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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Church Health will host a Living Life Deliberately: Mindfulness Meditation in Daily Life class Monday, July 24, at noon in the Church Health Meditation Chapel, 1350 Concourse Ave. Rob Dove from Rhodes College Counseling will discuss how to practice meditation in ways that foster the ability to live deliberately. The class will be offered again July 31 at noon. Email slateryj@churchhealth.org with any questions.

2. Malco Theatres Moves Forward With Adjusted Powerhouse Cinema Plans -

The Malco Powerhouse Cinema proposed for Downtown’s South Main Historic Arts District is still a go, despite delays that have already pushed it well past its expected opening day.

But the roughly $8 million project is going to look a little different than initially proposed, Malco officials disclosed recently, due to projected costs that came back much too high.

3. Scene Change -

The sprawling mixed-use complex opening next month on North Cleveland in Midtown is a high-profile example of where Memphis’ art community finds itself at the halfway mark in 2017.

When Crosstown Concourse opens there Aug. 19, it won’t just represent a new beginning that turns a former Sears distribution center into a 1.5-million-square-foot community mainstay. With tenants like Crosstown Arts moving in, the development is also a representation of how the city’s arts landscape is changing this year.

4. Events -

The Metal Museum will host the “Cu in Summer: Inspirations” opening reception and sale Thursday, July 20, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. The exhibition features works created by students ages 14-17 who participated in the museum’s six-week summer program. All proceeds go directly to the students. Visit metalmuseum.org.

5. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

6. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

7. Events -

Moonlighting for the Cure 2017, a seven-band show and silent auction benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is Saturday, July 15, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Tin Roof, 315 Beale St. Each band features one or more St. Jude employees who “moonlight” as musicians, and several art pieces in the silent auction were donated by St. Jude employees. Admission by voluntary donation. Visit facebook.com/moonlightingforthecure for details.

8. Three Local Developers Seeking DMC Grants to Attract New Tenants -

Three new redevelopment projects are seeking Exterior Improvement Grants from the Downtown Memphis Commission in the hopes of attracting new tenants.

The first applicant, Janice Holder, is a retired Tennessee Supreme Court Justice, seeking to restore the façade of her building, located 55 S. Main St., back to its Gilded Age roots.

9. Events -

L’Ecole Culinaire will host its “Date Night: Tour of Foods From Napa” cooking class Friday, July 14, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at L’Ecole, 1245 N. Germantown Parkway. Whether this is your first date or anniversary, this unique dining experience explores Napa wines and the foods that go with them. Cost is $95 per person; includes instruction, three-course meal and wine. Register at lecole.edu.

10. Events -

L’Ecole Culinaire will host its “Date Night: Tour of Foods From Napa” cooking class Friday, July 14, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at L’Ecole, 1245 N. Germantown Parkway. Whether this is your first date or anniversary, this unique dining experience explores Napa wines and the foods that go with them. Cost is $95 per person; includes instruction, three-course meal and wine. Register at lecole.edu.

11. Climbing Out When Stuck In Comfort Zone -

We all have them. We often go there looking for safety, acceptance, understanding or just a sense of the familiar. Our comfort zones are natural, but living there can keep you from fulfilling your purpose in life. A comfort zone, if you burrow in too deep, can become a rut you get stuck in.

12. Crust Named MSO Assistant, Youth Symphony Conductor -

Andrew Crust, who recently was named assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Memphis Youth Symphony, shares why young musicians inspire him and how orchestras can reach a younger audience in this week's Newsmakers Q&A.

13. Memphis Children Selected For JDRF Delegation -

Two Memphis-area youths have been chosen by JDRF, the leading global organization focused on Type 1 diabetes research, to join a delegation of children and celebrity advocates at the JDRF 2017 Children’s Congress July 24-26 in Washington, D.C.

14. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

15. The Week Ahead: July 10-16 -

Hello, Memphis! This week, a supercentenarian World War II veteran visits the Bluff City, a classic film flies into the Orpheum, and a piece of the Downtown skyline hits the auction block again. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

16. Need For Speed -

Access to high-speed broadband is a growing issue in Tennessee as technological advances in business and education become more digitally based. For the rural areas around Memphis and across the state, it is becoming a matter of disparity both on the workforce-training front and in classrooms. And the two are inextricably linked.

