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Editorial Results (free)

1. A New Benchmark -

Shelby Farms Park is gearing up for the second annual Mempho Music Festival and another chance to showcase the country’s largest urban park to a diverse and wide-reaching audience.
Memphis’ newest music festival is expecting a crowd of 20,000 on Oct. 6 and 7, which is impressive for a park two years out from a $70 million renovation embarked upon in 2010 with a distant vision for such an event.
The master plan for the park was designed not only for people to recreate and relax, but as a place to build community, and a music festival can be a big part of that, said Jen Andrews, executive director of Shelby Farms Park. Andrews has always had a larger vision for the park as a place where the community could come together and take ownership and pride in the best that Memphis has to offer.
Enter another visionary, native Memphian Diego Winegardner, founder of Mempho Fest and CEO of Big River Presents, which is putting on the festival. Winegardner grew up in Memphis and now lives outside of New York City where his day job is in finance and investment management. A couple of years ago on a trip home to Memphis he met some old friends for a bike ride at Shelby Farms Park.
“I was completely blown away,” Winegardner said. “The sun was setting on Hyde Lake, and I had this lightning-bolt moment of how special it would be to bring a world-class music festival to this site.
I thought about Memphis’ place in the annals of American music as the birthplace of blues, soul and R&B and the hip hop scene that we have here.
“If you think about the labels … Sun, Stax, Royal…I was exposed to all of that growing up, and seeing B.B. King on Beale Street was just normal,” he said. “I didn’t appreciate it until I was gone. I started to get really nostalgic about my hometown.”
Winegardner is a music enthusiast who has been to most of the notable music festivals in the U.S. and many around the world. He had the resources and connections to realize his dream. Last year, the first Mempho Fest kicked off with great success with 10,000 in attendance for two days of concerts featuring a variety of bands from different music genres.
“I’ve always been a big fan of (Memphis) and its people and a big defender of the city and its history,” Winegardner said. “This music festival was born out of my passion for music and my passion for the city of Memphis.”
When Winegardner first met with Andrews two years ago to pitch his idea, she caught his vision right away.
He approached it cautiously and wanted to understand how to protect the park and still give people a good experience, she said. “We like working with Diego,” she said. “They care about the park, and like us, have a big, bold vision, and they hired a professional team who knew how to put on a safe and fun event.”
This year’s festival will feature two days of multi-genre music headlined by Grammy Award-winning artist and hip-hop superstar Post Malone as well as Beck, Phoenix, NAS and Janelle Monae. Local talent like Lucero and alternative Mac deMarco also will perform, and there will be a special tribute to Willie Mitchell’s Royal Studios featuring the label’s past and present stars.
Sunday will feature performances by crowd favorites like George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic and Stones Throw, Chuck Laevell’s Rolling Stones’ backer band.
The festival will not only expand in attendance, but will add a larger culinary and craft beer presence in addition to on-site camping and VIP and super-VIP experiences.
“We’re trying to create more than just music on a stage,” said Winegardner, who also created a nonprofit arm called Mempho Matters that will partner with organizations that line-up with the vision of the festival, such as Oceanic Global Foundation, #BringYourSoul, Learn to Rock and the Memphis Area Women’s Council’s “Memphis Says NO MORE” campaign.
As part of Mempho’s partnership with the Oceanic Global Foundation, the festival has a 100 percent waste-free goal, which will start with its no straw policy.
“A best practice environmental policy is important to help make sure the park is as pristine when we leave as when we showed up,” said Winegardner.
The partnership promoting the Memphis Area Women’s Council’s “NO MORE” campaign is to make sure that Mempho Fest’s female attendees feel safe. Winegardner, who has a teenage daughter, knows stories about the lack of safety for females at other events, prompting him to take up the cause.
“In this day and age, you really have to take a stand and make it an institutional part of our way of doing things,” he said.
Money raised through Mempho Matters will also benefit the Memphis community through contributions to musical education in the form of free tickets for students and teachers to attend the festival as well as instruments and money for music education in local schools.
Last year, Mempho Matters gave away 2,000 tickets to students and teachers.
“We want to build bridges into the community and be as inclusive as possible,” Winegardner said. “We want to educate the children and the youth of tomorrow about the history of Memphis musically and create a sense of pride for its citizens while also attracting new people and adding another chapter to Memphis’ long, rich history.”
Andrews is optimistic about the growth of Mempho Fest this year, projecting double the attendance in its second year as well as adding 400 weekend camping permits. Those include primitive camping, RV hookups and glamping.
“The camping option is an important part of festival culture, and one of the great benefits of the park is its tremendous scale, which can accommodate that,” Andrews said.
But the plan is to grow Mempho Fest slowly, she said.
“We learned a lot the first year, and we’re applying the learning to this year’s festival,” she said. “We have a strong plan for safely managing the crowd. We want this to be a world-class festival.”
Big River Productions and Winegardner have an undisclosed agreement with Shelby Farms Park, and both entities hope to continue the relationship.
“I’m hoping that Mempho Fest will become a long-term asset for the city of Memphis,” Winegardner said.
Music remains a big driver of visitors to Memphis — 56 percent of leisure visitors come to the city for something related to music, said Kevin Kane, president and CEO of Memphis Tourism, formerly called the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau. “We’re supporters of (Mempho Fest),” he said. “We believe in it and want to see it grow. Music festivals have a big impact on the economy. The more events we have based in music the better, and we think it’s great to utilize Shelby Farms in this way.”

