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Editorial Results (free)

1. Where the Jobs Are -

Out of more than 15,000 Shelby County Schools students who took some kind of career and technical education, or CTE, courses in the 2015-2016 academic year, only 1 percent – roughly 150 – completed those classes to get some kind of work certification.

2. Last Word: 'Same Night Batteries,' Corker and Alexander React and ASD Results -

Things you notice in City Council chambers on a long council day: The clock on the wall in back of the chamber is placed over another clock – a clock built into the wall when City Hall opened in 1966 and since deprived of its hands. This came up because the clock in front stopped working Tuesday, the same day that the council got new microphones for a sound system that is consistently buggy.

3. Duffy-Geiger Named CFO At Monogram Foods -

Cheryl Duffy-Geiger has joined Monogram Foods as chief financial officer. In this role, Duffy-Geiger will be responsible for developing strategic business plans, partnering with operations and supply chain, building relationships with banking partners and overseeing accounting, among other duties. She joins Monogram from Kellogg Co., where she was chief financial officer for its largest global business unit, U.S. domestic snacks.

4. Memphis Seminary Pres. To Resign July 31 -

Memphis Theological Seminary president Dr. Jay Earheart-Brown recently announced his intention to resign his post effective July 31 after serving in the position for more than 13 years.

The MTS board of trustees plans to name an interim president by the first of August. The interim president will serve while a search is undertaken for the next full-time president.

5. Last Word: Riverfront Change, Skeleton to Canopy and Summer Camp -

The two contenders for Shelby County Mayor in the Aug. 2 county general election – Democratic nominee Lee Harris and Republican nominee David Lenoir – meet for the first time in the general election campaign Wednesday at the Memphis Kiwanis Club weekly luncheon. It is the first of several debates between the two. And judging from what Harris and Lenoir have said separately and what we’ve reported from those appearances, this is a highly anticipated debate/discussion about the future of Shelby County on several fronts.

6. Memphis Seminary President To Resign July 31 -

Memphis Theological Seminary president Dr. Jay Earheart-Brown recently announced his intention to resign his post effective July 31 after serving in the position for more than 13 years.

The MTS board of trustees plans to name an interim president by the first of August. The interim president will serve while a search is undertaken for the next full-time president.

7. Summer Camp Fun Comes With Lots of Literacy Planning -

The lunchroom tables at Bartlett Elementary School are stacked in the hallway, and from the outside it looks like the school is awaiting students’ return in August.

But inside, a small group of first- through third-graders are dancing, pasting strips of colored paper on plastic bottles, and most importantly, reading and writing.

8. Dailey, DeMoss Make History as Assistants in Hall of Fame -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Connecticut's Chris Dailey and former Tennessee assistant Mickie DeMoss are entering uncharted territory with their historic inductions into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame.

9. Back in Memphis, Alice Johnson Thanks Trump for ‘Mercy’ in Commuting Sentence -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A woman whose life sentence was commuted by President Donald Trump thanked him on Thursday for "having mercy" and said reality TV star Kim Kardashian West saved her life.

10. Trump Commutes Sentence for Drug Offender in Memphis Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump commuted the sentence Wednesday of a woman serving a life sentence in a Memphis drug case whose cause was championed by reality TV star Kim Kardashian West in a recent visit to the White House.

11. Last Word: Our Un-Signature, City Hall Beat Down and Lamar Avenue -

The first thing most people notice when they realize there is lots of development going on in Memphis but that its quite different than Nashville’s brand of development is that you don’t see nearly as many construction cranes here as you do there. It’s become an un-signature of sorts for what is an ongoing remake of Memphis. We adapt and use for new purposes. We also move institutions around, it turns out.

12. Dustin Johnson Heads FESJC Field -

The last FedEx St. Jude Classic will not be without star power. In the tournament’s final year under the current format before converting to the World Golf Championships - FedEx St. Jude Invitational in 2019, the field will feature World No. 2 Dustin Johnson, No. 9 Brooks Koepka and No. 15 Henrik Stenson (rankings through June 3).

