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Editorial Results (free)

1. THDA Resumes Inspections of HUD-Subsidized Apartments -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency plans to inspect at least a dozen apartment complexes in Memphis where federal subsidies pay tenants’ rent.

THDA executive director Ralph Perrey said the agency’s authority to make the inspections resumes in July. And the agency isn’t saying which properties will be visited “so as not to ruin the surprise,” Perrey said Wednesday, May 25, as he announced the resumption of the inspections.

2. $21.6 Million in Construction Headed to Graceland -

1064 Craft Road

Memphis, TN 38116

Permit Amount: $18.1 million

Project Cost: $21.6 million

3. City Opens Up Mid-South Coliseum to Reviews -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” has a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

4. Global Ministries Continues to Take More Heat -

The receiver for the Warren and Tulane Apartments is in place with the notice filed in Memphis federal court last week that Foresite Realty Management LLC had accepted the job and that its bonding is in place.

5. City Opens Coliseum To Experts In June -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” was announced by the city Friday, May 20, with a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

6. Latest 'High Gear' Book Maps Success for College Grads, Millennials -

The 21 million U.S. students enrolled in postsecondary schools grew up with technology and the hourly clock of life ticking ever faster. Yet this has not always translated into a generation of young people ready to attack a world that waits for no one.

7. Events -

Job Fair and Educational Summit for U.S. Veterans and People Living With Disabilities will be held Wednesday, May 18, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway. Meet with more than 50 local employers along with 30 community services and training providers. Breakout sessions from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. will cover interviewing tips, job preparedness skills and lifestyle issues. Cost is free. For more information, call 901-636-7940, 901-438-0412 or 901-726-6521.

8. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

9. Events -

Start Co. will offer small-business mentoring sessions Tuesday, May 17, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. This free program offers one-on-one counseling about starting or managing a small business. Visit memphislibrary.org for details.

10. Events -

Memphis College of Art will present “Best in Class 2015/2016,” an exhibition of the most creative undergraduate artwork from the academic year, on Monday, May 16, through July 8 in the Rust Hall main gallery, 1930 Poplar Ave. The exhibit features work from 45 artists across a range of disciplines. Visit mca.edu.

11. Events -

Tennessee Small Business Development Center will host a workshop on government contracting Thursday, May 19, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. The University of Tennessee’s Procurement Technical Assistance Center will teach small-business owners how to successfully compete for government contracts. Cost is free; registration required. Visit tsbdc.org/training for details.

12. Adults Not Helping Childhood Obesity Turn Corner Very Quickly -

Richard Hamburg does not pretend that there is a cure-all for childhood obesity, that just a little exercise will make things all better, that just a few policy changes or improvements in school lunch programs (which is happening), or a reduction of “food deserts” will solve the whole problem.

13. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

14. Downtown Condo Connection Added Management Service to Survive Recession -

When Karen Barrows and her husband decided to move back to Memphis from Florida to be closer to their daughter and young granddaughter, they had their eyes set on living in the heart of the city.

They previously had lived in Arlington and knew this time around they were interested in Midtown. Their daughter connected them to Kendall Haney, a Memphis Realtor who operates Downtown Condo Connection.

15. Women's Foundation Honors 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

The Women’s Foundation hosted its annual Legends Awards Tribute Luncheon on April 29 to honor women in Memphis leadership. Honey Scheidt received the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, received the Catalyst Award, and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, was recognized with the Innovation Award.

16. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

17. SCS Board Eyes Three Charter School Closings -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Tuesday, April 26, to close three Memphis charter schools performing in the bottom 5 percent of all schools statewide in terms of student achievement.

And the board set in motion a series of public hearing on closing two conventional high schools – Northside and Carver – as well as the Messick Adult Center.

18. Born to Play Football, Paxton Lynch Just Changing Leagues -

The player can’t tell you how it all started, not really. Neither can the player’s first coach and probably not the player’s dad.

No, to get to the root of things you turn to mom. Because mom will remember the details. And so as the countdown to the Thursday, April 28, NFL Draft turns from days to hours – experts of one stripe or another projecting how high former University of Memphis quarterback Paxton Lynch will be taken – it’s good to step back for a moment.

19. Essential Tactics For Innovation Intrepreneurs -

For authentic innovation to occur at an organization, you have to craft the culture of a place to accept and embrace new ways of working together and being in the market.