2. Amazon's Jeff Bezos to Start $2 billion Charitable Fund -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said Thursday that he is giving $2 billion to start a fund that will open preschools in low-income neighborhoods and give money to nonprofits that helps homeless families.

3. Elizabeth Smart Kidnapper to be Released from Prison -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A woman convicted of helping a former street preacher kidnap Elizabeth Smart as a teenager in 2002 from her Salt Lake City bedroom and hold her captive will be freed from prison in a surprise move announced Tuesday by state authorities.

4. Suburban Superintendents Mark Fifth School Year in Changing Times for Education -

When he began creating the Bartlett City Schools system five years ago, superintendent David Stephens had more middle schools than he had middle school students in the suburban city. And the high school-aged population was split between Bartlett and Bolton high schools.

5. Embrace Fully Innovations Underway in K-12 Education -

There are many changes taking place in education. As an outward sign of this change, schools are striving to make their environments more like the “real world,” which is to say like adult workplaces.

6. Next Generation Has Your Number in the NFL -

Fans often identify players by their jersey number. And likewise, many players come to identify themselves with the number on their back during their playing career.

All-time greats in a sport often have their number retired, and certain numbers seem to belong to a player many decades after his career or even his life has ended.

7. Karl Dean Pledges Bigger State Role in Memphis Economic Development -

Karl Dean, the Democratic nominee for governor, says each of the 61 days he has campaigned in Memphis, someone has complained that the city has “been cut adrift by the state of Tennessee.”

8. Democratic Nominee for Governor Pledges Bigger State Role in Memphis Economic Development -

Karl Dean, the Democratic nominee for governor, says each of the 61 days he has campaigned in Memphis, someone has complained that the city has “been cut adrift by the state of Tennessee.”

9. Water Coolers Replace School Drinking Fountains in Detroit -

DETROIT (AP) — Thousands of Detroit public schools students were told Tuesday to drink from district-supplied water coolers or bottled water on the first day of classes, after the drinking fountains were shut off because of contaminants in some water fixtures.

10. In New Orleans, A Regulation Reboot For Short-Term Rentals -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The sounds of a raucous pool party drift over a privacy fence amid brightly colored cottages that have become vacation rentals in New Orleans' Marigny neighborhood, and Allen Johnson laments the dwindling number of full-time neighbors.

11. From Penny Press To Snapchat: Parents Fret Through The Ages -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Stephen Dennis was raising his two sons in the 1980s, he never heard the phrase "screen time," nor did he worry much about the hours his kids spent with technology. When he bought an Apple II Plus computer, he considered it an investment in their future and encouraged them to use it as much as possible.

12. Around Memphis: September 3, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

13. SCS Superintendent Hopson Talks of New Map for School Locations -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson wants a more comprehensive view and plan for where schools of all types – charters, optional and conventional – are located.

Hopson’s concern is that some parts of Memphis are saturated with the various types of schools even after Shelby County Schools has closed 26 schools in the five years he has been superintendent.

14. Gov. Haslam Hears Concerns for TNReady Credibility at Collierville Forum -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam heard from a group of Memphis and Shelby County educators that the state’s TNReady test has credibility issues with parents and doesn’t provide reliable data quickly enough for teachers to make better use of it in improving student achievement.

15. Attitude, Ability Give Gabbert NFL Longevity -

Entering his eighth professional season, Blaine Gabbert has had many labels attached to his NFL career.

First-round pick. Franchise savior. Bust. Backup. Journeyman. But maybe what fits him best is survivor.