17. Shelby Farms Boutique Hotel; Midtown Gated Community on Latest LUCB Agenda -

Two proposed developments in two of the city’s high-profile areas – a 130-room boutique hotel near Shelby Farms and a new gated community in Midtown – will headline the Land Use Control Board’s Aug. 10 agenda.

18. SunTrust to Launch Financial Wellness Program -

Physical fitness initiatives have become an increasingly familiar part of corporate life, from employee health risk assessments to offering financial incentives to improve wellness. SunTrust Banks Inc. wants to help companies offer a twist on that concept – fiscal wellness.

19. Area’s Only Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Progressing in First Year -

With more than 30,000 epileptics living in the Memphis area, the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis, which opened nearly one year ago, is providing much needed specialized care and treatment for patients that previously were forced to drive to Jackson or Nashville for similar care.

20. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

21. Tennessee, Left Coast a World Apart on Immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

22. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

23. Community Rx -

As one of the city’s premier medical institutions, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital stays as busy as you might expect for an organization that tries to operate on the leading edge of pediatric care.

24. Former St. Francis CEO Now Teaching at CBU -

Dave Archer has never followed a prearranged plan for his career. The former CEO of St. Francis Hospital has always taken the next step, whatever that next step is, on faith.

25. Zoo Celebrating World Giraffe Day -

The Memphis Zoo will mark World Giraffe Day Wednesday, June 21, with a documentary film at the Zambezi River Hippo Camp, two chats with the zoo’s giraffe keeper and the zoo’s keeper of okapi, the closest living relative to giraffes.

26. Power Pitching, Hitting Goal Of New UT Baseball Coach -

Tony Vitello wants to put a Power T in Tennessee baseball, and with it a yearly contender for SEC championships and NCAA tournament bids.

The new UT baseball coach was introduced last Friday at Tennessee’s Lindsey Nelson Stadium. He emphasized power pitching and power hitting as part of his rebuilding plan.

27. Events -

Memphis Juneteenth Urban Music Festival will be held Friday, June 16, through Sunday, June 18, in Robert R. Church Park, at Beale and South Fourth streets. The festival will feature live music, vendors senior activities, kids zone and more. Admission is free. Visit memphisjuneteenth.com for a schedule.

28. Sharing Yards and Roots -

ROOTS AND MONKEY GRASS. So I’m waiting in line at Booksellers to get my high school classmate, Cary Fowler, to sign my copy of his new book when a moment of quintessential Memphis broke out.

29. Trezevant Celebrates 40 Years, Expanded Services -

For Jet Thompson, living at the Trezevant senior living community is part of a family tradition. She has been a resident there for the past 16 years – recently celebrating her 96th birthday – her mother had lived there for 20 years starting in 1981, and now two of her daughters are on the waiting list for admission.

30. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

31. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

32. The Health Of Care -

There's a school of thought in some industries that says it's ideal to have a narrow focus, to pick just one or a few things to excel at and not try to be all things to all people – that when you do so and go broad, you’re likely to end up instead being a master of nothing.

33. Golden India Seeks New Location Near Square -

The owners of Golden India restaurant in Overton Square want to move from their Madison Avenue storefront of 20 years to the site of a circa-1912 duplex on North Cooper Street where they intend to build a new restaurant.

34. Tennessee Brewery Developers Seek Incentives for Second Phase -

The developers of the Tennessee Brewery project are seeking a 20-year tax abatement to begin construction on phase two of their Downtown Memphis mixed-use development.

William Orgel, Jay Lindy and Adam Slovis, representing 495 TN Partners, have applied to the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. for a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive to build an additional 130-unit, four-story building they estimate will cost around $12.3 million.

35. Golden India Makes Relocation Plans Near Overton Square -

The owners of Golden India restaurant in Overton Square want to move from their Madison Avenue storefront of 20 years to the site of a circa 1912 duplex on North Cooper Street north of Madison where they intend to build a new restaurant.

36. Tennessee Brewery Developers Seeking Tax Incentives for Second Phase -

The developers of the Tennessee Brewery Project have applied for a 20-year tax abatement with the Center City Revenue Finance Corporation to begin construction on phase two of their Downtown Memphis mixed-use development.