More often than not, teams or outsourced agencies follow an innovation method, create many concepts that are new to the market and certain to create new value, but are crushed by the cultural antibodies of a place while still an embryonic idea.

20. Archimania Leads 2016 Architecture Awards -

Memphis architecture firm archimania was the biggest winner Saturday night at the 2016 AIA Memphis Design Awards, an annual bash that honors the city’s top architecture firms.

Also singled out for honors by the four members of the design awards jury - which this year was comprised of nationally recognized, award-winning architects from Raleigh, N.C. - were the firms designshop, Haizlip Studio and Self+Tucker Architects as part of a joint venture with archimania. There were 11 winners in all, and the honors were presented during the event at Clark Tower’s Tower Center by the awards’ jury chair Erin Sterling Lewis of Raleigh’s in situ studio.

21. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

22. Elkington Green Takes Infill Approach in Local Housing Market -

Two young developers are filling a niche by renovating, redoing, building and selling homes in the core of the city.

Griffin Elkington and Brian Green, principals of Elkington Green, are focusing on established areas of Memphis such as Crestview, Midtown, High Point and the University of Memphis area where residential properties have maintained a similar feel for generations.

23. A Look at the Numbers -

Ray’s Take: The economy is in flux and there’s a lot of uncertainty over the direction of the capital markets and interest rates. It’s a familiar refrain by this point. Volatility has increased to a numbing level where perhaps we aren’t paying attention as closely as we should to what’s happening in the financial world around us.

24. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

25. Omni Charter School Buys Permanent Home -

3385 Austin Peay Highway
Memphis, TN 38128

Sale Amount: $1.3 million

Sale Date: Feb. 26, 2016

26. University of Memphis Alumna’s Book Sheds Light on Jackie O -

For about three decades, Tina Santi Flaherty and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis lived in the same New York City apartment building. “I wasn’t friends with Jackie,” Flaherty said. “But I’d see her in the lobby and we had a nod-and-smile acquaintance.”

27. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

28. Last Word: Off and Running, Lawson Sticks and Downtown Office Space -

Now that you’ve had time to behold the large field of contenders in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District – all 13 – they are on the road campaigning on the way to the Aug. 4 election day.
And it’s quite a road with a lot of different scenery.
Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff is one of the seven contenders in the race from Shelby County. He hit the road Monday for three days of stops in each one of the 15 counties in the district.

29. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

30. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

31. Daughter of Duality, Gibbs is Building a Better Justice System -

Say you stole a television worth $300. How long should you be punished? A year? Five years? Whatever you answered, it probably wasn’t “for the rest of your life.” But that’s how the U.S. legal system currently treats many people who have been convicted of felonies.

32. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

33. Three Entities Pay $2.6M For Bartlett Apartments -

A Bartlett apartment community has sold for $2.6 million. In a March 30 warranty deed, Summereast, an affiliate of the Robert and Martha Fogelman Living Trust, sold the property at 776 Bartlett Road. Three entities – TN Summereast LLC, Garden View LLC and WI Memphis LLC – jointly purchased the property.

34. Events -

Opera Memphis will present the 2016 Midtown Opera Festival from Friday, April 1, through Sunday, April 10, with most shows at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St. Events include a variety of opera performances, dance and jazz concerts, and more. Schedule and tickets are available at operamemphis.org.

35. Open to Progress -

WE CANNOT REMAIN STILL. When the news of the assassination broke on April 4, 1968, I ran to the dorm phone to call home to find out what in my world was going on, if my city was on fire, my family safe. All the lines to Memphis were busy, the answers would have to wait.

36. Amended De-Annexation Bill Up for Key State Senate Committee Vote -

A de-annexation bill that takes in the whole state has a key state Senate committee vote set for Wednesday, March 30, after senators made some significant changes to the proposal Tuesday in committee.

37. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

38. Born Ready? Grizz Players, Brass Given No Choice -

This is not a Grizzlies season to remember. It is a Grizzlies season impossible to forget.

For fans.

For Chris Wallace, who is living the life of “GM, The Bargain Hunter.”

39. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

40. Girl 24 Initiative Launches Online Business Magazine -

GIRL Twentyfour, a teen initiative that launched last year to teach Memphis girls business and entrepreneurship skills, has launched an online business magazine.

Hey GIRL! Online, which went live Tuesday, March 15, includes a range of editorial features on topics such as: Being a Girl, Living Healthy (Dr. Talk), Building Your Brand, Being a Great Leader, Philanthropy/Shaping the World, teen profiles and more.

