» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Kids' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:12
Shelby Public Records:194
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:33
Middle Tennessee:156
East Tennessee:88
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Tigers Model Their Resolve in 70-65 Victory Over UCF -

The game started with the Tigers’ opponent hitting two contested 3-pointers, the Tigers taking and missing a couple of ill-advised jump shots, and UCF running out on two fastbreaks.

Just like that, only two minutes and two seconds into the proceedings, the University of Memphis was losing 10-0. It happened so fast the crowd at FedExForum didn’t even have time for much of a reaction.

2. Youth Sports Boost Players’ Skills, Benefit Memphis’ Bottom Line -

The baseball fields in January are relatively quiet, at least compared to March. That’s when 60 to 65 teams begin to make their way every weekend to the Gameday Baseball complex in Cordova, where tournaments are in high gear from March through October.

3. The Great Outdoors Still a Popular Destination for Mid-Southerners -

While pro and college sports dominate local media coverage, the Mid-South remains a hotbed for outdoors activities such as hunting and fishing.

Last year, Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid welcomed large numbers of guests for its various events and on-site offerings, while organizations such as Ducks Unlimited and the Tennessee Wildlife Federation continue working to protect and promote local wildlife habitats for future outdoor recreational use.

4. Sports Bind City -

Maybe it is your spouse’s Christmas party. Or a local business conference and no one else from your company is attending. When you give the room the once-over, it’s full of unfamiliar faces.

5. Markel Crawford Finally Arrives In His Redshirt Junior Year -

It’s a distinguished list of alumni that have gone from Melrose High School to play basketball at the University of Memphis: William Bedford, Larry Finch, Ronnie Robinson and Adonis Thomas. And yes, Markel Crawford planned to uphold that legacy.

6. Tradition, Not Politics, Puts Tennessee Band in Trump Parade -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The University of Tennessee marching band will perform Friday in its 15th presidential inaugural parade since 1953, despite a social media backlash over statements made by President-elect Donald Trump.

7. Spring Break Ideas From Memphis -

Spring break is right around the corner and if you’re still thinking of ideas for the family – even ones that have you joining the crowds – I have some thoughts.

Beaches. This is the obvious choice, but also a good one. We Southerners are guilty of spending much of our vacation time at the Gulf Coast beaches of Florida and Alabama. 

8. Youth Villages' New Marketing Officer Aims to Raise Nonprofit’s Identity -

For 15 years, Jennifer H. Jones was with Hilton Worldwide. Her task as senior director of brand marketing: build up the profiles of Conrad Hotels & Resorts and Waldorf Astoria Hotels.

Not long after Jones joined nonprofit Youth Villages last September as chief marketing officer, she was on a business trip. Her new boss, Youth Villages CEO Pat Lawler, wanted to know how she was doing – given that she was staying at the Hampton Inn and not the Waldorf.

9. Takata Agrees to Guilty Plea, Will Pay $1B for Hiding Defect -

DETROIT (AP) – Takata Corp. has agreed to plead guilty to a single criminal charge and will pay $1 billion in fines and restitution for a years-long scheme to conceal a deadly defect in its automotive air bag inflators.

10. Land Use Board Makes Decision on Trio of Controversial Cases -

The Shelby County Land Use Control Board met neighborhood opposition head-on Jan. 12, approving one controversial project and voting down two others.

Of the 18 cases approved on its consent agenda, the most pertinent project was the proposed Ice House entertainment center at 2166 Central Ave.

11. The Week Ahead: January 17-23 -

Good morning, Memphis! This is a good week to be inspired, as we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his courage to motivate and inspire change. Plus, UrbanArt Commission celebrates its 20th anniversary and the Brooks Museum of Art unveils an exhibition sure to make you hoppy – err, happy. Here’s what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

12. Saving More – Can It Be Done? -

Ray’s Take When you’re busy focusing on living your life, it’s easy to fall into spending habits that aren’t exactly consistent with your long-term goals. Marketing departments hire some very smart people who can get you to buy things that you didn’t even know you wanted!

