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Editorial Results (free)

1. Scalia's Memphis Visits Reflected Outspoken Supreme Court Justice -

Prior to his death Saturday in Texas at 79, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia a few times in recent years brought to Memphis the intellectual combativeness and pugnacious brand of jurisprudence for which he’s long been known and for which he will be remembered.

2. Scalia's Memphis Visits Reflected Outspoken Supreme Court Justice -

Prior to his death Saturday in Texas at 79, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia a few times in recent years brought to Memphis the intellectual combativeness and pugnacious brand of jurisprudence for which he’s long been known and for which he will be remembered.

3. Protecting Seniors From Predators -

Aging in place, being able to live at home in more or less independent circumstances, is what most seniors say they long for, and what advocates for the elderly recommend when possible.

But while comfort and familiarity can improve a senior’s quality of life, issues persist for all seniors, including dealing with crime and abuse.

4. Meeting the Demands of a Rapidly Aging Population -

When Gov. Bill Haslam gave his annual State of the State address on February 1, he proposed a $34.8 billion plan providing new spending on colleges and universities, road projects and a large deposit into Tennessee’s emergency budget reserves.

5. I Escaped Memphis to Open Feb. 12 -

I Escaped Memphis is the latest escape room provider in the Memphis area.

Located in a 2,400-square-foot bay at 5707 Quince Road, the business lays out a real-life escape room game where people need to complete puzzles against the clock to find their way out.

6. Timeout For Fresh Quotes -

THE SPORTS QUOTES YOU HAVEN’T HEARD. While the Super Bowl, Iowa and New Hampshire are behind us, the rest of the primaries, the general election, and a million tired sports analogies and metaphors are regrettably still in front of us … as in, we’re still in the early innings.

7. Life Without Marc? Yes, and Grizz Still Have Something to Play For -

In their first game after learning their franchise player had fractured his right foot and would be lost to the team indefinitely – and yes, perhaps for the rest of the season – the Grizzlies reacted just the way that was needed: They went out to Brooklyn and demolished the hapless Nets before starting their All-Star break.

8. Warren, Tulane Move-Out Leads to Larger Issues -

The end of federal rent subsidies at two Memphis apartment complexes with a recent history of code violations will create some larger issues for the surrounding communities.

Those larger changes begin to unfold next week as federal officials meet with residents at each of the apartment complexes to talk about their move out of the aging complexes.

9. I Escaped Memphis To Open Feb. 12 -

I Escaped Memphis is the latest escape room provider in the Memphis area. Located in a 2,400-square-foot bay at 5707 Quince Road, the business lays out a real-life escape room game where people need to complete puzzles against the clock to find their way out.

10. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

11. McMullen Takes on Public Sector Challenges as City’s Legal Chief -

Bruce McMullen remembers his hometown of Sparta, Georgia, as small, about 3,000 people.

“Life was pretty simple,” he said. “A lot of family, a lot of friends.”

12. Last Word: Early Voting Begins, Marc Gasol's Right Foot and TNReady's Problem -

Trump and Sanders win big in New Hampshire with a Republican scramble for second the only matter to be decided in the nation’s first Presidential primaries. That as the road to Tennessee begins to see some traffic in the distance.
Meanwhile, Marc Gasol goes from a “right mid-foot injury” on the Grizzlies DL to a fractured right foot.

13. For the Love Of Work -

I must confess: Valentine’s Day is very possibly my favorite holiday. Despite being overly commercialized, it’s what you make it, and that’s what I like. There are few expectations from family and friends. You can choose to ignore it, go all out, or find a comfortable space in between. And the best part is it’s about love and gratitude.

14. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

15. Last Word: TN(not)Ready, Hatiloo Expands and Tax Season Advice -

So what do you do when the test-makers fail the test?

You go back to the old test in the case of the Tennessee Education Department and the TNReady tests.
These were the new tests for the new statewide student achievement standards that replaced Common Core standards.
They can only be taken online.
But the system crashed Monday, which was the day that all of the preparation in the last year was geared toward. That included two tests locally of the on-line capacity and other technical standards necessary to make this go smoothly.
Here is a good account of what happened statewide and locally with a few other stops across the state to take in the scope of how big a failure this was and what failed.

16. Philanthropy is Alive and Well In The African-American Community -

Here’s a stereotype to bust: Philanthropy is about large gifts from the rich and the powerful who give to organizations and institutions that serve those in need. Here’s an expanded definition: Philanthropy includes everyday African-Americans who give freely of their treasure.

