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Editorial Results (free)

1. MSCAA Reorganizes, Makes Staff Promotion -

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority has promoted Angela Washington to director of properties.

2. Scandal-Hit Volkswagen Makes Profit Despite Scandal -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) – German automaker Volkswagen saw its net profit fall 19 percent in the first three months of the year – but showed it can still make money even as it grapples with a costly scandal over cars rigged to cheat on diesel emissions tests.

3. New Grizzlies Coach David Fizdale: 'I'm Here to Win' -

David Fizdale didn’t leave the Miami Heat, a place where he won two NBA championship rings as an assistant, and the surf and sand of South Beach, to take on a major rebuilding job.

“I’m here to win. That’s the best way I can put it,” Fizdale said during his introductory press conference as the new head coach of the Grizzlies on Tuesday, May 31, at FedExForum. “The goal is to win a title, no doubt about it.”

4. Greensward Protests See First Arrests -

Two protesters blocking cars from parking on the Overton Park Greensward were arrested Monday, May 30.

The arrests of Fergus Nolan and Maureen Spain are the first in protests that began in the spring of 2014.

5. Greensward Protests See First Arrests -

Two protestors blocking cars from parking on the Overton Park Greensward were arrested Monday, May 30.

The arrests of Fergus Nolan and Maureen Spain are the first in protests that began in the spring of 2014.

6. US Consumer Sentiment Up in May to Highest in Nearly a Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans turned more optimistic about the economy in May than the previous month, buoyed by steady hiring and higher incomes.

The University of Michigan said Friday that its index of consumer sentiment rose to 94.7 in May, the highest in nearly a year. That's up from 89 in April.

7. Downsize Your Expenses, Not Your Home -

Ray’s Take Millions of baby boomers are approaching, or have arrived at, retirement. Some may find themselves looking around their large homes where they raised their families and deciding they don’t need all that room anymore. The kids have grown up and moved out (maybe) and the money from a sale could really bulk up their retirement funds. It may also be time to consider a downstairs bedroom and other considerations for the next phase in life.

8. Cyclist Lucky – And Better Than Ever -

Phillip Poux smiles a lot these days. He laughs a lot and practically gushes about the Wolf River Greenway and the joy of riding his road bike in a safe and scenic environment.

He even says he wishes that he and wife Rhonda had moved to Memphis sooner.

9. Bartlett Native Wright Makes MLB Debut at Dodger Stadium -

When Daniel Wright stepped up on the pitcher’s mound at Dodger Stadium to make his major-league debut with the Cincinnati Reds the other night, a crowd of thousands was watching. And more than a dozen family members and friends from Memphis and Jonesboro, Ark., were there to root for him.

10. CEO Pay Climbs Again, Even As Their Stock Prices Don't -

NEW YORK (AP) – CEOs at the biggest companies got a 4.5 percent pay raise last year. That's almost double the typical American worker's, and a lot more than investors earned from owning their stocks – a big fat zero.

11. Reminiscing on Football Days -

It is reported that yet another memorable and popular former NFLer, this one a quarterback, suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, or simply the concussion disease. And the report comes, as has been the rule, post-mortem. That is to say, after the subject dies.

12. ASD's Raleigh Offer Makes School Board Skeptical -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools in a possible change of plans by the ASD for its takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

13. Former Church Health Center President Joins Methodist -

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare has added former Church Health Center president Antony Sheehan to its leadership team.

Sheehan, who will serve the hospital system as a senior adviser, left the faith-based Church Health Center organization in recent days over what it said was “a difference in philosophy” between him and Dr. Scott Morris, the center’s founder.

14. Last Word: Graduation Day, St. Jude's New Office Tower and Another Bike Map -

The chances are pretty good that you encountered someone in a cap and gown this weekend.

It is graduation season and Shelby County Schools kicked it off Saturday with 14 high school graduations – that’s in one day.