41. Five to Watch -

“You can’t live in Memphis without some kind of side hustle, right?” That’s the way former WMC-TV reporter Lauren Squires Ready sees it. Her side hustle, the passion project she’s been pursuing in her free time separate from all the writing, reporting and live shots as an on-air news personality?

42. Memphis Habitat Receives Statewide Grant Funds -

Memphis Habitat has received a $13,500 grant from the Tennessee Housing Development Agency through Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to support the construction of a new home in Uptown.

The funds were part of a $500,000 grant Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee received from the THDA Housing Trust Fund to distribute among the 50 Habitat affiliates across Tennessee to aid in the construction of 20 homes statewide.

43. Conference Aims to Empower Women Professionally and Personally -

Later this month Young Women Philanthropists, an auxiliary of the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis (WFGM), will put on its fourth Modern Day Woman’s Conference to empower, engage and educate women ages 25-45 on how to take the next step in their professional, civic, community and personal journeys.

44. Girl 24 Initiative to Launch Online Business Magazine -

GIRL Twentyfour, a teen initiative that launched last year to teach Memphis girls business and entrepreneurship skills, is launching an online business magazine.

Hey GIRL! Online, which will go live Tuesday, March 15, will include a range of editorial features on topics such as: Being a Girl, Living Healthy (Dr. Talk), Building Your Brand, Being a Great Leader, Philanthropy/Shaping the World, teen profiles and more.

45. Tri-Star Chronicles Captures Tennessee’s Lesser-Known Stories -

J.R. “Pitt” Hyde III is not Memphis’ most famous name across the state of Tennessee. But he is an important name, has a deep and rich story worth telling, and that is exactly the point.

46. Brandye Lee Training a New Generation of Diverse Dancers -

Brandye Lee is Memphis dance royalty. And like any true queen, she’s impossible to please.

“Jones, pull your tailbone down!” she screams. “No thumbs! And you have to get to fifth faster.”

47. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

48. Klondike Wants Plan To Stave Off Gentrification -

With multimillion-dollar investments growing up around it in the Crosstown and Uptown neighborhoods, the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp. is working with the University of Memphis on a grassroots action plan to stave off gentrification.

49. Anne Dixon Joins BRIDGES as CFO -

Anne Dixon has joined BRIDGES as vice president of finance and chief financial officer. Dixon, who is a Bridge Builders alumna, is responsible in her new role for financial reporting and analysis to help BRIDGES leadership in performing their responsibilities. 

50. Allen Leads Depleted Grizzlies Past Cleveland -

So what’s the real explanation for the Grizzlies’ stunning 106-103 victory over LeBron James and the defending Eastern Conference champion Cleveland Cavaliers? You know, given that they played without (long list here): Marc Gasol, Mike Conley, Zach Randolph, Matt Barnes, Brandan Wright and Chris Andersen?

51. Grit and Grind in Cleveland: With 26 Points from Tony Allen, Undermanned Grizz Beat Cavs 106-103 -

So what’s the real explanation for the Grizzlies’ stunning 106-103 victory over LeBron James and the defending Eastern Conference champion Cleveland Cavaliers? You know, given that they played without (long list here): Marc Gasol, Mike Conley, Zach Randolph, Matt Barnes, Brandan Wright and Chris Andersen?

52. The Week Ahead: March 7-13 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? In a few short days it’ll be time to “spring forward” – but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First, check out our weekly roundup of area happenings, from a discussion with local changemakers to the inaugural Memphis Black Restaurant Week…

53. Ikea Design Tells Unique Sales Story -

When Ikea opens its 271,000-square-foot store in Memphis later this year, it will bring a retail experience unlike any ever seen in the region.

The typical American retail setup is a big-box outlet with aisle after aisle of organized items displayed on neat shelves, usually with a row of check-out counters near the front.

54. Editorial: Greensward Controversy Enters New Chapter -

Even if you agree with the Memphis City Council’s decision on the Overton Park Greensward, you should have reservations about how the council went about this.

Nine council members don’t sponsor a controversial resolution like this without more than someone wordlessly circulating a draft resolution and them signing their names – also without any discussion.

55. LL&W Returns to Memphis for Alternative Spring Break -

Living Lands & Waters is returning to Memphis for its sixth year of hosting Alternative Spring Break on McKellar Lake. Since 2011, the organization has hosted 630 college students from 67 different schools across 22 states, and removed more than 640,000 pounds of trash through the spring break program.