17. Winners and Losers From Super Bowl 50’s Advertising Game -

The Super Bowl is the biggest advertising competition of the year. Brands that win big can reap the viral benefits for months to come. And those that fail do so publicly, oftentimes with mounting consumer criticism that can take just as long to overcome.

18. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present 2014 Tony Award winner “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder” Tuesday, Feb. 9, through Feb. 14 at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

19. Lifeblood Grows Fleet With 7th Bloodmobile -

Lifeblood has added a seventh bloodmobile to its fleet, thanks to a Plough Foundation grant.

The 40-foot-long mobile blood drive bus boasts the latest generator technology, including two turbo-charged generators with low emissions, as well as custom interior design for maximum comfort.

20. Events -

University of Memphis Hooks Institute will host “Stokely: A Life” author Peniel E. Joseph for a lecture, lunch and book signing Thursday, Feb. 11, at 11 a.m. in the University Center River Room, 499 University St. Joseph’s biography of Stokely Carmichael won the 2014 Benjamin L. Hooks Institute National Book Award. Visit memphis.edu/benhooks for details.

21. Financial Steps for Executors -

Ray’s Take The death of a spouse is high on the list of the most stressful events in life. But, as bad as the emotional trauma can be, the financial fallout can be equally traumatic – and can last much longer. Most spouses name each other as their executor, which makes sense. But the job is not an easy one, and few are fully prepared for the responsibility.

22. A Bit More Super -

CARE ABOUT THE GAME. I’m a homer. I can’t watch a sporting event for the beauty of the game, the spirit of the competition, the skill displayed on both sides. I want somebody’s butt kicked and for good reason.

23. Cates Wants Detail on Downtown Agreements -

From Mud Island River Park across the Memphis harbor to The Pyramid and further east to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there are a lot of connections as the areas head toward a new incarnation.

24. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

25. Lifeblood Grows Fleet With 7th Bloodmobile -

Lifeblood has added a seventh bloodmobile to its fleet, thanks to a Plough Foundation grant.

The 40-foot-long mobile blood drive bus boasts the latest generator technology, including two turbo-charged generators with low emissions, as well as custom interior design for maximum comfort.

26. For Whom Do You Create New Products? -

According to AcuPoll more than 95 percent of new products fail each year. This harrowing statistic should sound an alarm, one that says, the way we approach the conceptualization and launch of new products does not work

27. Boyd: Tennessee Shifting to ‘Product Development’ Site Selection -

Elected officials are going to say it if they talk long enough about economic development.

They will talk about how quality of life plays a role in business growth, specifically the move or expansion of corporations into a city or region they weren’t in previously.

28. Alexandria Smith Learning the ‘Undercurrents’ of Politics on the Job -

It would have made a good story, how another stone-hearted stockbroker that thrives on the “action” had been honing all the necessary skills since age 10.

How the future Wall Street wolf used to listen in on her grandfather’s speakerphone calls with his stockbroker and then ask questions, how the grandfather bought her shares in McDonald’s and Disney and Yahoo.

29. Tenn. Approves Incentives for TV Series Production in Memphis -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $4.3 million to support production of a TV series that will be shot in Memphis this spring.

The series will be an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama that Viacom’s CMT network is adapting from the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet.”

30. Casting Set to Begin for Memphis-based "Million Dollar Quartet" TV Series -

Viacom’s CMT network will announce Wednesday that it's begun casting for an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama it’s bringing to the small screen later this year.

The project is an adaption of the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet,” and the production will be based in Memphis, according to CMT.

31. Super Bowl Advertising Huge Gamble -

History has already been made at this year’s Super Bowl of advertising – thanks to a record price tag of $5 million for a 30-second spot. It’s a hefty spike from the $4.5 million advertisers ponied up last year, but it didn’t slow CBS from nearly selling all of its big-game ad time by last November.

32. Data Breaches: ‘The Third Certainty in Life’ -

I recently received an email from a former colleague that appeared to be a DropBox link with “important documents.” Since it had been awhile since our last correspondence, I emailed back to make sure that the note was real, only to receive a bogus response that confirmed my suspicions. Cue me reporting it to her company’s help desk, blocking the user from my email, and deleting the note.