13. New Banking Law A Step Forward For Community Banks -

Tennessee’s banks help our communities in the Volunteer State flourish. Small-business owners count on banks to provide the loans they need to succeed. Consumers depend on these financial institutions when they need a mortgage or car loan.

14. SEC Relaxes Transfer Rules, Clearing Path for UF's Jefferson -

The Southeastern Conference has relaxed two rules regarding intra-league transfers, clearing the way for former Mississippi receiver Van Jefferson to play at Florida this fall and opening the door for Alabama offensive lineman Brandon Kennedy to be eligible for a rival school this season.

15. Tacos 4 Life Opening First Tenn. Location in Jackson -

Tacos 4 Life, an Arkansas-grown taco restaurant with a mission to help end world hunger, is opening its first restaurant in Tennessee in Jackson as part of the Columns II development. The restaurant is expected to open in late June.

16. State High Court Seeks Input On Indigent Representation -

The Tennessee Supreme Court is taking public comments until June 25 on a proposed raise in the hourly rate paid to court-appointed attorneys who represent indigent defendants.

The comment period follows the Tennessee Legislature’s approval of a $9.7 million increase in indigent defense spending, which would be the first change in the state’s compensation rate in 20 years.

17. Op-Ed: New Banking Law a Step Forward for Community Banks -

Tennessee’s banks help our communities in the Volunteer State flourish. Small-business owners count on banks to provide the loans they need to succeed. Consumers depend on these financial institutions when they need a mortgage or car loan.

18. 100 North Main -

The city’s tallest building, the 37-story 100 North Main Building – may or may not become the city’s second convention center hotel. But the skyscraper that has been vacant for four years and counting is the centerpiece of a 3-acre planned commercial complex anchored by a 600-room hotel, no matter where it winds up in the footprint. The complex, as much as the hotel, promises to change more than the city’s convention business.

19. Tacos 4 Life Opening First Tenn. Restaurant in Jackson -

Tacos 4 Life, an Arkansas-grown taco restaurant with a mission to help end world hunger, is opening its first restaurant in Tennessee in Jackson as part of the Columns II development. The restaurant is expected to open in late June.

20. State High Court Seeks Input on Indigent Representation -

The Tennessee Supreme Court is taking public comments until June 25 on a proposed raise in the hourly rate paid to court-appointed attorneys who represent indigent defendants.

The comment period follows the Tennessee Legislature’s approval of a $9.7 million increase in indigent defense spending, which would be the first change in the state’s compensation rate in 20 years.

21. Barr Blames Ambien for Tweet; Drug Maker Replies -

NEW YORK (AP) – The maker of Ambien said Wednesday that "racism is not a known side effect" after Roseanne Barr cited the insomnia drug in explaining the tweet that led ABC to cancel her show.

22. Women Seek to Add to Senate Numbers, But Challenges Await -

PHOENIX (AP) – A record number of women are on track to run for the U.S. Senate, though it will be a challenge to capture those seats and help make the chamber more diverse.

Many face uphill campaigns and two Democratic incumbents in particular among the 23 women in the Senate are seen as politically vulnerable in the November election.

23. Last Word: After The Tom Lee Storm, Tiger Lane Changes and Crosstown Growth -

A year ago many of you were without power in the wake of a sudden and violent storm that has come to be known as the Tom Lee Storm. It is the third most powerful storm, according to Memphis Light Gas and Water Division, in terms of those without power and the damage done. It’s called the Tom Lee storm because the 1950s-era Tom Lee memorial in Tom Lee Park – the obelisk – was toppled and shattered as the obelisk fell from the base. A year later, the base that proclaims Tom Lee “a worthy Negro” remains and the obelisk is in storage.

24. Bitcoin Fans Rave, But Understand It’s Still a Risky Business -

By now, anyone who follows Wall Street even slightly has heard of cryptocurrency and its most famous spawn – bitcoin, which launched in 2009 but grabbed headlines last year for its wild swings in valuation.

25. Blockchain Tech ‘is the Shiny New Penny’ -

During the General Assembly session that just ended legislators debated a number of hot-button issues: guns, abortion, Confederate statues and medical marijuana.

But tucked among the headline-grabbers was a brief bill, less than 300 words long, that attracted no controversy whatsoever.