37. Memphis Violinist: United Wouldn't Let Her Board With Instrument -

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) – A classical musician from Memphis has accused a United Airlines supervisor of barring her from boarding a plane with her centuries-old violin, sparking a scuffle that caused her to miss her flight and left her worried her hands – and by extension, her livelihood – may have been harmed.

38. Last Word: The Jazz Cornerstone, Council Day and 100 Items at Brooks -

In Elmwood Cemetery Tuesday morning, a wreath laying ceremony at the grave of Jimmie Lunceford, the Memphis jazz giant who formed and taught the Manassas High School band known as the Chickasaw Syncopators who went professional in the jazz age of the 1920s and played The Cotton Club during the Harlem renaissance. Lunceford was the cornerstone of Memphis jazz and Manassas was its bedrock. And the story of his high school students going professional is but an early chapter in a much longer narrative of gifted musicians and artists at times literally walking out of a graduation ceremony and onto a tour bus.

39. Great Clips Eyeing Dozens Of Stores In Memphis Area -

Since 1982 Great Clips has opened up more than 4,000 salons across the U.S. and Canada and now has its sights on the Memphis market.

“With more than a million people living in the greater Memphis market, this is very similar to some of the other 180-plus markets where we cut hair,” Great Clips Chief Operating Officer Rob Goggins said. “Since we have a strong presence in nearby markets, it was an obvious choice to continue our expansion into the Memphis market.”

40. Gladney’s Career Path Leads to New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

41. UT-Boling Center Gets New Associate Director -

Belinda Hardy has been named associate director of the UT-Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

42. Gladney’s Career Path Leads Her To New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

43. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.

44. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

45. UT-Boling Center Gets New Associate Director -

Belinda Hardy has been named associate director of the UT-Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

46. 10 Nonprofits to Receive GiVE 365 Grants -

GiVE 365, The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program, has announced grants totaling $60,000 to 10 nonprofit organizations. This year’s grant cycle is themed “Foundations for the Future: programs that help youth meet their potential.”

47. Editorial: We Must Stand Together To Fight Memphis Blight -

The saying is you can’t see the forest for the trees. And at times that is what Memphis’ seemingly eternal battle with blight feels like.

Before you can address properties that have become eyesores in once-proud communities, you must sort through the red tape and bureaucracy that protects these monuments to neglect.

48. Memphis Jewish Home Turns 90, Plans Expansion -

Eugenia Levitch and Martha Mitchell have only known each other for about a year, yet they've got their comedy routine down pat.

49. UTHSC's Center for Bleeding Disorders Growing -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center stepped up a little more than a year ago to provide a special clinic for bleeding disorders, but has now turned that into a comprehensive center that provides life-changing treatment for those in the Mid-South afflicted with these disorders.

50. Last Word: Minority Business Mic Drop, Truckers & Taxes and Confederate Statues -

Quite the buzz around the minority business discussion on “Behind The Headlines” – notably the progress report from Greater Memphis Chamber board chair Carolyn Hardy about what’s working and, more to the point, what is not working. In Hardy’s view that would be general minority business goals that she said amount to black-owned businesses being left out some three years into the renewed push for minority business growth – in government contracts and private business-to-business contracts.

51. Hardy: EDGE’s MWBE Program Not Working -

The chairwoman of the Greater Memphis Chamber board said first indications are that minority business requirements in tax breaks awarded by the Economic Development Growth Engine – or EDGE – aren’t working.

52. National Foundation for Transplants Looks to Expand Beyond Memphis HQ -

The Memphis-based National Foundation for Transplants serves about 3,500 clients each year, and since its establishment in 1983 has distributed more than $80 million to pay for transplant-related expenses, in addition to promoting and advocating for organ and tissue donation.

53. Overton Park Gallery Designed for, by Artists -

An art lover and an artist have joined together to give Memphis artists a unique gallery option for showing and selling their work.

Diane Laurenzi, owner of the old Stonewall Masonic Lodge Building at 1581 Overton Park Ave. that houses her store, Diane’s Art Gift & Home, and neighborhood bistro Ecco, recognized the opportunity to use the unused upstairs of the building as a small gallery space to support local artists.

54. Ronald McDonald House Welcomes St. Jude Children, Families -

Jill Crocker knew of Ronald McDonald House Charities and its mission to provide a “home away from home” for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital families and their children receiving treatment. But she had not been there.