13. Ossei-Anto Lifts Up Memphis Kids -

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, Theo Ossei-Anto knew he wanted to make a difference in education – but he says coming to Memphis was an unexpected adventure.

“It’s an amazing place,” he reflects. “I have learned so much about teaching here. I love my kids and have become very committed to them.”

14. The Bard’s Barbs -

THE ENGLISH MAJOR RETORT. So here we are between the election – you remember the election – and the inauguration – you know, the upcoming event that even some of the Rockettes can’t raise a leg over – and we’re already exhausted.

15. Frayser Charter Seeks to Take Over Humes Prep Academy -

Bobby White admits Humes Preparatory Academy is a “challenging situation.”

“But it’s a situation that is manageable,” he told a group of 40 people in the auditorium of the North Memphis school Wednesday, Jan. 11.

16. NAACP Panel Hears Differing Local Views On Charter Schools -

It took awhile for an NAACP panel holding hearings on charter schools and their impact on education to wade into the complexity of charters in Memphis.

The panel for the national civil rights organization heard Tuesday, Jan. 10, that charters have become an effort to privatize schools the way prisons were privatized in the 1990s. They also heard that charters don’t “cherry-pick” the best students but help equalize access to a better education. And the seven members of the panel heard that charters have a place, but that there should be more thought given to where they fit long term, and their financial impact on public school districts.

17. Literacy Mid-South Building Network to Raise Reading Levels -

As a child, Knox Shelton witnessed first-hand the struggle to break a generational cycle of marginal literacy. He grew up in Jonesville, Virginia, a small Appalachian coal mining town.

“I mostly remembered the good times of being a kid,” said Shelton, who recently was promoted to the role of executive director at Literacy Mid-South. “But little memories come back that are very dark and scary, just to think of situations kids were in. I’m gonna make it sound like an awful town, but there were kids pulled out of school in first grade to work with their families.

18. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

19. Klondike Parents Review Options in Closing -

Most students at Klondike Preparatory Academy in North Memphis will be able to attend Vollentine Elementary next school year with transportation provided by Shelby County Schools.

That’s what leaders of the state-run Achievement School District told 70 parents, students, teachers and community members Monday, Jan. 9, at a meeting about the closing of Klondike.

20. Klondike Parents Explore Vollentine Transfers, Other Options -

Most students at Klondike Preparatory Academy in North Memphis will be able to attend Vollentine Elementary School next school year with transportation provided by Shelby County Schools.

That’s what leaders of the state-run Achievement School District told a group of 70 parents, students, teachers and community members Monday, Jan. 9, at a meeting about the closing of Klondike as an ASD school at the end of the current school year.

21. Parents, Save Up: Cost of Raising a Child is More Than $233K -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Expecting a baby? Congratulations! Better put plenty of money in your savings account.

The Department of Agriculture says the estimated cost of raising a child from birth through age 17 is $233,610, or as much as almost $14,000 annually. That's the average for a middle-income couple with two children. It's a bit more expensive in urban parts of the country, and less so in rural areas.

22. FedEx Ups Memphis Open Partnership for St. Jude -

FedEx Corp. has expanded its commitment to the GF Sports family of events, increasing sponsorship for the Memphis Open presented by ServiceMaster with the “Advantage St. Jude delivered by FedEx” ball kid program.

23. FedEx Ups Partnership With Memphis Open for St. Jude -

FedEx Corp. has expanded its commitment to the GF Sports family of events, increasing sponsorship for the Memphis Open presented by ServiceMaster with the “Advantage St. Jude delivered by FedEx” ball kid program.

24. Clemson Gives ‘Tackle Football’ Broader Meaning -

All that is lacking is corporate sponsorship. The Under Armour Groin Grab, perhaps. Or maybe the Jockey Junk Pull.

Yes, my dignity took a tumble just typing those words.