26. Last Word: St. Jude's Reach Across A Divide, One Beale Numbers and Draft Math -

To no one’s surprise the legal skirmish over Confederate monuments is on its way to the Tennessee Court of Appeals. Sons of Confederate Veterans and the Forrest family filed notice Thursday of their appeal of the Davidson County Chancery Court ruling of last week holding that the city of Memphis broke no laws in selling two parks, including the monuments in them, to a private nonprofit which then had the monuments removed.

27. NFL Awards 2019 Draft to Nashville -

ATLANTA (AP) – The NFL draft is heading to Music City.

League owners awarded the 2019 draft to Nashville during their annual spring meetings on Wednesday, clearly impressed with the city's turnout for events such as the NHL Stanley Cup Final and a party to unveil redesigned uniforms for the Tennessee Titans.

28. If Only Legislators Could Focus on Important Issues -

A year-old law enabling Tennessee colleges and universities to keep secret the “proprietary” fees they pay money managers for handling risky investments is likely to be reviewed this year.

29. Last Word: Bike Second Line Protest, Loeb's Portrait and SCS Budget Notes -

“Get on your bikes and ride.” The local bike share program begins Wednesday at 60 different Explore Bike Share stations at different points around town. The bike rental program is considered a milestone in the city’s bicycle culture. And like all milestones there has to be a ceremony. This effort to make it easier to mix bikes into your daily journeys will kick off Wednesday morning in Court Square at 9:30 a.m.

30. Memphis Surgeon Kelly Honored By Pediatric Orthopaedic Society -

Dr. Derek M. Kelly, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, has been awarded the Special Effort and Excellence Award from the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America.

31. Last Word: A New Council Member, Law Without Signature and Corker Down Under -

The Memphis City Council should be back up to full strength by the time Tuesday becomes Wednesday. Filling the Super District 9 seat left vacant by the resignation earlier this month of Philip Spinosa to join the leadership of the Greater Memphis Chamber is on the council’s agenda Tuesday afternoon – the last item on the agenda. But the council usually skips around.

32. Graceland Arena Controversy Shows Strings as it Broadens -

Elvis Presley Enterprises and City Hall got together last week in Whitehaven on neutral ground to talk about Graceland’s expansion plan, specifically a 6,200-seat arena. And from a distance you could barely see the strings from the arena attached to the 1,000-job manufacturing facility Graceland has also talked about starting on Brooks Road.

33. UTHSC, LeMoyne-Owen Partner To Help Students Earn Nursing Degrees -

With an expected nursing shortage of more than 1 million registered nurses by 2022, local colleges like the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and LeMoyne-Owen College are partnering to help students along the career pathway.

34. Dot Transportation To Open Terminal In West Memphis -

With a new distribution terminal opening in West Memphis this month, Dot Transportation, an affiliate of Dot Foods Inc., is looking to hire new truck drivers to add to its fleet.

35. Last Word: Monuments Ruling, The Open Council Seat and Not So Great Streets -

It is likely just the first round. But the city of Memphis prevailed on every major point in the Wednesday ruling out of Nashville by Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle upholding the removal of Confederate monuments this past December from two city parks.

36. Peabody Place Gets Restriped at End of Year-Long Experiment -

The two-way bike lanes and a pedestrian promenade with tables and chairs on Peabody Place between Front Street and B.B. King Boulevard are on the way out as a year-long trial run for the changed streetscape ends.

37. Last Word: The Bus to Shelby Farms, Sports Gaming In Tunica and Tom Lee's Story -

It hasn’t been this hot in 30 years … to the day. The high Monday of 93 degrees eclipsed the old record for the day of 91 degree in 1988. I’m not much of a thermometer watcher. But this did get my attention because I was imagining all of the big hair emergencies 30 years ago. Guys going to their closets to break out the Miami Vice pastel t-shirts and linen blazers. And of course California Raisins hysteria. And I do find it not entirely coincidental that we break a record from 1988 as there is talk of a remake of the movie “Willow.” We could break another record for all of this Tuesday and we’ll see what my mind does with the year of the old record if that’s the case.

