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Editorial Results (free)

1. ‘Why Don’t We Start Our Own?’ -

The diner-style restaurant planned for 2657 Broad Ave. is a bit unique as far as commercial real estate projects go.

Yes, it’s of a piece with the rest of the groundswell of redevelopment and commercial activity that’s transformed Broad into a people-packed arts, retail and restaurant scene. One of those hotspots along the street is the combination coffee shop and retailer City & State, the owners of which have signed a lease at 2657 Broad for their next venture.

2. Humane Society Seeks New Leader After Terminating Director’s Contract -

The Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County has terminated executive director Andrew Jacuzzi’s contract and retained Amy Howell as consulting interim director.

3. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

4. SCS Charter Schools Strategy Evolves -

Shelby County Schools board members vote Tuesday, June 28, on two new charter schools for the 2017-2018 school year and may reject applications for eight other charters, including Crosstown High School, for now.

5. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

6. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

7. Joint SCS-ASD Raleigh School Off for Now, But Debate Continues -

The Shelby County Schools system has turned down a collaboration with the state-run Achievement School District on an Innovation Zone middle school in Raleigh.

SCS will instead turn Raleigh-Egypt High School into a grade 6-12 school, which will compete with the ASD charter school that also opens in August at nearby Raleigh-Egypt Middle School.

8. ASD's Raleigh Offer Makes School Board Skeptical -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools in a possible change of plans by the ASD for its takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

9. ASD Offers To Collaborate On I-Zone School In Raleigh -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools on the ASD’s planned takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

10. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

11. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

12. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

13. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

14. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

15. Transgender Bathroom Bill Delayed Amid Financial Questions -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The sponsor of a Tennessee transgender bathroom bill told a Senate committee Tuesday that he has to consider a state attorney general's opinion before going forward. The White House called the proposal "mean-spirited."

16. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from New Memphis Institute's popular “Memphis 101” crash course to the music- and culture-filled Africa in April festival.

17. Hopson Warns of Budget Cuts Beyond $50 Million -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson says the budget proposal he will take to the SCS board next month includes $50 million in cuts and is still $36 million in the red.

“We’re still down $36 million,” Hopson said Tuesday, March 29, “and at this point, there is nowhere else to cut except in the classroom. The cuts will directly affect schools.”

18. The Week Ahead: March 28-April 3 -

Alright, Memphis, are you sure you found all your Easter eggs? Before you make one more sweep of the yard, check out this week’s roundup of local happenings – from the sweet sounds of “Zelda” to what’s being dubbed a “Mini-MEMFix” in East Memphis…

19. Proponents of Insure TN Enlist Billboards in Fight -

An effort to put pressure on the Tennessee General Assembly to consider Insure Tennessee has made its way to billboards across the state, including three in Shelby County.

The billboards are meant to pressure Tennessee Speaker Beth Harwell, R-Nashville, to use her “political clout” to send Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal through the House.

20. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

21. Last Word: The Bloody Shirt of Deannexation, More Boats and The Rise of ioby -

“Waving the bloody shirt” – get ready to hear that phrase a lot as a deannexation bill continues to be debated in Nashville – the one that the state House approved Monday evening.
There was a palpable frustration at City Hall during Tuesday’s council day that featured a light agenda but lots of attention to several challenges – many of them financial and hidden until recently – that the new mayor and council are facing.
As we mentioned in our Monday evening coverage of this, the skirmish lines over the deannexation bill and the larger issue are very close in Shelby County. Our legislative delegation is split between Memphis Democrats vocal in their outrage over the bill and Republicans in the county outside Memphis who are just as vehement in their support of the bill, especially the parts that apply to Memphis.

22. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

23. Elections Chief Finalists Have Political Histories -

The two finalists for the job of Shelby County Elections Administrator each told the Election Commission last week that if they get the job they will have some rebuilding work to do in how local elections are conducted.

24. Germantown Community Theatre Seeking Donations for Expansion -

The Germantown Community Theatre’s $1.5 million capital campaign has a clear theme: “Build, Grow, Expand.”

But GCT’s executive producer, Dr. Michael D. Miles, wants to make sure that the theater’s dedicated patrons understand that what they love most is not going to change.