16. Vols’ Johnson Helping Young Fans Excel in Classroom -

Kids don’t usually go rushing to school on Mondays to gush about watching an offensive linemen play football on TV. That status is mainly reserved for more glorified positions like quarterback or wide receiver.

17. Code Enforcement Losing Esteemed Leader Allen Medlock to Retirement -

About 50 years of experience in making Memphis-area buildings safer walks out the door Friday, Aug. 31, when Allen Medlock retires.

18. Still Learning -

An intensive, six-week teacher training program this summer deprived Tra Taylor of sleep and tested his resolve, but his passion to bring quality education to kids is now stronger than ever. “The ideals I had now have names and faces and stories,” said the 25-year-old Teach For America corps member who started his first permanent classroom assignment three weeks ago.

19. Justice Department Accuses Harvard of 'Racial Balancing' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In its latest push to end the use of race in college admissions, the Trump administration on Thursday accused Harvard University of "engaging in outright racial balancing" and sided with Asian-American students who allege the Ivy League school discriminated against them.

20. Accounting for Music -

For veteran accountant and accomplished musician Steve Dunavant, balancing his two passions – music and accounting – is easy. For more than 20 years, he has maintained music as a side gig, playing multiple instruments around town, recording albums, and creating a music label and recording studio to help showcase Memphis musicians. During his weekdays, he crunches numbers as CBIZ senior managing director.

21. A President Who Demands Loyalty Finds It Fleeting In DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Et tu, Michael Cohen? Loyalty has long been a core value for President Donald Trump. But he's learning the hard way that in politics, it doesn't always last.

22. The Week Ahead: Aug. 27-Sept. 2 -

Good morning, Memphis! When the calendar turns to September on Saturday, it becomes all things 901 for Memphians. Saturday also marks the first professional soccer game to be held in Memphis and the season opener for the University of Memphis Tigers.

23. Entrepreneurs’ Qualities Shine -

Is an entrepreneur born, or made? It’s been a heated debate for years, with strong proponents on both sides. I thought the truth lies somewhere in the middle, until last week.

I had lunch with a group of serial entrepreneurs. Most of them started businesses that have become household names, some were on their third or fourth great business, some had more failures than successes, and all were living their own dream.

24. New Program Provides Hub Workers LiFE Opportunity -

FedEx hub workers in Memphis can get a University of Memphis degree tuition free through a new online program called Learning inspired by FedEx (LiFE).

Tuition assistance has long been a hallmark of FedEx benefits and a much-touted incentive for working in the hub, but the LiFE program takes it up a notch.

25. Innovation Requires Patience in Building a Strategy -

Failure is real and should be feared. Ironically, fear of failure is the most potent saboteur. This is a fact proven time and time again in the world of innovation.

Many expensive and time-consuming efforts to build innovation capability and capacity inside of organizations fail for a few simple reasons. Either they import a framework completely from the outside without attuning it to their practices and the culture and internal systems reject it or an anxiety to “get it right” leads to years of benchmarking, planning, and the formation of the governance of innovation without actually doing the work—and the work is simple: create net new value.

26. Ben Carson's Politics Complicate His Legacy -

BALTIMORE (AP) — The portrait used to hang in the hallway, welcoming children and parents to the Archbishop Borders School in Baltimore: A smiling Dr. Ben Carson in surgical scrubs, rubbing together the careful, steady hands that helped him become the nation's most famous black doctor.

27. ServiceMaster Lends Helping Hand with Annual We Care Day -

For ServiceMaster employee Betsy Vincent, there’s a special emotion associated with giving back to her local community. Vincent and nearly 700 other local ServiceMaster employees spent Friday assisting 22 local organizations with projects like neighborhood beautification efforts, delivering/preparing school supplies and food along with working with patients and disadvantaged children.

28. Kroger Rolls Out Driverless Cars For Grocery Deliveries -

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — At a time when big-box retailers are trying to offer the same conveniences as their online competitors, the biggest U.S. grocery chain is testing the use of driverless cars to deliver groceries in a Phoenix suburb.

29. Last Word: Suburban Elections, Charter Changes and Aretha Franklin -

Almost there for the November ballot with Thursday’s qualifying deadline for the contenders in the five sets of elections in five of the six suburban towns and cities. Three mayor’s races – all contested -- in Germantown, Lakeland and Bartlett. 11 races decided at the deadline with candidates running unopposed. Something of a surprise in one of the Millington alderman races.

30. Compass Schools Conversion Pared From 9 Jubilee Schools to 6 -

The Shelby County Schools Board will consider adding nine new charter schools to the system in 2019-2020, including six Catholic Jubilee schools slated to become Compass Community Schools.