33. Hinds Joins Martin Tate Law Firm -

Rebecca Hinds has joined Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston P.C. as an associate attorney in the firm’s litigation section. In this role, Hinds represents clients in civil and commercial litigation matters, including business law, transportation liability, construction disputes, breach-of-contract matters and employment law. She also helps commercial clients obtain tax incentives and advises individuals and businesses in the drafting and negotiation of contracts. 

34. Pet Rehab, Fitness Practice Launches in East Memphis -

The young, injured patients often in need of rehabilitation and physical therapy who are brought to Dr. Roxana Caraballo’s new East Memphis center can’t speak for themselves or necessarily demonstrate where and why they hurt.

35. Playback Memphis Works to Expand Reach -

The Playback Memphis organization is looking to expand its reach this year and is preparing to host three training courses at the Pilgrim House Hostel and Retreat Center at First Congregational Church in Midtown later this month.

36. Planetarium Rings in New Era at Pink Palace -

When the AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium reopened to the public Saturday, Jan. 30, it was an important step in the transformation of the Pink Palace Family of Museums’ campus.

The museum, 3050 Central Ave., is undergoing a multi-year master plan that saw work begin in 2013. When complete in 2021, the property will be transformed with a completely renovated museum building and mansion to go along with other features.

37. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

38. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

39. 50-Year Star Trek Voyage Docks at Orpheum -

In the beginning there was Star Trek – a mid-1960s television series that didn’t make a five-year run ideal for syndication before it got cancelled. Then came a syndicated after-life anyway and five movies as well as four spin-off television series.

40. History Lesson -

A HISTORY LESSON TAUGHT, NOT LEARNED.

When I first wrote about attempts to steamroll Overton Park, a friend told me a great story. He was in his parents’ living room one afternoon in the late ’60s listening to his father go on and on about the battle to keep I-40 out of Overton Park ... too late to stop it, who are these silly protestors anyway, yadda yadda ... when they turned on the local news.

41. The Gift Of Writing A Book -

Running any business day-in and day-out can bring active contemplation to halt. The pace of work stays at such a staggering speed, leaving you inspired, exhausted and bewildered.

With such demands on your time, it’s hard to make sense of life and work, and even harder to extract wisdom out of the many experiences that constitute a workday.

42. Memphis CFO Brian Collins 'Constantly at 50,000 Feet' -

If you think about the city’s chief financial officer at all, you might imagine a robotic figure forever tethered to numbers and a desk, taking a microscopic view of life in search of where to squeeze out a few more dollars here, a few more dollars there.

43. Medical Startup Trades Texas for Germantown -

David Leon’s medical device startup is the latest addition to a rapidly expanding health care, biotech and life sciences landscape in the Memphis area.

44. Chase Planning Rollout of Card-Free ATMs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Soon, losing your ATM card won't be the financial life-stopping event it used to be. Just don't also lose your phone.

JPMorgan Chase customers will soon be able to withdraw cash or initiate other transactions using their cellphone at Chase ATMs being upgraded later this year.

45. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

46. HUD Funds Mid-South Greenprint With $60 Million Grant -

One of the largest federal grants ever awarded to Shelby County government will fund efforts to avoid some of the flooding the Memphis area saw in 2011.

The federal department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced Thursday, Jan. 21, the $60 million grant to fund the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan.

47. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

48. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

49. Growth in Health Care Means Busy Time for Recruiters -

Health care has been a leading engine of U.S. job creation lately, a reality that’s particularly evident in Memphis where the health care community is humming along with growth and investment.

All of which means a jam-packed schedule that shows no signs of slowing down for the likes of Shane Davis.

50. The Persecution of Jeremy Durham -

Inhumane and unfair: That’s the only way to describe the “liberal media’s” treatment of state Rep. Jeremy Durham over the last month.

51. Father Don’s Legacy: Planting Seeds of Hope -

It is said that the future belongs to those who give the next generation reason to hope. This saying rings true in the life of Rev. Donald Mowery, and is lived out through his decades of commitment to youth in Memphis and across the country.

52. Clean Memphis, Chamber Work to Spruce Up City -

Janet Boscarino’s career in business development had her traveling frequently. And while she always enjoyed coming home, one thing stood out that she hated: the amount of litter she saw across Memphis, especially compared to some of the cities she visited for business.

53. NCRM Forum on Sports and Race Features Lively Dialogue -

Professional athletes pay a price when they speak out on issues outside of or larger than the games they play.

