» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Long Development' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:4
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:23
East Tennessee:19
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

2. Roster Remix? Grizzlies May Finally Shake Things Up -

As amazing as it was that the Memphis Grizzlies set an NBA record by using 28 players this past season, it’s almost more unbelievable that they had to sign eight different players to 11 separate 10-day contracts.

3. Memphis Jewish Home's Bobby Meadows Wins National Honor -

Bobby G. Meadows III, executive director of Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab, has been awarded the 2016 Young Executive Award by the Association of Jewish Aging Services. The award honors an executive younger than 45 who demonstrates significant potential in health care management by virtue of his or her cumulative achievements or innovative results in management or administration.
As executive director of MJHR, Meadows is responsible for day-to-day operations of the only glatt (strict) kosher, rehab long-term care facility in Tennessee and surrounding states. Operations include the oversight of more than 300 staff members, 160 patients, and a kosher deli.

4. Periodically Check Processes to Best Track Funds -

Where’s the money? How do you process gifts?

Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted. –Albert Einstein

Ideally your nonprofit is focused on raising the money you need to deliver on your mission and vision. You have a strong fundraising team with talented staff, enthusiastic volunteers, the right technology, and a communications strategy that gets the word out to all the right people. The money is coming in and everyone is feeling good about the progress being made. You believe you are on target to meet or beat your fundraising goals. Or are you? What do you know, and what do you not know?

5. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

6. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

7. Editorial: Unlocking the Real Benefits of Regionalism -

It’s easy to say regionalism should be a goal – that the leadership of all of our communities should work together for the common good of the region.

And it’s been said so often that general appeals for regionalism have become meaningless.

8. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

9. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

10. EDGE Considering Fast-Track Incentive Program, Diversity Spend Changes -

The Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has started work on a new tax incentive program that would help Memphis compete with North Mississippi for industrial projects.

At its April 20 meeting, EDGE board chairman Al Bright appointed a committee to evaluate a proposed Fast Track PILOT and hammer out its policies and procedures.

11. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

12. City Council Approves Parkside Development -

The Memphis City Council has approved the concept of Parkside at Shelby Farms Park, a $200 million mixed-use development on the northern border of Shelby Farms Park.

13. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

14. Radical Team Dynamics for The Highly Productive -

Investing in people means the conventional and expected things. You can send high performers to leadership development, provide access and time for seminars and online learning. You can reward with money, praise and attention. Yet, three aspects of people investment tend to get overlooked, leaving the most driven and brightest unmotivated and rudderless, looking for the door.

15. Memphis Takes Pounding in Opener With Spurs -

The Memphis Grizzlies were not alone in their unmitigated defeat. The NBA Playoffs started this past weekend and while descriptions of what happened to the Grizzlies within the shadow of the Alamo in San Antonio were colorful – “a 106-74 bludgeoning by the San Antonio Spurs” read one account at NBA.com – this was hardly an isolated incident.

16. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

17. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

18. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

19. Southern Yankee -

To best understand another man’s baseball passion, you must first understand his baseball pain. So if you hope to truly understand Peter B. Freund, new majority owner of the Memphis Redbirds, you must travel back to his youth.

20. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

21. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

22. Last Word: The Zoo's Proposal, Health and Ed In Limbo and Annexation's Effect -

A busy weekend on several fronts not the least of which was Overton Park and the Greensward controversy.
The Greensward itself was pretty subdued on a chilly Saturday.
The action was to be found in an email the zoo sent out Saturday making some proposals and offering some thoughts on the traffic and parking study the Overton Park Conservancy released last week.
Here is our summary
of what the zoo is offering in what may be a new effort in the public discussion.
Of course, the private discussion which is the mediation effort continues. But it sounds like some of the mediation discussions may be finding their way into the public discussion.
The public discussion has been sporadically active but very muted so far. For instance there has been talk before of zoo parking on the eastern side of the park in what until recently was a city maintenance yard.
The proposal by the zoo was shot down pretty quickly because it included running a tram through the Old Forest.
But there are some scenarios that wouldn’t take such a tram through the Old Forest.
The zoo email from Saturday isn’t specific on how the folks who would park at the maintenance yard would get from there to the zoo.
Presumably that is grounds for some type of discussion.

23. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

24. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

25. Last Word: A Day In The Park, Fashion Week and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -

The skid is over. The Grizzlies beat the Bulls at home and the post-season possibility drama continues in the land of Griss and the one year and done college home of Derrick Rose.

