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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Basketball Capitol, Gang Fight in Southwest Memphis and Moving Polk -

There is something to be said for hosting a round of the NCAA’s March Madness without having a team in the playoffs. Much to be said against it. But after a weekend of what I think most of us here will call the most compelling of the regionals featured prominently on national television, you really can find very little to complain about. It might even have rekindled the intensity of our civic love of basketball.

2. Northern Mississippi Lawmaker Discloses Dementia Diagnosis -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A colorful Mississippi state lawmaker who is an undertaker by trade drew a standing ovation from colleagues Friday after announcing from the House floor that he has dementia, vowing to live out his days with "the gusto of a hound dog."

3. NCI Director Lowy Lauds Work of St. Jude -

Dr. Douglas Lowy returned to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on Friday, March 24, and praised the facility as being a worthy beneficiary of research funding that comes through his National Cancer Institute.

4. March 24-30, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2012: Guilty verdicts in the federal court trials of Clinton Lewis and Martin Lewis, the only two members of the Craig Petties drug organization to go to trial in the largest drug and racketeering case ever brought in Memphis federal court. Each is convicted of multiple drug conspiracy, racketeering and murder-for-hire charges and sentenced to life in prison.
The Lewises are relatively low-ranking members of a multistate drug organization whose center is the Riverside neighborhood of South Memphis. They are assigned to kill rival drug dealers and those within the organization suspected of cooperating with authorities. The trial testimony paints a vivid picture of the larger organization and its disintegration.
Petties, along with his childhood friends, builds an organization that deals directly with the Sinaloa drug cartel in Mexico, importing tons of cocaine and marijuana into the city via truck trailers and sending millions of dollars in drug money back to Mexico. Petties flees to Mexico in 2002 after police discover him in a house with 600 pounds of marijuana. It puts Petties and his organization on the radar of federal drug agents. Petties runs the drug organization from exile for six years before he is captured in Mexico and returned to the U.S. as the cartel splinters violently.
A year before the trial, Petties pleads guilty to federal charges in a sealed court hearing and is later sentenced to multiple life sentences. His attorneys argue that Petties did offer some cooperation short of testifying. But prosecutors say he never provided any significant information they didn’t already know and that he feared for his life if he cooperated in any significant way.

5. Expanding Baby Boomer Population Brings New Health Care Challenges -

Patients are having to wait longer to make appointments with new doctors in major U.S. cities, according to a new study that links the increased waits partly with an explosion of, well, new patients.

6. Porter-Leath Connects Generations Through Foster Grandparents Program -

They had done their part, put their work in for decades. George Watson had been a mechanic, worked right on past age 65 and into his early 70s. Ada McNeal had given 26 years to the Aeolian Piano Corp., first as a machine operator and then sorting parts after the rheumatoid arthritis came along, until the company closed its Memphis plant.

7. From Art to Zumba, Memphis Seniors Taking Steps to Keep Mind & Body Fit -

For people like Bill Wilson, 74, keeping active mentally as well as physically is the key to a healthier life.

8. Editorial: Ag Innovation Breaks Stereotypes, Boundaries -

You’ve heard the saying “this isn’t your parents’ fill-in-the-blank.” A better version for agricultural innovation might be “this is not your son’s idea of innovation” – which has a couple of stereotypes.

9. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

10. Virgin America Will Be the Latest Airline Brand to Disappear -

DALLAS (AP) – After months of teasing, Alaska Airlines has bad news for loyal customers of Virgin America – their airline's name is being dumped.

Alaska announced late Wednesday that it will retire the Virgin brand, probably in 2019, adding that name to a list including Continental and US Airways that disappeared in the past decade.

11. Whether Toting Gloves or iPads, Women Have Role to Play in Baseball -

First-year Memphis Redbirds manager Stubby Clapp has played and coached for Canada’s National Team. He understands, perhaps better than most do, that baseball’s stage extends beyond the major leagues and its minor league feeder system.

12. Grizzlies Scholars Launches Next Generation of Leaders -

Handing drums to a group of eighth-grade boys may not sound like the most relaxing way to spend a Saturday. But according to Frank Shaffer, it makes perfect sense.