And ESPN commentator and retired NBA player Jalen Rose draws a distinction between the way players in Major League Baseball and players in “black sports” are treated by their teams.

54. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

55. Shelby Farms Playground Part of National Case Study -

The American Society of Landscape Architects has put the spotlight on Shelby Farms’ Woodland Discovery Playground.

Woodland Discovery Playground in Memphis is one of 10 case studies included in the American Society of Landscape Architects’ newly expanded online exhibition, “Designing Our Future: Sustainable Landscapes.”

56. First Tennessee Invests in Tri-State Bank -

As of Dec. 31, Tri-State Bank of Memphis has secured almost $5 million in new capital, an investment fueled in part by an “unprecedented transaction” between it and First Tennessee Bank.

57. Outside the Box -

Southwest Tennessee Community College is opening its new Whitehaven Center on Tuesday, Jan. 19. The building, which accommodates nearly 2,000 students at 1234 Finley Road off Elvis Presley Boulevard, is seeing new life following its run as a Kroger store that closed in 2011.

58. Tennessee Startups Chasing Greater Opportunities -

When it comes to launching startup companies, Tennessee is best described as “early stage.”

The less than $200 million in venture capital invested in Tennessee businesses in 2014 is a rounding error compared to the $30 billion invested in California. And when the final tally for 2015 comes out later this month, the disparity won’t be much smaller.

59. It’s Time for Manning to Call it a Career -

No amount of film study has prepared Peyton Manning for this. He enters the NFL postseason uncertain about his football future. After 18 years as a pro and at the age of 39, his body is breaking down and his skills are slipping. Passes he once made with ease now wobble and sail off target.

60. Daush Eyes Next Career Chapter -

On one hand, a long journey in the education profession will come to an end this spring for Barbara Daush.

Daush is president of St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School, a role she has served since 1994. She’ll retire at the end of this school year but it’s a short retirement; Daush begins work in fundraising at the University of Mississippi July 5.

61. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

62. Are You Part of a Sandwich? -

Ray’s Take Being a member of the sandwich generation – adults who simultaneously care for children and aging parents – is becoming an increasingly familiar challenge.

It’s tough trying to make financial decisions to take care of loved ones today that may have a negative impact on your own future.

63. Stubby and Bo Know First Big-League Hit Is Forever -

They will always remember the first one because in baseball, there is no charity.

June 22, 2001, the St. Louis Cardinals are losing 10-5 to the San Francisco Giants when Stubby Clapp, back-flipping hero to Memphis Redbirds fans, leads off the bottom of the ninth inning as a pinch-hitter.

64. Ikea Brings Sustainability Practices to Memphis -

Sustainability at large businesses sometimes might seem to only focus on buzzwords such as solar panels, carbon footprints and LEED certification.

Those practices are good steps in today’s sustainable world. Sometimes, though, the little things go a long way.

65. Tourism Goes Beyond Graceland, Beale Street -

This week, hundreds of investors, community builders and federal leaders gathered at the third annual Rural Opportunity Investment Conference, which ended with a discussion of spurring economic development through tourism.

66. New Memphis COO Doug McGowen Knows Importance of Carrying Out Orders -

From age 13 until he finished college, Doug McGowen was filling in his summers and college breaks with work. Real work. Sweat-on-the-brow work.

He grew up in Meadville, a small town in northwest Pennsylvania. And there he toiled for a small family-owned construction company, doing whatever was asked.

67. Stocks Sink in Late Trading; Consumer Stocks Take a Beating -

Stocks fell sharply in late afternoon trading Wednesday as a dismal start to the new year got even worse. The selling was concentrated on some of the biggest winners from last year such as Netflix and Amazon, both of which doubled in value in 2015.

68. Last Word: SOTU React, OPEB Comeback and NFL Nostalgia -

The day after the last State of the Union address by President Barack Obama here's a breakdown of the reaction from our delegation to Washington.
Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen emphasized Obama's references to criminal justice reform.
"I know he is also committed to criminal justice reform and I hope my colleagues will work together to put meaningful reform on his desk," Cohen said.
Republican U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher tweeted, "We need a plan to keep America safe and make America strong. I did not hear that from the President tonight."
Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander: "If Pres. Obama focuses on what he agrees on with Congress instead of what we disagree on, there's quite a bit we could get done in 2016."
Republican U.S. Senator Bob Corker urged the "swift release" of U.S sailors being held overnight by Iran in a border dispute just before the speech.