Compass originally planned to take over nine of the Jubilee schools in the Memphis Catholic Diocese system, but has pared that back to six. The SCS board meets in special session Wednesday, Aug. 22, so it can hit a state deadline on what is a second round of charter applications.

31. Firestone Fallout -

The red letters grow fainter as the years pass in North Memphis. The Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. plant’s smokestack, once a symbol of the industrial base that defined North Memphis, has become a different kind of symbol in the 35 years since the tire plant closed.

32. Conscious Innovation a Necessity -

Readers of this column understand how the role of business itself is morphing. Technology has met customer preference and disrupted many categories. Think of Airbnb, Lyft and Uber, as well as UberEats. Look at the unimaginable growth of Apple and Amazon. Examine, too, the function of innovation as a formal discipline and the rise of Conscious Capitalism.

33. Germantown’s Ian Clark Finds His Krewe in Big Easy -

In 2017, former Belmont University star Ian Clark experienced the ultimate high for an NBA player, capturing the league championship as part of a star-studded Golden State Warriors team.

34. Aitken: Look Beyond Price Of New Collierville High School -

The day after the ribbon cutting, the toughest critics of the new Collierville High School got to look around – the high school’s seniors begin classes Monday, Aug. 13.

And the tour got rave reviews.

35. Redbirds Roster Changing Again As Cardinals Revamp Outfield -

Another week, another makeover for the Memphis Redbirds’ roster. Nothing new. After the St. Louis Cardinals used the trade deadline to restock and reconfigure the farm system creating opportunities for prospects, the Redbirds’ outfield got a fast remodel.

36. Gainwell Learning Multiple Roles on Offense As He Embarks On Tiger Career -

Memphis Tiger freshman Kenny Gainwell lined up as a running back in the middle of Sunday’s Liberty Bowl practice and took a handoff through the offensive line for a short gain.

There are no breaks on coach Mike Norvell’s field. So when Gainwell, listed as a running back, untangles himself from the arms of a defensive lineman, it’s time to reset and run another play.

37. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Aug. 8, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Pinot’s Palette, 8225 Dexter Road, suite 103. Wardell Seals will present “Heartbeat-CPR: A most entertaining introduction to learning about current CPR practices.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

38. Events -

Novel hosts mindfulness coach Greg Graber in conversation with Grizzlies play-by-play commentator Pete Pranica, discussing Graber’s book “Slow Your Roll: Mindfulness for Fast Times,” Tuesday, Aug. 7, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

39. Events -

The Whitehaven Farmers Market, hosted by Methodist South Hospital, is open Monday, Aug. 6, from noon to 5 p.m. in front of Methodist South’s Medical Office Complex, 1300 Wesley Drive. Shop locally grown fruits and vegetables, then visit the University of Tennessee Extension booth, Farmers’ Market Fresh, for children’s activities, food demonstrations, recipes and more. The market continues Mondays through Sept. 24, except for Sept. 3. For more information, call 901-516-3580.

40. Events -

Community Legal Center hosts Cocktails for a Cause Friday, Aug. 3, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 1509 Peabody Ave. No speeches, no agenda – just a good time with all proceeds benefiting CLC. Visit clcmemphis.org for details.

41. Federal Prosecutors Donate Suits To Lifeline -

Alfred Williams received his first suit last year. He received his second on the 8th floor of the Clifford Davis/Odell Horton Federal building in Downtown Memphis.

42. Orakpo, Other Defenders Buy Into New Titans Scheme -

One of the biggest beneficiaries of the Dick LeBeau era with the Titans was linebacker Brian Orakpo, who piled up 24.5 sacks in LeBeau’s system over the past three seasons.

So, the fact that Orakpo is as excited as he is over new defensive coordinator Dean Pees’ schemes is a pretty good sign for Titans fans.

43. Last Word: Back To School, Chamber Changes and The Race For Governor -

In many schools Monday, there were new faces and new places for familiar faces as well as the normal rituals of the start of another school year. And in many of those schools that was before the kids arrive next week. Why yes, teachers have back to school rituals and familiar totems they look for. The difference is they go back to school earlier and in this day and age often work through the summer in a city where there are lots of efforts to combat a summer slide – the ebb of summer eroding learning gains between school years.

44. Aug. 11 is Date for U of M Summer Commencement -

The University of Memphis will award 668 degrees, including 50 doctorates, at its summer commencement Saturday, Aug. 11, at 10 a.m. at FedExForum.