26. Events -

Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be at Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Union Avenue campus on Wednesday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 737 Union Ave. Career Coach staff will help people create resumes and register with jobs4tn.gov, where more than 90,000 jobs are available.

27. Three Ways to Finish Last -

In the world of sales, we are conditioned to live life by the month. We are driven by monthly sales goals and monthly paychecks. But when we don’t take time to create a plan of attack at the start of each month, we are workhorses rather than stagecoach drivers.
We work reactively instead of proactively. We allow our sales pipelines to control us and ultimately find ourselves spending the last week of the month scrambling to close business and meet targets. 

28. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

29. Events -

Start Co. will offer small-business mentoring sessions Tuesday, April 5, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. This free program offers one-on-one counseling about starting or managing a small business. Visit memphislibrary.org for details.

30. Orders for Lower-Priced Tesla Hit 198,000 -

HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) – Demand for Tesla Motors' new lower-priced electric car surprised even the company's CEO Friday as 198,000 people plunked down $1,000 deposits to reserve their vehicles.

31. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

32. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

33. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

34. Events -

Rhodes College will host the 2016 Brubeck Festival, highlighting the life and work of jazz pianist Dave Brubeck, Friday through Sunday, April 8-10. Highlights include Friday and Sunday performances of jazz musical “The Real Ambassadors” and a Saturday concert with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra, MasterSingers Chorale and three of Brubeck’s sons. Visit rhodes.edu/events/music for details.

35. Last Word: Greensward Truce, Connor Schilling Retires and MEMFix Goes East -

You’ve heard of the mediation process surrounding the long-term use of the Overton Park Greensward by the Memphis Zoo for its overflow parking.
It appears there is now a less formal mediation process underway when it comes to the use of the greensward during the park’s spring peak season which is now underway.

36. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

37. SweetBio Reaches $1 Million in Secondary Funding -

The dust has settled after New Orleans Entrepreneurship Week, and several Memphis startups have returned home as winners.

“It’s like South by Southwest, but for entrepreneurs in the South,” said Kayla Rodriguez, co-founder and chief operating officer of SweetBio, of the week-long event.

38. Last Word: Saturday In The Park, Lipscomb's Successor and Fred's Looks Up -

Quite the Easter weekend on the Overton Park Greensward.
Greensward partisans planned a Saturday Easter Egg hunt, Memphis Zoo parking crews found the eggs and a crowd of several hundred people blocked overflow parking briefly that afternoon.

39. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

40. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

41. Last Word: A Cleansing Breath, Urban Child Three Months In and Sugar In South Main -

Let’s all take a deep cleansing breath, away from the mounds of pollen that are amassing in the Memphis spring.
And resolve, however in vain it might be, that the word de-annexation will not be used in our presence at least until Monday – Tuesday if possible.

42. De-Annexation Bill Still Alive, Now In Two Versions -

At week’s end in Nashville, a bill to allow de-annexation by referendum was still on the tracks to passage. But there were significant differences in the Senate and House versions as the Tennessee Legislature heads for adjournment for the year in early April.

43. De-Annexation Bill Amended But Still on Path to Passage -

A state Senate committee considering amendments to the de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature has amended it to allow for de-annexation by referendum anywhere in the state.

The committee got through two of 13 proposed amendments Wednesday, March 23, and will resume work on the amendments next week.

44. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

45. Last Word: Confirming The Spike, Methodist Changes and The Honorary Miamian -

Lots of Memphians spending the week in Nashville in the name of bringing down the de-annexation proposal that’s already cleared the state House and is residing for now in a state Senate committee.

46. Mural Sets Scene for 107 S. Main Revelopment -

The long-blighted building at 107 S. Main St. is headed for active use and will see the addition of a mural by May 1.

At its March 16 meeting, the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. approved to put $10,000 toward a colorful mural designed by Chicago artist Damon Lamar Reed.

47. Last Word: A Trip to Committee, Minority Business Moves and the Issue With Reissues -

So those who support the general concept of de-annexation in the Tennessee state Senate were the most vocal Monday in sending the proposal back to committee for a more intense examination.

There were plenty of Memphians in the Senate chambers Monday despite the rumors that this was on its way back to committee.
Staying put until the deal is done has been a lesson won through bitter experience for some Memphis leaders.
Despite hearing from legislators in other parts of the state who are uneasy about this, the opposition remains a Memphis thing in Nashville.
But the Senate sponsor, Bo Watson, stumped his toe badly on this when he shut down an amendment Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville wanted to allow the voluntarily de-annexation of an area Millington recently took into its city limits.
So when the state and local government committee meets at noon Wednesday, it will be round – frankly, I forget which round it is. Just ring the bell and let’s see what happens.