56. MIFA Participating in 14th Annual March for Meals -

MIFA will be part of the 14th annual March for Meals, a monthlong, nationwide celebration of Meals on Wheels.

Meals on Wheels serves homebound and vulnerable seniors who rely on it as a vital safety net.

57. City Considers Seeking Delay In Warren and Tulane Apartments Move Out -

There is a move at City Hall to call for a delay in the relocation of tenants out of Warren and Tulane apartments, the two apartment complexes owned by Global Ministries Foundation, that have failed two federal inspections.

58. Doctors: 'Buyer Beware' as Cosmetic Surgery Grows -

If you often look around and feel older than you used to, it might not be you. It might be that everyone else looks younger.

The face of Tennessee is changing – literally – and as an influx of new residents and a booming economy creates a larger affluent class with more disposable income, the business of cosmetic procedures is on the rise.

59. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

60. Terry Manning Photography Exhibit Coming to Memphis -

The Stax Museum of American Soul Music will welcome Stax Records and Ardent Studios legend Terry Manning back to Memphis next month for his new photography exhibit, “Terry Manning: Scientific Evidence of Life on Earth During Two Millennia.”

61. The Tipping Point -

At age 25, Kem Wilson had his whole life laid out for him. He had graduated from Furman with an undergraduate degree in business administration. Newly engaged, he had a promising job at a Memphis financial consulting firm. Now all he had to do was take his rightful place at the head of the family business.

62. Medical Area Ready For Residential Development -

Every week day, 16,000 people go to work in the two-and-a-half square mile area that is the Memphis Medical Center District.

Add the 8,000 students to the workers at the eight major institutions in the district and you have more than a sell-out crowd for an event at FedExForum in that area every working day.

63. Events -

Ballet Memphis will present “Places,” a mixed-repertory show of three new works, Friday through Sunday, Feb. 19-21, at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St. Visit balletmemphis.org for details and tickets.

64. Events -

Rhodes College will host artist Mel Chin, keynote speaker for the “Memphis: Art and Place” symposium, Thursday, Feb. 18, at 6 p.m. in the Bryan Campus Life Center’s McCallum Ballroom on campus, 2000 North Parkway. Cost is free. Other symposium events are scheduled for Friday and Saturday. Visit rhodes.edu/content/memphis-center-conferences for details and a schedule.

65. Debate Rages Over Reasons For Rising Higher-Ed Costs -

When figures are presented detailing a 456 percent increase in tuition and fees at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville over the last 20 years, the result is usually some serious sticker shock.

That’s what happened recently when state Sen. Dolores Gresham presented the Tennessee Tuition Stability Act, a measure designed to rein in tuition growth and make it easier for students and parents to pay for a four-year degree.

66. PNA Conference Covers Gamut of Issues to Improve Seniors' Lives -

Most of the topics you would expect. The 2016 overview on Medicare, coordinating services for seniors, and dealing with grief in the workplace.

They are all anticipated – and needed topics – for the Feb. 23 Professional Network on Aging (PNA) Conference at Bartlett Municipal Center.

67. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from circus clowns to Republican senators…

Both U.S. Senators representing Tennessee will be in Memphis Saturday for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, historically the local party’s largest annual fundraising event.
Sen. Bob Corker is the keynote speaker with Sen. Lamar Alexander as a special guest.
The Lincoln Day gatherings are county-by-county events across the state that can extend far beyond the shadow of Presidents Day: A few of the Lincoln Day dinners have been known to find a place on the calendar in April.
This is the 41st Lincoln Day event in Shelby County, which puts the local event’s origins squarely in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, a low-point for Republican fortunes nationally after the state’s modern Republican party was formed and prospered in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
The event always comes with a large helping of local candidates testing the political waters among the dinner tables between podium speeches.
This year, the Shelby County event is sure to feature partisans from the various Republican presidential campaigns because of its place on the February calendar during the early voting period before the March 1 election day.

68. Confident Serrano Playing for Future at UT -

Tennessee baseball coach Dave Serrano wasn’t setting the bar too high when he met with the media for his 2016 preseason press conference.

Serrano made that mistake before the 2015 season with talk of reaching an NCAA regional and perhaps Omaha, Nebraska, site of the College World Series.

