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Editorial Results (free)

1. Spicer Abruptly Resigns as Trump Press Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House press secretary Sean Spicer abruptly resigned his position Friday, ending a rocky six-month tenure that made his news briefings defending President Donald Trump must-see TV. He said Trump's White House "could benefit from a clean slate."

2. FreezeFalling … Ole Miss Coach Exits in Disgrace -

A week before Hugh Freeze resigned his position, he stood at the podium at SEC Media Days, Ole Miss pin on his suit lapel, and delivered his last Sermon on the Mount.

3. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Could Lift Respective Neighborhoods -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

4. Venezuela Strike Erupts Into Sporadic Violence -

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A nationwide strike against plans to rewrite the constitution shut down much of Venezuelan's capital Thursday before erupting into sporadic violence when protesters clashed with riot police and burned a post office near the headquarters of the main state-run broadcaster.

5. Vols Roster Gets Little Respect from SEC Media -

It was no surprise last week when Tennessee’s football team was picked to finish third by the media in the East Division at 2017 SEC Media Days.

Almost every national publication is picking the Vols third in the East behind Georgia and Florida, although not necessarily in that order.

6. Jeremiah Martin: No Rest for The Memphis Tigers’ Weary Point Guard -

Forget the ugly recent past. Forget the final 19-13 record and surely forget those last two games of the season – the 103-62 humiliation at SMU and the 84-54 beat down from UCF at the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

7. Mock Election In ‘19 Could Test Ranked Choice Voting -

The Shelby County Election Commission could hold a public mock election of what is called Ranked Choice Voting in 2019, ahead of city of Memphis elections that year.

But the earliest the election commission could move to new machines that would provide such an option is the 2022 elections, says Shelby County Elections Administrator Linda Phillips. And that’s provided the state certifies the use of a voting system that includes the option, which it currently doesn’t.

8. Political Differences Endure After $4.11 Shelby County Tax Rate Compromise -

Shelby County commissioners were still calculating Monday, July 17, after they passed a compromised, $4.11 county property tax rate that appears will stay put long enough for the commission to take a final vote Wednesday at a special meeting.

9. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

10. ‘Fifth Wave’ of Federal Judicial Appointments Comes with Political Undercurrents -

The White House called it the “fifth wave” of federal judicial nominees. Among the 11 nominees announced by President Donald Trump Thursday, July 13, were two for the Memphis federal court bench. And the wave comes with a few political undercurrents.

11. Tennessee Comptroller's Office Website Briefly Hacked -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The website of the Tennessee comptroller's office was hacked into and a message was put up by a group claiming to be the Moroccan Islamic Union-Mail.

According to WSMV-TV , the comptroller's office said its website was defaced at 9:30 a.m. Friday for about a half-hour. The comptroller's office has temporarily pulled its website offline and nothing was compromised.

12. Tennessee Democrat Mackler Raises $451K in US Senate Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville attorney and former Army helicopter pilot James Mackler says he has raised $451,000 in his Democratic bid for the U.S. Senate.

Mackler's campaign says the total accounts for all fundraising since launching his 2018 campaign for Sen. Bob Corker's seat on April 17.

13. Toxins in Water Under Memphis Power Plant Causing Alarm -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Memphis residents are as proud of their sweet-tasting water as their barbecue and blues. The water – drawn from the Memphis Sand aquifer beneath this Tennessee city – is so revered that a city utility called it a "community treasure" in an online report on its cleanliness.

14. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

15. Audit: Memphis AD Had Conflict in Pastner Deal -

A state audit notes that Memphis athletic director Tom Bowen had a conflict of interest while renegotiating former basketball coach Josh Pastner’s contract in 2013 because they had the same agent at the time.

16. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

17. Life is Where You Live -

In our USAToday, we woke up here. We’ve all heard former Speaker Tip O’Neill’s grammatically flawed truism, “All politics is local.”

So is life, Mr. Speaker, and it deserves to be covered locally.