38. Former Bears Legend Mike Singletary to Lead Memphis Football Franchise -

If Memphis is going to have another pro football league that won’t be confused with the NFL – and it is – it can’t hurt for the first head coach to be a pro football Hall-of-Famer, a feared former linebacker who made the Chicago Bears proud.

39. First Tennessee Donation Aids Fogelman Y Project -

Thanks to a new partnership between First Tennessee Bank and the YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South, the Fogelman Downtown YMCA will receive a $500,000 donation and matching challenge gift of $500,000 from First Tennessee to remodel significant portions of the building that opened in 1987.

40. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

41. First Tennessee Donation Aids Fogelman YMCA Project -

Thanks to a new partnership between First Tennessee Bank and the YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South, the Fogelman Downtown YMCA will receive a $500,000 donation and matching challenge gift of $500,000 from First Tennessee to remodel significant portions of the building that opened in 1987.

42. Last Word: New Football League, Drone Testing and New Chandler Numbers -

The Alliance of American Football announces its presence in Memphis Thursday afternoon at the Liberty Bowl. And so begins another chapter in the city’s colorful history of start-up leagues. It is a long history dominated by football with a good stretch of the timeline taking in the city’s pursuit of an NFL franchise. Sometimes the rules are a bit different and the leagues have a history of not lasting very long. But they are fondly remembered.

43. Fall Creek Falls Project Leaves Destructive Trail -

The Fall Creek Falls Inn and Conference Center will soon be in ruins like the livelihoods of the state employees who worked there.

Fewer than half the state employees who worked at the inn found new state jobs after it closed in early April. Some are working for nearly half the pay, and some had to move away from Van Buren County or drive long distances to keep a job with the state.

44. Last Word: Veto Override Drama, Iran Reaction & Rise of the Rest Meets Soundways -

Shelby County Commissioners have a busy committee day Wednesday with a budget presentation – county mayor Mark Luttrell’s final one as the county’s chief executive, more discussions about the Graceland plan and a veto override.

45. Council Gives Final Approval to Speedway Terrace Historic District Status -

Memphis City Council members approved historic overlay district status Tuesday, May 8, for the Speedway Terrace neighborhood north of Crosstown Concourse. The approval on third and final reading of the ordinance is the second approval in a month of a district whose standards are governed by the Memphis Landmarks Commission.

46. Stengel Elected President Of Construction Counsel Association -

Evans Petree PC shareholder Elizabeth B. Stengel has been elected the first female president of the Tennessee Association of Construction Counsel, a not-for-profit professional association of Tennessee attorneys with practices related to the construction industry.

47. Pro- and Anti-Gun Bills Fail in Tennessee Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – An election-year Tennessee legislative session tinged by national attention on a deadly school shooting in Florida saw many high-profile gun bills fail – both Republican efforts to ease gun laws and Democratic pushes to put more restrictions in place.

48. Last Word: BSMF Notes, Political Dominoes and The Teacher Pipeline -

Yes, it rained. There was even hail for a brief period. None of that appeared to make a dent in the run of the Beale Street Music Festival. We are still waiting on exact box office numbers. The park was sold out – Ticketfly and at the gate -- early Sunday evening. It wasn’t a sellout Friday and Saturday but ticket supplies were tight for Tom Lee Park with the festival estimating there were thousands more people Saturday than there were Friday. Much to be said for a lineup this year that managed to strike a balance between hipster, cutting edge nobody-knows-about-this-yet new and used-to-be-big-not-so-long-ago nostalgia.

49. Verdict Still Out on Tale of Increased Voter Turnout In Primaries -

Voting in the May election that included primaries for most Shelby County government nonjudicial offices was up from the 2010 and 2014 primaries for both parties. But what that says about new political blood and energy in both of the local parties is still an open question.

50. Memphis Men’s Tennis Earns No. 2 Seed in NCAAs -

Following a historic regular season, the No. 20 University of Memphis men’s tennis team will make its sixth NCAA Tournament appearance in seven years.

The Tigers drew an at-large bid as a No. 2 seed and will travel to Starkville, Mississippi, to face South Alabama in the opening round May 11 at 10 a.m. The winner between the Tigers and Jaguars will play the winner between host Mississippi State and Tennessee Tech in the second round on May 12 at 1 p.m.