15. Methodist Agrees To ADA-Related Settlement -

Methodist University Hospital has agreed to shore up its procedures around communicating with patients who are deaf or who have hearing disabilities as part of a settlement of allegations it violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

16. One Family -

An unprecedented private investment aims to restore a commercial heart to the Soulsville USA neighborhood, where a pair of sprawling buildings take up nearly a full block across from the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. It isn’t an eyesore, but inactivity within those walls has been a drag on the community.

17. BRIDGES Celebrates Retirement of CFO Bob Rogalski -

The BRIDGES mission is as clear as it is bold: “To unite and inspire diverse young people to become confident and courageous leaders committed to community transformation.”

But every bridge needs support. For 11 years, Bob Rogalski has served as the nonprofit’s vice president of finance and CFO. He is retiring on June 30, the end of BRIDGES’ 2016 fiscal year. Endowment earnings for this fiscal year were $720,000 and next year’s endowment should be around $765,000, Rogalski said.

18. Poll: Two-Thirds of US Would Struggle to Cover $1,000 Crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) – Two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to an exclusive poll released Thursday, a signal that despite years of recovery from the Great Recession, Americans' financial conditions remain precarious as ever.

19. Poll: Americans More Upbeat About Own Finances Than Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are of two minds about the economy in the midst of an elec-tion race that largely hinges on the issue. They are strikingly pessimistic about the national econ-omy yet comparatively upbeat about their own financial circumstances.

20. City Sells Old Police Building to NCE Realty -

The company that had the only bid Tuesday, May 17, on the old Central Police Building at 128 Adams Avenue still has to close on the deal with the city of Memphis.

21. Last Word: Behind Brown, Selling 128 Adams and Preparing for School's Out -

It was a dark and stormy night. Well, dark but not really stormy – a little rain which is more than enough to activate all kinds of television mayhem and warnings that make your iPhone rattle and hum.

22. Target Names Nordstrom Exec As Chief Merchandising Officer -

NEW YORK (AP) – Target has poached Nordstrom for its new chief merchandising officer, a crucial position and the one who determines what appears on store shelves.

Mark Tritton was president of Nordstrom Product Group where he oversaw the merchandising, design, manufacturing, marketing and omnichannel distribution of more than 50 private-label brands across Nordstrom's full-price and off-price portfolio.

23. Methodist Agrees to ADA-Related Settlement -

Methodist University Hospital has agreed to shore up its procedures around communicating with patients who are deaf or who have hearing disabilities as part of a settlement of allegations it violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

24. Got a Minute for the Minutes? -

We recently facilitated two board meetings for two very different types of organizations. One was an institution that is over 100 years old with a multimillion-dollar budget. The other was an emerging grassroots, community-based organization. At both meetings the focus was fundraising, and board members were actively engaged.

25. Council Auctions Old Police Building -

The city holds a rare auction at the Tuesday, May 17, session of the Memphis City Council, selling the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. to the highest bidder.

26. The Week Ahead: May 16-22 -

With a barbecue-filled weekend behind us, it’s time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the Memphis in May Triathlon (where you can work off that pork belly) to the city’s first Palestine Festival (where, yes, there will be even more food).

27. Bass Learns to Focus His ‘Creative Laser Beam’ -

John Bass doesn’t look like an artist. In his crisp, checked shirt and brown wingtip oxfords, he looks more like somebody’s accountant. But stick an electric guitar in his hands, and it’s a whole different story.

28. Joerger Lands in Sacramento; Grizzlies Casting for Replacement -

Future conversation in Sacramento between new coach Dave Joerger and franchise player DeMarcus “Boogie” Cousins:

Joerger: “DeMarcus, do you get what we’re doing here, do you know what you’re doing on this play?”

29. Suck-Egg Dogs Revisited -

Several years ago – and I do mean several – my good friend Fred Harrison tipped me off to a pair of cases from the Mississippi Supreme Court. They were prominently featured in “Perry’s Dead! (And the ‘Juice’ is Loose),” 1995. Because of their lasting merit, I present them again in today’s column.