13. Binghampton Gateway Builds on Decade of Momentum -

While construction recently began on the large-scale Binghampton Gateway Center and more development is on the way, the revitalization process to bring businesses and jobs back to the distressed Binghampton area began more than a decade ago.

14. Turner Seeks Study of Civil Rights Cold Cases -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner can still feel the physical and emotional pain she endured for riding at the front of Memphis city buses while going home from LeMoyne-Owen College during the civil rights movement.

15. Sears, Once a Stalwart, Has ‘Substantial Doubt’ About Future -

NEW YORK (AP) – Sears, a back-to-school shopping destination for generations of kids and the place newlyweds went to choose appliances, has said that after years of losing money that there is "substantial doubt" it will be able to keep its doors open.

16. Arkansas Governor Expands Where Concealed Guns Allowed -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas' governor signed a sweeping gun rights measure into law on Wednesday that will allow concealed handguns at state colleges, some bars, government buildings and even the state Capitol.

17. Last Word: No More Lottery Balls, The Voucher Bill Advances and UCLA -

Spring is in the air, which can only mean one thing – the Overton Park Greensward controversy is back on. Just this past weekend, I was in the park noting the metal barrier that separates Greensward pedestrians from Zoo parkers and that the barrier was not “decorated” with save the greensward paraphernalia as much as it has been the previous three springs.

18. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics in Legislature -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

19. Mills Looks To Spread Republican Reach in City -

The Shelby County Republican Party is becoming more diverse and working to get back non-voting Republicans, its new permanent chairman says.

“For the longest time, we’ve talked about going into the African-American community, talked about going into the Hispanic community,” Lee Mills said. “But we haven’t actually done it and that’s our fault. We’ve got to reach out to them and we can’t reach out to them without going to them. So, we’re going to go to their communities and we’re going to find ways to do that.”

20. From Bedroom to Boardroom, Supreme Court is in Your Business -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Quick, name a Supreme Court justice. OK, name three. One of the current justices, Stephen Breyer, once noted wryly that their names are less well-known than those of the Three Stooges.

21. A Muppet With Autism to Be Welcomed Soon on 'Sesame Street' -

NEW YORK (AP) – Folks on Sesame Street have a way of making everyone feel accepted.

That certainly goes for Julia, a Muppet youngster with blazing red hair, bright green eyes – and autism. Rather than being treated like an outsider, which too often is the plight of kids on the spectrum, Julia is one of the gang.

22. Chuck Berry's Influence on Rock ‘n’ Roll Was Incalculable -

Rock n' roll was more than a new kind of music, but a new story to tell, one for kids with transistor radios in their hands and money in their pockets, beginning to raise questions their parents never had the luxury to ask.

23. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics After He is Honored -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

24. Last Word: Calipari Madness, Wolfchase 20 Years On and The Path Beyond Chemo -

John Calipari returns to Memphis at week’s end after Kentucky advanced Sunday to the NCAA South semifinals at FedExForum Friday. But based on the way his team played Sunday after a close game with Northwestern Saturday he might not be here long.

25. Mills Looks To Spread Republican Reach in 2018 County Elections -

The chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party says the local party has to become more diverse and work to get back non-voting Republicans.

“For the longest time, we’ve talked about going into the African-American community, talked about going into the Hispanic community,” Lee Mills said. “But we haven’t actually done it and that’s our fault. We’ve got to reach out to them and we can’t reach out to them without going to them. So, we’re going to go to their communities and we’re going to find ways to do that.”

26. Health Groups: Next Cure May Go Undiscovered With Trump Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – What goes on the chopping block: Research into cancer or Alzheimer's? A Zika vaccine or a treatment for superbugs?

Health groups say President Donald Trump's proposal to slash funds for the nation's engine of biomedical research would be devastating for patients with all kinds of diseases – and for jobs.

27. St. Jude Dedicates Research Tower After Pioneer Dr. Donald Pinkel -

In honor of his groundbreaking work to fight and cure childhood cancers, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital held a dedication ceremony on Friday, March 17, to rename its principal research tower for Dr. Donald Pinkel, the hospital’s first director and chief executive officer.