18. National Title is Success for Alabama, Not Other SEC Teams -

HOOVER, Ala. – They play in the same conference, but in different worlds. Alabama defines success as winning a national championship.

The rest of the Southeastern Conference?

If they’re honest, those teams now define success as how close they can come to Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide. They define success with the knowledge that there is the preeminent program in college football – winners of four national titles since 2009 and only a play away in 2016 – and then there are the other 13 teams in the SEC.

19. Visa Looking to Help Small Businesses Go Cashless -

NEW YORK (AP) – Visa is looking to push more small businesses into updating their digital payment technology, offering up to $10,000 each to 50 U.S.-based small business owners that are committed to going cashless.

20. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

21. Yellen Tells Congress to Expect More Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told Congress on Wednesday that the central bank expects to keep raising a key interest rate at a gradual pace and also plans to start trimming its massive bond holdings this year.

22. Audit: Memphis AD Had Conflict During Pastner Negotiation -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A state audit notes that Memphis athletic director Tom Bowen had a conflict of interest while renegotiating former basketball coach Josh Pastner's contract in 2013 because they had the same agent at the time.

23. Bielema Sees Progress on Targeting Rule; Open Door at Tennessee for Fulmer -

HOOVER, ALA. – Arkansas coach Bret Bielema understands as well as anyone that football and the risk of severe injury can’t be separated. Running back Rawleigh Williams gained more than 1,300 yards last year. But he suffered a second neck injury in this year’s spring game and decided, after consulting with doctors, to retire from the game.

24. Interim Leadership: Blessing or Curse? -

One of the biggest changes within the life of a nonprofit is the change in leadership. In most cases, this will be accompanied by a period of transition with an interim leader.

The position is short-term and in most cases temporary. We have seen interims who serve as placeholders or caretakers. Others are innovators. Some are turn-around leaders. Others are brought in explicitly to “clean house.”

25. Peaceful Bridge Anniversary Protests Draw Moving Police Presence -

A heavy but moving and shifting Memphis Police presence responded Sunday, July 9, to a set of peaceful protests and gatherings on the first anniversary of the protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the Mississippi River.

26. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

27. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit -

A Memphis federal judge has dropped four citizens as plaintiffs in a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters, saying the citizens don’t have standing.

28. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit, Drops Protester Plaintiffs -

A Memphis Federal Judge has dropped four citizens from a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters saying they don’t have standing.

29. Fed Debating When to Unwind $4.5 Trillion in Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is figuring out when to start unloading much of its $4.5 trillion in bond holdings – a major turning point for an economy still healing from the 2008 financial crisis.

30. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

31. Morris Recalls Brother’s Violent Death and Rage -

“Actually, the truth has never been told,” Charlie Morris said this week as he talked about the violent death of his brother 78 years ago in Arlington. Morris, now 96 years old, had family and friends gathered around him at the Memphis Branch NAACP headquarters Monday, July 3, as he marked the new state law that could reopen the investigation into the death of Jessie Lee Bond and other cold cases from the long arc of the civil rights movement.

32. When You Thought It Wasn’t Personal -

A reader recently wrote to me with a unique situation. They landed an impressive contract position. Everything was going along great for 11 months until one day, they were let go. The company laid off a large number of people all at the same time. After soliciting feedback, the reader was given a good review and sent on their way.

33. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

34. Editorial: Memphis Tourism Has Its Own Unique Ride -

Memphis is never, ever going to be a theme park built for the delight of visitors from around the world.

Memphis tourism is increasingly about exploration and personal experiences that tell someone on a journey a few things about themselves as well as this city by the river.

35. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

36. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

37. Last Word: Ransomware, Memphis Charitable Giving and The Race for Governor -

The ransomware problem got so serious Wednesday that trading in FedEx stock was stopped briefly during the afternoon. The virus was specifically aimed at TNT Express operations. Here’s a more detailed story via Bloomberg on what happened.