The featured speaker will be Dr. Frank Andrasik, winner of the 2018 Willard R. Sparks Eminent Faculty Award. Andrasik is distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Psychology and a member of the Institute for Intelligent Systems. He has been renowned as a clinical scientist by co-authoring 280 articles and chapters, co-editing or authoring eight texts (some translated into German, Spanish and Korean), presenting numerous invited addresses or peer-reviewed conference talks within the U.S. and abroad in 21 countries, and serving as a distinguished visiting professor at several major military medical centers.

45. Number of people ordered to flee California fires hits 15K -

REDDING, Calif. (AP) — The number of people ordered to flee from two Northern California wildfires swelled Monday to 15,000 as the flames rolled toward several small lake towns, and firefighters were hopeful that the state's largest and deadliest blaze of the year was slowing down after days of explosive growth.

46. Last Word: Early Voting's Strong Finish, School Moves and City Hall Crackdown -

Most of the major contenders for Tennessee Governor – Democratic and Republican – were in Shelby County over the weekend in which early voting ended and the campaigns now adjust their last minute efforts to the gap between early voting and election day on Thursday.

47. Glasgow Finds All the Answers in Her Second Home -

Born in Shanghai, China, Wang-Ying Glasgow always knew she wanted to come to the United States. Whether it was to advance her degrees, which she says is a must to be successful in China, or as an interpreter, it was only a matter of when.

48. Second Chance -

Four years ago Amber Pettis went to the doctor for what she believed was a stomach virus, one of those health-related speed bumps everyone hits from time to time before the smooth ride of their everyday life continues.

49. For Latest in Orderliness, Prisons Look to Computer Tablets -

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) – Allowing inmates to stare at computer tablet screens for hours each day may be just the ticket for creating calm, orderly cellblocks, prison officials say.

But tablets, growing in popularity in prisons nationwide, also can help inmates advance their education, connect with family and prepare them for life in the technology-saturated outside world, officials say.

50. Man Chooses To Live His Last Days On The Mississippi River -

NATCHEZ, Miss. (AP) – After learning he had only three months to live, Wisconsin native Kelly Phillips took a leap of faith into the Mississippi River, literally.

51. First Tennessee’s Gatti Named to Emerging Leaders Network -

First Tennessee Bank workforce management strategy manager Malerie Gatti has been selected to the BAI Emerging Leaders Network, a professional development network designed to foster the future leaders of the financial services industry.

52. In Face of 6-26 SEC Record Over Four Years, Vanderbilt's Mason Believes Team on Brink of a Breakthrough -

The question was natural, maybe even innocent. During Vanderbilt coach Derek Mason’s appearance at SEC Media Days in Atlanta last week, he was asked about going on the road to play Notre Dame early in the season, the challenge it would pose.

53. Next Generation: Business Owners Mentor Their Heirs Apparent -

NEW YORK (AP) – The plan was for Greg Goodman to sell his auto supply store and retire about the time he turned 60. Then Plan B came along – his son Chandler decided to join and eventually take over the family business instead of becoming an architect.

54. Old School, Brand New -

NEWS IS DEAD, LONG LIVE LOCAL NEWS. My grandfather, J.P. Alley, was the editorial cartoonist for The Commercial Appeal, and he won a Pulitzer in the 1920s fighting the KKK as part of the paper’s editorial team.

55. Kennedy Takes Helm As TFTA Board President -

Germantown Performing Arts Center director of development Parke B. Kennedy has been named board president for Tennesseans for the Arts. In her new role, Kennedy hopes to further efforts to actively support local arts organizations and the work of the Tennessee Arts Commission by working with legislators to maintain funding for the arts in Tennessee, supporting and promoting the work of the Arts Caucus in the General Assembly, and organizing and producing advocacy events.  

56. Take a Break from Social Media -

A lot of professionals I know relieve stress with a few minutes on Facebook after they finish a phase of a project or need a break from their tasks.

Welcome to facebook.com, where you can bliss out on cute kitten photos, catch up with an old friend, find a novel product, or play defense from aggressive people who pounce on your character to make a point. It’s weird. On one hand you get connection; on the other you get discord.

57. 7,000 People Fail to Meet Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirement -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – More than 7,000 people on Arkansas' Medicaid expansion didn't meet a requirement that they report at least 80 hours of work in June and face the threat of losing their coverage if they fail to comply sometime before the end of this year, state officials said Friday.

58. Preds Pay High Price For ‘Win-Now’ Mindset -

By the time the Predators made their first selection of the 2018 NHL Entry Draft last month, 110 prospects had been chosen by rival teams. Nashville had previously traded away its picks in the draft’s first three rounds, with two of the deals adding experienced players to the Preds’ talented core last season.