51. Memphis Men’s Tennis Earns No. 2 Seed in NCAAs -

Following a historic regular season, the No. 20 University of Memphis men’s tennis team will make its sixth NCAA Tournament appearance in seven years.

The Tigers drew an at-large bid as a No. 2 seed and will travel to Starkville, Mississippi, to face South Alabama in the opening round May 11 at 10 a.m. The winner between the Tigers and Jaguars will play the winner between host Mississippi State and Tennessee Tech in the second round on May 12 at 1 p.m.

52. Last Word: Primary Results and Analysis, Bike Launch, Gibson's Bankruptcy -

The immediate headline of Tuesday’s county primary elections is Lee Harris and David Lenoir battling in the August county general to see who becomes the next county mayor. But there were lots of other stories in the results. Here's the roundup of that and the other countywide primaries.

53. Bartholomew Named St. Mary’s Athletic Director -

St. Mary’s Episcopal School has promoted John Bartholomew to athletic director. Bartholomew has been coaching lacrosse at St. Mary’s since 2014, and the following year, he joined the school full-time as assistant athletic director and lacrosse coordinator. He has been serving as St. Mary’s interim athletic director since last fall.

54. County Commission Urges Haslam to Veto Immigration Bill -

Shelby County commissioners approved a resolution Monday, April 30, urging Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to veto a bill that would require local and state law enforcement agencies to work with federal immigration and customs enforcement agents on immigration matters.

55. Last Word: Trolleys Roll, Primary Election Day and The Rise of South City -

MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld likes to joke that the new trolleys are quieter since the transit authority decided to change from using square wheels. Transit humor. They really are quieter. And that may be because MATA wasn’t doing much of anything in the way of maintenance on them four years ago and even less in the way of record keeping when a second trolley car burst into flames causing MATA to shut down everything it ran on rails. So the trolley that rolled out of the MATA barn on North Main Street Monday morning and into service was symbolic of more than getting a trolley or three ready for service. It was about building a new system around the operation of the trolleys.

56. County Commission Urges Haslam Veto of Immigration Bill -

Shelby County commissioners approved a resolution Monday, April 30, urging Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to veto a bill that would require local and state law enforcement agencies to work with federal immigration agents on immigration matters.

57. SEC and Alabama Again Dominate NFL Draft -

The dominance of SEC football might come into question on a particular Saturday or during a specific postseason. But not during the NFL Draft as general managers time and again treat the league as the next-closest thing to pro football.

58. Tigers' WR Anthony Miller and LB Genard Avery Selected in NFL Draft -

Two former University of Memphis football players were selected in the 2018 NFL Draft and a third signed as a free agent.

Wide receiver Anthony Miller was drafted in the second round by the Chicago Bears at number 51 overall, and linebacker Genard Avery was taken in the fifth round, at number 150 overall, by the Cleveland Browns.

59. Memphis Army Depot, CA Building Get New Owners -

2028 Memphis Depot Pkwy.
Memphis, TN 38114

Sale Amount: $50 million

60. Last Word: Graceland Offensive, Mural Lawsuit, and a TNReady Encore -

It’s on in The Haven. Graceland’s managing partner, Joel Weinshanker, is looking to turn out Whitehaven residents in support of Graceland’s plans for a 5,000 to 6,000 seat arena and in the process a showdown over just what the city and county noncompete for FedExForum means. During a townhall meeting at Guest House Thursday evening, Weinshanker made his case to about 150 Whitehaven residents and around eight or nine candidates in this election year. And he said the chief problem is Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland won’t talk to him about projects he says will open up Whitehaven for future economic development and prosperity.

61. Last Word: Last Day of Early Voting, Senate Poll and Legislature Goes to Overtime -

The last day of early voting before the May 1 election day is Thursday. And the turnout count through Wednesday has eclipsed the total early voting turnout in this same set of elections in 2010 and 2014. You can find a list of early voting locations and the hours at www.shelbyvote.com, the website of the Shelby County Election Commission. The winners on election night next Tuesday advance to the August county general election.