69. What Are the Odds? -

I am writing this article as the Powerball lottery jackpot prepares to pay out $1.3 billion to some lucky fool – I mean lucky winner.

I’m always amazed at the long lines and hype surrounding these potential payouts from the lottery. It seems Americans just can’t pass up the possibility that, “I might win it.” So they stand in line, buy a ticket (or several) and hope.

70. 8 Career Trends For 2016 -

With the New Year here in full force, employees are setting their sights on new goals, new jobs and new careers. One question I keep hearing is “What’s new in 2016?” Here’s the rundown.

71. Hughes Promoted at Harris Shelton -

Brett Hughes has been promoted to managing member at Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC law firm. In his new role, Hughes will provide managerial support to the firm’s three offices. His primary responsibility will be to manage the firm’s administration and committees, particularly on issues that impact client service, as well as the morale, compensation, growth and development of the firm.

72. Reaves: Memphis Should Pay Share of Schools Liability -

The Shelby County commissioner who sought a legal opinion over who pays $1.1 billion of Shelby County Schools’ benefits liability says he has more questions.

Commissioner David Reaves requested the opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery in December through state Sen. Brian Kelsey.

73. Book Looks at Sam Phillips' Career, Early Days in Alabama -

FLORENCE, Ala. (AP) — The legacy of Sam Phillips is inextricably tied to Memphis, Tennessee, and his Sun Records and studio. But Phillips' Alabama hometown holds the key to understanding the man who gave the world rock 'n' roll.

74. Former Governor, Senator Bumpers Remembered at Service -

Former U.S. Senator and Arkansas governor Dale Bumpers was remembered Sunday by former President Bill Clinton and others for his public service, his wit and his role in ending the segregation of the school in his small western Arkansas hometown.

75. Tennessee Lawmaker Facing Ouster Benefited From '2nd Chance' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When Republican members of the Tennessee House gather Tuesday to decide whether to oust embattled Rep. Jeremy Durham from his leadership post, it won't be the first time that two-term lawmaker has had to answer for questionable behavior.

76. Muller: Memphis On Strong Footing, With Bright Future -

A key Greater Memphis Chamber official is preparing to retire this week after 15 years, at a time when he thinks the city of Memphis is on strong footing, and with a bright future that abounds with potential.

77. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

78. Does Your Battery Life Stink? Try Some High-Tech Workarounds -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – It's enough to make you want to drop everything and race for the nearest power outlet: Your workday isn't even done, and your smartphone or laptop battery is already in the red zone.

79. From the High-Flying to the Practical: CES 2016 in Brief -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – This year's CES gadget show, like ones before it, showed off a mix of the dreamy and the practical in technology. Gadget prototypes promised us fully autonomous vehicles carrying commuters on the streets and in the sky, while gizmos went on sale that aimed to solve daily problems like restocking your fridge.

80. Innova’s Bouten Talks Growing Health Care Hub -

When Jan Bouten looks out his office window at 20 S. Dudley St., he can count no less than five medical institutions in his field of view.

81. Shelby Farms Playground Part of National Case Study -

The American Society of Landscape Architects has put the spotlight on Shelby Farms’ Woodland Discovery Playground.

Woodland Discovery Playground in Memphis is one of 10 case studies included in the American Society of Landscape Architects’ newly expanded online exhibition, “Designing Our Future: Sustainable Landscapes.”

82. Memphis Average Airfare Continues Drop -

The average airfare at Memphis International Airport has dropped more than $93 since 2012, according to passenger and fare data from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The average round trip fare for Memphis International in the second quarter of 2015 was $418.70, an 18 percent drop compared to $511.93 in 2012.

83. Holistic Care Finally Finding Mainstream Acceptance -

Jean Wilhoite’s private practice as a holistic nurse in Knoxville is thriving even though she rarely actively advertises her services.

Clients often reach out to her when they’re at wit’s end because of chronic stress-related conditions. They find her by word of mouth or referral.

84. New Routes to a Healthier New Year -

About a year ago, Christina Charley launched Love Yourself Fitness, a virtual at-home personal training and holistic coaching business.

Now a year later, Charley’s new business is thriving and she’s in the process of expanding it.

85. Graffiti Green Light -

Brandon Marshall is a full-time artist, making a living painting commissioned murals for clients. He’s also well-versed in the graffiti world of Memphis, a small but determined group of artists who tag properties around the city.