59. Redbirds’ Third Baseman Finds New Success By Staying In The Moment -

He’s not a kid anymore. And that’s not being negative, that’s just an undeniable truth when you’re a 26-year-old baseball player in your third season in Triple-A.

But Patrick Wisdom also isn’t the same player he once was. Every hitter talks about taking the game one at-bat at a time. And every player struggles to do it.

60. Player-Coach Bond May Have Saved Lives in Thai Cave Ordeal -

The day-to-day pearls of wisdom imparted by coaches to players — from youth sports, to high school, to college and even the pros — are well-known: Try your hardest, don't lose focus, support your teammates, keep your chin up.

61. Detaining Immigrant Kids is Now a Billion-Dollar Industry -

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Detaining immigrant children has morphed into a surging industry in the U.S. that now reaps $1 billion annually — a tenfold increase over the past decade, an Associated Press analysis finds.

62. Youth Academy of Dreams Opening in Frayser -

The Frayser community has a new innovative after-school program designed to help youth ages 5 to 18 reach their full potential through comprehensive programming that includes education, mentoring, discovery and sports.

63. Former Football Player Mario Reed Spreads Message of Never Losing Hope -

It took relatively little time for Mario Reed to figure out that to survive in a life without the use of his arms and legs – taken from him in a split second during a high school football game in 1997, he would have to look inward – as deep as he could go.

64. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Education in Tennessee? -

Gov. Bill Haslam and the General Assembly have invested in education during the last eight years. Has that been a good investment and should it continue? What do the candidates propose for the next four to eight years?

65. Last Word: Kyle Anderson's Apartment Search, Tate vs. Robinson and Finding Capital -

Keedran Franklin, an activist who has been a visible part of the rise in local protests and other actions over the last two years or so is free on bond pending a first court appearance Monday morning after being arrested by Memphis Police on a variety of misdemeanor and felony charges Friday night.

66. Which E-Commerce Platform Is Right For You? -

Market research hub eMarketer estimates e-commerce sales will represent 10 percent of total retail sales in the U.S. this year. That equates to a whopping $526 billion.

Opening an e-commerce site can be a lucrative undertaking. Many entrepreneurs dream of e-shop empires as automated business models that don’t come with the headaches of a traditional brick-and-mortar establishment, but a lot more goes into building an e-commerce business than you might think.

67. Pitmaster Pride -

Rendezvous founder Charlie Vergos is among three new members being inducted into the Barbecue Hall of Fame. The American Royal Association announced the 2018 class of inductees in May. The induction ceremony will take place on Sept. 13, during the American Royal World Series of Barbecue in Kansas City, Missouri.

68. I Never Said That! High-tech Deception of 'Deepfake' Videos -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hey, did my congressman really say that? Is that really President Donald Trump on that video, or am I being duped?

New technology on the internet lets anyone make videos of real people appearing to say things they've never said. Republicans and Democrats predict this high-tech way of putting words in someone's mouth will become the latest weapon in disinformation wars against the United States and other Western democracies.

69. In Grizzlies Mini-Camp, Players Vying for Spots on NBA Summer League Roster -

One week after the Memphis Grizzlies used the No. 4 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft on Michigan State freshman Jaren Jackson Jr., he was on the practice court at FedExForum with 16 other members of the team’s Summer League Mini-Camp roster.

70. Catholic Charities Teams With Catholic Heart Work Camp -

Catholic Charities of West Tennessee will serve as a volunteer site for the youth and leaders from Catholic Heart Work Camp this week. Students will be painting a clothes closet and beautifying the front of the Fig Tree Food Pantry by planting flowers. The clothes closet and food pantry are part of the Fig Tree Emergency Services program, which served more than 26,000 people in the most recent fiscal year.

71. 5 Tips for Recruiting Gen Z Sales Talent -

Savvy sales managers are looking to reach, hire and retain the next wave of sales professionals, and they have found their answer in Gen Z. Born between 1996 and 2010 (ages 22 and under), Gen Z will comprise the largest generation ever to enter our workforce. They’re often called the igen because they’re digital natives – a generation reared on technology. They’re adept at learning in front of mobile screens, tablets or laptops.

72. Last Word: Rebranding and Self Identity, The Many Legs of CTE and Draft Recap -

What’s in a name? Plenty when it comes to tourism. The Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau is now Memphis Tourism – a name change that has been in the making for a while before last week’s unveiling at the CVB’s annual meeting where it flipped the switch on the new identity. There are a couple of key ingredients in the change – soul and home – according to Memphis Tourism president Kevin Kane.