55. Dorothy Day House Embraces Families in Need -

About 30 percent of Memphians live below the poverty line and 50 percent of them are children under age 18. It's a problem that Tracey Burgess, director of development and communication at the Dorothy Day House in Memphis, calls an "epidemic."

56. Editorial: Beyond the Experience Of Memphis in May -

At about the 40-year mark, the Memphis in May International Festival has seen some changes. And there should be more to come.

You could argue the first Memphis in May was a few years earlier with the 1974 opening of the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

57. Real Game Changer? MAM’s Randy Odom -

Randy Odom’s story starts with a youth basketball coach back in Big Spring, Texas. An otherwise anonymous guy named James Collinsworth, who became everything to a boy trying to find his way.

Odom’s mother had died of cancer. His father worked a lot – “I was one of those latchkey kids,” he said – and bad choices were at his fingertips.

58. New AD Fires Shot Easily Heard at Nelson Stadium -

Tennessee coaches of all sports were alerted last Thursday when Sam Winterbotham was fired after 11 seasons as the Vols’ men’s tennis coach.

No doubt UT baseball coach Dave Serrano got the alert. He could be next in line.

59. Legend Johnny Mathis Still Going Strong, Coming to Memphis -

As the story goes, Johnny Mathis was 8 years old and living on Post Street in San Francisco when his father purchased a piano for $25 and brought it home. But there was a problem: Clem Mathis couldn’t fit the piano through the front door of their small flat.

60. Airbnb Sees $1M Economic Impact During Music Fest -

An estimated $1 million of economic activity in Memphis will come from Airbnb guests staying in the city during the Beale Street Music Festival this weekend, according to the accommodations marketplace Airbnb.

61. Business Time -

Had the flattering comments come from the Memphis Grizzlies’ own content producers, Grind City Media, they would have been easy enough to dismiss. After all, that would have been like what center Marc Gasol said at season’s end when stressing the importance of candid evaluation.

62. Airbnb Sees $1M Economic Impact During Music Festival -

An estimated $1 million of economic activity in Memphis will come from Airbnb guests staying in the city during the Beale Street Music Festival this weekend, according to the accommodations marketplace Airbnb.

63. Shelby County Schools Head Discusses Stability, Next Steps -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson is always going to hear from parents. The only question day in and day out is how much he will hear from them.

The day after Germantown leaders offered Shelby County Schools $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools – known as the “three G’s” – Hopson heard a lot from parents of students in those schools.

64. View From the Hill: Forrest Kerfuffle Might Be Sign of Bigger Problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

65. Council Moves to Operating Budget Examination -

Memphis City Council members open budget hearings Thursday, May 5, on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s $680 million operating budget proposal for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

66. Sprouts Opening East Memphis Store July 12 -

Sprouts Farmers Market is close to finishing construction on its new East Memphis location on South Perkins Road and is looking to hire more than 100 full- and part-time positions before the store’s scheduled opening July 12.

67. Tenn. Lawmakers Look to Void Resolution Honoring Forrest Biographer -

NASHVILLE – Memphis lawmakers blasted a Smyrna legislator Thursday morning, accusing him of violating their honor system by sliding a resolution through the House honoring an author they perceive as a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist.

68. Sprouts Opens in East Memphis July 12, Looks to Hire More Than 100 -

Sprouts Farmers Market is close to finishing construction on its new East Memphis location on South Perkins Road and is looking to hire more than 100 full- and part-time positions before the store’s scheduled opening July 12.

69. Economy In Flux -

With apologies to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” for the professionals who follow economics for a living this is very much the best of times and the worst of times.

The moment is one of abundant optimism and rampant uncertainty. “Directionally,” they like to say, things look positive. And yet so much could still go very, very wrong.

70. Tennessee Lawmakers Condemn Resolution Lauding Forrest Biographer -

Memphis lawmakers blasted a Smyrna legislator Thursday morning, accusing him of violating their honor system by sliding a resolution through the House honoring an author they perceive as a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist.

71. Spring Lessons: Here’s Who Vols Will Start -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones isn’t big on naming starters and divulging depth charts. Not until he has to. So it comes as no surprise the Vols enter summer workouts and fall camp with junior Quinten Dormady and redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano still competing for the starting quarterback’s job.

