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Editorial Results (free)

1. Corporate Leaders Are True Partners -

“What can we do to help?” That was the question asked by a corporate representative at a conference we attended last week.

We were in Winston-Salem, participating in the State of Black North Carolina conference. We fell in love with the people, energy and positive, forward thinking. We were surrounded by people – including high school students and senior citizens – all of whom were asking questions, offering solutions, sharing history and strategizing.

2. Opening the Book -

A new Learning and Innovation Fund for Educators grant from Lausanne Learning Institutes (LLI) is now available to a team of teachers looking for funding to do creative things in their classrooms.

And the upcoming annual LLI Memphis teacher conference in July will give them the chance to share those ideas with their peers.

3. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

4. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

5. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

6. Bartholomew Named St. Mary’s Athletic Director -

St. Mary’s Episcopal School has promoted John Bartholomew to athletic director. Bartholomew has been coaching lacrosse at St. Mary’s since 2014, and the following year, he joined the school full-time as assistant athletic director and lacrosse coordinator. He has been serving as St. Mary’s interim athletic director since last fall.

7. EDGE Advances Both of EPE’s Graceland Expansion Requests -

After multiple delays, lawsuits and revamped plans, the next phase of Elvis Presley Enterprises’ Graceland expansion have been approved by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County.

8. EDGE Advances Both of EPE’s Graceland Expansion Requests -

After multiple delays, lawsuits, and revamped plans, the next phase Elvis Presley Enterprises’ expansion plans have been approved by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County.

9. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

10. Last Word: Opening Day, Slowing the Flow and 30 Years of Shangri-La -

There is something about opening day of the Major League Baseball season – especially when it is opening day for just about every team at the same time. Just seeing the green fields with a solitary outfielder, the low brick walls behind the symmetry of batter, catcher and umpire renews my love for the game. I don’t really pay attention to players – don’t know any of their names. And how and when did the Astros wind up in the American League and the Brewers in the National League? I just like watching the game in a sport where the team and the individual coexist as in no other sport.

11. New TCAT Campus to Address Workforce Development -

Planning for the new Tennessee College of Applied Technology satellite campus in Bartlett is moving forward, with a projected construction start date early next year.

The Greater Memphis Medical Device Council helped TCAT get the funding for the 48,000-square-foot campus, which will include a state-of-the-art medical device training center and the ability to train 350 to 400 students. Construction could get underway by next spring at the northwest corner of Appling Road and Brother Boulevard.

12. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

13. Love at Center of Pancreatic Cancer Battle -

This Valentine’s Day, Bartlett residents Kathryn and Tom Craig want to share their story of love and support as encouragement to those who are battling cancer with a loved one.

14. Agricenter Master Plan Hopes to Serve as a ‘Compass’ for Future Development -

Agricenter International hosts more than 1.3 million visitors a year and has an economic impact on the region of more than $500 million, but those numbers could soon balloon as it looks to build its 20-year Strategic Business Plan and Conceptual Master Plan.

15. Trump Suggests 2-Phase Immigration Deal for 'Dreamers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking a bipartisan compromise to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that an immigration deal could be reached in two phases – first by addressing young immigrants and border security with what he called a "bill of love," then by making comprehensive changes that have long eluded Congress.

16. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

17. Reconnecting Memphis -

Last August, GiVE 365 members toured the Memphis Oral School for the Deaf. The Germantown-based nonprofit had received a $4,100 grant toward its mission of helping children from birth through age 6.

18. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

19. Health: Our Local - and Global - Concern -

The United Nations Foundation’s theme this year is “Global Goals, Local Leaders” as it aims to engage our local elected officials in global health issues, especially health care.

Should Memphians be concerned about local health care? And, is there a way to create a conversation regarding health care that is non-partisan and, rather, more compassionate and humane? Now is the time our community must come together and respect each other regardless of race, gender, religion or political affiliation to make discussions about health care run smoothly.

20. The Ties That Bind -

When Big River Crossing was about to open a year ago, Doug Carpenter was asked often where the Tennessee-Arkansas state line is over the Mississippi River.