28. Baptist Opening New Grief Centers -

Baptist Memorial Health Care is expanding its grief services, adding new centers in Midtown and in Jonesboro, Arkansas, later this year, partly in response to demand from the community for the counseling and other benefits the organization has provided for years now.

29. Last Word: James Cotton, A Quiet Jackson Day in Memphis and 'A Football School' -

When you think of the blues and harmonica – James Cotton probably comes to mind – Sonny Boy Williamson too, who taught Cotton how to play.

30. Local Concert Business Amping Up, Keeping Memphis Promoters Busy -

The concert business appears to be healthier in 2017, with more performers and artists on tour than in recent years – and more of them are booking shows in Memphis.

But it’s never that simple in the business of shows, where booking is a process and touring is becoming more of a necessity.

31. Editorial: The Ride From Mall To Mixed Use -

Memphis has come a long way from Southland Mall – the city’s first shopping mall – which seemed so cavernous in the late 1960s and now seems so small.

That’s not to say the times have left Southland Mall behind. They haven’t. It can and should be a part of the renaissance now underway in Whitehaven.

32. Love Me Some Lent -

LENTEN LESSON. The Episcopal Church, with ancient roots in early Christianity, the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Church, has many arcane names and traditions in its liturgy derived from the many languages and practices of its long history.

33. Tennessee Lawmakers Weigh In on Trump Visit -

NASHVILLE – While state lawmakers recognized the historical significance of President Donald Trump visiting the home of President Andrew Jackson in Hermitage Wednesday, March 15, the review is mixed on comparisons between the two as well as the Jackson legacy.

34. Yoga Pants, Cozy Clothes May be Key Source of Sea Pollution -

KEY LARGO, Fla. (AP) – Comfortable clothes are emerging as a source of plastic that's increasingly ending up in the oceans and potentially contaminating seafood, according to Gulf Coast researchers launching a two-year study of microscopic plastics in the waters from south Texas to the Florida Keys.

35. Q&A: Change to Fuel Economy Standards Could Impact Consumers -

DETROIT (AP) – President Donald Trump plans to re-examine federal fuel economy requirements for new cars and trucks.

The requirements were a centerpiece of President Barack Obama's strategy to combat global warming. But Trump appears to be making good on a pledge to car company CEOs to reduce "unnecessary regulations."

36. Singing Along With Tone-Deaf Legislators -

Often dull, but never boring. They might even make you break out into song.

Halfway through the 2017 session, the General Assembly could be accused of lacking sharpness or sensibility, but what it lacks in luster it makes up for with lots of political song and dance.

37. Bill to Create Criminal Trespassing at Apartment Complexes Could Face Legal Challenges -

NASHVILLE – Two Memphis lawmakers are pushing legislation designed to clear apartment complexes of trespassers, in some cases to ensure that emergency personnel avoid intimidation and threats when they answer calls dealing with shootings.

38. Israel to Lead Greenline Group As Organization’s Focus Shifts -

Andrew Israel recently was named executive director of the Greater Memphis Greenline as the organization shifts its focus to promoting healthy lifestyles and increasing the use of trails, parks and green spaces.
As executive director, Israel is the strategic leader and the chief relationship officer for GMG. Along with creating programs and opportunities to enhance and expand the use of green spaces, GMG works at the grassroots level with neighborhood organizations and individuals to help promote their activities and expand the resources that are available. 

39. Last Word: Gas Tax Resurrection, More Monitoring and Germantown's $200 M Plan -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's gas tax bill emerged from the workshop effectively on Monday with a sharper cut in the state grocery tax making the complex set of gas tax hike and other tax rollbacks more than revenue neutral.

40. Inside Washington: Plane Fire Safety Rules Stall Under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A year ago, the U.S. government was campaigning for an international ban on shipments of rechargeable batteries on passenger planes because the batteries can self-ignite, creating intense fires capable of destroying an airliner.

