved in any way. No estimate from ICE on how many people were detained.

9. Developers Lay Out Latest Plans for Proposed Midtown Gated Community -

In a quiet room inside of his Midtown architecture firm, Lee Askew of ANF Architects presented the latest incarnation of his plans to turn the former Red Cross building at the corner of Central Avenue and Mansfield Street into a 12-unit luxury gated community.

10. New Homes Constructed for Rental Properties -

Shelby County’s new housing market has drastically declined since the housing crisis of 2008. At the end of the first quarter, there were 932 homes in new housing inventory compared to 3,327 homes at the end of the first quarter in 2007.

11. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Could Lift Respective Neighborhoods -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

12. Scene Change -

The sprawling mixed-use complex opening next month on North Cleveland in Midtown is a high-profile example of where Memphis’ art community finds itself at the halfway mark in 2017.

When Crosstown Concourse opens there Aug. 19, it won’t just represent a new beginning that turns a former Sears distribution center into a 1.5-million-square-foot community mainstay. With tenants like Crosstown Arts moving in, the development is also a representation of how the city’s arts landscape is changing this year.

13. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

14. Bruster’s Ice Cream To Open on Highland Strip -

The Highland Strip will soon be home to a tasty new tenant.

Bruster’s Real Ice Cream plans to move into the 1,300-square-foot space at 571 Highland St., with construction set to begin soon and an expected opening date late this year, according to Loeb Properties Inc.

15. Bruster’s Highlights Highland Strip Growth -

When a small record shop called Pop-I’s opened in late 1960s, it helped spark the transformation of a mundane neighborhood shopping center near the University of Memphis into a popular entertainment destination for students.

16. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

17. Kresge Foundation Awards $1.3 Million in Grants -

The Kresge Foundation has announced that 10 local organizations will receive a total of $1.3 million in grant support to boost opportunity for Memphis residents.

The grants range in size from $25,000 to $150,000 per year and are expected to provide support over 12-24 months.

18. Arlington Neighborhood Thriving Despite Investor Activity -

The Village of Summer Meadows subdivision located off Milton Wilson Drive just north of Interstate 40, behind Arlington High School, is a hot spot for local investors and national hedge funds.

19. Kresge Foundation Awards $1.3 Million in Grants -

The Kresge Foundation has announced that 10 local organizations will receive a total of $1.3 million in grant support to boost opportunity for Memphis residents.

The grants range in size from $25,000 to $150,000 per year and are expected to provide support over 12-24 months.

20. Foote Homes Families Leave Behind Memories Happy and Sad -

Streets Ministries on Vance Avenue has worked closely with the residents of Foote Homes, the last of whom moved out on Jan. 31 in preparation for the demolition of the city’s largest public housing project.

21. Long-Awaited Demolition at Foote Homes Begins -

Foote Homes, the last large public housing project in Memphis, began coming down Tuesday, May 30, with a formal ceremony marking the start of demolition toward the broader South City redevelopment.

22. Last Word: Halfway Point, The Cancer-Influenza Connection and Wade Baldwin's Way -

Monday was the day that Memphis Light Gas and Water Division reached the halfway point in restoring power. There were 90,384 customers without power Monday evening, compared to 188,000 without power at the outset Saturday evening at 11 p.m. There were 126 utility crews working by Monday evening.

23. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

24. Large Section of Cooper-Young Flourishing -

The Mount Arlington neighborhood located in the eastern section of Cooper-Young in Midtown Memphis has been expanding with new growth. Investors, rehabbers and builders have been cultivating the area, causing average sales prices to jump significantly.

25. Shaffer Named Executive Director Of Rebranded BLDG Memphis -

John Paul Shaffer recently was named executive director of BLDG Memphis, the rebranded entity that brings the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis and Livable Mem-phis under a single organizational identity.
In his new role, Shaffer’s job is to guide the organization in its mission of supporting neighborhood revitalization through a network of organizations and individuals working in the community development space – which BLDG Memphis does primarily through organizational capacity building, community education and engagement, and public policy and advocacy – as well as to promote the new brand. 

26. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

27. Pinch District Plan May Spell End to Moratorium -

The Pinch District Concept Study, the city’s strategic plan to guide the growth of the downtrodden Downtown neighborhood, was approved by the Land Use Control Board Thursday, April 13 – a move that could signal an end for a longstanding moratorium that has kept the nine-block district frozen in time.

28. Investor Dominance in Residential Real Estate Shows Signs of Change -

Investors buying single-family homes to rent them out or have a management firm rent them out may be giving way to banks more willing to make loans on lower-priced homes to owner-occupants.

“I would say the most interesting and big dynamic is folks who come in and buy a house for $20,000 these days, fix it up – sometimes well, sometimes poorly – sell it to a person in California for $64,000 – keep the rental management. And sometimes that helps a street and a neighborhood and sometimes it’s destructive,” said Steve Lockwood, executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp. on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

29. Community Groups Working to Bridge Economic Development Gaps -

When a $1 million award for North Memphis was announced recently, it signaled an opportunity to bring change to those communities.

North Memphis received a $1 million award through the Strong, Prosperous, And Resilient Communities Challenge (SPARCC) that went to the Memphis Partners for Resilient Communities. But in the Klondike and Smokey City neighborhoods of North Memphis, work has been underway for years to support the people who live and work there in the form of the Klondike Smokey City Community Development Corp.

30. Rudd Says University Redirecting Neighborhood -

The railroad tracks between Highland Avenue and Zach Curlin Drive have been a fact of life and a border of sorts for as long as there has been a University of Memphis – even before it was called the University of Memphis.

31. Binghampton Gateway Builds on Decade of Momentum -

While construction recently began on the large-scale Binghampton Gateway Center and more development is on the way, the revitalization process to bring businesses and jobs back to the distressed Binghampton area began more than a decade ago.

32. Tapping Young Donors -

Amelia Thompson is everything a nonprofit is looking for now and in the future. A 30-year-old Memphian who graduated White Station High School, she has worked with a nonprofit in Washington, D.C. and been a buyer for Macy’s in New York.

33. Last Word: Voucher Movement, The Battle of Pontotoc and Ch-Chandler Numbers -

Republican state Senator Brian Kelsey of Germantown had a very good week in the state capitol this week. His school voucher bill got unanimous votes in House and Senate committee this week despite a tide of opposition from local elected officials and leaders including fellow legislators in the Shelby County delegation and all seven public school districts in Shelby County including the six suburban school systems.

34. Another Country -

On the road into the C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa in southwest Memphis, there is a sign you might not notice on your way to the museum and archaeological site.

An arrow pointing east is the way to Memphis. The western arrow reads Chucalissa.

35. Cities, Developers Reaping Rewards of Mixed-Use Shift -

Commercial real estate is shifting to mixed-use developments designed to create a sense of place for homeowners longing for the community of days gone by, and the trend is profiting many parties as commercial developers see stronger returns and cities undergo revitalization in their core.

36. Binghampton Gateway Comes to Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

37. Binghampton Gateway Center Spells End for Inner City Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

38. Grant Begins New North Memphis Rebuilding Effort -

North Memphis was once a place where heavy manufacturing was across the street from residential development and mom-and-pop retail was just down the street.

It was a thriving, blue-collar area of Memphis with block clubs, union halls, grassroots politics, lumber yards and nightclubs.

39. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

40. Father-Son Duo Dickens Built Taps Infill Market In Collierville, Piperton -

A father-son home builder duo of Doug and Chris Dickens has taken advantage of a strengthening housing market recently by specializing in infill development, primarily in the Collieville and Piperton areas.

41. Developer Buys Former Merle Norman Warehouse -

3670 S. Perkins Road

Memphis, TN 38118

Sale Amount: $1.3 million

Sale Date: December 2016

Buyer: Farnsworth Investment Co.

42. Council Ends 2016 With Committee Changes -

The last Memphis City Council meeting of 2016 marks the end of the first year of a four-year term of office for the 13-member body.

It also marks a change from council chairman Kemp Conrad to incoming chairman Berlin Boyd.

43. Palazzolo Says Germantown Maximizing Commercial Development Where it Can -

Just a few years ago, Germantown leaders were worried. Sales tax revenues were down in the recession and the city had annexed the last of its reserve area.

Looking back on it, Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo admits it was a challenge. The perspective has changed as the recession has lifted.