His marketing firm DCA has overseen publicity for the crossing from concept through construction, so he has learned much about the history of the Harahan Bridge and the mighty river below it. But the stateline wasn't marked

21. AP-NORC Poll: Most Don't Want Young Immigrants Deported -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

22. Haslam Less Clear Than Usual On Run for US Senate -

Gov. Bill Haslam usually gives an answer to every question, even if his subjects and verbs don’t agree. But when it comes to a potential run for the U.S. Senate, he stumbles.

In fact, his response was almost inaudible just a week before his pal U.S. Sen. Bob Corker said he wouldn’t seek another term at the end of 2018.

23. Intriguing Story Playing Out Off The Football Field -

Anybody got an extra billion dollars lying around? If so, you can own one-third share of an NFL franchise plus a handful of other assorted business ventures.

That’s the situation involving the Tennessee Titans as they head into what could be a very eventful season. Susie Adams Smith, one of three children of the late franchise founder Bud Adams, is attempting to divest herself of one-third interest in KSA Industries, the business conglomerate built by her father.

24. Anderson Leaves ASD Bound By More Rules and With Different Role -

When the state-run Achievement School District began in the summer of 2012 there weren’t a lot of rules for how it would operate.

The superintendent of the turnaround model for schools in the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement could unilaterally take over any school on the list even if the local school district objected.

25. Anderson Leaving as ASD Superintendent -

Malika Anderson is stepping down as superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District effective at the end of September after being with the turnaround school district for the state’s lowest-performing schools since its inception in 2012 and as superintendent since January 2016.

26. Agricenter’s Sunflower Trail Makes Official Debut -

More than 30 years after its conception, the Agricenter Sunflower Trail finally enjoyed a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday, Sept. 5, on the grounds of Agricenter International. Work started on both ends of the Greenprint-certified trail, which was one of the first in Shelby County, back in the mid-1980s.

27. 9/01 in the 901 -

What started as an esoteric online conversation five years ago has grown into a massive citywide event to celebrate all the best parts of the Bluff City.

Though only in its second official year, attendance is expected to be high for Exposure at 901 Day, a free event that will be held at AutoZone Park from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on, you guessed it – Sept. 1.

28. South City Redevelopment Activity Heating Up -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

29. South City Redevelopment Heats Up With Renovations, New Construction -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

30. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

31. IRIS Orchestra Fellows Program Bridges Gap to Professional Career -

They get to play in an orchestra next to world-class musicians. They will have mentors and be mentors for children in the Shelby County Schools system. During their 10-month fellowship, they are paid a stipend and housing is provided at artist friendly Crosstown Concourse.

32. Money is Not Enough -

Nonprofits play a critical role across the Mid-South. They represent, serve and advocate for a great diversity of individuals, families and causes. They improve the quality of life, generate innovations, and give voice to the challenges unseen and needs still unmet. They are joined in this work by foundations and corporations who provide money, resources, connections and technical assistance.

33. Milford Joins Chamber As Programming, Events Director -

Ericka Milford recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as director of events and programming, a job in which she’s responsible for planning and executing chamber events and programs and for increasing engagement opportunities for members and the community. Milford’s new role marks her return to the chamber, where she served as events coordinator from 2007 to 2012 before taking a job with HigherVisibility.

34. Tennessee, Left Coast a World Apart on Immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

35. Shelby County Schools Debates Funding Strategy for Budget -

Shelby County Schools board members approved a two-year contract extension through the 2019-2020 school year for superintendent Dorsey Hopson Tuesday, May 30, with no debate or discussion and sent a combined $1.3 billion operating and capital budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission for approval.

36. New Documentary Tells Story of Tobey Skate Park -

A new documentary on the 6-year-old Memphis Skate Park at Tobey Park takes a look at skate culture in Memphis and the struggle to get the park to reality after securing a grant that ran out and then securing city capital funding for it.