41. Five Steps to Engage Volunteers -

A well-run volunteer management program can change the life of your nonprofit. Most leaders know this and yearn for a team they can depend on. At the same time, many delay engaging volunteers because “it’s a lot of work.” That’s the truth. But it’s also true that an investment in volunteers will leverage the work of your organization in ways you can’t yet imagine. 

42. University of Memphis Plans Veterans Care Center -

The University of Memphis has announced plans for a new veterans care center on campus.

The university said the outpatient Veterans Care Center will address the mental health needs of veterans, regardless of era, gender, discharge status or service connection.

43. 1892 Lynchings Remembered As Historic Moment -

When a mob of approximately 75 men in black masks took Thomas Moss, Calvin McDowell and Henry Stewart from a Downtown jail cell 125 years ago and shot them to death by a set of railroad tracks running by the Mississippi River, it was far from the first lynching in Memphis.

44. Editorial: Jackson Case Spotlights Prosecutorial Problems -

Five days after Noura Jackson was convicted of murdering her mother, one of the prosecutors filed a notice with the court saying he had not turned over a note from a key prosecution witness that might have helped the defense.

45. Tapping Young Donors -

Amelia Thompson is everything a nonprofit is looking for now and in the future. A 30-year-old Memphian who graduated White Station High School, she has worked with a nonprofit in Washington, D.C. and been a buyer for Macy’s in New York.

46. University of Memphis Plans Veterans Care Center -

The University of Memphis has announced plans for a new veterans care center on campus.

The university said the outpatient Veterans Care Center will address the mental health needs of veterans, regardless of era, gender, discharge status or service connection.

47. Keep Your Finances on Track -

Ray’s Take Not being careful about precisely where your money is going can leave you struggling to pay for necessities like groceries now and retirement later. Taking just a small amount of time to do some tasks now can lead to big financial wins all year long – and into the future.

48. What a Strange Twist of Events in Hiring of Currie -

John Currie is the new athletics director at the University of Tennessee. Has it sunk in yet? Currie, previously the athletic director at Kansas State, was introduced last week by new UT chancellor Beverly Davenport during a ceremony featuring fans, boosters, coaches and, of course, former Tennessee and NFL quarterback Peyton Manning.

49. Miller Strengthens Neighborhoods in Medical District -

Though you may not have noticed, one of Memphis’ districts is being thoughtfully enhanced, one project at a time.

It’s called the Medical District, and it comprises 2 1/2 square miles surrounding nine anchor institutions: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, Methodist Healthcare, Regional One Health, Memphis Bioworks, Southwest Tennessee Community College, Baptist College of Health Sciences and the Southern College of Optometry.

50. Kelsey’s School Voucher Bill Faces Legislative Showdown -

NASHVILLE – A showdown is looming over a pilot voucher program targeting Shelby County Schools after the legislation moved out of Senate and House panels this week with unanimous votes.

51. African Art Begins Transition at Brooks Museum -

For many visitors to the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, the museum’s African art collection has been a modest display of traditional African art symbolized by a grouping of large masks on a plain wall.

52. 'Heartbeat Bill' Put Off a Year -

NASHVILLE – Legislation outlawing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected is being postponed until 2018, but a House panel voted Wednesday to restrict abortions after the 20th week, a shift from the 24-week period defining “viability.”

53. Ready to Learn and Teach -

I have heard it said many times that when the student is ready, the teacher appears. The wisdom in understanding this is being open to learning, and prepared to teach what you learn, when either opportunity presents itself.

54. Last Word: Who Needs To Be Watched, Hopdoddy and Fresh Fed Numbers -

Three Memphis City Council members on Behind The Headlines had quite a bit to say about protesters and lists and police surveillance. Council chairman Berlin Boyd and council members Kemp Conrad and Worth Morgan all say the surveillance question, which is the central issue now that the City Hall list has been pared significantly, is complex because of public postings and protests in public places.

55. Arkansas Legislator Wants to Pack Heat at State Capitol -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Despite metal detectors and armed guards at the doors to the Capitol and leading to galleries overlooking the Arkansas House, a state lawmaker says he would feel safer if he were allowed to pack his own heat.

