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Editorial Results (free)

1. Finding Gratitude In Travel -

As November closes and we move fully into the holiday season, I still remain a touch thankful looking back over the past year. Yes, I have much to be thankful for on the personal side of life, but during this season of thanks there are some travel-related items worth mentioning.

2. Good Night, Night: Light Pollution Increasing Around Globe -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) – The world's nights are getting alarmingly brighter – bad news for all sorts of creatures, humans included.

A German-led term reported Wednesday that light pollution is threatening darkness almost everywhere. Satellite observations during five Octobers show Earth's artificially lit outdoor area grew by 2 percent a year from 2012 to 2016. So did nighttime brightness.

3. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

4. Arts Are Creative, Economic Fuel for Memphis -

On a recent arrival at the Memphis International Airport, I marveled that my watch hadn’t even been set to Central Time before I heard buzz of the RiverArtsFest, and acquired a hot tip to visit Wild Bill’s for a “real blues club” experience. I’d just arrived and already the arts in Memphis were calling to me.

5. Nashville City Council Approves Financing for MLS Stadium -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville's bid to land an expansion franchise from Major League Soccer now has $275 million in financing approved to build a new stadium, giving Music City a major boost weeks before a final decision from the league.

6. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

7. City Judges Timing and Steps in Fairgrounds Planning -

City of Memphis leaders likely will reveal a few new details when they present the draft plan for Mid-South Fairgrounds redevelopment at a Monday, Nov. 6, town hall meeting. But Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration took much of the suspense and speculation out of next week’s session Wednesday, Nov. 1, releasing details that show the administration’s general belief that a few steps still need to be taken before the city gets to a broad reconfiguration of the Fairgrounds.

8. City Fairgrounds Plan Keeps Coliseum on Hold -

When it unveils a general plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment Monday, Nov. 6, the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will put the emphasis on setting the stage for a fuller redevelopment.

9. Run Women Run -

In 2018, Shelby County voters will be presented with a long ballot as candidates compete for most county offices, many school board and suburban government positions and congressional and legislative seats.

10. Chain Reaction: Memphis Builds on National Restaurant Trend -

Morgan Hughes is a 22-year-old college student who regularly spends more than $100 a week going out to eat. Sometimes it’s a trip to Sonic, other times it’s a meal at Next Door in Crosstown Concourse, still other times it’s food from the restaurant where she works, Hog & Hominy.

11. Clicking on All Cylinders -

Memphis is a city on the precipice of change as projects that were once deemed impossible – like ServiceMaster’s Downtown headquarters or Crosstown Concourse – have emboldened developers and city officials to shoot for the moon.

12. Trump Declares Opioids a Public Health Emergency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In ringing and personal terms, President Donald Trump on Thursday pledged to "overcome addiction in America," declaring the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency and announcing new steps to combat what he described as the worst drug crisis in U.S. history.

13. Montgomery Martin Builds an Urban Renaissance -

Montgomery Martin has Memphis grit on his feet. He’s spent the afternoon walking through the Tennessee Brewery building, a 125-year-old South Bluff structure being reimagined and renovated with the help of Montgomery Martin Contractors. In other cities, an aging giant like the Brewery might be seen as condemned – too daunting to be granted new life. But Martin says, “We’re not afraid of old buildings – we figure out how to get it done.” And, he adds, “all this is coming together to draw people back into the city.”

14. Consortium Seeks Breast Cancer Policy Reforms -

Two-time breast cancer survivor Dr. Debra Bartelli and members of the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium are pushing to increase awareness of breast cancer in Memphis because they know first-hand that early detection and treatment will lead to higher survival rates.

15. Gibson Guitar Factory Looking For New Home -

Nashville-based guitar maker Gibson Brands Inc. is putting its Downtown Memphis factory on the market as it looks for a new, smaller home.

The 18-year-old Gibson Beale Street Showcase and Guitar Factory – located on nearly six acres at 145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., across South B.B. King Boulevard from FedExForum – clocks in at 127,620 square feet and has an adjacent 330-space parking lot. And it could be yours for $17 million.