38. The Latest: Trump Promises 'Big Surprise' on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Republican legislation to repeal and replace the Obama health care law (all times EDT):

2:30 p.m.

President Donald Trump says the Republican health care effort is "working along very well" and suggested there could be a "big surprise coming." The White House did not elaborate on what Trump meant.

39. Mississippi Man Takes Confederate Flag Fight to High Court -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A black Mississippi citizen is taking his case against the state's Confederate-themed flag to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In papers filed Wednesday, attorneys for Carlos Moore said lower courts were wrong to reject his argument that the flag is a symbol of white supremacy that harms him and his young daughter by violating the Constitution's guarantee of equal protection to all citizens.

40. Tennessee, Left Coast a World Apart on Immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

41. 2 Vandy Players Shot in Attempt to Recover Stolen Phone -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Two Vanderbilt football players were shot in what police are calling an "ill-conceived plan" to recover a teammate's stolen cellphone.

Tae Daley, 18, suffered a noncritical gunshot wound to his leg, and Frank Coppet, 18, received noncritical birdshot wounds to his arms, Nashville police said Tuesday in a statement. Detectives were working to identify and arrest the shooters.

42. Grizzlies Grabbed Accomplished College Players in NBA Draft -

When last week’s NBA Draft tipped off, the Grizzlies were outsiders with no picks. It didn’t stay that way. General manager Chris Wallace had indicated weeks earlier the Grizzlies would approach this draft as if they had picks, adding, “You don’t know what opportunities will come your way in the 11th hour.”

43. Theresa May Details Post-Brexit Plans for EU Citizens in UK -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May tried Monday to reassure European Union citizens living in Britain that their lives and those of their family will not be disrupted when Britain leaves the EU in 2019.

44. Tennessee Weighs Commission to Examine Jim Crow Brutality -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

45. Qatar Weighs Demands to End Crisis Amid Threat of Long Siege -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — With just days to decide, Qatar on Friday weighed an onerous list of demands by its neighbors as a way out of a regional crisis, and a top Emirati official warned the tiny country to brace for a long-term economic squeeze unless it is willing to acquiesce.

46. Editorial: Keep Juvenile Court Memorandum In Place -

The changes are coming quickly from the U.S. Justice Department and some local elected leaders when it comes to change at Juvenile Court.

Two of the expert monitors who are crunching numbers, examining court records and watching the juvenile justice process in action here had just turned in their latest reports when there was a request by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham to drop what is left of the 2012 memorandum of agreement between county government and the Justice Department to remedy long-standing problems in Juvenile Court.

47. Grizzlies Swap Future Picks for Rabb, Brooks in 2nd Round -

AP – The Memphis Grizzlies just couldn't sit out the NBA draft, so they swapped a future second-round selection apiece for a pair of second-round players Thursday night.

The Grizzlies landed power forward Ivan Rabb of California with the 35th pick in a draft-night trade with the Orlando Magic, then made a deal with the Houston Rockets for the rights to shooting forward Dillon Brooks of Oregon. Memphis selected Brooks with the 45th pick.

48. Last Word: Health Care Plan React, Treasury Footprint and Tom Bowen - Take Two -

It’s like they aren’t even looking at the same legislation. That’s one explanation of the very different reviews the Senate health care bill got Thursday as it was unveiled in Washington. Illustrating the contrast, the reactions of Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis.

49. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

50. For Memphis AD Bowen, Knowledge is Also Worry -

Among the items on Tom Bowen’s desk are a miniature University of Memphis football helmet and a Tubby Smith bobblehead that, I swear, gives off a “don’t worry, be happy” vibe.

51. Chamber Names 2017 Young Memphian Winners -

The Greater Memphis Chamber has announced its official 2017 Young Memphians list, which will be featured in the summer issue of Memphis Crossroads Magazine.