25. Meeting the Demands of a Rapidly Aging Population -

When Gov. Bill Haslam gave his annual State of the State address on February 1, he proposed a $34.8 billion plan providing new spending on colleges and universities, road projects and a large deposit into Tennessee’s emergency budget reserves.

26. Crosstown High School Plans Emerge -

As more details emerged this week of a new high school in the mammoth Crosstown Concourse redevelopment, there remained many other details to work out before the August 2017 planned opening.

Crosstown High School, which would use the University of Memphis’ Campus School as a model, has been talked about behind the scenes since Gestalt Community Services pulled out of Concourse last year. SCS board members got their first look at the plan Tuesday, Jan. 19.

27. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

28. Memphis Legislators Sound Off On State-Run School District -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

29. Last Word: Farewell For Now Midtown Kroger, Weather Hype and Tri-State Bank Clues -

A moment of silence for Midtown Kroger if you will, now that you’ve been through the New Year’s mountain of emails etc.
Where to shop with the Midtown supermarket landmark now closed was the water-cooler question of the day for those who have had a love-hate relationship with the store.
If you are a creature of habit and your habit is that store, you’ve known it by many names – Seesel’s, Seesel’s by Albertson, Schnucks and Kroger.
And as many bad names as you called its original parking lot, you came up with some new ones for the God-forsaken parking lot and its marked pedestrian walkway to hell built on the elegant ghost of the old Trousseau shop.
The store's interior wasn’t quite “Double Indemnity” tiny – think Barbara Stanwyck in cat sunglasses talking furtively over doll-like shelves to Fred MacMurray before “My Three Sons.”
But the “super” in its version of a supermarket was the 1950s black-and-white television Superman.
When Pau Gasol – the original Gasol -- was still playing for the Grizzlies, I ran across him on a late-night grocery excursion able to shop two aisles at once peering over his own aisle to the one I was on, suddenly having that feeling that someone was watching me.
An informal and decidedly unscientific sampling Monday found the alternative sites were the Kroger at Poplar and Cleveland, Cash Saver on Madison, West Memphis WalMart (a go to destination for left of Midtowners, otherwise known as Downtowners) and “I’m still waiting for Trader Joe's."
The old Midtown Kroger has closed as the new and bigger Kroger is starting to take shape behind chain link fences with tarps and other construction barriers just west of the original store but still within earshot of the Idlewild Presbyterian Church carillon.

30. Under Pressure -

The Urban Child Institute’s research produces data. That data provides guidance for making decisions about how to best help Memphis children age 3 and younger. And The Urban Child Institute’s assets, around $150 million in 2013, offer a means to that end.

31. ASD, I-Zone Competition Becoming Heated Debate -

Before winter break, Vanderbilt University released a study on achievement test results for students in the state-run Achievement Schools District and locally operated Innovation Zone schools, and the study has created a tipping point in an increasingly heated education debate.

32. SCS Leaders Seek Endgame in ASD Competition -

Shelby County Schools leaders formally began a move toward a short-term strategic plan this week that took a turn toward a possible endgame in the school system’s competition with the Achievement School District.

33. Shelby County Schools Eyes Crosstown -

Shelby County Schools wants to open a high school at Crosstown Concourse. SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson confirmed the school district’s interest Wednesday, Nov. 18.

“We’ve spoken with some of the local funders about putting together some plan to ensure that there are some high-quality options there,” Hopson said. “There are a number of different ways that we’re thinking about it. But absolutely we would love to be a part of it.”

34. The Week Ahead: Nov. 2, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here's our first weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the Indie Memphis Film Festival to Mississippi elections...

If you love the outdoors and good weather, these are the days you’ve been missing. And few things are as “fall” as a fall festival, and the kickoff of Miss Cordelia’s Saturday Market series this weekend seems like one more thing worth adding to the list of things to do in Memphis. There’ll be a growler station, local food and beer sampling, pop-up retail and food specials.

35. WEVL Celebrates Independence, Good Music in Memphis -

Downloadable podcasts, iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, Pandora – digital services like these and others have played a big part in replacing what a younger generation thinks of radio.

Which is one of many reasons why the story of WEVL 89.9 FM – an independent radio station that’s operated out of digs in the South Main Historic Arts District since 1990 – is an improbable one.