37. Southwest Tennessee Community College Moves Toward Change -

Kenyatta Lovett, the executive director of the nonprofit education advocacy group Complete Tennessee, says there is an old joke in higher education that sometimes comes to the surface when change is promised or pledged.

38. View From the Hill: Gas Tax Rancor Lingers as Session Coasts to Close -

Remnants of rancor over Republican leadership roiled the House, a reminder of outrage over roguish behavior as representatives reached the finish line.

Alliteration is probably better suited for poetry. But in a case of what could be considered poetic justice, at least for some, this literary device – goofiness maybe – is suitable for legislative action requiring a score card to keep up with the characters and a bit of history to put it all together.

39. Physical Education Bill Gets Tripped Up in Legislature -

Legislation requiring one hour of physical education per week for elementary students stumbled and fell Monday, May 8, when it hit a procedural hurdle.

The bill sponsored by Rep. Roger Kane went down in the House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee after a recount of sorts, one in which a member didn’t vote and then was allowed to cast a “no” vote killing the bill.

40. Tennessee House Abandons Amendments Before Approving State Budget -

Putting a day of acrimony behind it, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a $37 billion budget plan on Friday, May 5, stripping away nearly $320 million in amendments placed on it the previous day.

41. Thompson Securing Funds For Ballet Memphis’ Future -

Amelia Thompson has joined Ballet Memphis as development associate. In her new role, she works on the administrative side of the organization to generate and secure funding for Ballet Memphis’ daily annual operating budget as well as its capital campaigns.

42. Last Word: End of The Season, Honoring Forrest and MATA's Coming Campaign -

It’s over. No Game 7 for the Grizz and the off-season begins. Spurs advance after beating the Grizz at the Forum Thursday 103 – 96. But in the process, the Grizz created a chapter in Memphis basketball lore where it is about more than winning on the court.

43. Third-Party Litigation Financing Grows Into Popular, High-Stakes Trend -

Two decades ago, commercial third-party litigation financing was as small and uncommon as to be “negligible,” in Charles Agee’s words. Maybe $100 million in such funding per year.

44. Strickland Willing To Talk About Schools Funding, But Budget Set -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says his budget proposal to the Memphis City Council is set and ready to deliver next week. But he added Tuesday, April 18, that he is willing to talk with the citizens who drafted a letter to him last week calling on the city to put up $10 million in funding for schools in his proposal.

45. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

46. Last Word: Veep Visit, Women and Baseball and Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Game time at FedExForum for the NCAA South semifinals and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be here to cheer on the Butler Bulldogs. The Butler mascot – a live bulldog – was already in town Thursday making the rounds. I think March Madness requires that all involved up their mascot game if they get this far. So UCLA, we expect to see a live bear roaming Beale Street. You might be able to work a deal with the zoo on this. But if there’s a cost split make sure you nail down those percentages.

47. Trump: Next Old Hickory or Carnival Barker -

For those who ignore the news – fake or otherwise – Donald Trump won the presidency last November.

While he didn’t capture a majority of the vote, he did win the electoral vote, causing many detractors to call for the elimination of this outdated voting method.

48. Shelby County Schools Voucher Bill Advances in House -

NASHVILLE – Despite a packed room of Memphis-area people opposed to vouchers for public school students, a House Education Committee advanced a pilot program targeting low-income children in Shelby County Schools system’s low-performing schools.

49. Shelby County Schools Voucher Bill Advances in House -

NASHVILLE – Despite a packed room of Memphis-area people opposed to vouchers for public school students, a House Education Committee advanced a pilot program targeting low-income children in Shelby County Schools system’s low-performing schools.

50. Home Health Aides: Minimum-Wage Hikes Could Deepen Shortage -

WEST CHAZY, N.Y. (AP) – Only 17 snowy miles from the Canadian border, Katie Bushey's most basic needs are met by traveling health aides who come into her home to change her diapers, track her seizures, spoon-feed her fettuccine Alfredo and load her wheelchair into the shower.

51. Singing Along With Tone-Deaf Legislators -

Often dull, but never boring. They might even make you break out into song.

