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Editorial Results (free)

1. Food Truck Evolution: Owners Strategize as Novelty Wears Off -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

2. North American Trio Beats Morocco to Host 2026 World Cup -

MOSCOW (AP) – North America will host the 2026 World Cup after FIFA voters overwhelmingly opted Wednesday for the financial and logistical certainty of a United States-led bid over a risky Moroccan proposal for the first 48-team tournament.

3. 100 North Main -

The city’s tallest building, the 37-story 100 North Main Building – may or may not become the city’s second convention center hotel. But the skyscraper that has been vacant for four years and counting is the centerpiece of a 3-acre planned commercial complex anchored by a 600-room hotel, no matter where it winds up in the footprint. The complex, as much as the hotel, promises to change more than the city’s convention business.

4. Landing NFL Draft is Fine, But How About a Super Bowl? -

One after another, many of the nation’s top sporting events are finding their way to Nashville. News that Music City is playing host to the 2019 NFL Draft really came as no surprise, considering the city’s other recent sports successes here.

5. Blockchain Tech ‘is the Shiny New Penny’ -

During the General Assembly session that just ended legislators debated a number of hot-button issues: guns, abortion, Confederate statues and medical marijuana.

But tucked among the headline-grabbers was a brief bill, less than 300 words long, that attracted no controversy whatsoever.

6. A Better Ride -

The final phase of construction on the innovative Hampline will begin this summer, with a goal of completion by the end of the year. The protected bike path completes the missing link in the Greenline between Overton Park and Tillman Street, and has been an ongoing project since 2010.

7. Emergency 911 Technology Struggles to Keep Up With the Times -

ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) – High school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone.

8. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

9. Memphis To Be One of 10 Drone Test Sites -

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is leading a Memphis group that is part of a national pilot program to integrate drones into air traffic.

The U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration announced the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Pilot Program Wednesday, May 9, in Washington, D.C., with airport authority president and CEO Scott Brockman and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis both in attendance.

10. Groups Sue Ben Carson Over Delay of Anti-Segregation Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A group of advocacy organizations filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the Department of Housing and Urban Development and its secretary, Ben Carson, over his decision to delay an Obama-era rule intended to ensure that communities confront and address racial segregation.

11. DOT Urges Drivers to Take Care of Faulty Takata Air Bags Now -

NEW YORK (AP) – The U.S. Department of Transportation is again urging owners of vehicles with defective Takata air bags to seek repairs immediately.

The agency singled out Ford Rangers and Mazda B-Series trucks from 2006, which are under a "do not drive" warning. The agency said Monday that it is "deeply concerned" that they are not being returned for repairs quickly enough.

12. Week Ahead: May 7-13 -

Happy Monday. This weekend is the one between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest, but there are still Memphis in May International events to attend. Great month to be in Memphis!

13. RegionSmart Summit Brings Out Best of the Mid-South -

Though the Mid-South is made up of a many different neighborhoods, cities and even states, many of the ties that bind the region together were on display at the third annual RegionSmart Summit.

The Thursday, April 26 conference held at the Halloran Center for the Performing Arts & Education, featured a convening of the are area’s mayors followed by a trio of national speakers all with the intent to strengthen the intra-regional dialogue.

14. Bookings for Southwest Fall After Fatal Accident -

DALLAS (AP) – Southwest Airlines says bookings are down since the fatal accident on one of its planes last week.

The company said Thursday that it expects revenue per mile, which tracks average prices, will drop between 1 percent and 3 percent in the April-through-June quarter. It said that 1 to 2 percentage points of the decline is due to slower sales since the April 17 accident that killed a passenger.

15. Calling Our Bluff -

Marie Pizano believes everyone has a story, and she is building her business on telling it. The founder and CEO of MVP3 Entertainment Group, Pizano is producing films based on Memphis history.

On April 19, Pizano was in Washington, D.C., getting footage for her latest film, “Journey4Justice: The Abigail Noel Story.” Noel, a native Memphian and psychic/medium, claims there is more to be known regarding music icon Prince’s death. Noel is leading the movement #JusticeforPrince, which aims to press President Donald Trump to order a new investigation into the artist’s 2016 death.