30. A Graduation Speech to Inspire -

Graduation season comes with hundreds of commencement addresses meant to encourage and inspire. If you didn’t hear one this year, allow me to share an address I gave.

“Did you ever hear something that so captivated your thoughts that it eventually defined the process of your decision-making? I did. It was a quote attributed to Rev. Martin Niemoller, a Lutheran minister, about his experiences in Germany during World War II.

31. Mortgage Market Up 31 Percent in April -

Shelby County’s mortgage market kicked off the second quarter by posting strong numbers for April, a continuation of where the mortgage market has been heading so far this year.

Last month’s total purchase mortgage volume stood at a little more than $168 million, up from April 2015’s total of a little more than $128 million, for a gain of 31 percent. That’s according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

32. GOP Fractures Ruin Reagan Day Fundraiser in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Reagan Day fundraisers have been a staple of GOP politics ever since the Great Communicator made a point of promoting the 11th Commandment – thou shalt not speak ill of a fellow Republican. But in the conservative suburbs east of Nashville, the event has become too poisonous to be held this year.

33. Mayor Opposes City Funds for Mud Island -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the city may be willing to help fund a $9 billion expansion of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that is mostly private capital.

34. Joerger and Grizzlies Both had the Itch -

If Dave Joerger and the Memphis Grizzlies had been a married couple, they would have been those unsettled spouses forever undercutting each other in dinner party conversations, rolling their eyes, and smiling fake “we really do love each other smiles” while checking out all the other guests.

35. Grizzlies Fire Dave Joerger -

The Memphis Grizzlies on Saturday fired head coach Dave Joerger after three seasons. The team made the playoffs all three years, including this past season when the Grizzlies used an NBA-record 28 players due to multiple injuries.

36. Raleigh Mall Demolition Signals Change After Delays -

The crowd of several hundred people on the south end of the Raleigh Springs Mall Saturday, May 7, was larger than the crowd inside the mall to shop.

They came to watch the beginning of the end.

37. Demolition Begins On Raleigh Springs Mall Property -

With the business end of a Volvo crawler excavator, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison kicked off the start of demolition Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall.

38. Grizzlies Fire Dave Joerger -

The Memphis Grizzlies on Saturday fired head coach Dave Joerger after three seasons. The team made the playoffs all three years, including this past season when the Grizzlies used an NBA-record 28 players due to multiple injuries.

39. Marchionne: Self-Driving Cars Could Be on Roads in 5 Years -

WINDSOR, Ontario (AP) – Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne says working with Google convinced him that self-driving technology is closer than he thought and could be on the road in five years.

40. Downtown Condo Connection Added Management Service to Survive Recession -

When Karen Barrows and her husband decided to move back to Memphis from Florida to be closer to their daughter and young granddaughter, they had their eyes set on living in the heart of the city.

They previously had lived in Arlington and knew this time around they were interested in Midtown. Their daughter connected them to Kendall Haney, a Memphis Realtor who operates Downtown Condo Connection.

41. Raleigh Mall Demolition Begins Saturday -

The city begins demolition of the Sears Auto Center Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall even though the city is still in court with the owners of the main mall building itself in eminent domain proceedings.

42. Planning Your Second Act -

Ray’s Take When surveyed, many baby boomers say they plan to do some kind of work in retirement. The reality is that we are living longer, healthier lives than our parents and grandparents. When we reach the traditional retirement age, we probably have a lot of years of living (and spending) left. What to do with those years is changing with the retirement of the boomer generation.

43. Big 12 a Nice Dream but a Remote Reality -

Wading in on Big 12 expansion, steroids in baseball and a few basketball questions ….