56. Tennessee Leaders Weigh In on Death of Longtime Lawmaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Sen. Douglas Henry, a lawmaker with the longest tenure in the history of the Tennessee General Assembly, died at 90 years old on Sunday.

57. Former Sen. Douglas Henry, Longest-Serving Lawmaker, Dies -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Sen. Douglas Henry, a larger-than-life former state lawmaker with the longest tenure in the history of the Tennessee General Assembly, has died. He was 90.

58. Real Estate is a Way of Life for Judy McLellan -

For Judy McLellan, real estate is more than a job – it’s a way of life. In fact, it’s the only life Crye-Leike Realtors Inc.’s No. 1 agent for 19 out of the last 20 years has known.

59. Last Word: Bar Louie's Corner, Chucalissa and Shark Tank for Ag -

The key corner at the intersection of Madison Avenue and North Cooper Street is the southwest corner where since the opening of a renovated Overton Square several years ago Bar Louie has had the corner. And the restaurant chain wants to keep the corner although its landlord wants to make a change. That’s the bottom line in bankruptcy reorganization court documents filed in February.

60. Nintendo Switch's Big Challenge: Luring Casual Gamers -

NEW YORK (AP) – With three kids and constant travel for work, John Hussey jumped at the chance to play an open-world adventure game like "The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild" anywhere, anytime.

61. SEC Ready to Tee Up Media Days; UT’s AD Raises the Bar -

It’s almost time to kick off the 2017 college football season. And by that we mean that SEC Media Days should again be flagged for encroachment on summer.

The conference has not yet jumped in front of the Fourth of July, but SEC Media Days in Hoover, Alabama, continues to move ever closer to summer’s signature date.

62. Ag Shark Tank Joins Memphis Farm & Gin Show -

The Memphis Farm & Gin Show opened its annual two-day stay at the Memphis Cook Convention Center Friday, March 3, with something new – a business “shark tank” of sorts amidst the towering farm machinery and other agriculture technology.

63. Heartbeat Bill Hits Hurdle -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Micah Van Huss’ “heartbeat bill” ran into an unlikely opponent this week: Tennessee Right to Life. The legislation would prohibit abortions once a heartbeat is detected by ultrasound in a fetus, usually at six to eight weeks, a measure Van Huss is sponsoring to severely restrict abortions, except in cases when the mother’s life is in jeopardy.

64. Last Word: Changes on EP Boulevard, March Madness at Rhodes and Cheffies -

I don’t think it worked out this way on purpose – but the $45 million, 200,000 square foot entertainment complex “Elvis Presley’s Memphis” opens the same day that episode two of “Sun Records” airs on CMT.

65. Editorial: Memphis’ Future Needs Chucalissa’s Past -

It won’t be long before we mark 200 years as the city of Memphis. Plans are already underway for the city’s bicentennial. At times like this, you might wonder about who and what came before.

66. Another Country -

On the road into the C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa in southwest Memphis, there is a sign you might not notice on your way to the museum and archaeological site.

An arrow pointing east is the way to Memphis. The western arrow reads Chucalissa.

67. Senate Confirms Carson, Perry For Housing, Energy Posts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Two of President Donald Trump's former rivals for the GOP White House nomination won Senate confirmation Thursday to join his administration.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson was confirmed as secretary of the Department of House and Urban Development on a vote of 58-41. A few hours later, the Senate backed former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to be energy secretary, 62-37.

68. Filmed Against a Memphis Backdrop -

Artist Martha Kelly, who illustrates Memphis life and culture every month for The Daily News and The Memphis News, was on location for the filming of “Winding Brook,” a short film written and directed by Mark Goshorn Jones. Starring Corey Parker and Kim Justis Eikner, the plot centers on a husband trying to get his wife to a treatment center when she starts to hear voices and see dead members of her family. Day two of shooting took place at the historic Annesdale Mansion in Midtown Memphis.

69. Midlife Insurance Audit -

Ray’s Take Owning the right type of insurance policies at the right price at the right time of your life is a crucial element to your financial planning. Preparing for retirement is a particularly important time to do a full risk management evaluation, as you may no longer need some types of coverage you’ve had for years. You might be overpaying for others or might be inadvertently underinsured against some potential risks.