73. Online sellers consider how to comply with sales tax ruling -

NEW YORK (AP) — While a Supreme Court ruling on sales taxes will create more obligations and expenses for many small online retailers, owners are already thinking about how they'll comply.

74. Looney Ricks Kiss: Memphis-Grown Urbanism Spurs World-Class Design -

Crosstown Concourse, a gem of mixed-use urbanism and historic redevelopment, has recently been honored with a spate of awards for its design and innovation. These include the grand prize at the Congress for the New Urbanism’s Charter Awards, and the 2018 TN Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Award. Additionally, Crosstown received the 2018 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification, the highest level of LEED certification available.

75. Where the Jobs Are -

Out of more than 15,000 Shelby County Schools students who took some kind of career and technical education, or CTE, courses in the 2015-2016 academic year, only 1 percent – roughly 150 – completed those classes to get some kind of work certification.

76. Financial Literacy and Adults -

Ray’s Take: Can you explain what risk diversification is? Can you identify the effects of inflation? Do you know how to calculate interest? If you answered yes to these three questions, you are better off than 43 percent of Americans and a whopping two-thirds of the world’s population, according to Maggie McGrath in an article written for Forbes Magazine about the results from the first-ever S&P Global FinLit Survey.

77. Next Inning for Jason Motte? Teaching Players at U of M -

With former St. Louis Cardinals closer Jason Motte joining the University of Memphis baseball program as director of player development, a review is in order.

If you’re a student of Cardinals World Series history, you probably remember the highlights of their victory over the Texas Rangers in 2011. Down three games to two in Game 6 at Busch Stadium, David Freese provided the heroics with a two-out, two-run triple in the bottom of the ninth inning to tie the score at 7-7 and rescue the Cardinals.

78. 5 Questions to Ponder Before Titans’ Camp -

In a little more than a month, the Titans will take the field for their first training camp under head coach Mike Vrabel.

There’s an air of anticipation surrounding the team as it comes off back-to-back winning records for the first time since 2007-08.

79. Month-old Bike-Share Program Exceeding Expectations in Memphis -

And we’re rollin’! The new bicycle-sharing system introduced a month ago is exceeding expectations and fueling hopes that Memphis is on a revolutionary pathway to improve health and community connectivity.

80. Verizon, AT&T to End Location Data Sales to Brokers -

Verizon and AT&T have pledged to stop providing information on phone owners' locations to data brokers, stepping back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy.

The data has apparently allowed outside companies to pinpoint the location of wireless devices without their owners' knowledge or consent. Verizon said that about 75 companies have been obtaining its customer data from two little-known California-based brokers that Verizon supplies directly – LocationSmart and Zumigo

81. Alexa, Sell My Brand … -

“Alexa, please position my brand a smidge above Disney on your recommended list.”

Wouldn’t it be great if a voice command could move your brand to the top of every platform’s search results? Unfortunately, even in this new age of consumer-trusted voice-assistants and artificial intelligence (AI) platforms, marketing isn’t that easy. In fact, technology is forcing marketers to up their game exponentially.

82. Avoiding Early Career Pitfalls -

The summer is an exciting time for young job seekers. A new group of graduates has just been minted and are searching for their first full-time job. But, there are many pitfalls you may encounter along the way. Here are a few suggestions to help you in your search.

83. Duffy-Geiger Named CFO At Monogram Foods -

Cheryl Duffy-Geiger has joined Monogram Foods as chief financial officer. In this role, Duffy-Geiger will be responsible for developing strategic business plans, partnering with operations and supply chain, building relationships with banking partners and overseeing accounting, among other duties. She joins Monogram from Kellogg Co., where she was chief financial officer for its largest global business unit, U.S. domestic snacks.

84. Madonna Learning Center Gets IT Makeover -

Madonna Learning Center will get a $30,000 makeover of its office technology with a grant from Unistar-Sparco Computers Inc.

85. Vanderbilt’s Late Turnaround Sets Stage for Next Year -

The history of Vanderbilt baseball since coach Tim Corbin took over in 2003 is tremendous.

In 16 seasons, the Commodores have produced nearly 700 victories, advanced to eight NCAA super regionals and played in three College World Series – winning one.

86. Summer Camp Fun Comes With Lots of Literacy Planning -

The lunchroom tables at Bartlett Elementary School are stacked in the hallway, and from the outside it looks like the school is awaiting students’ return in August.