72. Riding New Wave -

In 2007, about a half-dozen Memphis companies came together to found the Urban Land Institute Memphis chapter. It was a fine start. Six years later, ULI Memphis was convening a group of mayors from the tri-state area and, at least initially, trying very hard to make it informal and non-threatening.

73. House, Senate Approve IMPROVE Act -

The House and Senate are nearly ready to send the IMPROVE Act to Gov. Bill Haslam, passing it with relatively wide voting margins after months of debate.

Only one adjustment is needed in a measure providing property tax relief for veterans, the disabled and elderly before the measure can be sent to Haslam.

74. RegionSmart Speaker to Highlight Suburban Retrofitting -

Redevelopment is a ubiquitous term in Memphis right now. Major projects such as the Crosstown Concourse and ServiceMaster’s new headquarters are located well within the city limits, but according to Ellen Dunham-Jones, that is only just one piece of the puzzle.

75. Shaffer Named Executive Director Of Rebranded BLDG Memphis -

John Paul Shaffer recently was named executive director of BLDG Memphis, the rebranded entity that brings the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis and Livable Mem-phis under a single organizational identity.
In his new role, Shaffer’s job is to guide the organization in its mission of supporting neighborhood revitalization through a network of organizations and individuals working in the community development space – which BLDG Memphis does primarily through organizational capacity building, community education and engagement, and public policy and advocacy – as well as to promote the new brand. 

76. Defining the Basics: Bike Lane Expansion -

Our current administration’s platform desires to be brilliant at the basics, but what is the definition of basic?

“Basic” is not merely the ability to reduce crime, provide sanitation services or put out fires; in today’s world, it means more than that. The basics are the acceptable standard of living in a large metropolitan city.

77. Mayors Say Region Needs New Mindset, More Density -

When Hernando West first surfaced in 2007, it was going to be a different kind of development south of the state line. But the recession that followed put the plans for the city’s first mixed-use development on hold – until recently.

78. Fuel-Tax Bill Short of Votes in the House -

NASHVILLE – Votes aren’t adding up in the House of Representatives for passage of the governor’s gas tax/tax cut legislation.

With floor debate scheduled Wednesday morning, not only is a Republican head count showing lack of support, Democrats aren’t exactly lining up behind the measure. The minority party says it wants concessions on other items from the governor before it can vote for the IMPROVE Act, and some Democrats say they won’t go for a combination of tax cuts for wealthy investors tied to a higher gas tax.

79. Guest Column: Defining the Basics – Bike Lane Expansion -

Editor’s note: Voice your opinion on Memphis’ proposed repaving and bike lane by taking the city’s online survey by 11:59 p.m. Monday, April 17.

80. Airport Releases New Strategic Overview -

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority released a new Strategic Overview for the next five years, which serves as a comprehensive plan to implement improvements in all airport operations.

The Strategic Overview, which was last updated in 2015, is broken down into nine categories: physical/terminal, environment, properties/cargo, airfield, communications and reputation, air service, business model/finance, human capital management, and general aviation – each with its own one-, three- and five-year goals.

81. After Successful First Year, ‘Art by Design’ Returns -

As a board member of ArtsMemphis, Greg Baudoin had contributed other fundraising ideas, including one for a culinary series showcasing the city’s best chefs.

But the fundraiser “Art by Design” was even more of a natural for him. As the owner of Greg Baudoin Interior Design, he knew the potential for this event as well as anyone.

82. Airport Releases New Strategic Overview -

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority released a new Strategic Overview for the next five years, which serves as a comprehensive plan to implement improvements in all airport operations.

The Strategic Overview, which was last updated in 2015, is broken down into nine categories: physical/terminal, environment, properties/cargo, airfield, communications and reputation, air service, business model/finance, human capital management, and general aviation – each with its own one-, three- and five-year goals.

83. PRIZM Music Camp and Festival Expands -

Memphis’ PRIZM music camp and international chamber music festival is adding a new location as well as an extra week of programming.

The PRIZM Ensemble, formed in 2004, consists of classically trained Memphis musicians who specialize in chamber music and work to develop and promote Memphis-area talent through education and performance opportunities.

84. Task Force Backs 3 De-Annexations, 3 Referendums -

A task force on de-annexation is recommending referendums in three recently annexed areas of Memphis, an automatic de-annexation of three other sparsely populated areas on the city’s borders and keeping a part of Raleigh proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for de-annexation.