But the lead-up to the college football national championship game between Alabama and Clemson has been reduced to TV-MA, for mature audiences only, in the wake of the extracurricular activities in the Clemson-Ohio State semifinal and subsequent comments from players.

25. Crosstown Concourse Sees First Residents -

Less than a week into 2017 and something is going on that hasn’t happened in nearly a quarter of a century. “We had our first apartment residents move in,” Crosstown Concourse co-founder Todd Richardson said. “After 24 years of being empty, we’ve got our first occupants.”

26. Comedian Michael Jr. Bringing Clean Humor to Memphis Church -

Comedian Michael Jr. is talking about a trip to the mall and seeing a guy wearing a T-shirt that reads: “If you don’t speak English, leave the country.”

Pause … “It was written in English,” Michael Jr. says on stage, and the laughs start to tumble like dominoes. “So I went up to him and said, ‘You’re dumb.’ But I said it in Spanish.”

27. Crosstown High Hires Terrill As Executive Director -

Crosstown High School is still forming. But the school to open for classes at Crosstown Concourse in August 2018 has an executive director.

The board of Crosstown High announced Monday, Jan. 2, that it has named Chris Terrill, an educator from Mooresville, North Carolina, as the school’s first executive director.

28. How to Spend More Mindfully in the New Year -

Mindfulness and meditation can ease chronic pain, anxiety and depression. Now some money experts say awareness tools such as these can help you avoid impulse purchases and create a spending plan that reflects your values.

29. Lawmakers Address Prosecutors, ASD -

The majority and minority leaders of the Tennessee Senate say there is political pressure to break the link in funding for prosecutors and public defenders.

“I think it takes both efforts,” state Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said on ‘Behind The Headlines,’ the WKNO/Channel 10 program. “I think we need more prosecutors. I think we also need more public defenders.”

30. New Technology Gives Everyone a Personal Assistant -

If you’re a small-business owner or running a startup, you might dream of having a personal assistant to help you manage your calendar or do inventory of the office supply closet. Luckily, Amazon and Google have developed technology that offers many of the benefits of an assistant for a fraction of the cost.

31. Change Defines Education Landscape in 2016 -

By the time Rhodes College trustees made their choice in December of Marjorie Hass as the college’s new president, higher education in Memphis had been through quite a few changes.

Hass succeeds William Troutt, president of Rhodes for the last 18 years.

32. Driver in Fatal Chattanooga Bus Crash Given Extra Training -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – The driver in a school bus crash that killed six Chattanooga children had been given additional training after previous traffic accidents in the months before the fatal wreck.

33. Memphis Residential Real Estate Market Remains Healthy in 2016 -

A strong year in the Memphis-area residential real estate market has the potential to carry over into 2017 and even beyond.

Low inventory and the talk of potential interest rate increases are some of the main factors contributing to a competitive market.

34. Our Nostalgia is a College Running Back’s Unnecessary Risk -

There is never enough money and there are always too many games. We all recognize this truth, right? The NBA’s 82-game schedule remains an owner’s revenue-generating necessity while simultaneously the reason to rest star players in hopes of avoiding injuries.

35. Lawsons Equip Educators with Tools for Success -

Kenda and Dominic Lawson were enemies before they were friends. Today they’re married and they run a company together. “We’re not about telling people what to do,” Kenda observes. “Our job is to find opportunities for children and empower teachers to create their own content.”

36. Chairman's Circle Moon Missions Are Taking Flight -

Although the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle and its Moon Missions are designed to bring change on a long-term scale, some of the missions are already having a tangible effect on the community.

37. Empty Seats -

Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves can still see it clearly: “Take the whole map of the county and lay a grid on it. Then I’d like you to say, ‘Where’s the population? Where’s the projection?’ And then let’s strategically place schools all over the county based upon that and make them all of equal offerings.”

