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Editorial Results (free)

1. Attorney Harkavy Named To Wyatt’s Executive Committee -

Lee A. Harkavy is one of two attorneys from the Memphis office of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP to be named to the regional law firm’s executive committee. Harkavy is a commercial transactional attorney focused primarily on representing businesses in their external growth endeavors or exit strategies. In that capacity, he advises clients on mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, and capital-raising transactions.

2. Draft DHS Guidelines Sharpen Focus on Those Here Illegally -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Homeland Security Department has drafted sweeping new guidelines aimed at aggressively detaining and deporting immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, according to a pair of memoranda signed by DHS Secretary John Kelly.

3. Data: Self-Driving Cars Needing Less Human Help Than in Past -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Self-driving car prototypes appear to be getting better at negotiating California streets and highways without a human backup needing to intervene, according to data made public Wednesday by California transportation regulators.

4. A Commuter's Dream: Entrepreneurs Race to Develop Flying Car -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even before George Jetson entranced kids with his cartoon flying car, people dreamed of soaring above traffic congestion. Inventors and entrepreneurs have long tried and failed to make the dream a reality, but that may be changing.

5. College of Art Ranks High For Graphic Design Degree -

Memphis College of Art has been recognized by the Animation Career Review as having one of the top 10 collegiate Graphic Design programs in the South, surpassing 94 percent of schools in the analysis.

6. College of Art Ranks High For Graphic Design Program -

Memphis College of Art has been recognized by the Animation Career Review as having one of the top 10 collegiate Graphic Design programs in the South, surpassing 94 percent of schools in the analysis.

7. New Prescription: Doctor Offices That Look Like Apple Stores -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – After a relative suffered a heart attack a few years ago, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Adrian Aoun got an unsettling look at a health-care system that he diagnosed as an inefficient and outdated mess.

8. Surge in Traffic Deaths Outpaces Increase in Travel -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Traffic deaths surged about 8 percent in the first nine months of last year, continuing an alarming upward spiral that may be partially explained by more Americans on the roads due to the economic recovery, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates released Friday.

9. Adapt To Survive -

According to Charles Darwin, it’s not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change. In my experience, that’s a true assessment not only for human beings, but also for businesses, regardless of the focus of the business.

10. Google's Self-Driving Car Project Gets a New Name: Waymo -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The self-driving car project that Google started seven years ago has grown into a company called Waymo, signaling its confidence that it will be able to bring robot-controlled vehicles to the masses within the next few years.

11. City’s Momentum Charts Different Course, Method -

Nike community relations director Willie Gregory came to The Peabody hotel Wednesday, Dec. 7, to roll out the new MemphisWorks app for the Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce, which he chairs.

12. The Innovation Trajectory Leads To Collaboration -

Talk by Tamara St. Claire, CIO, Xerox Healthcare. We use three key methods at innovation in my group, started St. Claire:

1. Lean Startup model: Based on a non-conventional approach to management to act more like a startup, not assuming you know what the market wants. Build. Measure. Learn – this is the cycle of Lean Startup. Then, build MVP, minimally viable product, which is a way to test customer reactions. Develop criteria for success. Should you pivot or persevere? This process manages the chaos and uncertainty of new product development. 

13. Five Learning Strategies for Resilience In the Business Consolidation Age -

Global competition is heating up and a wave of consolidation is sweeping various industries, from the tech economy to the old economy. Google and General Electric continue to master their domains and expand their reach. Microsoft bought LinkedIn and Bayer is looking to buy Monsanto.
On Wall Street, the five largest banks have increased their share of banking assets from 25 percent in 2000 to 45 percent today. AT&T, America’s second-largest wireless-telecom firm, is looking to buy Time Warner, the country’s second-biggest media firm. Big companies have reaped enormous efficiencies by creating supply chains that stretch around the globe. They hope to realize immense gains by controlling complementary assets, as AT&T is looking to combine distribution with content. 

14. Feds: Railroads Slow to Make Progress on Train Technology -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The nation's three busiest commuter railroads - which together serve nearly 1 million riders in the New York City area each day - continue to lag behind their smaller West Coast counterparts in installing sophisticated train-control technology that's seen as an antidote to crashes involving speeding and other human factors, federal regulators said Monday.