Halfway through the 2017 session, the General Assembly could be accused of lacking sharpness or sensibility, but what it lacks in luster it makes up for with lots of political song and dance.

52. Dean Brings Business Focus to Nonprofit Alliance as Interim CEO -

In 1995 when Nancy McGee became executive director of what is now known as the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence, it was just a small grant-writing center. It grew into a holistic nonprofit support organization that offers management services to more than 200 members.

53. Shelby County Educators Spar With DeBerry Over Voucher Bill -

NASHVILLE – A group of Shelby County teachers and parents disappointed that voucher legislation was put off until next week turned their ire Tuesday, March 14, on Rep. John DeBerry, and he responded in kind.

54. Tapping Young Donors -

Amelia Thompson is everything a nonprofit is looking for now and in the future. A 30-year-old Memphian who graduated White Station High School, she has worked with a nonprofit in Washington, D.C. and been a buyer for Macy’s in New York.

55. Last Word: The Governor's Race, Beale Street Complications and Southern Avenue -

A close one for the Tigers Sunday at the Forum but Houston still wins 72-71. One more home game Thursday against Tulane and a road game Saturday against SMU before March Madness begins. As that was happening here, better results in Denver Sunday where the Grizz beat the Nuggets 105-98.

56. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

57. Road for Haslam’s Fuel-Tax Plan Has Many Twists and Turns -

Three major West Tennessee road projects, including Lamar Avenue in Memphis, are part of a wish list Gov. Bill Haslam sent to the Trump administration as it weighs the start of an aggressive infrastructure program.

58. NAACP Panel Hears Differing Local Views On Charter Schools -

It took awhile for an NAACP panel holding hearings on charter schools and their impact on education to wade into the complexity of charters in Memphis.

The panel for the national civil rights organization heard Tuesday, Jan. 10, that charters have become an effort to privatize schools the way prisons were privatized in the 1990s. They also heard that charters don’t “cherry-pick” the best students but help equalize access to a better education. And the seven members of the panel heard that charters have a place, but that there should be more thought given to where they fit long term, and their financial impact on public school districts.

59. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

60. Strickland Surprised by Record Homicide Rate, Defends ‘Brilliant at the Basics’ -

At the last Memphis City Council meeting of 2016, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland dropped by to give high marks for cooperation between his office and the council.

61. Last Word: St. Jude Dollar Amounts, Fred's On The Move and The Treble Clef -

Grizz over the Trailblazers 88 – 86 Thursday evening at the Forum. At the end of the first half, Grizz coach David Fizdale had to be restrained by players on the way off the court after a technical was called on him. And welcome to Memphis, Toney Douglas. We love what you are doing with the fourth quarter.

62. SCS Board Mulls Details of Right-Sizing Plan -

Shelby County Schools board members may push a vote on a proposal to close seven schools and build three new ones to February instead of January. A review of the proposal by the SCS board Tuesday, Nov. 29, still keeps in place a vote at the Dec. 6 school board meeting that would start a process of public meetings to gauge the reaction of parents affected by changes.

63. School Board Gets More Specifics on Right-Sizing Proposal -

Shelby County Schools board members think the holiday season may push a vote on a proposal to close seven schools and build three new ones to February instead of January.

A review of the proposal by the SCS board Tuesday, Nov. 29, still keeps in place a vote at the Dec. 6 school board meeting that would start a process of public meetings to gauge the reaction of parents affected by the change.

64. Physical Restaurant To Join Sushi Jimmi Trucks -

Jimmy Sinh, the owner of the Sushi Jimmi food truck, is cooking up something new, something he thinks he’ll be ready to unveil, finally, in early December.

It’s not another wrap or elaborate sushi dish. It’s something altogether more complicated, rewarding and something he’s wanted to pursue for a while – four walls of his own.

65. Deer Hunting Season Brings More Food For Needy Through TWF Program -

For Melvin Williams, chef at Alpha Omega Veteran’s Services, receiving venison donated by the Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s Hunters for the Hungry program is a special treat each hunting season.