38. Tuning Up Your Finances for 2017 -

As a longtime financial professional, I can vouch for the power of the looming New Year – more people begin showing interest in getting their finances in order during this time than any other. I’ve always found that the best way to ensure a great financial future is by mapping out your goals and avoiding common financial pitfalls. I’ll outline some of my most tried and true tips here.

39. Mansberg Teaches Young Women To Give Back -

In a city full of dreamers, Leigh Mansberg works on the front lines. “My goal is to raise a generation of smart, empowered women who can take on any challenge,” she observes. “It’s been an amazing journey.”

40. Liberty Bowl Coaches: Today’s Offenses Go Ever-Faster, Tackling is a Skill in Demand -

Gary Patterson was still relatively new to this head coaching business when in 2002 he brought TCU to Memphis for the Liberty Bowl. His team defeated Colorado State 17-3 and the memories are good.

41. Faison’s Folly? Pushing Pot as a Conservative -

By just about any measure, state Rep. Jeremy Faison is a hardcore conservative. But when it comes to the cannabis plant, the East Tennessee legislator is ready to fire up the General Assembly with a move to liberalize the state’s pot law.

42. Snowball Express Benefits Local Families Who Lost Military Parent -

Seven local families are in Dallas/Fort Worth this week for the 11th annual Snowball Express Weekend, an all-expense-paid holiday gala for children of fallen military heroes.

They are among approximately 1,800 children and spouses of fallen military participating in the event that runs Dec. 11-15.

43. Trump Picks Fast Food Executive Andrew Puzder for Labor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump plans to add another wealthy business person and elite donor to his Cabinet, saying he would nominate fast-food executive Andrew Puzder as labor secretary.

44. Marion Near Downtown Memphis But Retains Its Small-Town Identity -

The location is the selling point. It comes with a small-town way of life and easy access to Downtown Memphis.

Yet it also comes with the challenge of being a well-kept secret off the interstate. No doubt, you’ve seen the road signs for Marion, Arkansas. But have you stopped there? Have you considered living there or operating a business there?

45. Giving is a Gift -

ORDINARILY EXTRAORDINARY. If you ask one, what makes Memphians special is nothing special.

We do hard well. We work hard, play hard. We come by what we have by the hardest – and here’s the thing – we share ours with people who have it harder.

46. Surgeon General Sounding Alarm on Teens' Use of E-Cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. surgeon general is calling e-cigarettes an emerging public health threat to the nation's youth.

In a report released Thursday, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy acknowledged a need for more research into the health effects of "vaping," but said e-cigarettes aren't harmless and too many teens are using them.

47. Bibbs Empowers Teachers for Student Success -

Miska Clay Bibbs never planned to pursue a career in education. But no matter where life takes her, she always ends up coming back to it.

48. LeBron as a Cub, Grizz Sign Toney Douglas, And Matt Barnes is in Trouble Again -

LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers made a fantastic comeback to beat the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals last summer. But when the Cleveland Indians couldn’t hold off the Chicago Cubs in the World Series, it cost James dearly.

49. Bartlett Soap Co. Rebrands As Buff City Soap -

The Bartlett Soap Co. has rebranded as Buff City Soap – a new name that acknowledges its growth into new markets while still paying homage to its local roots.

50. Events -

Memphis 3.0 kickoff rallies continue through Saturday, Dec. 10, at locations around Memphis. The rallies will include a short overview of the Memphis 3.0 planning process followed by an opportunity for citizens to provide input on the future of their neighborhoods. Upcoming rallies include (start time is 5:30 unless otherwise noted): Dec. 5 at Raleigh Community Center; Dec. 6 at East High School; Dec. 7 in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds; Dec. 8 at McFarland Community Center; Dec. 9 at Bert Ferguson Community Center; Dec. 10 (10 a.m.) at the Cossitt Library; and Dec. 10 (2 p.m.) at the McWherter Senior Center. Visit memphis3point0.com for details.