15. Human Evolution of Innovation -

A Back End of Innovation Conference keynote by Kevin Ashton. Ashton opened his innovation talk at the Back End of Innovation Conference by taking a picture of the crowd and publishing it on Twitter, which he remarked was revolutionary a decade ago. 

16. 1-Year-Old Halloran Centre Expands Orpheum’s Reach -

The contrast couldn’t be greater. The Orpheum Theatre opened in 1928 and was one of the first buildings in Memphis placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Orpheum’s Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education is a year old and is a model of contemporary design, technology and other amenities.

17. Windows 10 to Bring 3-D to Two-Dimensional Experiences -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft wants to bring life to common computing experiences by adding a third dimension to widely used software such as Windows and Office.

The new tools, part of a free "Creators Update" to Windows 10 early next year, promise to make it easy for people to create and share photos, drawing and other images in 3-D.

18. Innovation And The Tech World -

While the world of technology has filled the world with tools of productivity and connection, it has its drawbacks. Many people today suffer from the shadow side of technology.

Droves of burned out, screen-addicted zombies sign up for Digital Detox weekends. Families schedule a family night without cellphones at the table once a week or only allow their preschoolers to play games after reading. Technology has imploded many of the societal norms we once held sacred: look how online dating has disrupted generations of rituals.

19. Meet Olli -

With deep and well-funded resources such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, the Knoxville region is no stranger to innovation in science and technology.

But a new kid on the block, Local Motors, has the potential to spark a whole new era of manufacturing innovation and make Knoxville a hotbed for a technology sector widely considered to be truly revolutionary – self-driving cars.

20. Samsung Joins Digital Assistant Race With Acquisition of Viv -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Samsung Electronics is joining the race to create the smartest digital assistant by acquiring Viv, a Silicon Valley startup launched by the same entrepreneurs who sold Siri to Apple.

21. Last Word: FedEx Changes, The Blue Cross Exit and Armageddon -

Was that really autumn Monday or was the drop in humidity a prank to get the trees to drop their leaves?

The FedEx shareholder’s meeting Monday included some changes in the management chart at FedEx Corp. – more like some changes in the seating with one retirement by Mike Glenn, whose office is next to company founder Fred Smith.

22. Feds Preview Rules of the Road for Self-Driving Cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Obama administration officials are previewing long-awaited guidance that attempts to bring self-driving cars to the nation's roadways safely – without creating so many roadblocks that the technology can't make it to market quickly.

23. Last Word: Pot's Second, Marina Cove to Eden Square and Deadspin on the NCRM -

With the work week underway, the gas price spike is official and regional.

24. Tech May Help Steer Older Drivers Down a Safer Road -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Older drivers may soon be traveling a safer road thanks to smarter cars that can detect oncoming traffic, steer clear of trouble and even hit the brakes when a collision appears imminent.

25. Zika Researchers Seeking Volunteers Willing to Be Infected -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wanted: Volunteers willing to be infected with the Zika virus for science.

It may sound bizarre, but researchers are planning just such a study – this winter, when mosquitoes aren't biting – to help speed development of much-needed Zika vaccines.

26. Self-Driving Car Race Sees Flurry of Partnerships -

Uber announced Thursday that it will partner with Volvo to make autonomous vehicles. The tie-up is the latest between automakers and tech companies hoping to speed driverless cars to market. Here's a rundown of who's working with whom:

27. Technology or No, Matrix Achievement Group Strives for Sales Results -

The pitch for Matrix Achievement Group can seem to be all about now, all about the fast-moving, 24-hour clock exhausting everyone, and the feeling that if only the technology could be made to always work for you, everything would be better.

28. Court Reporter Traces Career Back to HS -

Lynette Mueller’s journey to owning Omega Reporting in Memphis began in a high school classroom in Inkster, N.D.

29. Plans for Self-Driving Cars Have Pitfall: The Human Brain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Experts say the development of self-driving cars over the coming decade depends on an unreliable assumption by many automakers: that the humans in them will be ready to step in and take control if the car's systems fail.

30. EU Says China Needs to Give EU Companies Fair Market Access -

BEIJING (AP) — The EU trade commissioner said Monday that China has to give European companies the same kind of market access that Chinese companies enjoy in Europe before discussions can start on a bilateral free trade agreement.