16. Corporations to Keep Tax Break Lost by Millions of Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans would lose a prized tax break under President Donald Trump's sweeping revamp of the tax code, but corporations would get to keep it.

The Republican proposal would eliminate the federal deduction for state and local taxes, a widely popular break used by some 44 million Americans, especially in high-tax, Democratic-leaning states like New York, New Jersey, California and Illinois. But corporations, which pay billions in local property levies and state income taxes, wouldn't be affected.

17. Last Word: Athens Bound, The Amazon Campaign and All Things Grizz -

This may be the most covered meeting of the Tennessee Historical Commission ever – the meeting Friday in Athens, Tennessee where Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will attempt to make the case for the commission granting him permission to remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest in Health Sciences Park. The chairman of the commission has already told Strickland in writing that the commission will not take up the matter – not even discuss it. Strickland hopes he will at least be heard. And he says the city should have a decision by mid-November and is adamant that this cannot be put off into the new year.

18. Trump’s Bluster Cascades Through State Politics -

The chaos emanating from President Donald Trump’s administration is changing the landscape of Tennessee politics, setting the stage for upheaval within the dominant Republican Party.

“This is a really big moment for the Tennessee Republican Party,” with the Trump wing or far-right wing “firmly in control,” says Kent Syler, Middle Tennessee State University political science professor.

19. Buffett Says Government Should Do More to Combat Poverty -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Billionaire Warren Buffett says America will continue to prosper overall, but government and philanthropy should do more to ensure that pockets of poverty don't continue to make it difficult for some to succeed.

20. Hooks Institute to Hold Oct. 5 Open House, Panel -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis will lead a community conversation about defending diversity, social justice and human rights in today’s America at its annual open house on Oct. 5. At the event, the Hooks Institute will release the 2017 Hooks Institute Policy Papers, “Bending the Arc Toward Justice: Including the Excluded.”

21. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

22. Hooks Institute to Hold Oct. 5 Open House, Panel -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis will lead a community conversation about defending diversity, social justice and human rights in today’s America at its annual open house on Oct. 5. At the event, the Hooks Institute will release the 2017 Hooks Institute Policy Papers, “Bending the Arc Toward Justice: Including the Excluded.”

23. Target is Raising Minimum Hourly Wage to $15 by End of 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Target Corp. is raising its minimum hourly wage for workers to $11 starting next month and then to $15 by the end of 2020, a move it says will help it hire and keep the best employees and make shopping a better experience for customers.

24. Memphis Small Business Landscape Stable Amid Slow Economic Growth -

While the local small-business landscape mirrors the national environment of a slowly growing economy keeping things stable, the lack of population growth is holding the Memphis area back from truly breaking out.

25. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

26. Top US Fall Destinations -

Fall is my favorite time of year. The cooling temperatures, changing colors and football season all combine to make for a fun time of year.

It’s also a great time to travel. Fall means shoulder season in many top destinations, making travel a bit more affordable. But there also are some destinations that just seem to make more sense from Labor Day to the start of the holiday season at Thanksgiving. Here are my top U.S. fall destinations on my radar for travel this year.

27. Drivers Whose Cars Were Flooded by Harvey Can't Find Rentals -

BEAUMONT, Texas (AP) – His three vehicles flooded by Hurricane Harvey, Jason Bell checked at one car-rental office only to find about 2,500 people ahead of him on the waiting list. When he tried a more out-of-the-way location, the reservations still numbered about 300.

28. Fewer Americans Buying Insurance in Coastal Areas -

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) – Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home's flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn't hit and her home isn't in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due next week, to another use.

29. Latino & Local -

Mauricio Calvo has heard the saying “all politics is local” in the course of making and maintaining connections through the Latino Memphis organization he leads. But prior to this year, political connections for the organization were more about getting needed services and building long-term relationships over time.

30. On a Chaotic Day in DC, Trump Goes After Amazon, Again -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump renewed his attacks on e-commerce giant Amazon, saying Wednesday that the company is "doing great damage to tax paying retailers."

Trump, in a tweet, said that "towns, cities and states throughout the U.S. are being hurt – many jobs being lost!"

31. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

32. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

33. Memphis-MidSouth Affiliate of Susan G. Komen Foundation Expanding Reach -

In 2017, there will be an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,610 breast cancer deaths. Those sobering numbers come from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the largest nonprofit source of breast cancer research.

34. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

35. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

36. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

37. Memphis Getting Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

38. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

39. Memphis Gets Federal Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

40. Higher Prices Squeezing Both Renters and Would-Be Homeowners -

A diminished supply of available homes is swelling prices in large U.S. metro areas from New York to Miami to Los Angeles, squeezing out would-be buyers and pushing up rents as more people are forced to remain tenants.

41. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

42. The Week Ahead: June 12-18 -

Get ready to groove, Memphis, because this week we're welcoming the inimitable Ruthie Foster to town, along with the return of both the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival and the Soulsville Record Swap. Plus, we've got details on the state House District 95 election, free MATA rides and what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

43. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

44. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

45. Tennessee Governor Signs NRA-Backed Metal Detector Gun Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Many Tennessee city and county buildings, parks and buses will either have to buy metal detectors, hire security guards and check people's bags, or let handgun permit holders bring in their guns, under a law signed Friday by Gov. Bill Haslam.

46. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

47. Bank On Memphis Effort in National Spotlight -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir was in the nation’s capital this week, speaking by invitation on a panel at the 2017 Bank On national conference in Washington, D.C.

48. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

49. Last Word: Sticker Shock Questions, Council Day Recap and Mueller's Move -

It’s not the final vote on the county property tax rate. But Monday’s acceptance by the Shelby County Commission of the state-certified property tax rate is an important insight into how the state and local governments get together on setting a tax rate that takes into account changes in overall property values from the countywide property reappraisal to set a tax rate that produces the same amount of revenue as the current rate.

50. JPMorgan Chase Pumps $17M Into Summer Job Programs -

BOSTON (AP) – JPMorgan Chase has announced a five-year, $17 million investment in a summer job program to give youth the skills needed to succeed in the modern business world.

The first phase of the Summer Youth Employment Program announced Monday includes $3 million to organizations in 19 U.S. cities that provide training and work experience to the young.

51. Bike Summit Features Call for Changes in Push for Bike Ways -

The city’s former bicycle and pedestrian coordinator who put the city on the map nationally for bike lanes and bikeways says bicycle advocates have to think differently.

Kyle Wagenschutz is currently director of local innovation for “People for Bikes” – a Boulder, Colorado advocacy and advisory organization that works with cities nationally.

52. Hackett Retires From CMOM to Devote Effort to Grand Carousel Fundraising -

Former Memphis Mayor Richard C. Hackett is retiring as CEO of the Children’s Museum of Memphis in June to devote his attention to fundraising for the institution he helped create 30 years ago. Hackett became leader of the museum in 2006.

53. Luttrell: Mend Issues That Divide Region -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says his hope for a more civil national political discourse may be “a little Alice in Wonderland.” And there are times when he sees local discussions veering in the direction of “Nashville and Washington,” he told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, May 16.

54. Cyberattack Wave Ebbs, But Experts See Risk of More -

LONDON (AP) – The "ransomware" cyberattack that has hit companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.

55. Outdoors Inc. Opens Downtown Pop-Up Store -

Outdoors Inc. is trying something new for its sixth retail location, which opened its doors earlier this month at 100 Peabody Place Downtown.

56. The Week Ahead: May 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! This week, Downtown welcomes barbecue teams from around the world coming to compete in the Super Bowl of Swine. Plus, we’ve got details on the remembrance of a somber moment in Memphis history; a reading festival for kids of all ages; and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

57. Haslam Credits Republican Leadership for Budget, Economic Accomplishments -

With the legislative session finished, Gov. Bill Haslam is touting budget accomplishments and a strong economy as the result of Republican leadership.

In a Capitol Hill press conference shortly after the General Assembly adjourned for the year, the governor called passage of a $37 billion budget, the second consecutive one with no new debt, as the Legislature’s most important act.

58. Soaring Costs -

With more than 800 million passengers zipping through U.S. airports in 2016 and air cargo accounting for more than one-third of the world’s trade by value, the nation has become increasingly dependent on air travel to stay competitive. But what sometimes get lost is the amount of upkeep needed to maintain the infrastructure of these self-contained cities.