16. RegionSmart Summit To Focus On Fourth Bluff -

Since its inception, Memphis and The Fourth Chickasaw Bluff on the Mississippi River have been bound together.

So as Memphis is going through its latest growth spurt, so too is the Fourth Bluff as it was selected to be a part of a $40 million national initiative known as Reimagining the Civic Commons.

17. Scenes From National Walk Out Protests -

Shelby County Schools officials estimated approximately 20 Memphis schools participated in the April 19 National Walk Out protests. The protests in numerous cities were over two days to call attention to gun violence.

18. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

19. Last Word: 'Poking The Bear,' National Walk Out Day and McQueen on Capitol Hill -

The state House’s Tuesday action cutting $250k in funding for Memphis from Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget proposal is turning into a cause back here, starting with a GoFundMe page. Elsewhere on social media, you can see the unmistakable outline of a party or parties for the cause beginning to form. This is near the end of session for the Legislature when the budget is the last action before going back to the district to run for re-election. Different timing over here, with multiple crawfish outings leading into Memphis in May.

20. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

21. HelloHome Shifts Business Model To Take Firm ‘Back to Our Roots’ -

HelloHome. That’s the new name of a 3-year-old real estate technology platform that founder Jessica Buffington is tweaking to improve customer experience.

Buffington, now 30, began her career in real estate at the absolute worst time. The housing market had tanked. A recession was in full swing. Her niche became Memphis bank-owned and foreclosure properties. During the following five years, she sold millions of dollars in real estate. She became a board member of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors’ Multi-Million Dollar Club and the Women’s Council of Realtors.

22. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

23. Luttrell Says County Pre-K Funding Source Likely to Differ From City’s -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell probably won’t follow the city’s blueprint for funding universal prekindergarten in Shelby County.

24. Third Annual RegionSmart Summit to Be Held April 26 -

More than 300 government, economic development and community leaders will gather at the third annual RegionSmart Summit this month to discuss some of the Mid-South’s biggest planning issues.

Hosted by the Mid-South Mayors’ Council and the Urban Land Institute’s local affiliate, ULI Memphis, the April 26 summit at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education will tackle topics such as the future of workforce development, transportation and land use.

25. Selfie Medicine: Phone Apps Push People to Take Their Pills -

SEATTLE (AP) – Take two tablets and a selfie? Your doctor's orders may one day include a smartphone video to make sure you took your medicine.

Smartphone apps that monitor pill-taking are now available, and researchers are testing how well they work when medication matters. Experts praise the efficiency, but some say the technology raises privacy and data security concerns.

26. Visiting Memphis 50 Years After King's Assassination -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Fifty years ago, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader's shocking murder on April 4, 1968, marked one of the most significant moments in U.S. history.

27. Memphians Taking Part In March Against Gun Violence -

Memphis will join cities in all 50 states Saturday, March 24, in responding to the national call to action against gun violence by March For Our Lives.

Organized by a grassroots coalition of high school youth from across greater Memphis, the local march is an officially recognized partner of the national March For Our Lives movement and will mirror the youth-led march on Washington, D.C.

28. Memphians Taking Part In March Against Gun Violence -

Memphis will join? ?cities in all 50 states Saturday, March 24, in responding to the national call to action against gun violence by March For Our Lives.

Organized by a grassroots coalition of high school youth from across greater Memphis, the local march is an officially recognized partner of the national March For Our Lives movement? and will mirror the youth-led march on Washington, D.C.

29. Trump Opioid Plan Includes Death Penalty for Traffickers -

MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) – President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid drug addiction calls for stiffer penalties for drug traffickers, including the death penalty where appropriate under current law, a top administration official said. It's a fate for drug dealers that Trump has been highlighting publicly in recent weeks.