44. Medical District Collaborative Offers Financial Carrot for Residents -

Employees of five major medical and academic institutions of the Memphis Medical District Collaborative (MMDC) now have a financial incentive to live in the Medical District thanks to a new Live Local 901 initiative.

45. Clayborn Reborn Effort Charts Different Pre-vitalization Path -

The hope has been that the redevelopment of Central Station in the South Main area would cause a ripple in development to the east and link up with the sprawling South City development that encompasses the Foote Homes public housing development, the area south of FedExForum, and go south of Crump Boulevard.

46. City Council Vote to Focus On Highland Strip Project -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 18, on an economic impact plan for the Highland Strip area that sets the stage for the tax increment financing district to finance infrastructure changes in the private development hot spot.

47. Artspace Locks in Rents in Hot Area -

A Downtown apartment complex will lock in affordable rents in one of Memphis’ most expensive areas. The South Main Artspace Lofts saw a formal groundbreaking Thursday, Sept. 29, at the giant United Warehouse building at 138 St. Paul Ave., tucked off of South Main.

48. Last Word: Gas Prices, Hotels and Airbnbs and Dicamba Drift -

How is your gas tank doing as the work week begins? If you are running on fumes you will probably also notice a dramatic hike in gas prices at the pump very shortly.

The Colonial Pipeline from Houston to New York closed Sept. 9 after a spill of 250,000 gallons was found in Alabama.

49. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

50. Memphians Invited to Tour Victorian Village Homes This Weekend -

Scott Blake lives in the kind of Memphis neighborhood where he can go three, sometimes four days without ever starting his car. Everything he needs, everywhere he has to go, is that close by.

51. South End Gets a $15 Million Apartment Complex -

250 E. G.E. Patterson Ave.
Memphis, TN 38126

Permit Amount: $14.6 million

Owner: Elmington Capital Group

52. Frayser Targeted as Pilot Area for Citywide Fight Against Blight -

Last week, a wrecking team demolished a single-family home in the Washington Heights neighborhood in South Memphis. The effort, organized by United Housing Inc. and backed by the U.S. Department of Treasury, was the first of its kind to take place.

53. Pinch District to Move in a New Direction: Up -

The Pinch District is getting a sky-high development treatment. For decades, the north Downtown neighborhood has been known as a sea of parking lots punctuated by a handful of small businesses.

With St. Jude Children's Research Hospital announcing $1 billion in new construction, the Pinch's largest tenant is opening up its campus with new buildings, some as tall as 12 stories, in the greater Pinch neighborhood. A neighborhood-level presence is a sea change for the institution, which has grown to 2.5 million square feet behind a gated campus.

54. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

55. Last Word: Lights, Camera, Demolition, Our Cautious Prosperity and City Hall Redux -

In south Memphis Wednesday, an old house on Mississippi Boulevard was demolished as part of a press conference to tout anti-blight measures in a city that has a lot of blight.

At times it seems like we have a different blight program for just about every blighted property.

56. Last Word: Budget No Go, Largest Home Sale of 2016 and Crosstown Moves -

The Shelby County Commission probably has enough votes to approve the funding in the county budget the Shelby County Schools system wants, which includes $24.7 million on new funding.

Yet after about four hours of discussion, the commission didn’t take votes on any budget resolutions or the county property tax rate resolution Monday.

57. The Week Ahead: June 20-26 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from a new headstone for one of the Beale Street Sheiks to an event to celebrate (and buy from) Memphis' maker community. 

58. Young Brings Data Focus to City Planning -

Want to gaze into the future? Hop into Paul Young’s Infiniti and ride around Downtown for an hour. “These three blocks will be something of a spine for the neighborhood,” he says, as a light rain falls on the windshield. “We envision five- or six-story buildings with restaurants and retail at street level, commercial and residential up top.”

59. Women's Foundation Honors 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

The Women’s Foundation hosted its annual Legends Awards Tribute Luncheon on April 29 to honor women in Memphis leadership. Honey Scheidt received the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, received the Catalyst Award, and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, was recognized with the Innovation Award.

60. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

61. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

62. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

63. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

64. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

65. Last Word: The Zoo's Proposal, Health and Ed In Limbo and Annexation's Effect -

A busy weekend on several fronts not the least of which was Overton Park and the Greensward controversy.
The Greensward itself was pretty subdued on a chilly Saturday.
The action was to be found in an email the zoo sent out Saturday making some proposals and offering some thoughts on the traffic and parking study the Overton Park Conservancy released last week.
Here is our summary
of what the zoo is offering in what may be a new effort in the public discussion.
Of course, the private discussion which is the mediation effort continues. But it sounds like some of the mediation discussions may be finding their way into the public discussion.
The public discussion has been sporadically active but very muted so far. For instance there has been talk before of zoo parking on the eastern side of the park in what until recently was a city maintenance yard.
The proposal by the zoo was shot down pretty quickly because it included running a tram through the Old Forest.
But there are some scenarios that wouldn’t take such a tram through the Old Forest.
The zoo email from Saturday isn’t specific on how the folks who would park at the maintenance yard would get from there to the zoo.
Presumably that is grounds for some type of discussion.

66. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

67. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

68. Fertile Ground -

Residents of the Memphis Medical District have begun filing in to the Premier Palace ballroom on Madison Avenue, along with area stakeholders, planners and other attendees who have business interests in the area.

69. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

70. Memphis Habitat Receives Statewide Grant Funds -

Memphis Habitat has received a $13,500 grant from the Tennessee Housing Development Agency through Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to support the construction of a new home in Uptown.

The funds were part of a $500,000 grant Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee received from the THDA Housing Trust Fund to distribute among the 50 Habitat affiliates across Tennessee to aid in the construction of 20 homes statewide.

71. Memphis Habitat Receives Statewide Grant Funds -

Memphis Habitat has received a $13,500 grant from the Tennessee Housing Development Agency through Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to support the construction of a new home in Uptown.

The funds were part of a $500,000 grant Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee received from the THDA Housing Trust Fund to distribute among the 50 Habitat affiliates across Tennessee to aid in the construction of 20 homes statewide.

72. Klondike Wants Plan To Stave Off Gentrification -

With multimillion-dollar investments growing up around it in the Crosstown and Uptown neighborhoods, the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp. is working with the University of Memphis on a grassroots action plan to stave off gentrification.

73. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

74. The Week Ahead: February 29, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? We know what you’ll be doing Tuesday (voting, of course!), but plenty of nonpolitical happenings grace this week’s calendar too – from a trio of Grizzlies games to a fundraiser supporting fair housing.

75. Numbers Show Memphis’ Commercial Real Estate Market Stable in 2015 -

Across all sectors, the Memphis market was stable in 2015.

That’s according to the latest data from Integra Realty Resources, a national appraisal and advisory firm. At its annual Viewpoint local market presentation Wednesday, Feb. 24, local Integra leaders spoke on the industrial sector’s banner year, multifamily’s expansion cycle, what’s next for an office market without any remaining Class A space, and growth in the retail sector.

76. Duke Takes Reins at Friends for Life -

Longtime nonprofit administrator Diane Duke recently took the helm of Friends for Life as its new executive director. In her new role, the Los Angeles native leads and oversees an organization that’s helping those affected by HIV/AIDS through the provision of education, housing, food, transportation and healthy life skills training.

77. Medical Area Ready For Residential Development -

Every week day, 16,000 people go to work in the two-and-a-half square mile area that is the Memphis Medical Center District.

Add the 8,000 students to the workers at the eight major institutions in the district and you have more than a sell-out crowd for an event at FedExForum in that area every working day.

78. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

79. EDGE Grants Development Loans to 4 Inner-City Businesses -

Memphis’ inner-city neighborhoods garnered $79,000 in business development loans at the Feb. 3 meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine’s finance committee.

80. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

81. Highland Heights CDC Rehabs Five More Homes -

On his desk at Treadwell Middle School, Jared Myers keeps a colorful map marked by green, red and blue shapes.

82. Blight Authority of Memphis Convenes to Tackle Problem Properties -

“This is historic,” attorney Steve Barlow said at the inaugural meeting of the Blight Authority of Memphis, held Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Downtown Memphis Commission’s office.

83. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

84. Board Denies Plans for Used-Car Lot in South City -

Plans for a used-car lot on Vance Avenue have been shot down by the Shelby County Board of Adjustment.