31. FedEx Institute of Technology Builds Tech Reputation -

The FedEx Institute of Technology will host a training course on blockchain technology, the buzzy infrastructure that comprises the backbone of bitcoin, as part of a broader push to position itself at the center of innovation in the city.

32. Death Sparks 'Autopilot' Car Probe; Man Had Speeding Tickets -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The first American death involving a car in self-driving mode presents a dilemma: How aggressively to embrace the potentially life-saving technology after a fatal crash. The driver's history of speeding complicates the question.

33. Investigator: FDA Still Taking Months to Recall Tainted Food -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal health officials failed to force a recall of peanut butter and almond products for three months after advanced DNA testing confirmed salmonella contamination, government investigators reported Thursday.

34. Cellphone Radiation Study Raises Concerns Despite Low Risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A new federal study of the potential dangers of cellphone radiation, conducted in rats, found a slight increase in brain tumors in males and raised long-dormant concerns about the safety of spending so much time with cellphones glued to our ears.

35. Tethering the Void to Moonshot Ideas -

This talk was given by Donna Sturgess, executive in residence, Carnegie Mellon University, at the annual Front End of Innovation Conference in Boston this month.

“I’ve been spending a lot of time in the future,” is how Sturgess opened this evocative session. “Things get funded at Carnegie Mellon for big, breakthrough ideas, exponential innovations.”

36. Lendermon Sports Medicine Explores Non-Surgical Healing Methods -

Laura Lendermon is amazed at how the body works. As a former college athlete and lifelong runner, she’s familiar with the aches and pains athletes experience. As a doctor, she’s knowledgeable on a much deeper level of the magic of the human body.

37. NTSB Blames Distracted Engineer for Deadly Amtrak Wreck -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The speeding Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia last year, killing eight people, most likely ran off the rails because the engineer was distracted by word of a nearby commuter train getting hit by a rock, federal investigators concluded Tuesday.

38. Move Over Drones, Driverless Cars – Unmanned Ship Up Next -

SAN DIEGO (AP) – It's not only drones and driverless cars that may become the norm someday – ocean-faring ships might also run without captains or crews.

The Pentagon on Monday showed off the world's largest unmanned surface vessel, a self-driving 132-foot ship able to travel up to 10,000 nautical miles on its own to hunt for stealthy submarines and underwater mines.

39. Memphis Zoo's New Attraction Takes High-Tech Dive Into Zambezi -

On the African continent, the Zambezi River Valley is south of the savanna. At the Memphis Zoo, it is west of the savanna-like grassland environments where elephants, zebras and giraffes can be seen.

40. Experts Caution Self-Driving Cars Aren't Ready for Roads -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Self-driving cars are more likely to hurt than help public safety because of unsolved technical issues, engineers and safety advocates told the government Friday, countering a push by innovators to speed government approval.

41. Genome Explorations Leads Push To Bring Personalized Medicine to Patients -

Memphis-based Genome Explorations is hoping to take 15 years of genetics and pharmacogenetics research and translate it into personalized medicine that will fundamentally change the way prolific diseases like cancer and heart disease are treated.

42. Will Americans Like Blendle, The iTunes for News? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Americans pay to download music. They pay for TV episodes. Will they pay a few cents for news articles to escape ads and bypass subscription requirements?

The news service Blendle launches Wednesday in the U.S. with 20 news outlets, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg Businessweek. You pay 9 cents to 49 cents to read a story (with a refund if you don't like it).

43. GM Buys Software Company to Speed Autonomous Car Development -

DETROIT (AP) – With hopes of speeding development of self-driving cars, General Motors has acquired a small software company that's been testing vehicles on the streets of San Francisco.

44. Up, Up and Away -

The modern-day drone is both a high-tech military tool and a safer way to play humanitarian and deliver medicine and supplies to the suffering people of war-torn Syria.

The drone is everything from a stalking device to track poachers creeping through the South African bush hunting rhinos to the impetus for a potential commercial growth industry right here in Memphis.

45. Snapchat, Seagate Among Companies Duped in Tax-Fraud Scam -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Tax-filing season is turning into a nightmare for thousands of employees whose companies have been duped by email fraudsters. A major phishing scheme has tricked several major companies – among them, the messaging service Snapchat and disk-drive maker Seagate Technology – into relinquishing tax documents that exposed their workers' incomes, addresses and Social Security numbers.