But inside, a small group of first- through third-graders are dancing, pasting strips of colored paper on plastic bottles, and most importantly, reading and writing.

87. Schowen Named Manager Of Baptist Ambulance -

Greg Schowen has been named general manager of Baptist Ambulance, a member of the Priority Ambulance family of companies that currently serves 10 Baptist Memorial Health Care facilities with interfacility transport, as well as six communities with 911 response. Schowen brings 25 years of experience overseeing operations for emergency medical service providers in high-performance 911 service areas, including Los Angeles County, California, and Las Vegas, Nevada.

88. The Week Ahead: June 11-17 -

Good morning, Memphis! Father’s Day is this weekend – and no matter whether yours is a rocker, a runner or a reader, there’s something to do with dear ol’ dad. Plus, check out where to see Gov. Bill Haslam, former VP Joe Biden and the “winningest woman in racing” in The Week Ahead.

89. Snapshot: Getting Robotic Puppies on the Mend -

Second-grade students work on dissecting small dog robots during Camp Invention at Grahamwood Elementary. Through Camp Invention's Robotic Pet Vet module, campers nurse their robotic puppy back to health, and design and build dog parks as they hammer out ideas for the best park attraction. Camp Invention, a nationally recognized, nonprofit summer enrichment camp program, integrates the STEM learning model into the educational camp.

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90. Bartlett High Joins Wave of School Construction -

Though summer break has started, some of the school-year buzz remained on the campus of Bartlett High School this week as a group of adults gathered with ceremonial shovels for a groundbreaking.

Student-athletes came and went from other parts of the sprawling 26-acre campus that has been home to Bartlett’s only high school for more than a century.

91. U of M Professors Awarded $1.9 Million NIH Grant -

Two University of Memphis professors have received a $1.9 million grant for a collaborative brain imaging and big data project. The grant was awarded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health.

92. Pinnacle Bank Maps More Growth, Additional Hires in Memphis Market -

With new bank branches and loan production offices planned locally, new hires and increased production numbers, Nashville-based Pinnacle Financial Partners is making an impact on the Memphis banking market following its acquisition of Magna Bank in 2015.

93. New 529 Plans Buy Education Options -

Ray’s Take: Did you know that back in 1870 you could attend Harvard for a mere $150 per year, and for half that amount, you could attend Brown University? According to Best Colleges, college costs began to rise in the 1970s at a rate much higher than inflation, and this hasn’t slowed down.

94. Mariota Still The Key To Titans’ Success -

Say what you will about the Titans’ new head coach, the team’s pricey free-agent acquisitions and its talented draft picks during the offseason.

The ability of this year’s team to improve upon 2017 is still likely to be based largely on quarterback Marcus Mariota’s ability to change and adapt, more so this season than ever before in his career.

95. Virtually Famous -

Grizz Gaming’s Mehyar Ahmed-Hassan (AuthenticAfrican) gets the ball beyond the arc, dribbles, hesitates, and then accelerates around the defender and drives all the way to the rim for a one-handed dunk. It appears effortless and the longer you watch the avatar that is AuthenticAfrican on the NBA 2K court, the clearer the conclusion becomes:

96. Evidence to Action -

She remembers the government cheese – “It was delicious” – but she would like to forget the taste of those dried eggs. “I absolutely hated those eggs,” said Dr. Renee Wilson-Simmons, new executive director of the ACE Awareness Foundation in Memphis. “To this day, I don’t like eggs. I still have that can. It’s a reminder of where I came from.”

97. Paraham Joins DCA As PR, Social Media Coordinator -

Wesley Paraham has joined Memphis-based creative communications consulting firm as PR and social media coordinator. In this role, Paraham supports DCA’s public relations and social media strategies for clients including Explore Bike Share, Memphis Greenspace, Memphis Public Libraries and Big River Crossing, with a special emphasis on research and content development.

98. Chiozza, Players With Local Connection Workout for Grizzlies -

There was a time four years ago when Chris Chiozza’s dream was to stay home and play his college ball at FedExForum.

99. Bitcoin Fans Rave, But Understand It’s Still a Risky Business -

By now, anyone who follows Wall Street even slightly has heard of cryptocurrency and its most famous spawn – bitcoin, which launched in 2009 but grabbed headlines last year for its wild swings in valuation.

100. Schrock Building Game Around His Calling Card of Hitting -

Max Schrock can look at his current manager Stubby Clapp eye-to-eye – something he’s uniquely qualified to do – and see what he needs to do to take that last step up the baseball food chain.