36. Hopson Calls Off Hillcrest-Whitehaven Merger For Now -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson is calling off a plan to merge Hillcrest High School into Whitehaven High School and turn Hillcrest into a ninth grade academy.

Hopson told school board members Tuesday, Sept. 29, that the school system will wait to see if the state-run Achievement School District matches Hillcrest with a charter school operator and takes it into the ASD next school year.

37. Mathes Takes Helm at Community Legal Center -

Longtime attorney Anne Mathes has been named executive director of the nonprofit Community Legal Center, which has been providing civil legal services to lower-income Memphians for more than 20 years. In addition to civil cases and divorces, the CLC collaborates with other agencies to serve victims of domestic violence and elder abuse. They also take some immigration cases.

38. From University Labs to the Marketplace -

The health care industry contributed $38.8 billion to Middle Tennessee’s economy in 2014, according to a study released by the Nashville Health Care Council, which is a 32.9 percent increase from the 2010.

39. Farmers First -

After all these years – 27 weeks of Saturdays for a decade – Jill Forrester calls it a “nice routine.” And by that she means she and husband Keith getting up at 3 a.m., loading their produce, herbs and flowers, and driving to the Memphis Farmers Market downtown.

40. Rocking for Love -

When Lahna Deering and Jason Freeman join the other musicians performing at the Rock for Love music festival next week, the gig will be a bit more meaningful for them than the shows they normally play.

41. Acting Up -

The Knoxville area has a rich legacy of actors who have found success in show business: Patricia Neal, David Keith, Cylk Cozart, David Dwyer, John Cullum, Bruce McKinnon, Polly Bergen, Dale Dickey, Brad Renfro, Johnny Knoxville, perhaps the most famous of all, Dolly Parton, singer/songwriter turned actress.

42. Got A Dream? Launch It With Help From Crowdfunding -

One friend helped Annie Klaver get into her corporate job, and 131 helped her get out. More specifically, 131 people pledged a total of $15,556 on Indiegogo, enabling Klaver to launch her new outdoor company, River Queen Voyages, this month.

43. Incumbent’s Advantage Faces Test in Mayor’s Race -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. rolls out a new plan for emergency medical services Tuesday, May 10, that is expected to involve some private, nongovernment involvement.

No further details of the announcement were forthcoming from his administration, but it returns the still-forming 2015 race for mayor to an issue that is basic to virtually every mayoral election: public safety.

44. School Closings and Consolidations Approved -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Tuesday, March 31, to close three elementary schools and one middle school for the coming school year and to dismantle the school system’s short-lived plan for a return of Woodstock High School.

45. School Leaders Concerned About Closing Disruptions -

Orleans Elementary School closed last year and its 169 students were transferred to Lincoln Elementary School for the current school year.

Under a proposal the Shelby County Schools board votes on next week, Lincoln Elementary would close at the end of this school year and in August its students would attend A.B. Hill Elementary School.

46. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

47. Blues Birthplace -

Every day, Tunica, Miss., was missing an opportunity. Worst of all, that opportunity was passing by on the Blues Highway, also known as U.S. 61.

“You come out of Memphis and Beale and Graceland, and those interested in the genre of the blues were coming south and going to Clarksdale,” said Webster Franklin, president and CEO of the Tunica Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Before the museum, people would just drive right by. Now, those folks will make the museum their first stop in Mississippi.”

48. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

49. Boyd Gets Encore as City Council Member -

After serving less than a year on the Memphis City Council in 2011, Berlin Boyd is back on the council and working toward a longer stay.

Boyd was the pick of the other 12 council members Tuesday, Jan. 20, to fill the District 7 vacancy created when Lee Harris resigned to take his seat in the state Senate.

50. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

51. Competition, Cooperation Part of Regionalism Mix -

When a group of mayors with common borders get together, it is usually a sympathetic gathering of chief executives where there is much comparing of notes.

The items range from sewer projects and common problems to relationships with legislative bodies from aldermen to council members.

52. Board Seeks ASD Transition Involvement -

As the state-run Achievement School District prepares to announce which low-performing Memphis schools it will take in its third year starting in August, Shelby County Schools board members are considering a better transition period.