62. Schools’ Success Too Dependent on Weak Vendor -

The “debacle” called TNReady, a standardized test ruling the lives of students, teachers and administrators, is the predictable result of brain drain – not by students but by Tennessee’s leaders.

63. Musician, Songwriter Sykes Joins Ardent as Chief Manager -

Longtime songwriter, touring artist and studio owner Keith Sykes has joined Ardent Studios as chief manager, bringing more than 40 years’ experience in the music industry. More than 100 of Sykes’ songs have been recorded by other artists – including John Prine, Rosanne Cash and George Thorogood – and have sold more than 25 million records worldwide. In addition, he once played in Jimmy Buffett’s Coral Reefer Band and co-wrote the 1979 hit “Volcano” with Buffett.

64. UTHSC Set To Open New Training Facility -

In less than three weeks, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center will launch its new $39.7 million, 45,000-square-foot building packed with high-tech tools and a cutting-edge training environment.

65. Last Word: Reading Early Voting Tea Leaves, Corker Qualifies and New Carrot -

This should be the week that the Tennessee Legislature adjourns and state Senators and state Representatives return to their districts to begin campaigning in earnest for the August primaries and the November general election beyond that. The only hold-up to adjournment this week would be any more tremors surrounding education policy, specifically the TNReady test debacle of last week.

66. State Weighted Caseload Study Shows Two More Judges Needed Locally -

Shelby County’s court system – civil and criminal – is down about two judges, according to the Tennessee Comptroller’s annual report on weighted caseloads.

The report, required by state law since 1997, calculates the number of judges needed to handle different kinds of cases.

67. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

68. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

69. Pruitt Pumped Up for ‘Exciting’ Spring Game -

Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt loosened up a bit as the Vols went through spring practices last week, talking at length about individual players for the first time.

Big deal? Yeah, probably for media and fans starved for information about Pruitt’s first team of Vols.

70. SCS Leaders Question TNReady Credibility -

Shelby County Schools board members are questioning the credibility of state student achievement testing after the third major problem with online testing in three years.

“I believe this was intentional,” school board member Stephanie Love said Tuesday, April 17, at a board work session, noting that the test results are used to evaluate teachers as well as students and schools. “We are the largest poor school district in the state of Tennessee. If something continues to happen, it is intentional.”

71. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

72. SCS Leaders Question Credibility of TNReady Testing -

Shelby County Schools board members say they question the credibility of state student achievement testing after the third major problem with online testing in three years.

“I believe this was intentional,” school board member Stephanie Love said Tuesday, April 17, at a board work session, noting that the test results are used to evaluate teachers as well as students and schools. “We are the largest poor school district in the state of Tennessee. … If something continues to happen, it is intentional.”

73. Republican Gubernatorial Debate Wednesday Will Air Statewide -

The Greater Memphis Chamber Chairman’s Circle announced Tuesday the organization will co-host the first statewide televised Tennessee gubernatorial debate for Republican candidates on Wednesday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at the Halloran Centre of The Orpheum Theatre, 225 S. Main St.

74. Hacker Blamed for Third TNReady Computer Snafu -

Frustrated by a third year of TNReady foul-ups, this time with testing statewide disrupted by a suspected hacker, state lawmakers are set to step in and put an end to what they feel is a fiasco.

Two measures were to be considered by the House Tuesday afternoon, April 17, to put an end to mistakes in the administration of tests used to evaluate student progress and teacher effectiveness. School districts statewide were affected by the disruption this week after an outside source hit the state’s testing vendor, Questar.

75. Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation Puts $5 Million in Whitehaven Park Renovation -

A Whitehaven park is getting a $5 million remake, including a $900,000 endowment fund to keep the new David Carnes Park ready for recreation.

76. Last Word: Parking Distrust, Early Voting Numbers and Missile Strike Reaction -

There is probably no better symbol of the distrust that has been a factor in reaching a compromise in Overton Park to end greensward parking by the Memphis Zoo. It is what happened to the idea of a walkway from the zoo plaza to the greensward with the critical juncture being where the gravel driveway is now that is used by cars to park on the greensward. We examine that and other larger points from last week’s decision by City Hall to change the design and make the amended plan the final plan.