59. Harsher Sentences Could Result From Guidance Weighed by US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Justice Department officials have been weighing new guidance that would encourage prosecutors to charge suspects with the most serious offenses they can prove, a departure from Obama-era policies that aimed to reduce the federal prison population and reshape the criminal justice system.

60. Last Word: RiverPlay, New City Property Tax Rate and House Republican Rift -

The Memphis In May International Festival arrives Friday with the Beale Street Music Festival and hopefully with warmer temperatures than the Thursday chill. Meanwhile, RiverPlay, the conversion of Riverside Drive between Jefferson and Court to a pop-up park linking up Memphis and Mississippi River Parks, makes its debut Friday afternoon.

61. Senate Sends $1.1T Spending Bill to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate has delivered to President Donald Trump the first significant legislation of his presidency, a bipartisan $1.1 trillion spending bill that would keep the government running through September – putting off, for now, battles over Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall and his promised military buildup.

62. Tennessee House Passes Gun-Lawsuit Bill -

Legislation making it easier for cities to be sued over gun restrictions eased through the state House Wednesday, May 3, even though it would allow those filing lawsuits to claim triple attorney fees.

63. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.

64. Lawmakers Settle on $1T Plan to Avoid US Gov't Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Lawmakers on Monday unveiled a huge $1 trillion-plus spending bill that would fund most government operations through September but would deny President Donald Trump money for a border wall and rejects his proposed cuts to popular domestic programs.

65. Memphis United in Support of Grizzlies on National Playoffs Stage -

Yes, the Grizzlies’ 116-103 loss in Game 5 at San Antonio was disappointing. So step back a moment and remember the atmosphere at FedExForum – and across the city – during the two wins that briefly evened this first-round West Conference Playoff Series at 2-2.

66. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

67. Setting New Tax Rate After Reappraisal Becomes ‘Moving Target’ -

For local government leaders, the 2017 countywide property reappraisal is about resetting the property tax rate for Shelby County government and all seven of the cities and towns within the county.

68. Setting New Tax Rate After Reappraisal Becomes ‘Moving Target’ -

For local government leaders, the 2017 countywide property reappraisal is about resetting the property tax rate for Shelby County government and all seven of the cities and towns within the county.

69. Setting New Tax Rate After Reappraisal Becomes ‘Moving Target’ -

For local government leaders, the 2017 countywide property reappraisal is about resetting the property tax rate for Shelby County government and all seven of the cities and towns within the county.

70. Setting New Tax Rate After Reappraisal Becomes ‘Moving Target’ -

For local government leaders, the 2017 countywide property reappraisal is about resetting the property tax rate for Shelby County government and all seven of the cities and towns within the county.

71. Setting New Tax Rate After Reappraisal Becomes ‘Moving Target’ -

For local government leaders, the 2017 countywide property reappraisal is about resetting the property tax rate for Shelby County government and all seven of the cities and towns within the county.

72. Memphis Looks to Detroit’s Riverfront for Inspiration -

In a lot of ways Memphis and Detroit are kindred spirits. Both cities have similar populations, demographics, soul-laced musical legacies and are both looking to rebuild their economies after getting hammered by the recession.

73. Last Word: Derailed, The View From Pyramid Harbor and New History -

“Do Not Occupy” notices posted Thursday afternoon on most but not all of the newly-opened Railgarten complex on Central Avenue east of Cooper in Midtown. Local code officers acted after questions about whether the owners of the complex had approval for intermodal containers being used as part of the structure. The restaurant part of the structure in what was once an ice house remains open. There was already a lot of grumbling from neighbors about the music volume and late hours as well as parking for the development

74. Transit Options Vital to Regions, Expert Says -

Establishing mode share in a region – the percentage of travelers using a certain a mode of transportation – is one the first and most important baselines for a region to establish on the way to improving transportation as a whole.

75. Award-Winner McCloy Brings Modern Applications to Library System -

Keenon McCloy got around to doing the math on her time at City Hall. “I just crossed over 25 years,” said McCloy, director of the Memphis Public Libraries system, a position she has held for 10 years. Before that she was director of the city’s Division of Public Service, head of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center and started as director of the transition office for Memphis Mayor-elect Willie Herenton in 1991, one of four mayors whose administrations she has worked in.