51. Events -

Snowy Nights in My Big Backyard will be held Friday and Saturday, Dec. 2-3 (along with Dec. 9-10 and Dec. 16-23) from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road. Bring the family to play in the “snow,” sip hot cocoa or spiced tea, create a winter craft, and enjoy music, lights and more throughout My Big Backyard. Tickets are $8 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

52. Bartlett Soap Co. Rebrands As Buff City Soap -

The Bartlett Soap Co. has rebranded as Buff City Soap – a new name that acknowledges its growth into new markets while still paying homage to its local roots.

53. Events -

The St. Jude Memphis Marathon Weekend kicks off with the Health & Fitness Expo on Thursday, Dec. 1, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday, Dec. 2, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Open to the public, the expo will feature nearly 100 exhibitors with the latest in all racing needs. Race day on Saturday, Dec. 3, will feature five races: the 5K and 10K starting at 7 a.m., the half-marathon and marathon at 8:30 a.m., and the kids marathon at 1:30 p.m. Visit stjudemarathon.org for details.

54. Saving Money On 2017 Travel -

I can’t in good conscience encourage anyone to spend money. Do we really need a Cyber Monday to go online and shop more? And it’s not like you’re saving money; yes, that TV might be $50 less than it was the previous day, but you’re still spending money.

55. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Nov. 30, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the University of Phoenix’s Memphis campus, 65 Germantown Court, first floor. Blight Authority of Memphis executive director Sheila Jordan Cunningham and Neighborhood Preservation Inc. president Steve Barlow will present “Fighting Blight in Memphis.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz or call Jo Garner at 901-482-0354.

56. U of M Children’s Defense Clinic Assisting Local Youth with Legal Woes -

Students at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law are making a significant impact in the courtroom this semester working to assist the city’s youth.

The newly formed U of M Children’s Defense Clinic gives student attorneys the opportunity to provide legal representation to youth facing criminal charges in delinquency proceedings in the Shelby County Juvenile Court.

57. Distracted To Death -

When the Tennessee Highway Patrol began using a tractor-trailer on the interstate to catch people texting while driving, the troopers knew their view from above would help their cause. From that higher vantage point, they could see drivers holding their phones in their laps and typing.

58. Thanksgiving. For Real. -

NORMAN’S NORMAL. You’ve probably seen “Freedom From Want,” Norman Rockwell’s iconic Thanksgiving painting.

You know, Grandmother with the turkey so lovingly prepared. Grandfather preparing to lovingly carve it and serve it to the loving bunch assembled. Aunts, uncles, in-laws, kids and siblings, all smiling, all whiter than the white meat in that turkey, the view of the outside world obscured by white curtains.

59. Griffin Helps Memphis Students Beat the Odds -

Closing the educational achievement gap is one of the hardest and most important challenges Memphians face. For Dr. Sharon Griffin, it starts with creating a supportive environment that allows teachers to innovate and experiment with different strategies.

60. School Bus Driver Charged in Deadly Chattanooga Crash -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – A school bus driver who authorities say was speeding along a narrow, winding road when he wrapped his vehicle around a tree was arrested and charged with vehicular homicide in the deaths of five children.

61. 'We are Seeing a War for Talent’ -

Despite a daily influx of new Middle Tennessee residents, companies looking to hire workers for the upcoming holiday season may have a tougher time than usual filling those spots.

That’s because Davidson County’s unemployment rate was 3.8 percent in August, according to the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development, the lowest urban figure in the state and well below the state’s 4.4 percent rate.

62. Transcript: CBU to Transform Campus, Transition to Project-Based Learning -

Christian Brothers University is not only changing the look of its campus at Central Avenue and East Parkway. Leaders of the institution are embarking on the second phase of a $70 million capital campaign that includes plans to “blow up” the university’s department of education to include Crosstown High School and the neighboring Middle College High School, extend internships to all students and to create a new library that is more than “air conditioning for books.”