Nominations for the Young Memphians award were submitted via the chamber’s website, social media outlets and email. All nominees must be under 40 and a member of the Greater Memphis Chamber.

52. Angry Dems Turn Against Leaders After House Election Losses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Party divisions were on glaring display Wednesday as a special election loss in a wildly expensive Georgia House race left bitter lawmakers turning their anger on their own leaders.

53. Man Pleads Guilty to Selling Heroin That Led to Overdose -

MEMPHIS (AP) — A Halls, Tennessee man faces 25 years in federal prison after he pleaded guilty to selling heroin that led to a person's overdose.

The U.S. Attorney's Office in Memphis says 49-year-old Marvin Foster entered a guilty plea to distributing heroin on Friday.

54. Tigers’ Jimario Rivers Has Head Start On Doing the Dirty Work -

When Josh Pastner recruited Jimario Rivers from Southwest Tennessee Community College, the University of Memphis coach envisioned him as a small forward who could play some at the four.

After Pastner left for Georgia Tech and Tubby Smith became the basketball coach, Rivers initially thought that would still be his role. He provided some spark off the bench, but then 6-11 Chad Rykhoek got hurt and Rivers was starting and basically playing the role of a 4/5 player – at 6-8 and 195 pounds.

55. Former St. Francis CEO Now Teaching at CBU -

Dave Archer has never followed a prearranged plan for his career. The former CEO of St. Francis Hospital has always taken the next step, whatever that next step is, on faith.

56. 3 Tips for A Successful Interview -

Interviewing is hard work. If you're currently looking for something new, you know that finding a job is a job. From preparing your favorite suit to revising your resume to networking and rounds of interviews – there are times it feels like it will never end. It can be tough to keep your head above water with your existing role while you're balancing your life and your job search. To ensure you're making the most out of every interview, do these three things.

57. After Warmbier's Death, US Weighs Travel Ban on North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is considering banning travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea, officials said Tuesday, as outrage grew over the death of American student Otto Warmbier and President Donald Trump declared it a "total disgrace."

58. Last Word: Centennial, Rental in Arlington and Monterey 50 Years Later -

The county leaders whose entities signed onto the 2012 memo with the Justice Department that launched concentrated change at Juvenile Court want U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to end the memorandum agreement. Word of the June 9 request came this weekend along with the disclosure in the letter that the Justice Department had dropped 17 items in the memo two months ago at the request of county leaders. The three areas left are the most debated of the problems the Justice Department found at Juvenile Court in a study and examination over several years that resulted in the scathing 2012 report and the memorandum that followed, avoiding a Justice Department move to federal court.

59. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

60. Mississippi Schools Plan Seeks to Double Proficiency Levels -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's state Board of Education wants 70 percent of all students to perform proficiently on standardized tests under a new plan to comply with federal education legislation.

61. The Week Ahead: June 19-25 -

Hello, Memphis! Summer officially arrives in our Central time zone at 11:24 p.m. on Tuesday, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac. Well, we know what summer in Memphis means – a heapin’ helpin’ of humidity. Stay cool with all these hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

62. Editorial: Memphis NAACP And The Crucible -

It’s hard to imagine a more perilous birth than the one that brought the Memphis Branch NAACP into the world a century ago.

Let’s be specific about what that world was like in 1917, because it is a horrific reality we should never forget.

63. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

64. Trump Orders More Cash, Industry Input, for Apprenticeships -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Thursday ordered more money and a bigger role for private companies in designing apprenticeship programs meant to fill some of the 6 million open jobs in the U.S.

65. Finals Run Gives Predators Look at Young Talent -

As if the Nashville Predators’ march to the Stanley Cup Final wasn’t riveting enough on its own, the journey has also provided fans with some unexpected glimpses into the team’s future.

66. Facilities, Football Fever Growing At the University of Memphis -

Somewhere, in a long-ago Division I sports galaxy far away, an athletic director could catch his breath after his college baseball team made its last out and before his football team started practice. Not so much now.

67. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

68. Tipton County DA Dunavant Nominated as US Attorney -

President Donald Trump has nominated District Attorney General Mike Dunavant of Tipton County as the new U.S. attorney for West Tennessee. And he could be close to nominating a new federal district judge for West Tennessee as well.

69. Tipton DA Dunavant Nominated As U.S. Attorney For Western District -

President Donald Trump has nominated District Attorney General Mike Dunavant of Tipton County as the new U.S. Attorney for West Tennessee.

70. Daniel Berger Makes it Back-to-Back Wins at FESJC -

When he won his first PGA Tour event here last year, young Daniel Berger celebrated. Maybe a bit too much at the cost of some sleep.

71. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

72. Redbirds’ Chad Huffman Grinding For a Return to Big Leagues -

The Memphis Redbirds had just finished a Tuesday afternoon game at AutoZone Park. Wednesday was a cherished off day at home. It was a good time for a player to exit quickly, to get the most of the down time before coming back for the next game on Thursday night.

73. Last Word: Easy Fishing on Big River, Competing City Priorities and Durham's Fine -

The Arkansas side of the Big River Crossing opened Wednesday for the first time since May 2 when a rising Mississippi River prompted its closing while the crossing proper on the north side of the Harahan Bridge remained open. There is still some of the muddy river left on the Arkansas flood plain and several dozen cranes stopping in Wednesday afternoon for some easy fishing in the shallow waters.

74. Ole Miss Disputes NCAA Lack of Institutional Control Charge -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) – The University of Mississippi disputes the NCAA's charges of lack of institutional control and failure to monitor by head coach Hugh Freeze, along with allegations of a $10,000 cash payment to a recruit.

75. Get Inside The Head of The Job Seeker -

Typically, this column is targeted toward the job seeker. Today, I’m going to take a slightly different approach. I’ve received the same question from multiple different employers in the past week: “How can I hire better candidates?” 

76. MLGW ‘Hardening’ Utilities, But Rules Out Underground -

As several hundred Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division customers entered their 10th day without power Tuesday morning, MLGW officials already are working on “hardening” the utility system and using newer technology to reset and check for outages.

77. Memphis Violinist: United Wouldn't Let Her Board With Instrument -

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) – A classical musician from Memphis has accused a United Airlines supervisor of barring her from boarding a plane with her centuries-old violin, sparking a scuffle that caused her to miss her flight and left her worried her hands – and by extension, her livelihood – may have been harmed.

78. MLGW Looks Ahead to 'Hardening' Utilities Further, Rules Out Underground -

With 600 customers still without power as of late Tuesday morning, Memphis Light Gas and Water Division officials are already working on “hardening” the utility system and using newer technology to reset and check for outages.

79. Gladney’s Career Path Leads to New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

80. Green Drops Gubernatorial Bid After Failed Trump Nomination -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican state Sen. Mark Green announced Friday that he will not resume his bid for Tennessee governor after withdrawing from consideration as President Donald Trump's pick for Army secretary.

81. Cleaning Authority Program To Benefit Food Bank -

For the second consecutive year, The Cleaning Authority of Memphis is conducting a summer donation program to help the Mid-South Food Bank.

82. Methodist Stays Busy With Wave of Construction Projects -

This year is proving to be another busy one for executives at Methodist Healthcare like Richard Kelley.

83. Frayser Recovery Efforts Before Storm Continue Afterward -

Recovery efforts in Frayser aren’t just about the weather and they didn’t just start after the Memorial Day weekend storm that did plenty of damage in neighborhoods with old, large trees.

84. After Surgery, Redbirds Lefthander Gonzales Savoring Every Pitch -

The rise was quick. So was the fall. The St. Louis Cardinals used the 19th overall pick of the 2013 MLB First-Year Player Draft on Gonzaga University lefthander Marco Gonzales. It was the first time since 1994, when the Cardinals drafted Wake Forest southpaw Bret Wagner, they had spent a first-round selection on a left-handed pitcher.