77. The Week Ahead: April 16-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s time for Africa in April, which in the minds of many Memphians, is the seasonal kick-off for festivals. The annual Southern Hot Wing Festival comes this weekend on Tiger Lane, so get ready for good times to replace that winter weather. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

78. Green Dot Gets $3M Loan For Bluff City High School -

Green Dot Public Schools is preparing for renovations of its Bluff City High School in Hickory Hill with a $3 million loan from Nonprofit Finance Fund and Boston Community Capital.

The loan is for further renovations, including modular buildings for classrooms and staff offices, at the charter school’s campus in what was Solid Rock Christian Church, 4100 Ross Road.

79. Overton Square Adds Two New Restaurants in One Week -

2110 Madison Ave.

Memphis, TN 38104

Lease Amount: 3,790 square feet 

Tenant: Bogard

Tenant’s Agent: Barry Maynard, LRG

Landlord: Loeb Properties Inc.

80. Around Memphis: April 16, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

81. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

82. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

83. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

84. Last Word: Bakery Rising, Legislative Notes From Nashville and Jazz Messiah -

Some call it the Bakery Project – others Wonder Bread. Whatever you call it the redevelopment project that is centered on the old Wonder Bread bakery on Monroe between Downtown and the Medical District is moving with a building permit this week for what developer Gary Prosterman and his team call the Cadillac Building … because it was once a Cadillac dealership. That’s part of the code being used for places that have been out of action or barely functioning for decades and are now under development.... very post-apocalyptic. 

85. Green Dot Gets $3M Loan For Bluff City High School -

Green Dot Public Schools is preparing for renovations of its Bluff City High School in Hickory Hill with a $3 million loan from Nonprofit Finance Fund and Boston Community Capital.

The loan is for further renovations, including modular buildings for classrooms and staff offices, at the charter school’s campus in what was Solid Rock Christian Church, 4100 Ross Road.

86. Cooper-Young Overlay OK’d With Footnote -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading will require approval of a companion ordinance further defining what can and cannot be built there or how properties can be changed so the local Landmarks Commission can properly enforce terms of the overlay district.

87. Sunday Wine, Liquor Sales Passes in Tenn. Senate -

NASHVILLE – Buoyed by Bible verses and compromise giving liquor stores a head start on Sunday sales, legislation allowing grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays passed the Senate Wednesday on a 17-11 vote.

88. Last Word: Play Ball, Porch & Parlor and A New Bus System -

If you go to enough political gatherings you start to see parallels. Sometimes you see things that aren’t there but that’s another story. Many political gatherings begin with the pledge of allegiance and a prayer as well. Sometimes the pledge isn’t enough and there is someone there to sing the National Anthem.

89. City Council Grants Historic Overlay Status to Cooper-Young -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading likely isn’t the end of the discussion about how decisions will be made by the local Landmarks Commission enforcing terms of the overlay that govern what can and cannot be built there or who it can be changed.

90. Drug Distributor to Donate 80,000 Doses of Overdose Antidote -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio-based drug distributor facing lawsuits linked to the opioid crisis is donating more than 80,000 doses of an overdose antidote for use by emergency responders in several states, including Tennessee.

91. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

92. Statewide Clinical Trials Effort Launches Out of UTHSC -

When Dr. Steven Goodman, vice chancellor for research at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, arrived at the college more than two years ago, his ambition was to launch a statewide clinical trials network.

93. Week Ahead: April 9-15 -

Good morning, Memphis! We’ve seen in recent national elections how important every vote can be, much less on the local level where far fewer votes are cast than in a national presidential election, for example. It’s one of your basic rights and a great opportunity for you to be an influence in the local community.

94. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20.  Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

95. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

96. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

97. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20. Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

98. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

99. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

100. Last Word: Holder in Memphis for MLK 50, EDGE Sets a Date and South City Moves -

The week of MLK50 commemorations began Monday with a speech by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and the arrival Monday afternoon of Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meanwhile, Monday's day of free admission to the museum, underwritten by FedEx drew a long line. It also drew some remote trepidation that tends to make the situation seem worse than it is once you actually go there for yourself.