48. Last Word: D-Day, Opera Festival Returns and Buying GMF After the Bond Default -

This is what you might call D-Day in Nashville. The “D’ in this case stands for deannexation.
The bill to permit deannexation by referendum has in the course of two weeks become the city’s dominant political issue.

49. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

50. Memphis Youth Symphony Hires New Conductor -

After a year-long search for a candidate, the Memphis Youth Symphony Program has hired S.C. Toe as youth symphony conductor.

Toe will take the podium in September when MYSP’s 2016-2017 season begins.

51. Memphis Youth Symphony Hires New Conductor -

After a year-long search for a candidate, the Memphis Youth Symphony Program has hired S.C. Toe as youth symphony conductor.

Toe will take the podium in September when MYSP’s 2016-2017 season begins.

52. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

53. The $10.6 Million Question: Fire Josh Pastner or Keep Him? -

The Hall-of-Fame coach was speaking on ESPN Radio’s “Mike & Mike,” his team sitting on the outside looking in on this year’s NCAA Tournament because of his university’s own imposed ban:

54. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

55. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

56. Nonprofit Communication Checklist -

Sometimes it is necessary for you as a nonprofit leader to personally check how easy or difficult it is to communicate with your organization. When you verify these for yourself you can best assess your nonprofit’s responsiveness.

57. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

58. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

59. Shelby Farms Conservancy Makes 2 Executive Hires -

Jen Andrews, the longtime development and communications director of the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy is the new executive director of the conservancy.

60. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

61. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

62. Shelby Farms Conservancy Makes 2 Executive Hires -

Jen Andrews, the longtime development and communications director of the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy is the new executive director of the conservancy.

63. Kentucky-Bred Alex Castle Brewing Up Memphis Inventions -

Alex Castle, head distiller at Old Dominick Distillery, will be responsible for Memphis’ only brand of Tennessee whiskey and bourbon when the Downtown facility is up and running later this year.

64. Strickland Outlines $136.1M In Capital Expense Surprises -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

65. Strickland Backs MATA's Cost-Neutral Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is backing the plan by the Memphis Area Transit Authority to make some short-term adjustments to its route system later this year.

66. Strickland Outlines $136.1M in Capital Surprises -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

67. New Owner to Revive South Main Eyesore -

The long-maligned building at 107 S. Main St. has a new owner who has signed on to long-term redevelopment and short term-beautification. Prau Investments LLC purchased the 34,200-square-foot building on Dec. 11 for $720,000.

68. Strickland Says $136.1 Million In Capital Surprises 'Kick in the Shin' -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

69. Council Approves Zoo Control of Overton Greensward Section -

Memphis City Council members voted 11-1 Tuesday, March 1, to grant the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Overton Park Greensward.

The control comes in a resolution that surfaced earlier in the day Tuesday after a weekend of rumors about such a move by some on the council.

70. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

71. City Considers Seeking Delay In Warren and Tulane Apartments Move Out -

There is a move at City Hall to call for a delay in the relocation of tenants out of Warren and Tulane apartments, the two apartment complexes owned by Global Ministries Foundation, that have failed two federal inspections.

72. Birth of a Product Company, Part 3 -

Editor’s note: Part three of a four-part series. At this point in the dialogue, I felt the need to break down the conversation into helpful actions in two main categories: test marketing and business planning.

73. Hopson: Help ASD Improve, At Least for Now -

The state-run Achievement School District has a problem in how it engages with the public, especially in areas where it is about to take over a school.

But Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson isn’t ready to say it is time for the state to pick a winner and a loser and fund either the ASD or Innovation Zone schools run by SCS.

74. Mud Island Management Search Narrows to Two -

A committee reviewing proposals to manage the Mud Island River Park has narrowed the field of four contenders down to two.

The Riverfront Development Corp. working committee has narrowed the field to RVC Outdoor Destinations of Memphis and Mansion Entertainment and Media LLC.

75. Parent Leaders are the ‘Voice’ for Their Children and the Community -

Parents take on many different roles in the lives of their children: cheerleader, counselor, teacher, friend, and so many more. A role we don't hear about as often though is advocate. What exactly does that mean?

76. Farm and Gin Show Features Startup-Ag Combo -

The annual Mid-South Farm and Gin Show looks like any other gathering of farmers over the years, but there is a distinct entrepreneurial underpinning this year merging technology with venture capital.

77. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

78. Zuckerberg to Press On With Internet Access Despite Setback -

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg vowed Monday to press on with his 3-year-old effort to bring the developing world online, even after Indian regulators banned one of the pillars of the campaign.

79. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, Feb. 24, from 9:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Mike Brady and Keith Tucker of Cyber Solutions Group Inc. will discuss cybersecurity in the workplace. Email bigformemphis@phelpssecurity.com to RSVP.

80. Birth of a Product Company, Part 2 -

Editor's note: Part two in a four-part series. In the last column I profiled a too-common scenario. A person with passion, drive and talent created a handful of products without considering the many factors of launching a new company in a complex, overcrowded market.

81. Last Word: Drum Circles and Voting, Lincoln Day and Carolyn Hardy's Clients -

I think I may have stumbled upon a way to increase voter turnout in Memphis.
I would say nationally, but we all know what works in Memphis does not always work elsewhere and what works elsewhere does not always work in Memphis.
It came to me as I was at Overton Park ever so briefly Saturday. It’s part of my weekend run whenever the weather is spring-like or actually spring to see what will happen in the nearly three-year Greensward controversy.
Lots of people having fun and a few kite-flyers coexisting on the greensward with zoo overflow parking but no protest with brass band.
As I filed that away I wondered what happened to that park institution -- the drum circle.
Audubon Park had one too along with the Society for Creative Ananchronism – the folks who dress up like Game of Thrones only they were doing it before the television show.
Anyway, I started hearing the drums in my head as I imagined drum circles outside the early voting places because that's how my mind works in a career spent covering politicians since before I was old enough to vote.
Of course the drums would be outside the 100-foot limits for physical campaigning that state law requires.
But imagine you are in the area of let’s say Agricenter, maybe in Shelby Farms Park, and in the distance you hear drums. Wouldn’t you be curious? If you had the time would you try to find the source? And if you discovered it was outside an early voting place and you were of voting age and registered and if you had not already voted (for you may vote early but not often) would you not vote, once your curiosity had been satisfied?
I thought your answer to all of the above would be a resounding yes.

82. Events -

SRVS will host a free dance and movement class for the general public, including people with disabilities, on Tuesday, Feb. 23, from 10 a.m. to noon at the J.K. Lewis Senior Center, 1188 North Parkway. Participants must be 18 or older. Email astrid.french@srvs.org to register.

83. Beale Street Management Firm Possibly On March Agenda -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority may be ready to pick a day-to-day manager for the entertainment district at its March 10 meeting.

But after meeting with leaders of the four companies who have formally applied for the job, members of the authority said last week they have a lot of information and are looking for some more detail before making a decision.

84. Biden Praises Benefits of 2009 Stimulus Package at Rail Yard -

For 36 years Vice President Joe Biden was an Amtrak train commuter, traveling an estimated 2 million miles in his daily trips to Washington D.C. as a U.S. senator from Delaware.

So when he arrived at the Memphis Regional Intermodal Facility in Rossville Wednesday, Feb. 17, Biden’s photo-op with workers at the Norfolk Southern rail yard before his speech became a long walk to the podium.

85. Last Word: 901Fest, First Tennessee Sues Pinnacle and EDGE Responds -

U of M Tigers 73 – UCF Knights 56 at FedExForum and on ESPN Wednesday evening.

As that was underway, Vice President Joe Biden was on his way out of the Memphis area after a visit to the Norfolk Southern intermodal facility in Rossville.
Here’s the basic web story account from Wednesday evening of Biden’s visit which comes on the seventh anniversary of the enactment of the federal stimulus act.
More on the larger themes in the visit and three-city tour by Biden in the print version that hits online Thursday afternoon.

86. City Council Punts Minority Business Issue to Panel -

Memphis City Council members debated at length Tuesday, Feb. 16, whether or not to form a committee to explore the lack of minority business growth locally.

And the debate mirrors a larger debate across the city’s political and business communities about the way forward on the long-standing issue of minority business growth in a city where the minority is the majority of the population but not of the business receipts.