69. Collaborative Aims to Enhance Memphis Medical District -

In 2016, the Memphis Medical Center will see $1.8 million in upgrades and enhancements aimed at creating a unified, livable district. That’s the annual budget for the newly established Medical District Collaborative, a nonprofit entity made up of the area’s stakeholders and executives.

70. Hinds Joins Martin Tate Law Firm -

Rebecca Hinds has joined Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston P.C. as an associate attorney in the firm’s litigation section. In this role, Hinds represents clients in civil and commercial litigation matters, including business law, transportation liability, construction disputes, breach-of-contract matters and employment law. She also helps commercial clients obtain tax incentives and advises individuals and businesses in the drafting and negotiation of contracts. 

71. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

72. Facing History Mural To Visualize Broader Goals -

Last year, when Facing History and Ourselves moved into its new South Main office at 115 Huling Ave., the nonprofit knew it wanted to bring its brand of socially conscious education to the broader community.

73. Belz Sells Linden Camilla Towers for $14.4 Million -

256 S. Camilla Street
Memphis, TN 38104

Sale Amount: $14.4 million

Sale Date: Dec. 6, 2015

74. Belz Sells Linden Camilla Towers for $14.4M -

An entity affiliated with Belz Enterprises has sold the Linden Camilla Towers in Midtown for $14.4 million.

The 11-story senior living apartments, located 256 S. Camilla St., are still under local ownership.

75. Growth in Health Care Means Busy Time for Recruiters -

Health care has been a leading engine of U.S. job creation lately, a reality that’s particularly evident in Memphis where the health care community is humming along with growth and investment.

All of which means a jam-packed schedule that shows no signs of slowing down for the likes of Shane Davis.

76. ‘Complete Gut’ Planned for Dermon Building in Downtown Memphis -

The historic Dermon Building at the northeast corner of Third Street and Court Avenue will be turned into a boutique hotel following a recent purchase.

The 46 N. Third St. structure, which was built in 1925, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places due to its art deco and Renaissance-styled architecture. Real estate and bail bonding firms have occupied the lower levels, but the 10-story building has sat completely vacant for a few years and substantially vacant for well over 10 years.

77. Belz Sells Linden Camilla Towers for $14.4M -

An entity affiliated with Belz Enterprises has sold the Linden Camilla Towers in Midtown for $14.4 million.

The 11-story senior living apartments, located 256 S. Camilla St., are still under local ownership.

78. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

79. Tennessee Startups Chasing Greater Opportunities -

When it comes to launching startup companies, Tennessee is best described as “early stage.”

The less than $200 million in venture capital invested in Tennessee businesses in 2014 is a rounding error compared to the $30 billion invested in California. And when the final tally for 2015 comes out later this month, the disparity won’t be much smaller.

80. Editorial: Listen to What Musicians Say, as Well as What They Play -

If you are looking for what has become of the troubadour – or where the troubadour lives when he or she isn’t on the road less traveled – you are in his or her capital.

It’s hard to think of anyone able to make a living as a musician today in Memphis who isn’t totally consumed by it, immersed in all of it.

81. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

82. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

83. Collierville Assisted Living Facility Sells for $17 Million -

601 Wolf River Blvd.
Collierville, TN 38017

Sale Amount: $17 million

Sale Date: Dec. 29, 2015

84. Muller: Memphis On Strong Footing, With Bright Future -

A key Greater Memphis Chamber official is preparing to retire this week after 15 years, at a time when he thinks the city of Memphis is on strong footing, and with a bright future that abounds with potential.

85. Graffiti Green Light -

Brandon Marshall is a full-time artist, making a living painting commissioned murals for clients. He’s also well-versed in the graffiti world of Memphis, a small but determined group of artists who tag properties around the city.

86. From City to Rural County, Food Bank’s Mobile Pantry Delivers -

Poverty and hunger are easy enough to find in Memphis. You don’t have to go far from the Mid-South Food Bank’s offices, at 239 South Dudley St., before you start wandering into pockets of isolation – food deserts.

87. Incarcerated Youth Offer Solutions, Hope -

There is a growing concern about the increase of youth violence in the United States, and an equally growing commitment to advance the work of violence prevention and early intervention to prevent youth violence before it occurs. Memphis is no exception, on either issue.

88. Last Word: The River, The New Mayor and Explaining Boll Weevils -

Hello, 2016. What’s your hurry?