The half-acre lot at 704 Vance was the center of controversy at the board’s Wednesday, Dec. 16, meeting, drawing opposition from residents, stakeholders, developers and the Memphis Housing Authority.

85. Proposed Used Car Lot In South City Draws Ire -

An applicant seeking to operate a used car lot at 704 Vance Ave. will go before the Shelby County Board of Adjustment Wednesday, Dec. 16, in what seemingly would be a cut-and-dry affair with the BOA staff recommending conditional approval.

86. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

87. Oxford Feels Stress from Development Boom -

Kent Wunderlich travels to Oxford, Miss., often, in part because his grandson is the kicker on the University of Mississippi football team.

88. Habitat for Humanity to Build 21-Home Community in Uptown -

The open field between Third and Seventh streets, south of Cedar Avenue in north Memphis, is surrounded by homes – some that have seen better days and others that are newly built.

Now after more than a decade of building homes on scattered sites one or two at a time, the local Habitat for Humanity chapter this summer will build its first Uptown subdivision. And the community will take the name of a section of North Memphis remembered by long-time residents.

89. Home Values Point to a Sharp Wealth Divide Within US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's still possible in Boston for a mail carrier, an accountant and a Harvard-trained psychiatrist — basically, the crowd from "Cheers" — to live as neighbors.

That finding by the real estate brokerage Redfin makes the capital of Massachusetts a rarity at a time when neighborhoods in most U.S. cities are increasingly isolated from each other by income and home values.

90. THDA Makes $1 Million Habitat Challenge Grant -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will contribute $1 million in matching funds to Habitat for Humanity’s fundraising drive for the 2016 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis.

91. THDA Makes $1 Million Habitat Challenge Grant -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will contribute $1 million in matching funds to Habitat for Humanity’s fundraising drive for the 2016 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis.

92. Home Giveaway For Local Veterans -

Four local veterans received Orange Mound homes Thursday, Nov. 12, in a giveaway hosted by United Housing Inc.

93. EDGE Still Explaining Itself To Memphis, Shelby County Elected Leaders -

Four years into its existence, Reid Dulberger is still explaining the basics of a group created by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to streamline local economic development efforts.

94. New Tax Breaks Attract Grocers to Memphis Food Deserts -

Two of Memphis’ prominent food deserts are on the mend with possible tax breaks to attract grocery stores.

Binghampton and Uptown are set to receive Community Builder PILOTs, a new payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive granted by the Memphis and Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

95. Historic Clayborn Temple to be Restored -

Clayborn Temple, the home base for the sanitation worker strikes of 1968, is on its way to restoration after decades of neglect and four years on the market. Nonprofit Neighborhood Preservation Inc. is taking over what is expected to be a multimillion-dollar project to return the church to religious, educational and community uses.

96. Earlier Conversions Leave Lessons for Foote Homes Project -

The coming redevelopment of Foote Homes will be different from previous public housing conversions, incorporating lessons learned from relocating residents.

The last phase of neighboring Cleaborn Homes’ conversion to a mixed-use, mixed-income development is under construction on the other side of Lauderdale Street. It will create 67 multifamily units and should be completed by the end of the year.

97. New Life -

A development 10 years in the making, the abandoned 33,000-square-foot Universal Life Insurance Co. building is within sight of its new lease on life through the support of public and private partnerships.

98. Last-Minute Negotiations Secure $30 Million Foote Homes Grant -

The Foote Homes public housing development is still standing with word Monday, Sept. 28, that the city of Memphis has secured a $30 million federal grant to convert it to a mixed-use, mixed-income development.

99. Memphis Nabs $30 Million South City Grant After Last-Minute Negotiations -

The Foote Homes public housing development is still standing with word Monday, Sept. 28, that the city of Memphis has secured a $30 million federal grant to convert it to a mixed-use, mixed-income development.

100. Tennessee Housing Agency Adopts Green-Building Standards -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency wants to build healthy communities from the ground up.

Under new guidelines to be incorporated later this year, affordable housing developers seeking Low-Income Housing Tax Credits will have to qualify for full certification from Enterprise Green Communities. The certification was first introduced nationally in 2004, and the THDA board recently approved incorporation of the revamped 2015 criteria.