53. Four Memphis Charter Schools To Close In Summer -

Four charter schools operating in Memphis will close at the end of the current school year under terms of a recently enacted Tennessee law.

The law requires the closure of any charter school that is ranked in the bottom five percent of schools in the state in terms of student achievement as measured by state test scores. The closing comes without any decision by the local school board that originally authorized the charter schools.

54. Raleigh Egypt High Dropped From ASD List -

Raleigh-Egypt High School won’t be joining the state-run Achievement School District next school year.

Leaders of the Achievement School District made the announcement Thursday, Nov. 20, citing a decision by Green Dot Public Schools, the charter operator that was to operate the high school in the school year that begins this coming August.

55. Raleigh Egypt High Dropped From ASD List -

Raleigh-Egypt High School won’t be joining the state-run Achievement School District next school year.

Leaders of the Achievement School District made the announcement Thursday, Nov. 20, citing a decision by Green Dot Public Schools, the charter operator that was to operate the high school in the school year that begins this coming August.

56. Frayser Battleground for Achievement Schools -

After two years of being confronted with bad student achievement data, teachers at schools on the Achievement School District’s list for a takeover are confronting the ASD and charter organizations with data from the first two years of the state-run district.

57. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

58. Indmar Marine Engines Files Expansion Permit -

5400 Old Millington Road
Unincorporated Shelby County
Permit Cost: $2 million

59. Alco Files $4 Million Loan on Todd Creek Apartments -

Alco Management Inc. has filed a $4 million loan on the 155-unit Todd Creek Apartments at 1541 Northside Dr. in Frayser.

60. Musical Tribute -

Jack T. Cooper was born a few years after American modernist composer Charles Ives died, but this did not the stop them from connecting – even before Cooper was born.

Cooper, 51, and an associate professor and the director of jazz and studio music at the University of Memphis, was born in Los Angeles to a mother who was a professional keyboardist and a father who was an amateur saxophone and clarinet player.

61. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

62. Finding Forever Homes -

It isn’t that there are not compelling animal stories. There are.

In fact, visit the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County on Farm Road and those stories are just about everywhere, including in the administrative offices on the second floor, where two Labrador retrievers – Bambino and DeMarco – have run of the place.

63. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

64. Local Firms Benefiting from Cycling, Walking Paths -

For years Memphis was labeled as a backwater when it came to walking trails and bike lanes, showing up on list after list highlighting the worst cities for pedestrians and cyclists.

That has changed dramatically over the last several years and there are now 150 more miles of new trails and bike lanes planned over the next three years.

65. Parking Wars -

It’s been a hot, humid and restless spring at Overton Park.

The park has been crowded, but not as crowded as expected given the political tempest over parking on Overton’s greensward.

66. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

67. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

68. Wilkins Maps Different Challenge of Cohen -

Ricky Wilkins is promising to match U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s energy level and be more of a presence in the district than Cohen if he upsets the incumbent in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

69. Invest Early For the Best Retirement -

Ray’s Take The very best friend a young investor has is time. Someone who puts $4,000 per year into retirement accounts starting at age 22 could have $1 million by age 62, assuming an 8 percent average return. Waiting 10 years to start contributing means you would need to put in $8,800 per year to get the same results.

70. Memphis Repertory Orchestra Plans More Growth -

Coming off a year in which it found a home at the Buckman Performing Arts Center and released a CD of its music, the Memphis Repertory Orchestra – a small, all-volunteer chamber group – is looking to do even bigger things in 2014.

71. Business Leaders Optimistic About Local Economy -

As they have for a few quarters now, Memphis-area business leaders continue to acknowledge an incremental sense of optimism about specific aspects of their companies and the economy, according to the results of the third Memphis Economic Indicator.

72. Early Advantage -

Talk, touch, read and play.

These four words focused on early childhood development have helped to shape the mission of the Urban Child Institute for the past four years, and now they are traveling beyond the building and into the Memphis Pink Palace Museum. The important message bears repeating and repetition in creating bright young minds, and the institute is focused on spreading the word as far and wide as possible – starting with their kiosk-like exhibition, “The Early Advantage.”

73. Williams Honored by Tennessee Urban Forestry Council -

Laurie Williams, adult education coordinator at Memphis Botanic Garden, was recently awarded the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council’s President’s Award for her contribution to establishing and maintaining viable community forests in Tennessee. Williams was one of seven individuals the urban forestry council honored this year.