30. Last Word: Waiting on Hardaway, Campaign Habits and Hasheem Thabeet's Shadow -

Penny Hardaway’s formal hiring as the new Tigers basketball coach is expected next week and you can almost hear all of the resume’s hitting Hardaway’s email as he puts together a staff. Hardaway’s name first surfaced as a possible coach in the last days of Josh Pastner, pre-Tubby Smith. It's only become stronger and better developed since then.

31. Gorillas in the Living Room -

IMPROVING THE VIEW. There are very large gorillas in our living room.

It seems these things are never seen when such a sight would spoil the vision at hand – except, of course, by those who see the reality of unpleasant things. Never mentioned in polite conversation – except, of course, by those who discuss unpleasant things. Avoided at all costs by those charged with promoting civic accomplishment – except by those who measure the cost of unpleasant things.

32. For Many Factory Towns, White Collar Job Loss Hurts the Most -

ERIE, Pa. (AP) – With the abandoned smokestacks off the bay and ramshackle factories along 12th Street, it's easy to pin the blame for this industrial city's plight on the loss of manufacturing jobs to China and Mexico.

33. Members of Congress Lay Wreath at Site of King Assassination -

MEMPHIS – About a dozen Democrats and Republicans prayed and sang "Amazing Grace" during a solemn ceremony Friday at the site where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated nearly 50 years ago, marking the start of a three-day congressional "pilgrimage" to sites with ties to the civil rights era in the South.

34. Report: Inequality Remains 50 Years After Kerner Report -

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Barriers to equality are posing threats to democracy in the U.S. as the country remains segregated along racial lines and child poverty worsens, says a study examining the nation 50 years after the release of the landmark 1968 Kerner Report.

35. The Week Ahead: February 26-March 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! There are plenty of business, government and sporting events to keep your interest this week, along with the annual farm and gin show. And Shakespeare could inspire some Shelby County students to have their works published in a literary magazine.

36. Memphis Issues RFQ For Brooks Museum Reuse -

The city of Memphis is looking for developers and planners to find a new use for the 102-year-old Memphis Brooks Museum of Art building in Overton Park.

The city issued a request for qualifications, or RFQ, notice this week that seeks developers and others to “rehabilitate, adaptively reuse and manage” the building at 1934 Poplar Avenue.

37. Sign of Community -

Montavious Dean, a 16-year-old from Hamilton High School, and Sequoia Campbell, an 18-year-old from Grad Academy, are among 10 South Memphis teenagers who’ve been volunteering their time for a singular mission.

38. Revisiting Winter Olympics Destinations -

I’ve been an Olympics fan since 1984, when I recall cheering on Mary Lou Retton and Carl Lewis to win gold in Los Angeles. I’ve only been to one Olympics, the Summer Games in Atlanta in 1996.

39. Case, Vance Bringing 'Rise of the Rest' Startup Fund to Memphis This May -

The co-founder of America Online is coming to Memphis this May with his investment fund to hear pitches from local startup companies and award $100,000 in seed funding to one of them.

Steve Case, the chairman and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based venture capital firm Revolution, and venture capitalist and author J.D. Vance are leading the second leg of the current Rise of the Rest bus tour. Rise of the Rest is also the name of the seed fund.

40. Marchers Mark 50th Anniversary of Start of 1968 Sanitation Strike -

The signs are now iconic. “I Am A Man” signs from the 1968 sanitation workers strike are museum pieces, even collectibles. So more than a few of those who marched Monday, Feb. 12, 50 years to the day that the historic strike began, kept the signs stapled to yard sticks, another nod to the past. Still others went for different versions – “I Am A Woman,” “I Am A Person.”

41. Marchers Mark 50th Anniversary of Start of 1968 Strike -

Several hundred people marched from Clayborn Temple to City Hall Monday, Feb. 12, 50 years to the day that the 1968 sanitation workers strike began.

The march, coordinated by the new Poor People’s Campaign being organized by Rev. William Barber, leader of the national Moral Mondays movement, and the Fight for $15 minimum wage effort, retraced the route the striking workers in 1968 took in daily marches.

42. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

43. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

44. Moment of Silence Set to Honor Memphis Sanitation Workers -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Rain was falling in Memphis, Tennessee, when two sanitation workers picking up trash sought shelter in the back of a city garbage truck on Feb. 1, 1968.

The poorly-maintained truck's compactor malfunctioned, crushing Echol Cole and Robert Walker to death.

45. Federal Judge Wants Opioid Lawsuits To End In Settlement -

The goal is impressive: Hammer out a legal deal that starts guiding the nation out of an epidemic of opioid addiction.

How and when that can happen, if at all, is the subject of talks scheduled to begin Wednesday in a federal courthouse in Cleveland.

46. Southern States Join To Promote Civil Rights Tourism -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – Southern states that once fought to maintain racial segregation are now banding together to promote civil rights tourism at sites including the building where the Confederacy was born and the motel where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. died.

47. Finding The Best in The Worst of Times -

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times” is the opening line of Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities.” The story, set during the French Revolution, centers on the possibility of resurrection and transformation both on personal and societal levels. Rooted in that transformation is the sacrifice and suffering that accompanies it.

48. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

49. A New View -

People tend to rely on the new year mark as a time to make resolutions and look ahead. But it also provides a chance to reflect upon and recognize how much we and our environment have changed in just a short year.

50. Decade Since Recession: Thriving Cities Leave Others Behind -

As the nation's economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle's was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union district – and then expanded eight-fold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

51. Cities Sue Defense Dept. Over Gun-Check System Failures -

NEW YORK (AP) – Three large U.S. cities filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday against the Department of Defense, arguing that many service members who are disqualified from gun ownership weren't reported to the national background check system.

52. Editorial: National Black Theater Museum Would Be Big Bang for the Arts -

When Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele took his well-developed idea for a National Black Theater Museum in Overton Park to the Memphis City Council this month, he began by saying: “It doesn’t exist anywhere in the world. This didn’t come from anywhere.”

53. GOP Tax Overhaul Will Be Felt by State, Local Governments -

With Congress sending President Donald Trump a tax overhaul, state and local governments are preparing for some fallout.

A look at some of the ways it might affect them:

FEDERAL-STATE CONNECTIONS

54. Black Theater Museum Plan Gets Good Reviews at City Hall -

For about five months, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele had been working on the idea he proposed Tuesday, Dec. 19, to establish the National Black Theater Museum inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art building in Overton Park.

55. 2017 a Year of Expansion for Memphis Banks -

The biggest banks in Memphis made aggressive pushes this year to raise their profiles and expand footprints, as competition in the sector heats up and the industry continues winning back the strength it enjoyed before the bust of 2008.

56. Finding Gratitude In Travel -

As November closes and we move fully into the holiday season, I still remain a touch thankful looking back over the past year. Yes, I have much to be thankful for on the personal side of life, but during this season of thanks there are some travel-related items worth mentioning.

57. Good Night, Night: Light Pollution Increasing Around Globe -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) – The world's nights are getting alarmingly brighter – bad news for all sorts of creatures, humans included.

A German-led term reported Wednesday that light pollution is threatening darkness almost everywhere. Satellite observations during five Octobers show Earth's artificially lit outdoor area grew by 2 percent a year from 2012 to 2016. So did nighttime brightness.

58. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

59. Arts Are Creative, Economic Fuel for Memphis -

On a recent arrival at the Memphis International Airport, I marveled that my watch hadn’t even been set to Central Time before I heard buzz of the RiverArtsFest, and acquired a hot tip to visit Wild Bill’s for a “real blues club” experience. I’d just arrived and already the arts in Memphis were calling to me.

60. Nashville City Council Approves Financing for MLS Stadium -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville's bid to land an expansion franchise from Major League Soccer now has $275 million in financing approved to build a new stadium, giving Music City a major boost weeks before a final decision from the league.

61. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

62. City Judges Timing and Steps in Fairgrounds Planning -

City of Memphis leaders likely will reveal a few new details when they present the draft plan for Mid-South Fairgrounds redevelopment at a Monday, Nov. 6, town hall meeting. But Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration took much of the suspense and speculation out of next week’s session Wednesday, Nov. 1, releasing details that show the administration’s general belief that a few steps still need to be taken before the city gets to a broad reconfiguration of the Fairgrounds.

63. City Fairgrounds Plan Keeps Coliseum on Hold -

When it unveils a general plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment Monday, Nov. 6, the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will put the emphasis on setting the stage for a fuller redevelopment.

64. Run Women Run -

In 2018, Shelby County voters will be presented with a long ballot as candidates compete for most county offices, many school board and suburban government positions and congressional and legislative seats.

65. Chain Reaction: Memphis Builds on National Restaurant Trend -

Morgan Hughes is a 22-year-old college student who regularly spends more than $100 a week going out to eat. Sometimes it’s a trip to Sonic, other times it’s a meal at Next Door in Crosstown Concourse, still other times it’s food from the restaurant where she works, Hog & Hominy.

66. Clicking on All Cylinders -

Memphis is a city on the precipice of change as projects that were once deemed impossible – like ServiceMaster’s Downtown headquarters or Crosstown Concourse – have emboldened developers and city officials to shoot for the moon.

67. Trump Declares Opioids a Public Health Emergency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In ringing and personal terms, President Donald Trump on Thursday pledged to "overcome addiction in America," declaring the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency and announcing new steps to combat what he described as the worst drug crisis in U.S. history.

68. Montgomery Martin Builds an Urban Renaissance -

Montgomery Martin has Memphis grit on his feet. He’s spent the afternoon walking through the Tennessee Brewery building, a 125-year-old South Bluff structure being reimagined and renovated with the help of Montgomery Martin Contractors. In other cities, an aging giant like the Brewery might be seen as condemned – too daunting to be granted new life. But Martin says, “We’re not afraid of old buildings – we figure out how to get it done.” And, he adds, “all this is coming together to draw people back into the city.”

69. Consortium Seeks Breast Cancer Policy Reforms -

Two-time breast cancer survivor Dr. Debra Bartelli and members of the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium are pushing to increase awareness of breast cancer in Memphis because they know first-hand that early detection and treatment will lead to higher survival rates.

70. Gibson Guitar Factory Looking For New Home -

Nashville-based guitar maker Gibson Brands Inc. is putting its Downtown Memphis factory on the market as it looks for a new, smaller home.

The 18-year-old Gibson Beale Street Showcase and Guitar Factory – located on nearly six acres at 145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., across South B.B. King Boulevard from FedExForum – clocks in at 127,620 square feet and has an adjacent 330-space parking lot. And it could be yours for $17 million.

71. Corporations to Keep Tax Break Lost by Millions of Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans would lose a prized tax break under President Donald Trump's sweeping revamp of the tax code, but corporations would get to keep it.

The Republican proposal would eliminate the federal deduction for state and local taxes, a widely popular break used by some 44 million Americans, especially in high-tax, Democratic-leaning states like New York, New Jersey, California and Illinois. But corporations, which pay billions in local property levies and state income taxes, wouldn't be affected.

72. Last Word: Athens Bound, The Amazon Campaign and All Things Grizz -

This may be the most covered meeting of the Tennessee Historical Commission ever – the meeting Friday in Athens, Tennessee where Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will attempt to make the case for the commission granting him permission to remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest in Health Sciences Park. The chairman of the commission has already told Strickland in writing that the commission will not take up the matter – not even discuss it. Strickland hopes he will at least be heard. And he says the city should have a decision by mid-November and is adamant that this cannot be put off into the new year.

73. Trump’s Bluster Cascades Through State Politics -

The chaos emanating from President Donald Trump’s administration is changing the landscape of Tennessee politics, setting the stage for upheaval within the dominant Republican Party.

“This is a really big moment for the Tennessee Republican Party,” with the Trump wing or far-right wing “firmly in control,” says Kent Syler, Middle Tennessee State University political science professor.