46. Last Word: The Moving Election Comes to Town and Missing Early Voters Are Found -

We probably haven’t had this much action with so many presidential candidates in the Memphis area since the 1984 Democratic presidential primary campaign.

Four of the contenders – three Republicans and one Democrat – in Memphis over the weekend looking for votes in advance of Tuesday’s Tennessee primary elections.

47. Cancer Patients Snagged in Health Law's Tangled Paperwork -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Walt Whitlow was under treatment for cancer when he got an unwelcome surprise.

His financial assistance under President Barack Obama's health care law got slashed. That meant his premium quadrupled and his deductible went from $900 to $4,600.

48. Computer As Driver? 'Yes' From Feds Boosts Self-Driving Cars -

DETROIT (AP) — Computers that control cars of the future can be considered drivers just like humans, the federal government's highway safety agency has decided.

The redefinition of "driver" by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is an important break for Google, which is developing self-driving cars that get around without steering wheels, pedals — or even the need for a person to be inside.

49. Twitter Moves to Actively Seek Out Terrorist Supporters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Twitter is now using spam-fighting technology to seek out accounts that might be promoting terrorist activity and is examining other accounts related to those flagged for possible removal, the company announced Friday.

50. From the High-Flying to the Practical: CES 2016 in Brief -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – This year's CES gadget show, like ones before it, showed off a mix of the dreamy and the practical in technology. Gadget prototypes promised us fully autonomous vehicles carrying commuters on the streets and in the sky, while gizmos went on sale that aimed to solve daily problems like restocking your fridge.

51. The Week Ahead: Jan. 11, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from drones and robot research to the Grizzlies’ annual MLK symposium at the National Civil Rights Museum...

52. The Latest in Gadgets: Even Footballs Are Getting Smarter -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The latest developments surrounding the consumer-electronics show in Las Vegas known as CES (all times PST):

12:15 p.m.

Kids tossing around a football probably hope to throw a perfect spiral in a big game one day. Technology is about to help them out.

53. Thrive in The Expectation Economy -

Maxwell Luthy’s keynote begins with a warm-up. Luthy, director of Trends and Insight, showed two innovations and asked if they were good or bad. The first has a real-time countdown of your life expectancy. The second innovation is an emoji-based room service.

54. University of Memphis to Focus on Drone Research in 2016 -

The FedEx Institute of Technology in 2016 will roll out heavy programming, research and community engagement in drones and other unmanned vehicles as these emerging technologies continue to mature.

55. Creative Christmas Gifts For Your Favorite Nonprofit -

Its Christmas time! And soon to be Kwanzaa. Then New Year’s! It’s time to celebrate and share gifts. We give to our families and friends. Many of us have already made a gift to nonprofits we hold closest to our hearts. But there’s always time for more giving.

56. Beware Thyself -

Over the last 13 months, or 262 trading days, the S&P 500 has produced a 0% return while the Barclays total bond market index has produced an enviable 1%. Over the last several weeks I have received several calls and emails from clients, fatigued by sideways markets that want to “do something” about it.

57. Beware Thyself -

Over the last 13 months, or 262 trading days, the S&P 500 has produced a 0% return while the Barclays total bond market index has produced an enviable 1%. Over the last several weeks I have received several calls and emails from clients, fatigued by sideways markets that want to “do something” about it. This emotion, while understandable, can often lead to mistakes. One of our roles as investment advisors is to help clients widen their field of view and mitigate the risk of trading mistakes. Over the past twelve months the markets have produced some distinct winners and losers. US stocks +.91% vs. international stocks -7%. US internet and biotech stocks +20% vs. US energy stocks -20%. US growth stocks + 7%, US value stocks -4%. Which would you buy if you were craving returns? Clearly large cap US growth themes like biotech and technology make money while US value themes like Europe, emerging markets and commodities do not.

58. Emami's Care2Manage Startup Helps Families Care for Aging Loved Ones -

Ela Emami has a vision for her startup Care2Manage, an entity focused on helping families caring for a loved one, that blends technology with a human touch.

Her venture is a service platform for families with an elderly loved one that connects them to social workers, local elder care resources and organizes total health care needs. Emami also works as a geriatric care consultant, something she sees as a complementary service to her technology platform.