86. Back to Basics: Investing 101 -

Ray’s Take Learning how to invest your money is one of life’s more important lessons. You don’t need to be Warren Buffet to start investing. But you do need to have a basic understanding of investment and investment terms along with the confidence to make a plan.

87. Mediocre Grizz, McGwire Gets It, NCAA Madness -

Wednesday night, Jan. 6, Grizzlies at Oklahoma City on ESPN. It was, well, must-grimace TV.

With Mike Conley in street clothes because of a sore left Achilles, hopes were not particularly high from tip-off. But the Thunder closed the first quarter on an 11-1 run and the Grizzlies never mustered a threat, losing 112-94.

88. SEC Still Overrated? Wrap Your Head Around SEC West, Says Bielema -

That an Arkansas team played its best football at season’s end, coming into Memphis and defeating Kansas State 45-23 in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, hardly qualifies as a surprise.

But the Southeastern Conference’s eight bowl wins – the most by a conference in a season – did seem to shake up some folks.

89. The Latest in Gadgets: Even Footballs Are Getting Smarter -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The latest developments surrounding the consumer-electronics show in Las Vegas known as CES (all times PST):

12:15 p.m.

Kids tossing around a football probably hope to throw a perfect spiral in a big game one day. Technology is about to help them out.

90. How To Innovate Like A Startup -

Ann Thompson, The Garage Group; Kristi Zuhlke, Knowledge Hound; Tarrae Schroeder, Kellogg; Kristine Greiwe, LYFT; Luana Nichifor, Proctor & Gamble

 Ann Thompson began the talk about her big company background, at Proctor and Gamble. Then, switched to her life now at a startup. The garage group helps enables corporations to innovate and grow like startups. 

91. ‘Undefeated’ Courtney to Speak at Tigers Baseball Banquet -

The University of Memphis baseball program has never been shy about swinging for the fences when booking speakers for its annual Meet the Tigers Banquet. Past speakers include Hall-of-Famer George Brett, best-selling author John Grisham, and pitcher Jim Morris, who inspired the movie “The Rookie.”

92. Memphis Legislators Sound Off On State-Run School District -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

93. Incarcerated Youth Offer Solutions, Hope -

There is a growing concern about the increase of youth violence in the United States, and an equally growing commitment to advance the work of violence prevention and early intervention to prevent youth violence before it occurs. Memphis is no exception, on either issue.

94. Letting Go Of Fear -

As we enter into a new year, there’s quite a bit of talk about setting new goals. They may be related to career, family, fitness or other personal pursuits. As these goals began to be shared, it’s interesting to think about which will be achieved and which will eventually be shelved.

95. Sutherland Named HR Manager At CDS -

Renee’ Sutherland has joined Central Defense Staffing as the human resource manager. In her role, she is responsible for conducting recruitment efforts, training and development of employees, employee relations, conflict resolution and workers’ compensation. She has a team that consists of recruiters, coordinators and administrative support workers.

96. St. Jude, Methodist, Le Bonheur Prep For a Year of Expansion -

Flush with updated master plans, plentiful resources and abundant cash to spend, the arrival of 2016 finds at least three Memphis hospitals with ambitious New Year’s resolutions.

A flurry of announcements over the past month has set the stage for a veritable building and investment boom Downtown and in the medical district between Methodist University Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The activity will play out starting this year and beyond, resulting in everything from expanded campus footprints to the deployment of new cutting-edge equipment.

97. An Emotional Obama Unveils His Plan to Cut Gun Violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama, at one point wiping tears from his cheek, unveiled his plan Tuesday to tighten control and enforcement of firearms in the U.S., using his presidential powers in the absence of legal changes he implored Congress to pass.

98. Tri-State Bank HQ Sale Heightens Speculation -

The northeast corner of Main and Beale streets is more than prime real estate; it’s historic ground with a direct connection to ongoing racial and economic issues.

Tri-State Bank, the city’s 70-year old black-owned bank, and Belz Investco announced Thursday, Dec. 31, that the bank was selling its headquarters, 180 S. Main St., to Belz Investco GP in a $3 million deal.

99. Fitness Resolutions -

Exercise trends through the years have included everything from grainy VHS tapes of Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons to step and spin classes, Zumba, and CrossFit.

100. Strickland Pushes Change Theme Beyond Campaign Borders -

Change as a political force is usually defined by the length of a campaign season.

Once the votes are counted, it’s taken as a verdict on how much or how little voters wanted change in a short span of time.