70. The Press Box: Chandler Parsons a Playa, Just Not Yet a Player -

These are headlines you could not have read:

“Chandler Parsons on Four-Game Hot Streak for Grizzlies.”

“Parsons Knee Recovery a Medical Miracle!”

“Parsons’ Play Pushes Grizz to Next Level of Title Contender.”

71. City Hall List Leads to Court Fight Over Police Surveillance -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration may have put to rest the basic matter of the City Hall escort list and who is on it.

72. Last Word: Arnold's in the Alley, Haslam's Gas Tax Bill Wins A Round and Hershey -

A busy day in the City Hall list saga. The list is a lot shorter, but there is a second lawsuit over this in Memphis Federal Court. And the list itself seems to be giving way to a controversy that is all about whether police were unlawfully following and tracking protesters who broke no laws.

73. Protesters Pared from City Hall List as Second Lawsuit Filed -

Protesters on the City Hall escort list are off the list, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings said Wednesday, March 1. But their names will remain on a no trespassing notice for Mayor Jim Strickland’s home.

74. View From the Hill: House Leaders Still Figuring Out Sexual Harassment Policy -

In a case of déjà vu all over again, Democratic state Rep. Bo Mitchell isn’t willing to give Republican House leaders a break on their handling of former Rep. Mark Lovell’s resignation for alleged sexual misconduct.

75. Getting To Know Dallas -

Once upon a time, I called Dallas home. But as many Memphians can attest when admitting to never visiting Graceland, as a Dallasite I didn’t hit many of the tourist attractions.

I’ve returned to Dallas off and on since moving away in 2000, mainly to attend sporting events. But in October we visited for a longer stretch, enough time to hit some of the city’s highlights. We simplified things and used a CityPASS ticket to lead our decisions.

76. Fitzhugh Talks About Race for Governor Without Formally Committing -

NASHVILLE – House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh hasn’t officially entered the 2018 race for governor, but he has a “gut feeling” it’s a step he should take.

77. SCS to Open 20 Summer Learning Academies, Raising Bar on Student Academic Achievement -

Shelby County Schools is preparing a set of 20 summer learning academies that will start at the end of the current school year and use certified teachers with a specific summer curriculum to battle “summer learning loss” in reading, math and science.

78. Study Shows Radiation Raises Risk Of Future Cancer -

Thanks to results from a newly released study based at St. Jude, doctors have fresh data on the long-assumed link between using radiation to treat children with cancer and the higher likelihood those patients will develop new cancers later in life.

79. Hopson Plans 20 Summer Learning Academies for 5,000 Students -

Shelby County Schools is preparing a set of 20 summer learning academies that will start at the end of the current school year and use certified teachers with a specific summer curriculum to battle “summer learning loss” in reading, math and science.

80. Robinson Chosen to Lead Cancer Society’s Hope House -

Maria Robinson has been named senior manager for the American Cancer Society’s Harrah’s Hope Lodge in Memphis. In that role, she oversees day-to-day lodge operations, including guest services, volunteer engagement and community involvement.
Robinson, who is an eight-year cancer survivor herself, joined the American Cancer Society in 2012 as community manager for Relay For Life. Prior to that, she worked in the finance, real estate and restaurant industries. 

81. State Democrats Introduce Bill of Rights, Looking For Every Win They Can Get -

NASHVILLE – House Democrats introduced a People’s Bill of Rights in the State Capitol Monday, Feb. 27, a comprehensive legislative package to ensure rights of Tennesseans affecting everything from jobs to criminal justice to education.

82. Ex-Nashville Mayor Karl Dean to Run for Tennessee Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Nashville mayor Karl Dean said he's decided to run for governor of Tennessee in 2018.

83. YWCA to Hold 20th Annual Benefit Luncheon March 8 -

The YWCA of Greater Memphis will feature Grammy Award nominee Michel’le at its 20th annual benefit luncheon for domestic violence, scheduled for March 8.