59. Methodist Caps Busy 2015 With $40M Plans for Transplant Institute -

New money is pouring in to the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, and it will be put to use as investments in everything from patient care to research. Construction work is under way at a number of facilities, and myriad future projects are in the works.

60. Rings and Pacifiers: Health Gadgets Get Sophisticated -

HELSINKI (AP) — After the smartphone and fitness bracelet, here comes the smart ring. And the smart pacifier, and smart rollator.

"Wellness" computers that monitor your pulse, temperature and other health indicators are becoming increasingly sophisticated and varied to cover every aspect — and age — of human life.

61. What Hiring Managers Wish You Knew -

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak with a group of hiring managers at a conference hosted by the Society for Information Management. It’s an organization that encourages networking and education for technology leaders.

62. From University Labs to the Marketplace -

The health care industry contributed $38.8 billion to Middle Tennessee’s economy in 2014, according to a study released by the Nashville Health Care Council, which is a 32.9 percent increase from the 2010.

63. Toyota to Invest $50M in Car-Tech Research at Stanford, MIT -

EAST PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) — Toyota is investing $50 million with Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in hopes of gaining an edge in an accelerating race to phase out human drivers.

64. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

65. When Did We Stop New Thinking? -

Human evolution is a complex topic. Personal growth may be more perplexing even to the best psychologists. The theme that really defies reason is when a whole organization or market segment falls into the trap of formal rigidity, as in “it’s just the way it is.”

66. Health Law Sign-Ups Keep Growing; Uninsured Rate Declines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a million people signed up for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law even after the official enrollment season ended, helping push the share of uninsured Americans below 10 percent and underscoring how hard it could be for Republicans to dismantle the program.

67. Study Says West Tennessee Economy Has Lagged -

West Tennessee’s economy has been lagging behind other regions in the state but is starting to make inroads in employment growth and technology-related hirings, a new report says.

The region’s mayors and economic development officials met Thursday at Jackson State Community College to review the report, The Jackson Sun reported. The study was financed by a $50,000 grant given by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

68. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

69. As Amazon Turns 20, A Look at Its Biggest Bets -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon has come a long way from selling books out of a Seattle garage.

The company had an inauspicious start in July 1995 at the dawn of the Web as an online bookseller. It narrowly escaped the dot-com bust of 2000 to reinvent online retailing. And eventually, it morphed into the global e-commerce powerhouse it is today with $89 billion in annual revenue.

70. IBM Claims Breakthrough in Making Chips Even Smaller -

NEW YORK (AP) – IBM says it has achieved a breakthrough in making computer chips even smaller, creating a test version of the world's first semiconductor that shrinks down the circuitry by overcoming "one of the grand challenges" of the tech industry.

71. US Unemployment Falls to 7-Year Low, But Wages are Flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. unemployment fell to a seven-year low of 5.3 percent and employers hired at a solid pace in June, but other gauges of the job market drew a bleaker picture: A wave of people stopped looking for work, and paychecks failed to budge.

72. New Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect on Wednesday, July 1.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state’s abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

73. New Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Wednesday.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state's abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

74. New Tennessee Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect on Wednesday, July 1.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state’s abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

75. Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Develops Tighter Focus -

In good times and bad, change is a constant. During the recession, nonprofits were stretched financially and emotionally as demands for services increased and funding declined.

A recalibration was in order, and that was something that the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence preached.

76. How Pope Francis’ Climate Encyclical Translates to Memphis -

On Thursday, June 18, the Vatican released Pope Francis’ much-anticipated encyclical, “Laudato si” (Praise Be to You: On the Care for Our Common Home). For some time now, Catholics, environmentalists and other Vatican watchers were aware that Francis was going to focus on the environment, especially the problem of global climate change.

77. Who Donates The Most? Individuals! -

The numbers are in: Americans gave an estimated $358.38 billion to charity in 2014. That’s 7.1 percent over 2013, and the fifth year in a row that giving increased. Individuals – that’s you and me – continue to give an estimated 90 percent of all gifts.

78. American Bar Association President Pushes Online Models for Civil Disputes -

The president of the American Bar Association says the traditional method of providing pro bono legal services in civil matters to those who can’t afford to pay for an attorney isn’t working despite best efforts.