85. Gladney’s Career Path Leads Her To New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

86. Tale of a Lost Tiger: Woods Can’t Go Much Lower -

Sometimes context can be found in the most obvious of places. Right now, at pgatour.com, Tiger Woods shows up as the 876th-ranked golfer in the world.

He’s right behind Han Lee, who last played a PGA tour stop in 2007 and has amassed $5,970 in career winnings.

87. Baseball Brawl: It’s in the DNA Of Players, Part of Unwritten Rules -

Memphis Redbirds manager Stubby Clapp and his family were out to dinner the other night when the replay of the San Francisco Giants-Washington Nationals brawl flashed across the television screen.

88. OrthoMemphis Calls Its First NUsurface Implant a Success -

Dr. Tim Goldsmith, chief clinical officer at Youth Villages, had never been a guinea pig before, but now he is glad he was. Last year, Goldsmith became the first person in Tennessee to receive meniscus replacement surgery through his involvement with an ongoing clinical trial in Memphis for Active Implants’ NUsurface meniscus implant device.

89. International Medical Corps’ Portable Hospital Finds Home At FedEx -

Valued at more than $2 million, International Medical Corps’ massive field hospital has yet to save even a single life since it was constructed five years ago.

That could soon change, however, with the addition of FedEx.

90. Fed Survey Finds Tight Labor Markets, Rising Wages -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy kept growing in April through late May, with more regions citing worker shortages across a widening range of occupations, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday.

91. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

92. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

93. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

94. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

UPDATE: As of 9 a.m. Monday, May 29, 125,000 Memphis Light Gas and Water Division customers were without power. And 32 people were staying at the Red Cross shelter at the Orange Mound Community Center. City Public Works has hired more contractors to help clear downed trees and other debris from roads.

95. Mike Huckabee to Revive His Talk Show on TBN -

NEW YORK (AP) – Former Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee will start a new weekly talk show on the religious Trinity Broadcasting Network this fall.

The show will follow a format similar to the weekend show that the former Arkansas governor hosted on Fox News Channel from 2008 to 2015. TBN said on Thursday that the show will be filmed before a live audience in Nashville, Tennessee.

96. Cleaning Authority Program to Benefit Food Bank -

For the second consecutive year, The Cleaning Authority of Memphis is conducting a summer donation program to help the community.

Called The Cleaning Authority CARES, the company collections donations of food from clients and the community to give to the Mid-South Food Bank. The initiative first launched in April 2016 and the Memphis office collected 2,456 pounds of food for the food bank.

97. States Struggle With Oversight of Online Charter Schools -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – As U.S. children flock to virtual charter schools, states are struggling to catch up and develop rules to make sure the students get a real education and schools get the right funding.

98. North Mississippi Developers Gear Up to Land Large Clients -

With almost 3.5 million square feet of speculative space floating around in North Mississippi just between Crossroads Distribution Center and Gateway Global Logistics Center alone, it appears that there is no shortage of interest in the region from prospective clients.

99. Emotional Innovation -

A Front End of Innovation Conference talk by Craig Dubitsky, founder, Hello Products. Hello Products is disrupting a $30 billion daily use global category by asking the right questions and delivering delight.

100. May 26-June 1, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1956: Carl Perkins at the Overton Park Shell with a surprise visit by Elvis Presley. Just five months earlier, Sun Records had released Perkins’ biggest hit, “Blue Suede Shoes.” And Presley had left Sun late in 1955 for RCA.
On his way to New York City in March for an appearance on NBC’s nationally televised “Perry Como Show,” Perkins and his band were in a car crash in Delaware that killed the driver of other car; left Perkins’ brother Jay with critical injuries from which he would never recover; and seriously injured Perkins himself, who was unconscious for a day. Perkins and his band were back on the road less than a month later and recording a string of hits at Sun when he wasn’t booked.