I applaud University of Memphis president David Rudd’s efforts to get the Tigers into the Big 12, should the league expand. In a short time, Rudd has been a strong influence on U of M athletics and he understands the bigger picture – that what is good for the athletics department will, in many cases, be good for the university and the city.

44. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

45. Survey: US Businesses Add Jobs at Slowest Pace in 3 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. companies added jobs at the slowest pace in three years in April, a private survey found, a sign that slower growth and volatile financial markets could be weighing on hiring.

46. Last Word: Budget-Mania, TNReady's Backstory and Slow Down Millenial Investors -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy moves back to City Hall Tuesday as the council talks over an ordinance that sets further in stone the council’s decision in March to give the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the greensward.

47. Elway Has Faith in Lynch, and That’s Good Enough -

Todd McShay, NFL Draft expert and college football analyst, was a backup quarterback for the mighty University of Richmond Spiders.

John Elway, general manager for the Denver Broncos, won two Super Bowls for the team, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and was the first pick of the 1983 NFL Draft.

48. Elway Has Faith in Lynch And That’s Good Enough -

Todd McShay, NFL Draft expert and college football analyst, was a backup quarterback for the mighty University of Richmond Spiders.

John Elway, general manager for the Denver Broncos, won two Super Bowls for the team, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and was the first pick of the 1983 NFL Draft.

49. Ole Miss to Investigate Tunsil's Comments on Receiving Cash -

Laremy Tunsil said enough about Mississippi at the NFL draft for the university to launch an investigation into his time at the school. Now, the former Rebel offensive lineman only wants to talk about his new team, the Miami Dolphins.

50. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

51. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

52. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School Dis-trict’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

53. Grinding Recovery -

Michael Drury is watching the current U.S. presidential season with a combination of professional detachment and an air of resignation.

Detachment, because part of his job as chief economist at Memphis-based McVean Trading & Investments is to keep abreast of what makes economies around the world tick. Part of that, of course, means at least some degree of focus on the man – or, possibly a few months from now, the woman – who sits astride the dominant global economy.

54. UPS 1st-Quarter Profit Rises 10 Percent, Beating Forecasts -

DALLAS (AP) – United Parcel Service Inc. said Thursday that first-quarter profit rose 10 percent to $1.13 billion, helped by an increase in both ground shipments and next-day air deliveries in the United States.

55. Tennessee Legislature's 2016 Session: Unbelievable -

THE STATE OF UN. In this nadir of presidential elections with everyone awash in slimy sound bites, with Congress and a Supreme Court nominee stuck in the mud, it takes truly jaw-dropping state legislative idiocy to draw the attention of the national media, make the monologues of late-night hosts and inspire “Saturday Night Live” skits.

56. Dave Joerger: The NBA’s Invisible Man -

Congratulations to Golden State’s Steve Kerr. You can’t say he wasn’t a worthy recipient for NBA Coach of the Year.

57. Roster Remix? Grizzlies May Finally Shake Things Up -

As amazing as it was that the Memphis Grizzlies set an NBA record by using 28 players this past season, it’s almost more unbelievable that they had to sign eight different players to 11 separate 10-day contracts.

58. Last Word: TNReady Termination, NFL Draft Day and What Drove The Bible Bill -

When students in public schools take tests these days, it is about more than how they are doing and whether they know what is being taught them.

The scores play a significant role in how teachers are evaluated and rated. And both play a role in their careers and how much they will be paid. They play a role in whether the state decides to take over a school or the school system they remain in decides to essentially start over with an Innovation School model.

59. Speaker Harwell's Health Care Task Force Holds First Meeting -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Members of a health care task force assigned with proposing alternatives to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's Insure Tennessee plan on Tuesday stressed their desire to include "circuit breakers" to prevent out-of-control costs.

60. FBI Says It Won't Disclose How It Accessed Locked iPhone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The FBI said Wednesday that it will not publicly disclose the method that allowed it to access a locked iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino attackers, saying it lacks enough "technical information" about the software vulnerability that was exploited.

61. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

62. Last Word: The Friendly Church on the Parkway and Paxton Lynch's Mom -

He came to Memphis in the late 1950s from Chicago as the first pastor of Monumental Baptist Church, the “friendly church on the parkway” in a city that was anything but friendly to the causes of Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles.

63. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School District’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

64. Commission Debates Full Bill for Police Body Cameras -

Most Shelby County commissioners expressing an opinion say they favor body cameras for Memphis Police.

But the opinions begin to differ significantly when comes to who pays for the back-office system to handle the recordings and how much the whole bill will be.

65. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

66. County Commission Delays Vote on Police Body Camera Positions -

Shelby County Commissioners put off a vote Monday, April 25, on funding related to police in-car and body cameras for the District Attorney General’s office.

Commissioners voted 10-1 to send the item back to committee for a discussion that will center on what the larger plan is for more than equipping Memphis Police officers with the cameras.

67. Volkswagen Appealing Ruling Allowing UAW Vote in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Volkswagen is appealing a ruling that allowed a union vote ultimately won by the United Auto Workers at the German automaker's lone U.S. assembly plant in Tennessee.

68. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

69. Editorial: Unlocking the Real Benefits of Regionalism -

It’s easy to say regionalism should be a goal – that the leadership of all of our communities should work together for the common good of the region.

And it’s been said so often that general appeals for regionalism have become meaningless.

70. One-Time Star in Solar Energy, SunEdison Seeks Protection -

NEW YORK (AP) – SunEdison, a one-time star in the alternative energy field, filed for bankruptcy protection Thursday after years of rapid-fire acquisitions left the solar company in a desperate cash situation.

71. Tickled Pink -

MEMPHIS IN BLACK AND WHITE. AND PINK. I’m glad Billy Orgel got engaged at Justine’s because that inspired his family to save it, not because they miss the crystal and crabmeat but because the place is personal.

72. Grizzlies, NBA Preparing for Start of Jersey Sponsorship Era -

Everyone understands what corporate clutter looks like. It’s the NASCAR driver’s racing suit, cap and car, where it seems every square inch has been sold off to sponsors and the athlete becomes part Ricky Bobby.

73. Study: MLB Teams Could Do Better Hiring Minorities, Women -

Major League Baseball teams could do a better job of hiring minority candidates for managing and GM posts or women for VP and other administrative positions, according to an annual report released Wednesday.

74. Rudolph: The Hidden Story -

This column is about Rudolph, the reindeer with the red nose. Or, rather, the literature via which he was created. I heard that it all started in a department store. Could this be true?

After investigation, I can report that Rudolph indeed was the 1939 brain child of a 34-year-old Montgomery Ward copywriter.

75. Dedric Lawson May Give NBA a Look -

After coach Josh Pastner left the University of Memphis for Georgia Tech and before the Tigers had hired Tubby Smith to replace him, forward Dedric Lawson announced he would not test out his NBA Draft prospects and would return to school for his sophomore season.

76. Dedric Lawson May Give NBA a Look -

After coach Josh Pastner left the University of Memphis for Georgia Tech and before the Tigers had hired Tubby Smith to replace him, forward Dedric Lawson announced he would not test out his NBA Draft prospects and would return to school for his sophomore season.

77. Finding a Compromise on the Greensward Issue -

The current debate over the Memphis Zoo’s use of the Greensward for overflow parking is more complex than most realize. Opponents of this usage try to paint a very compelling picture of the Zoo as a massive, profit-driven enterprise which came into Overton Park like an invasive species and has recklessly expanded, gobbling up park land and taking it away from the citizens.

78. Football Tigers Readying For Friday Nights Stripes -

The University of Memphis football team spring practice seasons culminates Friday, April 22, with Friday Night Stripes at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. The Tiger Lane Block Party will kick off the evening’s events, running from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

79. Sale of Former Memphis Police Headquarters Set for May -

The tours and inspections are done for now. And City Hall’s timeline for selling the circa-1910 Memphis Police headquarters at 128 Adams Ave. is a bit behind schedule.