66. TWF Celebrates 70 Years of Conservation Leadership -

The Tennessee Wildlife Federation turns 70 this year, and its rich history over the years includes work in West Tennessee that has helped restore wildlife species, protect habitat for public use, and introduce kids to the Great Outdoors through youth hunting and fishing events.

67. SCS Weighs Complexities of School Closings, Food Operations Shift -

Among the start-of-school-year emergencies Shelby County Schools leaders faced in August was a shift of the school system’s food services out of the 70-year-old Central Nutrition Center building.

68. The World at your Doorstep -

There is nothing you can’t get delivered these days. If you can imagine owning it, it’s only a matter of time before it can be in your possession, brought to your front door within minutes, hours or days from the first moment you even conjured the thought of having it.

69. Toast to the Achievement School District -

Somebody forgot to tell the Achievement School District it had to follow a few simple rules when the Legislature formed it a few years ago to save failing schools: Primarily, don’t party with the money.

70. ‘Why Don’t We Start Our Own?’ -

The diner-style restaurant planned for 2657 Broad Ave. is a bit unique as far as commercial real estate projects go.

Yes, it’s of a piece with the rest of the groundswell of redevelopment and commercial activity that’s transformed Broad into a people-packed arts, retail and restaurant scene. One of those hotspots along the street is the combination coffee shop and retailer City & State, the owners of which have signed a lease at 2657 Broad for their next venture.

71. Humane Society Seeks New Leader After Terminating Director’s Contract -

The Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County has terminated executive director Andrew Jacuzzi’s contract and retained Amy Howell as consulting interim director.

72. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

73. SCS Charter Schools Strategy Evolves -

Shelby County Schools board members vote Tuesday, June 28, on two new charter schools for the 2017-2018 school year and may reject applications for eight other charters, including Crosstown High School, for now.

74. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

75. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

76. Joint SCS-ASD Raleigh School Off for Now, But Debate Continues -

The Shelby County Schools system has turned down a collaboration with the state-run Achievement School District on an Innovation Zone middle school in Raleigh.

SCS will instead turn Raleigh-Egypt High School into a grade 6-12 school, which will compete with the ASD charter school that also opens in August at nearby Raleigh-Egypt Middle School.

77. ASD's Raleigh Offer Makes School Board Skeptical -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools in a possible change of plans by the ASD for its takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

78. ASD Offers To Collaborate On I-Zone School In Raleigh -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools on the ASD’s planned takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

79. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

80. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

81. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

82. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

83. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

84. Transgender Bathroom Bill Delayed Amid Financial Questions -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The sponsor of a Tennessee transgender bathroom bill told a Senate committee Tuesday that he has to consider a state attorney general's opinion before going forward. The White House called the proposal "mean-spirited."

85. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from New Memphis Institute's popular “Memphis 101” crash course to the music- and culture-filled Africa in April festival.

86. Hopson Warns of Budget Cuts Beyond $50 Million -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson says the budget proposal he will take to the SCS board next month includes $50 million in cuts and is still $36 million in the red.

“We’re still down $36 million,” Hopson said Tuesday, March 29, “and at this point, there is nowhere else to cut except in the classroom. The cuts will directly affect schools.”

87. The Week Ahead: March 28-April 3 -

Alright, Memphis, are you sure you found all your Easter eggs? Before you make one more sweep of the yard, check out this week’s roundup of local happenings – from the sweet sounds of “Zelda” to what’s being dubbed a “Mini-MEMFix” in East Memphis…

88. Proponents of Insure TN Enlist Billboards in Fight -

An effort to put pressure on the Tennessee General Assembly to consider Insure Tennessee has made its way to billboards across the state, including three in Shelby County.

The billboards are meant to pressure Tennessee Speaker Beth Harwell, R-Nashville, to use her “political clout” to send Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal through the House.

89. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

90. Last Word: The Bloody Shirt of Deannexation, More Boats and The Rise of ioby -

“Waving the bloody shirt” – get ready to hear that phrase a lot as a deannexation bill continues to be debated in Nashville – the one that the state House approved Monday evening.
There was a palpable frustration at City Hall during Tuesday’s council day that featured a light agenda but lots of attention to several challenges – many of them financial and hidden until recently – that the new mayor and council are facing.
As we mentioned in our Monday evening coverage of this, the skirmish lines over the deannexation bill and the larger issue are very close in Shelby County. Our legislative delegation is split between Memphis Democrats vocal in their outrage over the bill and Republicans in the county outside Memphis who are just as vehement in their support of the bill, especially the parts that apply to Memphis.

91. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

92. Elections Chief Finalists Have Political Histories -

The two finalists for the job of Shelby County Elections Administrator each told the Election Commission last week that if they get the job they will have some rebuilding work to do in how local elections are conducted.

93. Germantown Community Theatre Seeking Donations for Expansion -

The Germantown Community Theatre’s $1.5 million capital campaign has a clear theme: “Build, Grow, Expand.”

But GCT’s executive producer, Dr. Michael D. Miles, wants to make sure that the theater’s dedicated patrons understand that what they love most is not going to change.

94. Meeting the Demands of a Rapidly Aging Population -

When Gov. Bill Haslam gave his annual State of the State address on February 1, he proposed a $34.8 billion plan providing new spending on colleges and universities, road projects and a large deposit into Tennessee’s emergency budget reserves.

95. Crosstown High School Plans Emerge -

As more details emerged this week of a new high school in the mammoth Crosstown Concourse redevelopment, there remained many other details to work out before the August 2017 planned opening.

Crosstown High School, which would use the University of Memphis’ Campus School as a model, has been talked about behind the scenes since Gestalt Community Services pulled out of Concourse last year. SCS board members got their first look at the plan Tuesday, Jan. 19.

96. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

97. Memphis Legislators Sound Off On State-Run School District -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

98. Last Word: Farewell For Now Midtown Kroger, Weather Hype and Tri-State Bank Clues -

A moment of silence for Midtown Kroger if you will, now that you’ve been through the New Year’s mountain of emails etc.
Where to shop with the Midtown supermarket landmark now closed was the water-cooler question of the day for those who have had a love-hate relationship with the store.
If you are a creature of habit and your habit is that store, you’ve known it by many names – Seesel’s, Seesel’s by Albertson, Schnucks and Kroger.
And as many bad names as you called its original parking lot, you came up with some new ones for the God-forsaken parking lot and its marked pedestrian walkway to hell built on the elegant ghost of the old Trousseau shop.
The store's interior wasn’t quite “Double Indemnity” tiny – think Barbara Stanwyck in cat sunglasses talking furtively over doll-like shelves to Fred MacMurray before “My Three Sons.”
But the “super” in its version of a supermarket was the 1950s black-and-white television Superman.
When Pau Gasol – the original Gasol -- was still playing for the Grizzlies, I ran across him on a late-night grocery excursion able to shop two aisles at once peering over his own aisle to the one I was on, suddenly having that feeling that someone was watching me.
An informal and decidedly unscientific sampling Monday found the alternative sites were the Kroger at Poplar and Cleveland, Cash Saver on Madison, West Memphis WalMart (a go to destination for left of Midtowners, otherwise known as Downtowners) and “I’m still waiting for Trader Joe's."
The old Midtown Kroger has closed as the new and bigger Kroger is starting to take shape behind chain link fences with tarps and other construction barriers just west of the original store but still within earshot of the Idlewild Presbyterian Church carillon.

99. Under Pressure -

The Urban Child Institute’s research produces data. That data provides guidance for making decisions about how to best help Memphis children age 3 and younger. And The Urban Child Institute’s assets, around $150 million in 2013, offer a means to that end.

100. ASD, I-Zone Competition Becoming Heated Debate -

Before winter break, Vanderbilt University released a study on achievement test results for students in the state-run Achievement Schools District and locally operated Innovation Zone schools, and the study has created a tipping point in an increasingly heated education debate.