87. Last Word: Tiger Turmoil, Choosing Hotels and Grasshopper In The Committee Room -

When there is turmoil in the world of University of Memphis sports, it is almost impossible to hide and the turmoil inevitably surfaces toward a much faster end game than the city’s mercurial and lively politics. And then there is the period of mourning and regret -- unless the coach's name is John Calipari.
So consider these events all in the space of an overcast Tuesday afternoon.
University of Memphis cheerleaders in Overton Square and on Highland Avenue, near the campus, waving pompoms and signs urging Memphians on the drive home to support Tigers basketball.
Just before the rush hour, the university’s athletic department put out a statement that may have been intended to quell speculation about the future of Tigers basketball coach Josh Pastner but which was so enigmatic that it probably did just the opposite.
You be the judge:
“We continue to receive inquiries concerning the future of Tiger basketball.
Tom Bowen
, UofM Athletic Director, the athletic senior leadership team and the Office of the President will conduct a post-season review of the men’s basketball program, as is customary with all UofM sports teams.
We urge Tiger Nation to support this team through the end of the basketball season with special attention given to the final three home games at FedExForum.”
And late Tuesday evening, the Memphis Rebounders sent an email appeal urging a strong turnout for the Wednesday UCF game at FedExForum which is also on ESPN.
“If business or family obligations prevent you from attending, please give the tickets to family, friends or me,” wrote Harold Byrd of the Rebounders, “as we have multiple requests from many who can’t afford season tickets.”

88. Council Debates, Forms Minority Business Committee -

Memphis City Council members debated at length Tuesday, Feb. 16, whether or not to form a committee to explore the lack of minority business growth locally.

The council ultimately voted to form an ad hoc committee tasked with coming up within three months a set of recommendations to improve city government’s contract spending with minority businesses.

89. Council Debates, Forms Minority Business Committee -

Memphis City Council members debated at length Tuesday, Feb. 16, whether or not to form a committee to explore the lack of minority business growth locally.

The council ultimately voted to form an ad hoc committee tasked with coming up within three months a set of recommendations to improve city government’s contract spending with minority businesses.

90. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

91. Memphians Invited to the Table for Black Restaurant Week -

At Mot & Ed’s restaurant, regular customers go back a couple of generations. Owner Edna Banks-Hawkins only opened the soul food restaurant four years ago, but people come in with memories of her family’s chain of Boyd BBQ restaurants.

92. Memphis City Council to Get Police Body Camera Update -

Memphis City Council members are to get a timeline Tuesday, Feb. 16, on the roll out of police body cameras from Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland as well as some idea of the additional cost.

93. Editorial: A Call for More Conservancies -

When you look at the physical changes currently underway at Shelby Farms Park, it can be easy to miss the rise of conservancies as forces that are changing the landscape of our city.

94. Urban Treasure -

They were at the 2007 National Recreation and Park Association conference in Indianapolis and they had been dutifully attending the seminars and taking notes. But one day this two-woman contingent from Memphis and the newly formed Shelby Farms Park Conservancy skipped out of the afternoon workshops.

95. Last Word: Clinton in Whitehaven, Changes to Parkside and The Replacements Book -

The Presidential primary caravan has arrived.
Former President Bill Clinton was in Whitehaven Thursday evening to campaign for his wife, former Secretary of State and U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton.
And it was a reminder of his political potency as well as his popularity in a city that went for Barack Obama over his wife in the 2008 Tennessee Presidential primary but which was solidly behind him in both of his successful bids for the White House in the 1990s.
Clinton spoke in a packed Whitehaven High gymnasium to more than 700 people for almost an hour and then worked the crowd that gathered near the podium for another 25 minutes before sprinting out a door to a waiting car.
We’ll be busy this weekend with the opening of the local Bernie Sanders campaign headquarters and we’re still waiting on that promised Donald Trump Memphis appearance.
And we expect to encounter lots of Republican presidential partisans at the local GOP's annual Lincoln Day Gala on the 20th.

96. Parkside at Shelby Farms Proposal Goes to LUCB -

A plan to build three mixed-use apartment towers and garden apartments on the northern border of Shelby Farms Park goes to the Land Use Control Board Thursday, Feb. 11.

97. Cates Wants Detail on Downtown Agreements -

From Mud Island River Park across the Memphis harbor to The Pyramid and further east to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there are a lot of connections as the areas head toward a new incarnation.

98. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

99. Boyd: Tennessee Shifting to ‘Product Development’ Site Selection -

Elected officials are going to say it if they talk long enough about economic development.

They will talk about how quality of life plays a role in business growth, specifically the move or expansion of corporations into a city or region they weren’t in previously.

100. Tentative Pinch Development Plan About to Emerge -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Bass Pro Shops have agreed on a tentative and general plan for future development of the Pinch District, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.