80. AMC U-Turns; Texting in Theaters Now on 'Cutting Room Floor' -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Oops. The idea lasted about as long as a Snapchat text: the head of AMC Theatres mulled openly about creating texting-friendly movie theaters to appeal to smartphone-addicted youngsters. Two days later, after a backlash on social media, the company says it's leaving the idea on "the cutting room floor."

81. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

82. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

83. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

84. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

85. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

86. Warriors Beat Grizzlies for Record 73rd Win; Now It's the Alamo -

When the Grizzlies nearly beat the Golden State Warriors at FedExForum a few nights ago, falling 100-99, there was that feeling of letting one slip away (and yes, some people believe the officials took it away).

87. Three Decades In, Africa in April Maintains Cultural Focus -

It was 30 years ago that David and Yvonne Acey answered a dilemma from an educators’ conference about levels of learning among African-American students compared to white students.

88. NCAA Tournament Deal With CBS, Turner Extended Through 2032 -

NEW YORK (AP) – With eight years left on their deal to broadcast the NCAA Tournament, CBS and Turner are tacking on another eight.

The extension announced Tuesday goes all the way through 2032. The length of the contract is not unusual for college sports these days, though with the NCAA facing legal challenges on multiple fronts, a lot can change in 16 years.

89. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

90. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

91. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

92. Court Strikes Down Enhanced Sentencing Law for Gang Members -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Criminal Appeals Court says a Tennessee law that allows longer sentences for gang members is unconstitutional.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports (http://bit.ly/1WhkgLi) the Thursday ruling came in the case of Devonte Bonds, Thomas Bishop and Jason Sullivan. The three were convicted of attempted second-degree murder for beating Jonathan Dyer when they kicked him out of their gang.

93. 4 Fed Leaders Face Questions About Their Powerful Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Janet Yellen was put on the spot about whether she made a mistake in raising interest rates in December. Ben Bernanke was quizzed about what it felt like to be called a traitor by the governor of Texas.

94. Georgia Tech Hires Pastner From Memphis to Replace Gregory -

ATLANTA (AP) – Josh Pastner isn't promising a quick fix as Georgia Tech's basketball coach.

95. Grizz Guard Mike Conley Reportedly Out for Season -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley most likely will not return to the court this season, sources told ESPN’s Marc Stein.

96. Editorial: Memphis Police Director Search Needs Better Sense of Urgency -

Sixty-one homicides in 90 days, including a March death that was classified as a homicide by police on the other side of April.

This will likely get worse before it gets better because there is no quick fix.

97. Tigers' Josh Pastner Going to Ga. Tech Would Mean Fresh Start for All -

The sports business is the expectations business. Always. No exceptions.

Josh Pastner, while taking some heat a couple of seasons ago at the University of Memphis, said he was getting out of the expectations business.

98. Senate Refuses to Stop Airlines From Shrinking Seat Sizes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate refused Thursday to come to the aid of airline passengers squeezed by the ever-shrinking size of their seats.

An amendment by Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., would have blocked airlines from further reducing the "size, width, padding, and pitch" of seats, passengers' legroom and the width of aisles. "It costs you an arm and a leg just to have room for your arms and legs," Schumer said.

99. Fed Minutes Show Officials Wary of April Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers were split at their last meeting over how to respond to a slowing global economy, with two officials supporting a rate hike in March even as an opposing group felt that even raising rates in April would be too soon.

100. Tennessee AG: Fantasy Sports Contests Are Illegal Gambling -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's attorney general has called fantasy sports contests illegal gambling.

Attorney General Herbert Slatery wrote a formal opinion that said fantasy sports betting violates state laws against gambling because participants pay an entry fee to win a prize and a portion of that fee goes to a pot where wins are paid out.