79. Tennessee State Employees Slighted by 'Voluntary' Buyout -

More and more, Tennessee’s state employees are feeling the same harsh realities of those working – or formerly working – in corporate America.

On the heels of 1,500 buyouts under the Bredesen administration in 2008 and 850 layoffs in 2010, Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 2,000 employees in the executive branch.

80. Apple Music Brings Change to Streaming, But Is It Enough? -

When Apple launches its Apple Music streaming service at the end of June, it will affect things big and small in the music industry.

Hundreds of millions of iPhone and iPad users in more than 100 countries will get to try the $10-per-month service for free for the next three months when it is pushed to their devices with a free upgrade.

81. Council to Fill Vacancy, Consider Buying State Office Building -

Memphis City Council members appoint a new council member Tuesday, May 18, and consider spending more than $8 million to purchase, renovate and relocate workers to the Donnelley J. Hill state office building that stands near City Hall in Civic Center Plaza.

82. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

83. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

84. Welcome to the New Era of Automation -

When Netflix put the video rental retail stores in their coffins, there was still a sizable segment of people who missed the convenience, were suspect of a mail-order or streaming subscription service or simply didn’t have the connectivity to enjoy it.

85. Council Remains Critical of City Plans for State Office Building -

The city of Memphis’ information technology department recently signed a new lease for office space at Pembroke Square Downtown.

The city inked the 20,595-square-foot lease as the administration of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to win council approval to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building for $1.5 million.

86. Don't Panic, College Seniors: Jobs for Grads Likely to Grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The consulting and accounting firm EY is aggressively recruiting on college campuses this spring. The company formerly known as Ernst & Young plans to hire 9,000 graduates from U.S. universities this year, up from 7,500 in 2014. But recruiting isn't as easy as it used to be.

87. 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite for Edible Insects -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.

An increasing number of "entopreneurs" are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.

88. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

89. Internet Outages Reveal Gaps in US Broadband Infrastructure -

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – When vandals sliced a fiber-optic cable in the Arizona desert last month, they did more than time-warp thousands of people back to an era before computers, credit cards or even phones. They exposed a glaring vulnerability in the nation's Internet infrastructure: no backup systems in many places.

90. How to Delve Further Into User Insights -

Think of it as the front end of the front end, this fusion of methods for solving problems for real people and creating a better experience for them.

By fusing Design Thinking and User Experience, you learn the socio-psychological wants and desires of your user base and understand their world, as well unpacking attitudes, reactions, and emotions about a specific tested object.

91. The Science Behind Making the Visible Invisible -

Researchers like Dr. Rami Kalyanaraman and Gerd Duscher, associate professors of materials science engineering at the University of Tennessee, could not develop cloaking devices or work to achieve true invisibility without the use of metamaterials. But what are these fancy new materials and how do they work?

92. Drones Rule: Proposed Rules for Commercial Unmanned Aircraft -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Drone on, the government says.

Just not through the night sky. Or close to an airport. Or out of the operator's sight. And probably not winging its way with a pizza or package, any time soon.

93. Sunday Deadline Driving Health Law Sign-Ups for 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Ahead of a Sunday deadline, consumers are stepping up to enroll for 2015 coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law, administration officials said Wednesday.

94. Anthem Breach: A Gap in Federal Health Privacy Law? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Insurers aren't required to encrypt consumers' data under a 1990s federal law that remains the foundation for health care privacy in the Internet age – an omission that seems striking in light of the major cyberattack against Anthem.

95. Living Well -

Depression doesn’t make reservations in advance. It just descends. There is also no formula for a human being’s breaking point. Especially when there could be neurologic or psychiatric forces in play, perhaps without the affected person even being aware of them.

96. Obama Administration on Track to Surpass Health Care Goal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Some 9.5 million people have already signed up for 2015 coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law, and the administration is on track to surpass its nationwide enrollment target set last year.

97. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

98. Medicare Chief Steps Down, Ran Health Care Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare's top administrator unexpectedly resigned Friday, becoming the latest casualty in the turmoil over the president's health care law, which is still struggling for acceptance even as millions benefit from expanded coverage.

99. Three Ways to Evaluate Nonprofit Technology -

Part one of a two-part series. “The main reason nonprofits look to update or implement technology is to acquire additional functionality that will automate more tasks, which they hope will free up time to work on more strategic projects.” – Janna Finch

100. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.