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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Opening Day at the Polls, Court Square Sighting and Different Moonlight -

For some candidates summer heat is a campaign tradition that they thrive on. Governor Ned McWherter was one of those candidates. But for most of those running for political office in an election year, it amps up the grueling pace immeasurably, especially the pace of a statewide campaign in a state whose northeastern most point is closer to Canada than it is to Memphis. That is the atmospheric setting for Friday’s first day of the early voting period. And a look at the past turnout for this election cycle shows the statewide primaries on the ballot will likely tell a good part of the story.

2. Slumping tech stocks erase earlier, oil-led rise for indexes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The surging price of oil lifted energy stocks on Wednesday, but other areas of the market faltered. After zooming higher in the morning, a slump in technology stocks helped drag U.S. indexes to modest losses in the afternoon.

3. Last Word: The Heat and The Memphis Identity and Stackhouse to Grizz -

What is it that draws us to social events outside when it is this hot? This is a topic where the specifics counsel against generalities. So it could be argued that the beckoning of summer heat – pre-summer heat in this case – that smothers you after greeting you like a brick wall at any door opening is an indication of the degree to which you are of Memphis.

4. UT/West Institute’s Hayes Plays Critical Role in The Cancer Genome Atlas -

The Cancer Genome Atlas, a comprehensive map of the key genomic changes in 33 types of cancer, wrapped up a decade-long, $300 million national science project in April, with Dr. D. Neil Hayes, scientific director of the University of Tennessee/West Institute for Cancer Research, playing one of only a handful of leadership roles. 

5. Last Word: Bar-B-Foo, Grizz Draft Prospects and The Hampline -

Alleged sightings of Dave Grohl at the barbecue contest Thursday in Tom Lee Park and a photograph from a distance that might or might not be the head Foo Fighter. This does happen at the barbecue contest – celebrities quietly coming in with a team. Sometimes not so quietly as when Vice President Al Gore returned in the 1990s to a contest he had a booth at during his time as a U.S. Senator.

6. Tom Wolfe, Pioneering 'New Journalist,' Dead At 88 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Tom Wolfe, the white-suited wizard of "New Journalism" who exuberantly chronicled American culture from the Merry Pranksters through the space race before turning his satiric wit to such novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full," has died. He was 88.

7. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Stupid F#!&ing Bird” Friday, April 20, through May 13 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

8. Last Word: Parking Distrust, Early Voting Numbers and Missile Strike Reaction -

There is probably no better symbol of the distrust that has been a factor in reaching a compromise in Overton Park to end greensward parking by the Memphis Zoo. It is what happened to the idea of a walkway from the zoo plaza to the greensward with the critical juncture being where the gravel driveway is now that is used by cars to park on the greensward. We examine that and other larger points from last week’s decision by City Hall to change the design and make the amended plan the final plan.

9. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

10. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

11. Lawmakers Seek to Ease Jack Daniel’s Tax Burden -

NASHVILLE – Jack Daniel’s is over a barrel – literally – regarding a tax assessment, an attorney general’s opinion and the potential impact of President Donald Trump’s trade tariff.

12. Last Word: Graceland's New Lawsuit, Memphis March For Our Lives and Trolley Test -

Remember the comment from last week’s EDGE meeting by EDGE board member Tom Dyer who said the economic development body was likely to be sued no matter what it did on Graceland’s application for tax breaks on its “convention center” plan in Whitehaven? At week’s end, Graceland followed through with a lawsuit in Chancery Court against EDGE for delaying a decision on the matter. The lawsuit contends EDGE has no intention of making a decision on incentives and that Graceland is entitled to those incentives.

13. White House Downgrades Kushner's Security Clearance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The security clearance of White House senior adviser and presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner has been downgraded, significantly reducing his access to classified information, according to two people informed of the decision.