63. Hobson Helps Memphis Kids Get Healthy -

At parties, people ask Thomas Hobson what he does for a living. When he tells them, he usually gets a response he describes as “thanks but no thanks.”

64. Porter-Leath Engages Community in Promoting Literacy -

Porter-Leath has a long history of serving Memphis’ most vulnerable children, a mission on full display recently when more than 400 volunteers joined nearly 2,000 children in classrooms around Memphis to read “The Bear Ate Your Sandwich.”

65. CBU Honors Salinas As Distinguished Young Alumna -

Gabriela “Gabby” Salinas has been named Christian Brothers University’s 2016 Distinguished Young Alumna. Salinas, who was among the honorees at the Bell Tower Gala on Saturday, Nov. 12, graduated from CBU’s biochemistry program in 2011 and went on to earn a microbiology degree from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She currently is a pursuing a Ph.D. in immunology and biochemistry at the University of Kentucky.
In addition to her studies and managing her job at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Salinas travels the country advocating the work of St. Jude. She’s also a three-time bone cancer survivor who founded Danny’s Dream Team, a fundraising team of pediatric cancer survivors who now participate in the St. Jude Half Marathon.

66. State Board to Authorize Its First Memphis School After Overruling SCS Decision -

For the first time next year, the Tennessee Board of Education will oversee a charter school in Memphis.

The board said Monday, Nov. 14, that it will authorize a controversial new charter school run by a national operator Green Dot Public Schools.

67. Splitting Your Savings – Retirement or College? -

Ray’s Take After purchasing a home, the two biggest expenses most couples encounter are saving for retirement and saving for kids’ college expenses. In a perfect world, parents would estimate how much each goal would require, make a conservative estimate about returns, and then invest enough money each month to reach those goals on target.

68. Why is It So Difficult for Tennessee To Oust Indicted Politicians? -

Tennessee is lagging much of the nation when it comes to the ability to remove scoundrels from public office.

And, make no mistake, the Volunteer State has had its fair share of ne’er-do-well politicians who would likely have been thrown out of office if the proper procedures had been in place. 

69. New Houston Levee Community Center Sees the Real-Life Needs in Cordova -

When Tonya Bradley was an executive with the Mid-South Food Bank she saw time and again that hunger didn’t respect people’s stereotypes or ZIP codes, that families anywhere in the Memphis area could find themselves in a tough position.

70. Expanding Care -

With the arrival of the holiday shopping season, dozens of major retailers – brands from Best Buy to Williams-Sonoma to Brooks Brothers and New York & Co. – as well as the consumers who patronize them will also be turning their attention to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

71. Bad Week for Jones Means Losing On, Off the Field -

If Tennessee football coach Butch Jones thought last Saturday night was bad in Columbia, South Carolina, he had no idea what was waiting when he got back to Knoxville.

Fans were still stewing over UT’s 24-21 loss to unranked South Carolina. It dropped the then-ranked No. 18 Vols (5-3, 2-3 SEC) out of the polls and probably out of contention for the East Division title and SEC Championship game.

72. 1-Year-Old Halloran Centre Expands Orpheum’s Reach -

The contrast couldn’t be greater. The Orpheum Theatre opened in 1928 and was one of the first buildings in Memphis placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Orpheum’s Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education is a year old and is a model of contemporary design, technology and other amenities.

73. Local Politicos Shift Focus to 2018 Given Expected Presidential Results -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism threw a masquerade party two nights before Halloween on an excursion boat.

74. The Week Ahead: Oct. 31–Nov. 6 -

Good morning, Memphis – and happy Halloween! From the Indie Memphis Film Fest to the long-awaited opening of the Midtown Kroger, there’s plenty of exciting happenings to keep you busy in the coming days. Peruse what’s going on in The Week Ahead while you munch on the candy you’re supposed to be saving for the trick-or-treaters. (We won’t tell.)