74. Memphis Economic Indicator Shows Business Optimism -

The results of the second Memphis Economic Indicator, a new survey measuring general business sentiment jointly produced by The Daily News and Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP, reflect a modest overall improvement in optimism among business leaders compared to last quarter’s survey results.

75. Fullilove’s Funding Push Raises Legal Questioning -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pushed hard for $1.5 million in city funding for the renovation of Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

76. Health Care’s ‘Lost Opportunity’: A Q&A with Phil Bredesen -

More than two years after leaving state office, Phil Bredesen, the popular former governor and mayor of Nashville, is still on the go. While enjoying a post-political life in Nashville that includes gardening and grandparenting with his wife, Andrea Conte, Bredesen remains active in promoting bipartisan solutions to issues such as the national debt as a speaker and as a member of the Governors’ Council of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.- based think tank.

77. Coffield Finds Home to Contribute to Memphis -

When Ashley Coffield accepted the position as president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Greater Memphis Region last spring, it was a sort of homecoming for the Rhodes College graduate.

Only, she didn’t have to move at all.

78. United Housing Places 3,000th Homeowner -

Lisa Brice was living in a Memphis-area townhouse with her two teenage daughters when the water was turned off in the community back in January.

79. Martin’s Program Keeps Girls Engaged in STEM Fields -

Girls Inc. is a national nonprofit providing girls ages 6-18 with after-school and summer programs, field trips and college tours.

80. Upstart Memphis Begins Hatching Women-Led Startups -

The fourth floor of Playhouse on the Square’s facility at 66 S. Cooper St. is a bustling hub of entrepreneurial activity.

81. Electrical Workers Union Speaks Out Against Smart Meters -

The union representing Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division employees, including meter readers, plans to take its problems with Smart Meters to the road – the side of the road.

Leaders of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1288 said Monday, July 8, they intend to put up billboards warning the public of what they say are the dangers of the new meters the utility plans to seek city funding for later this year.

82. Bean’s Third Career Helps Researchers Around Globe -

More than a decade ago, Bob Bean and Tim Hodge met at a Wendy’s near Baptist Memorial Hospital to discuss what it would take to develop a lab for genetically testing mice for use in research.

83. Old Boundaries Fade as Schools Merger Nears -

There is still some power left in the line that separates Memphis City Schools from Shelby County Schools with about two weeks left until the two public school systems formally become one.

That was evident Tuesday, June 11, as the countywide school board approved a slate of 35 policy decisions for the merged school system whose fiscal year begins July 1.

84. Alco Files $4.7 Million Loan on Greenbriar Apartments -

Memphis-based Alco Properties Inc. has filed a $4.7 million loan on the Greenbriar Apartments at 3131 Madewell Street in Frayser.

85. Arts Award -

The New Ballet Ensemble and School is a first-time recipient of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, money the Midtown-based school is using to create and perform an original dance work.

86. Cestaro: Lab Will be First of its Kind -

TriMetis president Phil Cestaro took a year off after he resigned from Nashville-based SCRI Global Services at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in 2011, where he was president.

“I didn’t know how much time I was going to take off, I just knew I was going to enjoy life and my family,” he said. “It was the best decision I ever made.”

87. Lendermon Discusses Riverfront Access -

Riverside Drive could work well if it lost a lane of automobile traffic in each direction, says the president of the Riverfront Development Corp.

88. ‘Teacher Town’ -

There was a time not too long ago when teacher residency programs in Memphis were exercises in isolation. The new teaching recruits in and out of those programs often talked of being overwhelmed in their new school and career environments. But in the larger maelstrom of changes to the face of local public education, the residency programs are growing across all the different types of public schools emerging in advance of the August merger of city and county schools.

89. South Main’s New Life -

The history of the South Main Historic Arts District is as colorful as its present-day users, an alternating rhythm of sorts in Memphis’ songbook.

The area has oscillated from its ritzy suburban roots of the 1800s to the industrial era ghost town of the 20th century and now to its current status as Downtown’s flourishing arts and boutique district and the subject of some $100 million in investment. And it’s all due to stakeholders who braved the status quo in distinguishing the southern end of the Central Business District as that funky place with an indescribable vibe.