First things first – the Mississippi River at our doorstep is above flood stage. But the crest is now predicted to come Friday and will be just over 40 feet – lower than predicted last week.
We will be posting web stories on the forecasts and other announcement from the county’s Office of Preparedness each evening to work with their schedule for summarizing where we are.
Floods are a slower moving cause for concern because we know what is happening upriver from us where the river is narrower. But this is also the Mississippi River, which is the definition of unpredictable.

89. Local Alzheimer’s Chapter Gets $265,000 Gift -

The Mid-South Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association got a special holiday gift this year – a $265,000 donation, to be exact.

The gift that will help the association continue and expand on the work it will be doing in the year ahead came in the form of a check from Charles and Connie Cotros of Memphis, the association said.

90. Local Alzheimer’s Chapter Gets $265,000 Gift -

The Mid-South Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association got a special holiday gift this year – a $265,000 donation, to be exact.

The gift that will help the association continue and expand on the work it will be doing in the year ahead came in the form of a check from Charles and Connie Cotros of Memphis, the association has announced.

91. Christmas Coming Home -

CHRISTMAS TIME. Every Christmas I tell this story, and in the telling Christmas comes home.

It was my first time to England and overseas, and prime time for The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Soho.

92. ArtsMemphis Gets $40K NEA Grant -

The National Endowment for the Arts has given ArtsMemphis a $40,000 grant to help fund its Community Engagement Fellows Program.

ArtsMemphis launched the program in 2014 with the intent to address neighborhood problems through art. Projects include establishing a Family Resource Center at Dunbar Elementary, where parents and students can gain instruction with classes like Arts Too!, a multidisciplinary arts experience for parents, and O-MUSIC, an after-school music program in which older students living in the Orange Mound neighborhood instruct younger students in playing musical instruments.

93. Redemption Unreachable as Pete Rose Keeps Screwing Up -

In the TV commercial, banished Hit King Pete Rose is walking down a hallway lined with trophies and baseball memorabilia. His stated purpose: to promote Skechers Relaxed Fit shoes.

Anything for a buck, right, Charlie Hustle?

94. Memphis Lessons That Follow You Home -

Every now and then events occur that seem small, routine, just part of the job until they collide with such force that they explode with meaning, renewing your work with a sense of purpose and change a job into a mission.

95. ArtsMemphis Gets $40K NEA Grant -

The National Endowment for the Arts has given ArtsMemphis a $40,000 grant to help fund its Community Engagement Fellows Program.

ArtsMemphis launched the program in 2014 with the intent to address neighborhood problems through art. Projects include establishing a Family Resource Center at Dunbar Elementary, where parents and students can gain instruction with classes like Arts Too!, a multidisciplinary arts experience for parents, and O-MUSIC, an after-school music program in which older students living in the Orange Mound neighborhood instruct younger students in playing musical instruments.

96. Memphis Tech Firm Changing Real Estate Site Selection Process -

Considering how spread out Memphis is, most residents have to get behind the wheel to get to their destination. In reflecting the flux of a vibrant city, homegrown tech company Meridian Econometrics has developed a new commercial real estate site selection program that capitalizes on mobility.

97. Grizzlies’ Footprint Growing Across Region; Redbirds, RiverKings Try to Hit Their Niches -

Decades ago, the St. Louis Cardinals used their vast radio network to extend their brand across the middle of America. Even today, they have more than 130 affiliated stations in eight states.

“The Cardinals did a great job through their radio outreach,” said John Pugliese, Memphis Grizzlies vice president of marketing, communications and broadcast.

98. ‘Creatives in the City’ Conference Celebrates Memphis Ventures -

Josh Horton’s Memphis-based creative company Hieroglyph is known for its hip T-shirts and for the branding work it provides to nonprofits and small businesses.

Launching and sustaining such a venture has arguably steered some cool cachet to his enterprise – not that it hasn’t been a hustle. There have been times, Horton said this week at “Creatives in the City,” a panel discussion at the Memphis College of Art, that he felt he was “making headway in a city that needed me but didn’t understand me.”

99. Ginkgos And Thanks. And Thanks Again. -

LOOK FOR THE WONDER. REPEAT. I write about it every year. And it’s happened again.

Right outside my window is a ginkgo tree, and another on the other side of the house. Every fall they engage in an ancient mating dance, a spectacular competition for attention. So exhausting is the effort, it doesn’t last long. So intense is the result, it’s explosive. And then it’s gone.

100. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.