75. Have a Kid With Migraines? Sugar Pills Work As Well As Drugs -

CHICAGO (AP) – Sugar pills worked as well at preventing kids' migraines as two commonly used headache medicines, but had fewer side effects, in a study that may lead doctors to rethink how they treat a common ailment in children and teens.

76. Vols Prepare for ‘Grind’ of Weaker Foes -

Tennessee begins the easy part of its football schedule Saturday, Oct. 29, at 7:15 p.m. (ESPN2) against South Carolina in Columbia. Just don’t tell UT coach Butch Jones this is the easy part of the schedule.

77. TWF Celebrates 70 Years of Conservation Leadership -

The Tennessee Wildlife Federation turns 70 this year, and its rich history over the years includes work in West Tennessee that has helped restore wildlife species, protect habitat for public use, and introduce kids to the Great Outdoors through youth hunting and fishing events.

78. Events -

Houston Levee Community Center will open on Thursday, Oct. 27, with a ribbon cutting at 9 a.m. and a grand opening celebration from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 1801 N. Houston Levee Road. HLCC will house a teen lounge, computer lab, games room, and community and multipurpose rooms. RSVP to 901-384-3885 or hlccmemphis@gmail.com.

79. Obaji Named New CEO Of McDonald Murrmann Clinic -

Rola Obaji has been named CEO of McDonald Murrmann Women’s Clinic. Obaji, who has more than 20 years’ experience managing medical groups, comes to McDonald Murrman from Integrity Oncology, where she had served as CEO since 2009.

80. Monogram Foods Foundation To Award $250,000 This Year -

The Monogram Loves Kids Foundation will award $250,000 this year to charities focused on children and families in regions of the country where Monogram Foods operates. A total of $75,000 will go to Memphis-based charities.

81. Events -

Leadership Memphis will host its ninth annual Multicultural Breakfast on Wednesday, Oct. 26, from 7:45 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Kenneth S. Robinson, president and CEO of United Way of the Mid-South, will present the keynote. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased at eventbrite.com through Monday, Oct. 24.

82. Grier Helps Memphis Youth Find the Right Career -

As director of career development at the Juice Plus+ Technical Training Center of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis, Tiffanie Grier has an important job. She helps students between the ages of 16 and 24 find career paths that align with their personalities, talents and passions.

83. I’ll Never Be President -

BIRTHDAY REFLECTIONS IN AN ELECTION YEAR. Let’s face it; I’ll never be president.

Another birthday just showed up and I didn’t blow out any candles. Maybe I don’t have the breath for it anymore. Maybe I don’t have the enthusiasm. While I’m grateful for another year, the count thereof gives me pause.

84. Financial Accounts and College Fees -

Ray’s Take We are now seeing total undergraduate degree costs well in excess of the cost of a new home. We could talk about whether it’s worth it, but that’s another column. Today we want to discuss ways to save for it. First thing–start immediately. You should get going the moment you have a social security number for your child. Second–run the numbers honestly. It’s not realistic to assume scholarships before potty training. A multi-faceted plan will probably work best.

85. Sisterpact Fighting Breast Cancer One Promise at a Time -

July 3, 2008: the day my life changed forever. I was actually at work that day, expecting a phone call from my doctor. I had a biopsy done days earlier and was waiting for the results.

Even though it was possible that the doctor could call with bad news, I never thought that he would. I never for one moment thought that I would get a call saying that I had breast cancer, but I did get that call.

86. Board of Regents Vice Chancellor Talks Of Second TCAT Center for Memphis -

The leader of the statewide system of Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology wants another one of the centers in Shelby County.

James King, the vice chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents, said in Bartlett Monday, Oct. 17, that he hopes a machine tool technology work room TCATP is a part of at Bartlett High School is the start of a broadening of the system.

87. Frustration Runs Deep for Customers Forced to Change Marketplace Plans -

Andrea Schankman’s three-year relationship with her insurer, Coventry Health Care of Missouri, has been contentious, with disputes over what treatments it would pay for. Nonetheless, like other Missourians, Schankman was unnerved to receive a notice from Coventry last month informing her that her policy was not being offered in 2017.