14. Gibson Confirms Plans for New Memphis Facility -

Nashville-based guitar maker Gibson Brands Inc. confirmed Friday, Oct. 20, it is putting its Downtown Memphis factory on the market and plans to build and lease a new facility nearby.

15. Gibson Confirms Plans for New Memphis Factory -

Nashville-based guitar maker Gibson Brands Inc. confirmed Friday, Oct. 20, it is putting its Downtown Memphis factory on the market and plans to build and lease a new facility nearby.

The Gibson Beale Street Showcase and Guitar Factory opened more than 16 years ago at 145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., across South B.B. King Boulevard from FedExForum.

16. In No-Nonsense Business Of SEC, Bottom Line is Bottom Line -

That red Pontiac Fiero. Texas A&M football coach Kevin Sumlin had one back in the day.

“Remember those things?” Sumlin said before the season, answering a question about his job security and recalling his career’s humble beginnings. “They caught fire in the back and all that other stuff.”

17. Amazon Must Pay $295 Million in Back Taxes, EU Says -

BRUSSELS (AP) – Amazon has to pay $295 million in back taxes to Luxembourg, the European Union ordered Wednesday, in its latest attempt to tighten the screws on multinationals it says are avoiding taxes through sweetheart deals with individual EU states.

18. Win vs. Georgia Now Needed to Save Season -

It’s been a long week for Tennessee football. UT’s Sept. 30 game against Georgia at Neyland Stadium can’t get here soon enough. Not after the Vols’ 26-20 loss to Florida last Saturday in Gainesville.

19. Last Word: The Brooks Question, Boyd's Answer and Tigers In the Polls -

Art as a real estate consideration. One of the more unusual of many considerations as the Brooks search for a new site – a possible new site, I should add, becomes the city’s favorite topic. So from the CRE vantage point – here are two more possible sites to think about if you haven’t already – Cossitt Library and the Fairgrounds, as well as right where it has been for the last century.

20. Be Prepared to Strike While the Iron is Hot -

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Charlottesville. DACA. These are just three “hot topics” that dominated traditional and online media recently. Here’s the question: Has your nonprofit increased its revenue, number of donors, people served or community profile as a result of recent national media attention?

21. Vols, Jackets Each Eager to Make Statement -

Enough of the talk. Enough of the speculation. Let’s play some football.

Tennessee starts its fifth season of the Butch Jones coaching era on Monday night against Georgia Tech at the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. Kickoff is 8 p.m. (TV: ESPN).

22. Last Word: No Deal, Ivan Rabb and Intermodals in Overton Park -

And the winner is … not Fred’s. After months of speculation about the Memphis-based discount retail store’s transformation into a pharmacy-based enterprise with the purchase of hundreds of Rite Aid stores in a third-party divestment move, Fred’s was nowhere to be found when Walgreens announced a deal Thursday to buy the Rite Aid stores. The corporation told investors it will still pursue its strategy but acknowledged its trajectory is “stunted” – that as Fred’s got hammered on Wall Street.

23. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

24. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

25. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

26. The Press Box: Chandler Parsons a Playa, Just Not Yet a Player -

These are headlines you could not have read:

“Chandler Parsons on Four-Game Hot Streak for Grizzlies.”

“Parsons Knee Recovery a Medical Miracle!”

“Parsons’ Play Pushes Grizz to Next Level of Title Contender.”

27. Networking Helping Propel Women-Owned Businesses To New Heights -

When Memphis middle schoolers and sisters Madison Star and Mallory Iyana went on “Shark Tank” and secured $60,000 and partnerships with both Mark Cuban and Daymond John, they took their place among the ranks of female entrepreneurs who, in large numbers these days, are showing the business world that they are a force to be reckoned with.

28. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

29. Last Word: Humes Next, Top ZIPs in Residential and Payback in the Legislature -

Add Dave & Buster’s to the list of "it" retail hot spots. The restaurant-arcade has inked a lease in Cordova by Wolfchase Galeria with plans to open later this year, probably fourth quarter.