85. Starting Up -

Scott Vogel is part of a small but scrappy band of entrepreneurs in Memphis focused on building and launching startups. Some have come here from around the country to participate in any of the area’s startup accelerators. They’ve founded everything from innovative medical devices to enterprises built around new twists on old challenges.

86. De-Annexation Task Force Recommends 3 Referendums, 3 Automatic De-Annexations -

A task force on de-annexation is recommending de-annexation of three recently annexed areas of Memphis, an automatic de-annexation of three other sparsely populated areas on the city’s borders and keep a part of Raleigh proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for de-annexation in the city of Memphis.

87. Senate Passes Less Speedy Rural Broadband Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Senate on Monday passed a bill that could make it easier for rural areas in Tennessee to get access to high-speed internet. However, a last-minute amendment tacked on to the bill would not require the internet to be so speedy.

88. Immigrant Tuition Break Gaining Support in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A push to offer in-state college tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally is picking up unlikely momentum from some Republicans in Tennessee, a deeply conservative state that voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration.

89. Bradshaw Joins Trezevant As Human Resources Director -

Kathy Bradshaw has joined Trezevant as director of human resources. With more than 10 years of experience in the senior living industry and 20 years of HR experience, Bradshaw will oversee staff operations and manage all human resource initiatives for the senior community.

90. The Week Ahead: April 3-9 -

This week, Memphis marks the 49th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination with events at the National Civil Rights Museum and elsewhere. The Week Ahead also holds a look into the science of Overton Park’s Old Forest, a chance to support cancer research with Relay for Life, and much more...

91. Last Word: A New Chapter, The Kissell Dome and The New Bartlett High School -

Booksellers of Laurelwood is set to return in most of the same location with a smaller footprint and new owners. John Vergos of the Rendezvous and a former Memphis City Council member is among the investors bringing back the East Memphis institution that closed in February. No word on whether the new group will keep the name or go with a new name.

92. Events -

Opera Memphis’ fifth annual Midtown Opera Festival will take place Friday, March 31, through April 9 at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St. The Festival is anchored by three intimate operas, all by living American composers, plus “fringe events” that include other musical performances, family events, panel discussions and more. Visit operamemphis.org/mof for a schedule.

93. Johnson Comes Back to Memphis to Lead Comprehensive Pharmacy Services -

Calvin “CJ” Johnson came home to Memphis in February to take over as CEO of Comprehensive Pharmacy Services after the past few decades traveling the world, first as a part of the U.S. Army and more recently as an executive in the health care industry.

94. Events -

Vatterott College-Memphis Appling Farms will hold a college planning night Thursday, March 30, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on campus, 6991 Appling Farms Parkway. High school students and their families can explore programs offered at the school, tour the campus and learn about financial aid opportunities. Cost is free. RSVP to 901-372-2399.

95. Events -

The Midtown Memphis Development Corp. will host the 2017 Mojo of Midtown Awards Bash Wednesday, March 29, at 6 p.m. at Circuit Playhouse, 51 S. Cooper St. The awards honor six individuals and organizations for their “mojo” in making significant contributions to Midtown. 
Ticket are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. Visit facebook.com/MidtownMemphis.MMDC for details.

96. Black Lives Matter Groups Joining Forces With Wage Activists -

A cluster of Black Lives Matter groups and the organization leading the push for a $15-an-hour wage are joining forces to combine the struggle for racial justice with the fight for economic equality.

97. The Week Ahead: March 27-April 1 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! The Bluff City plays host to several big names this week, from acclaimed country musician Margo Price and influential feminist Dolores Huerta to the always-popular St. Louis Cardinals. Plus, Midtown celebrates its mojo and Germantown goes to the dogs, all in The Week Ahead… 

98. From Art to Zumba, Memphis Seniors Taking Steps to Keep Mind & Body Fit -

For people like Bill Wilson, 74, keeping active mentally as well as physically is the key to a healthier life.

99. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

100. Lehman-Roberts’ Moore Lauded By Asphalt Industry Group -

Rick Moore, who is retiring as chairman of Lehman-Roberts Co. March 31 after 46 years with the company, has been named the National Asphalt Pavement Association’s Man of the Year.