76. Immigrant Tuition Break Gaining Support in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A push to offer in-state college tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally is picking up unlikely momentum from some Republicans in Tennessee, a deeply conservative state that voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration.

77. Last Word: Mike Rose, Bartlett High Options and Memphis-Nashville Talk -

Mike Rose transformed Memphis-made Holiday Inn from a single brand to multiple brands and a corporation that transformed the hospitality industry as casino gaming spread beyond Las Vegas and Atlantic City in the 1990s. During his time at the helm of Holiday Inns and Promus Companies, Rose was also one of the city's most influential corporate leaders with the money and ability to raise money and set terms that made possible the transformation of St. Jude into a research institution and pointed the University of Memphis in that direction as well. Rose died Sunday in Nashville of cancer.

78. Memphis Continues Pursuit of New Convention Center Hotel -

More Downtown hotel rooms. Lots of them. And preferably under one roof.

“We need a big hotel,” said Chuck Pinkowski of Pinkowski & Co. “Four hundred, 500, 600, 800, 1,000. We need a big hotel at the Cook Convention Center to see more conventions. The question is: How do you fund improvements to the convention center and how do you fund a big hotel?”

79. Trump's Budget Priorities Set Small Businesses Strategizing -

NEW YORK (AP) – The priorities laid out in President Donald Trump's budget message have some small business owners strategizing how they might benefit from a big boost in defense spending, and others thinking about how to make up for revenue they could lose to cuts in grant programs and subsidies.

80. RegionSmart Gets City Lover Peter Kageyama -

Renowned author and lover of cities Peter Kageyama will be speak at this year’s RegionSmart Summit, which is the second annual gathering of Mid-South mayors and civic leaders to discuss future workforce development, transportation and land use in the area.

81. Last Word: Basketball Capitol, Gang Fight in Southwest Memphis and Moving Polk -

There is something to be said for hosting a round of the NCAA’s March Madness without having a team in the playoffs. Much to be said against it. But after a weekend of what I think most of us here will call the most compelling of the regionals featured prominently on national television, you really can find very little to complain about. It might even have rekindled the intensity of our civic love of basketball.

82. Black Lives Matter Groups Joining Forces With Wage Activists -

A cluster of Black Lives Matter groups and the organization leading the push for a $15-an-hour wage are joining forces to combine the struggle for racial justice with the fight for economic equality.

83. RDC President Gives Riverfront Update -

Pop-up parks, cruise lines and plans to enhance existing attractions were all topics Riverfront Development Corp. president Benny Lendermon touched on during a state of the riverfront he delivered Friday, March 24, to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

84. True Fakes -

TRUISH. These days, fake news can seem so real, and real news gets more and more unbelievable.

I offer recent local, state and national examples.

ZOO PREPARING BOAT PARKING FOR RAINBOW LAKE

85. Already in Peril, Rural Hospitals Unsure on Health Care Bill -

CLAXTON, Ga. (AP) – Talmadge Yarbrough had just sat down at his desk and opened a box of pecans when he let out a gasp that could have been his last breath. He'd gone into cardiac arrest in his office, a co-worker called 911, and an ambulance drove him two miles to the small hospital that serves this rural community in southeast Georgia.

86. Two National Experts Join RegionSmart Summit -

The RegionSmart summit in Memphis on April 27 has added two national experts to its lineup.

One is Paulo Nunes-Ueno, the former director of transportation mobility for the city of Seattle and Seattle Children’s Hospital. Nunes-Ueno is a nationally renowned expert in sustainable transportation and effective urban solutions for transit, mobility and parking. He specializes in helping cities, neighborhoods and major employers develop innovative plans that safely and efficiently meet the various transportation needs of workers, residents and visitors. He last visited Memphis in October 2016 as part of the Memphis Medical District Collaborative and Innovate Memphis' parking summit.