90. So Southern Makes Functional Items Beautiful -

Ideas behind small businesses tend to spring from familiar places and from entrepreneurs who see a need, have a passion, are good at what they do and want to turn it into a labor of love.

The best small-business concepts often combine all those aspects into one enterprise. Which makes sense, because with all the difficulties of running a business comes the realization that, for it to work, it has to be sustained over a long period of time. Thus, the necessity, of doing what you love.

91. Startup Ground Zero -

For three days over the past week, Memphis was effectively ground zero for technologists, startup founders, investors and entrepreneurs from near and far.

For that, the city can thank the organizers of the Everywhere Else startup conference who, with help from a collection of sponsors and supporters, took what was initially going to be called “Pitchmas,” happening last December, and refashioned it in a matter of months.

92. Lighting the Spark -

Somewhere, there’s an entrepreneur scribbling an idea on little more than the back of a napkin. Someone else has all the pieces of a new company in place, and now they’re ready to dial for dollars. Entrepreneurs are a talented bunch, but that talent doesn’t always include a knack for management or finance – skill sets that plenty of experts in Memphis stand ready to help explain.

93. Cash’s Turbulent Tenure Full of Surprises -

Kriner Cash came to the city as Memphis City Schools superintendent in July 2008. He began with an informal census that organized the school district’s student population by how many students were overage for their grade level, how many had no primary care physician and how many had access to no pre-kindergarten services.

94. Cash Exits At Critical Juncture In Merger -

Countywide school board members approved Thursday, Jan. 10, a severance package that ends Kriner Cash’s tenure as superintendent of Memphis City Schools.

Cash will remain through the end of July as an employee in an advisory capacity. At the end of July he gets six months of regular pay and $17,000 in moving and legal expenses as well as a letter of recommendation from the school system.

95. 2013: A Year of Books -

Last week we shared more ways you can celebrate the holidays while giving back at the same time. This week let us explore an easy way we can start planning ahead to make 2013 a Year of Books by working with Shelby County Books from Birth to plant the seeds of literacy and help build a stronger foundation for our future.

96. Aging With Grace -

Overton Park’s combination party and fundraiser this past weekend celebrated a milestone birthday for the park.

But in addition to serving as a way for supporters to tip the hat in honor of the park’s 111th anniversary and enjoy drinks, hors d’oeuvres, music and dancing in the park’s “formal gardens,” the “Magical Night at Overton Park” event Saturday, Nov. 10, was something more. Tina Sullivan, executive director of the Overton Park Conservancy, said the event was the group’s first major fundraiser.

97. Hotel Chisca Gets New Owners, Art Facelift -

The chain-link fence surrounding the dilapidated Hotel Chisca in Downtown Memphis is a little bit easier on the eyes as of Saturday, Oct. 27.

That’s because it now boasts 30 colorful banners created by students of St. Louis Catholic School, under the leadership of art teacher Robin Durden. The art exhibit, “Memphis Music Icons,” pays tribute to the Hotel Chisca’s legacy of being the location where Elvis Presley was first played on Dewey Phillips’ “Red, Hot and Blue” radio show from the WHBQ studios in 1954.

98. Hotel Chisca Gets New Owners, Art Facelift -

The chain link fence surrounding the dilapidated Hotel Chisca in Downtown Memphis is a little bit easier on the eyes as of Saturday, Oct. 27.

That’s because it now boasts 30 colorful banners created by students of St. Louis Catholic School, under the leadership of art teacher Robin Durden. The art exhibit, “Memphis Music Icons,” pays tribute to the Hotel Chisca’s legacy of being the location where Elvis Presley was first played on Dewey Phillips’ “Red, Hot and Blue” radio show from the WHBQ studios in 1954.

99. Volunteer Spirit -

We volunteer. Those two words comprise this particular radio station’s independent streak and listener-supported ethos, which traces its beginning to 1976 and to the days of vinyl and reel-to-reel tapes.

100. University of Memphis Law School Makes Hires -

New faces are becoming a familiar part of the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

The school, which is closing in on its 50th anniversary celebration later this month, is in the midst of a health law initiative. It’s looking for a professor who will start up a health law program there.