74. Buffett Says Government Should Do More to Combat Poverty -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Billionaire Warren Buffett says America will continue to prosper overall, but government and philanthropy should do more to ensure that pockets of poverty don't continue to make it difficult for some to succeed.

75. Hooks Institute to Hold Oct. 5 Open House, Panel -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis will lead a community conversation about defending diversity, social justice and human rights in today’s America at its annual open house on Oct. 5. At the event, the Hooks Institute will release the 2017 Hooks Institute Policy Papers, “Bending the Arc Toward Justice: Including the Excluded.”

76. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

77. Hooks Institute to Hold Oct. 5 Open House, Panel -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis will lead a community conversation about defending diversity, social justice and human rights in today’s America at its annual open house on Oct. 5. At the event, the Hooks Institute will release the 2017 Hooks Institute Policy Papers, “Bending the Arc Toward Justice: Including the Excluded.”

78. Target is Raising Minimum Hourly Wage to $15 by End of 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Target Corp. is raising its minimum hourly wage for workers to $11 starting next month and then to $15 by the end of 2020, a move it says will help it hire and keep the best employees and make shopping a better experience for customers.

79. Memphis Small Business Landscape Stable Amid Slow Economic Growth -

While the local small-business landscape mirrors the national environment of a slowly growing economy keeping things stable, the lack of population growth is holding the Memphis area back from truly breaking out.

80. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

81. Top US Fall Destinations -

Fall is my favorite time of year. The cooling temperatures, changing colors and football season all combine to make for a fun time of year.

It’s also a great time to travel. Fall means shoulder season in many top destinations, making travel a bit more affordable. But there also are some destinations that just seem to make more sense from Labor Day to the start of the holiday season at Thanksgiving. Here are my top U.S. fall destinations on my radar for travel this year.

82. Drivers Whose Cars Were Flooded by Harvey Can't Find Rentals -

BEAUMONT, Texas (AP) – His three vehicles flooded by Hurricane Harvey, Jason Bell checked at one car-rental office only to find about 2,500 people ahead of him on the waiting list. When he tried a more out-of-the-way location, the reservations still numbered about 300.

83. Fewer Americans Buying Insurance in Coastal Areas -

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) – Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home's flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn't hit and her home isn't in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due next week, to another use.

84. Latino & Local -

Mauricio Calvo has heard the saying “all politics is local” in the course of making and maintaining connections through the Latino Memphis organization he leads. But prior to this year, political connections for the organization were more about getting needed services and building long-term relationships over time.

85. On a Chaotic Day in DC, Trump Goes After Amazon, Again -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump renewed his attacks on e-commerce giant Amazon, saying Wednesday that the company is "doing great damage to tax paying retailers."

Trump, in a tweet, said that "towns, cities and states throughout the U.S. are being hurt – many jobs being lost!"

86. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

87. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

88. Memphis-MidSouth Affiliate of Susan G. Komen Foundation Expanding Reach -

In 2017, there will be an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,610 breast cancer deaths. Those sobering numbers come from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the largest nonprofit source of breast cancer research.

89. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

90. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

91. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

92. Memphis Getting Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

93. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

94. Memphis Gets Federal Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

95. Higher Prices Squeezing Both Renters and Would-Be Homeowners -

A diminished supply of available homes is swelling prices in large U.S. metro areas from New York to Miami to Los Angeles, squeezing out would-be buyers and pushing up rents as more people are forced to remain tenants.

96. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

97. The Week Ahead: June 12-18 -

Get ready to groove, Memphis, because this week we're welcoming the inimitable Ruthie Foster to town, along with the return of both the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival and the Soulsville Record Swap. Plus, we've got details on the state House District 95 election, free MATA rides and what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

98. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

99. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

100. Tennessee Governor Signs NRA-Backed Metal Detector Gun Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Many Tennessee city and county buildings, parks and buses will either have to buy metal detectors, hire security guards and check people's bags, or let handgun permit holders bring in their guns, under a law signed Friday by Gov. Bill Haslam.