Known for her childlike speaking voice, Michel’le’s 1989 debut album sold more than 1.5 million copies and produced such hits as “Turn off the Lights,” “Nicety” and “Something in My Heart.” Decades later, she returned to the limelight as a reality TV star on “R&B Divas: LA,” which aired on TV One from 2013 until 2015.

84. Secrets to Passionate Leadership -

Some leaders have charisma, that ability to engage others. They reach out and touch your heart and soul. Others are quiet with a passion that reveals itself more slowly but is equally compelling. These leaders know what they are talking about, and they know how to connect with people.

85. Women Executives Share Business, Life Lessons -

Through several career stops, Susan Hunsberger learned that she didn’t like being a financial analyst, she did like engaging with people through recruiting and human resources, and that it was more than fine to let colleagues see that you don’t know it all.

86. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

87. Hattie B’s ‘Excited’ About Midtown Location -

For Nick Bishop Sr. and Nick Bishop Jr., owner-operators of Nashville-based Hattie B’s Hot Chicken, opening a Memphis outpost had been something they’d wanted to do for a while. Now it’s becoming a reality.

88. Lessons Learned -

Kat Gordon had made up her mind. She’d decided she was at a point in her life where it was time to carpe diem, suit up and take a leap of faith, and she gave herself two options for doing so – literal (go skydiving) or figurative (start her own business).

89. Last Word: 'Sun Records,' Ole Miss's Lack of Control and Haslam in 2018 -

I am not going to be one of those people who at this late date in the history of television dramas based on real people points out every departure from reality. The first episode of the CMT television series “Sun Records” Thursday was a scene-setter and introduction of sorts to an ensemble cast with plenty of opportunities to name that place in Memphis. That usually means a pretty complex story line to come and there are more than enough memorable characters in the story of Sun.

90. UT Freshman Arnold Scorching Batters With 0.00 ERA This Season -

Caylan Arnold never met a challenge she didn’t like, and she’s taking on a new one almost every day this spring. The 2016 Maryville High School graduate has emerged as one of the top pitchers for Tennessee’s softball team, ranked No. 15 in both major preseason polls.

91. Harwell: Lovell Investigation Handled Correctly -

NASHVILLE – An investigation into now-former Rep. Mark Lovell started a day after he allegedly had inappropriate contact with a woman and lasted two to three days, House Speaker Beth Harwell says.

92. Escort List Lawsuit Revives Old Court Order -

Nearly 40 years after U.S. District Judge Robert McRae signed a federal consent decree barring the Memphis Police Department from ever gathering and keeping information from “political intelligence” surveillance of Memphis citizens, the court order has come back to life.

93. Binghampton Gateway Comes to Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

94. Binghampton Gateway Center Spells End for Inner City Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

95. High Court Ruling Limits International Reach of Patent Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Wednesday sided with California-based Life Technologies Corp. in a patent infringement case that limits the international reach of U.S. patent laws.

96. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

97. Akbari Expungement Bill Passes in Subcommittee -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Raumesh Akbari’s effort to cut felony conviction expungement fees in half received a strong endorsement today in the form of bipartisan support.

The legislation, which would reduce the fee to $180 from $350, advanced from the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee with support from the panel’s chairman, Republican Rep. Tilman Goins of Morristown.

98. Living Well is Best Prescription for Dying Well, Morris Says -

Dr. Scott Morris never shies away from tough topics. His keynote address at the Professional Network on Aging Conference, with its theme, “Aging: The Rhythm of Life,” was no exception.

99. Last Word: This is Memphis, Sedgwick Deal Expands and Violent Crime Drops -

There used to be a time when a 10-second shot of the Memphis streetscape in a commercial was enough to start an avalanche of speculation about the economic impact of the placement. And when people didn’t mob the city the next day, we were always hopeful that the next little peek of our brand would surely be the one that brought that about.

100. Akbari Expungement Bill Passes in Subcommittee With Bipartisan Support -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Raumesh Akbari’s effort to cut felony conviction expungement fees in half received a strong endorsement today in the form of bipartisan support.

The legislation, which would reduce the fee to $180 from $350, advanced from the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee with support from the panel’s chairman, Republican Rep. Tilman Goins of Morristown.