87. Jackson's Birth Marked in Memphis, the City He Co-Founded -

While President Donald Trump’s Nashville visit – including a tour of Andrew Jackson’s plantation The Hermitage – drew much of the national political attention Wednesday, March 15, a much smaller observance of what would have been Jackson’s 250th birthday took place in a courtroom in Memphis, the city he co-founded.

88. Tennessee Fusion Center Monitored July Protests In Memphis, Emails Reveal -

A state “fusion center” that coordinates information among local law enforcement has been keeping a detailed list of legal protests in Memphis and other Tennessee cities, according to emails from last July requested by a student researching “predictive policing” efforts in Memphis.

89. Tapping Young Donors -

Amelia Thompson is everything a nonprofit is looking for now and in the future. A 30-year-old Memphian who graduated White Station High School, she has worked with a nonprofit in Washington, D.C. and been a buyer for Macy’s in New York.

90. Bacon, Soda & Too Few Nuts Tied to Big Portion of US Deaths -

CHICAGO (AP) – Gorging on bacon, skimping on nuts? These are among food habits that new research links with deaths from heart disease, strokes and diabetes.

Overeating or not eating enough of the 10 foods and nutrients contributes to nearly half of U.S. deaths from these causes, the study suggests.

91. Last Word: Gas Tax Conflict, Redbirds Changes and Hidden Office Space -

The CEO of Memphis-based AutoZone, Bill Rhodes, among the corporate leaders meeting with President Donald Trump recently to urge him to abandon plans for a border tax. This is the tax on goods imported to the U.S. from other countries that U.S. Rep. David Kustoff says also has some opposition among Republicans in D.C.

92. Cities, Developers Reaping Rewards of Mixed-Use Shift -

Commercial real estate is shifting to mixed-use developments designed to create a sense of place for homeowners longing for the community of days gone by, and the trend is profiting many parties as commercial developers see stronger returns and cities undergo revitalization in their core.

93. Duck Boats Face Increasing Calls for Improvements, Bans -

BOSTON (AP) – With their festive, party-like ambiance and ability to travel on land and in water, duck boats have long been tourist attractions for sightseers around the U.S. But a string of deadly accidents has left the industry reeling, forced safety improvements and led some advocates to call for a total ban on the vehicles.

94. North Memphis Effort Gets $1 Million SPARCC Grant -

A national organization focused on local neighborhood revitalization efforts is awarding a group working in North Memphis a $1 million planning and technical assistance grant over three years.

The Strong, Prosperous, and Resilient Communities Challenge, or SPARCC, announced Wednesday, Feb. 15, the grant to Memphis Partners for Resilient Communities as part of a three-year, $90 million nationwide initiative to bolster communities.

95. North Memphis Effort Gets $1 Million SPARCC Grant -

A national organization focused on local neighborhood revitalization efforts is awarding a group working in North Memphis a $1 million planning and technical assistance grant over three years.

The Strong, Prosperous, and Resilient Communities Challenge, or SPARCC, announced Wednesday, Feb. 15, the grant to Memphis Partners for Resilient Communities as part of a three-year, $90 million nationwide initiative to bolster communities.

96. State Of The Suburbs -

With its central location, unparalleled access to major roads, rails, runways and rivers and low cost-of-living, it’s no surprise that Memphis and the surrounding area is a popular destination for corporate headquarters, national retail brands and major industrial centers.

97. Arkansas Breaks From Other Red States on Sanctuary Campuses -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas lawmakers rejected a proposal Tuesday to block funding to colleges and universities that don't cooperate with federal immigration authorities, a stance that differs with other Republican states targeting campuses and cities offering sanctuary to immigrants in the country illegally.

98. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

99. Memphis Students Leave Their Beautiful Mark on Blighted Downtown Building -

A Memphis woman is using inspiration she found on a summer trip to help transform a blighted building in Downtown Memphis, giving credence to the sentiment that one person can make a difference.

Carolee Carlin, a Germantown resident who works at International Paper Co., was visiting her family in New England last summer when her mom took her to see an abandoned building. The boarded up windows had been replaced with plywood panels of art that had been created by local high school students.

100. Governor Defends Big Proposals for Statewide Infrastructure -

NASHVILLE – Protesters overshadowed Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address Monday night, chanting in the Capitol in opposition to a spate of executive orders from President Donald Trump.