88. Wind Ensemble to Perform At Halloween Film Screening -

In celebration of Halloween, the University of Memphis Wind Ensemble will perform the music for a special screening of the classic 1931 movie “Frankenstein” Monday, Oct. 31, at 7:30 p.m. in the Rose Theatre.

89. Big River -

Jim Jackson had it planned. At the third annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander bicycle ride, the 100-kilometer bike ride would become what it was intended to be – a ride across the Mississippi River from West Memphis to Memphis across the northern side of the Harahan Bridge.

90. Cervantes Helps Latino Memphians Stay Connected -

Fabiola Cervantes is proud of her Mexican heritage. At the same time, the public relations and digital content manager at Latino Memphis loves calling the Bluff City home. Her dual heritage makes her a perfect fit to connect and empower Memphis’s 81,000 Latino residents.

91. Mattress Firm Collecting Shoes for Youth Villages -

Mattress Firm’s 22 Memphis locations are hosting a shoe drive through Oct. 30 to help local foster youth and families.

New shoes and monetary donations will be collected during normal business hours, with all proceeds going to Youth Villages, one of the national retailer’s local nonprofit partners.

92. The Week Ahead: October 10-16 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Get ready for an eclectic mix of fairs, food and festivals to keep you entertained this week. Check out details on those and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead…

93. Meet Olli -

With deep and well-funded resources such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, the Knoxville region is no stranger to innovation in science and technology.

But a new kid on the block, Local Motors, has the potential to spark a whole new era of manufacturing innovation and make Knoxville a hotbed for a technology sector widely considered to be truly revolutionary – self-driving cars.

94. Southwest President Says Community College Going in ‘Wrong Direction’ -

For a room with several dozen brightly colored balloons and a buffet, the small auditorium at Southwest Tennessee Community College on Macon Cove got very quiet last week when SWTCC president Tracy D. Hall began talking about her 14-month tenure as leader of the city’s community college.

95. Hall Says Southwest Tennessee Community College Must Change -

The president of Southwest Tennessee Community College told teachers and other staff of the school Thursday, Oct. 6, that they are sending students on “journeys of confusion” with answers that either make no sense or are different than the answers students get elsewhere on campus.

96. How Do You Fight Chronic Absenteeism? Put a Nurse in Every School -

Almost a fifth of Memphis students are considered chronically absent from school, and too often it’s because of an asthma attack, a toothache or an undiagnosed psychological condition.

Community leaders grappling with the city’s high rate of absenteeism frequently have cited challenges rooted in poverty — from students who struggle to get a ride to school to embarrassment over dirty uniforms. Now they’re zeroing in on a deeper related problem: chronic health conditions.

97. Memphis Trucker Drives 5 Million Miles With No Accidents -

Joe Brown didn’t understand what the big deal was Wednesday, Oct. 5, at the YRC Freight Memphis terminal and distribution center in South Memphis.

98. Events -

Mid South Area Business Travel Association will meet Thursday, Oct. 6, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Courtyard Memphis East, 6015 Park Ave. Brian De Leon of Chrome River Technologies will present “‘What Were They Thinking?’: Expense Report Fraud.” Cost is $25 for members and $40 for nonmembers. Visit msabta.org. 

99. Events -

The Booksellers at Laurelwood will host Memphis journalist Daniel Connolly for a discussion and signing of “The Book of Isaias: A Child of Hispanic Immigrants Seeks His Own America” Tuesday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit thebooksellersatlaurelwood.com.

100. Carpenter St. Workshop in Binghampton Graduates First Students -

On his first day on the job a couple of weeks ago, one of Clark Butcher’s newest employees at Victory Bicycle Studio built a $2,100 mountain bike in addition to assembling a $500 hybrid. Both Butcher and the employee, Donte Davis, were proud for reasons that extended beyond the top-notch set of wheels.