30. 2016: Not Too Many Banking Industry Surprises -

When shareholders of First Tennessee Bank’s Memphis-based parent company convened in April at the bank’s Downtown Memphis headquarters for their annual meeting, the whole thing wrapped up in about 10 minutes.

31. Baptist Prepares to Open Pediatric Intensive Care Unit -

Baptist Memorial Health Care is opening a 12-bed pediatric intensive care unit next week at the Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital, the latest addition to Baptist’s growing suite of pediatric services.

32. 20th Haiku Conference a Good One -

Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that traditionally was written in three lines, featuring two images juxtaposed. Always with a syllable-count of 17, parsed as 5-7-5. There are other rules as well.

33. Zuckerberg: 'Crazy' to Say Facebook Influenced Election -

NEW YORK (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says the idea that fake news spread on Facebook influenced the outcome of the U.S. election is "crazy."

Still, the majority of Americans (six in 10) say they get at least some news from social media , mostly Facebook, according to the Pew Research Center. While a lot of this news comes from established outlets – whether CNN or BuzzFeed News, misinformation spreads on Facebook just as information does, shared by users, recommended by software and amplified by both.

34. Businesses Can Expect to Pay More For Insurance Products in 2017 -

Many businesses are feeling the sting of increasing medical insurance costs, while premiums for other types of business insurance have remained stable over the past year. But that’s all likely to change in the next year, as rates are expected to rise.

35. Hospitable Market -

The Memphis area hotel market continues on its solid run of the past few years, led by the Downtown submarket with strong occupancy and room rates. The pipeline for new Downtown hotel projects is loaded, with as many as 15 projects in various stages of development and hotel construction picking up in other parts of the county.

36. Vols Can’t Afford Another Iffy Effort at the Speedway -

Imagine if Tennessee running back Jalen Hurd hadn’t recovered the fumble by UT quarterback Joshua Dobbs in the end zone for a touchdown in overtime last Thursday night.

37. Creating Environmentally Conscious Offices -

Environmental consciousness is a hot topic for many individuals today, but is that conversation transferrable to the workplace? It’s possible to bring a green mindset to the workplace by either implementing a few eco-friendly tips yourself or by suggesting them to management for all to benefit from. And, why not start now, during the warm, dare we say scorching hot, months of the summer, which raise some particularly unique solutions for consideration.

38. Starbucks to Increase Base Pay of Workers in October -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks is boosting the base pay of all employees and store managers at U.S. company-run stores by 5 percent or more.

In a letter sent to workers Monday, CEO Howard Schultz said that the amount of the raise — which will occur in October— will be determined by geographic and market factors. Starbucks doesn't disclose specifics on starting salaries for employees, saying it's determined on a market by market basis.

39. 1866 Memphis Massacre Anniversary Draws Historians -

South Street is now named G.E Patterson Boulevard in one of two name changes since the thoroughfare was a dirt road trod by horses and the wagons they pulled.

The only reminder of the street’s status as an epicenter of the violence 150 years ago this month that killed 46 people and burned every black church and school in the city to the ground is a plaque unveiled Sunday, May 1, in Army Park.

40. Events -

SRVS will host a free dance and movement class for the general public, including people with disabilities, on Tuesday, April 26, from 10 a.m. to noon at the J.K. Lewis Senior Center, 1188 North Parkway. Participants must be 18 or older. Email astrid.french@srvs.org to register.

41. Events -

SRVS will host a free dance and movement class for the general public, including people with disabilities, on Tuesday, April 26, from 10 a.m. to noon at the J.K. Lewis Senior Center, 1188 North Parkway. Participants must be 18 or older. Email astrid.french@srvs.org to register.

42. Student Loans: The Next Subprime Disaster? -

Ray’s Take: If you Google the words “student loan crisis,” millions of hits should convince you that this is a very hot topic.

According to the most recent Department of Education report released in September 2015, the federal loan default rate stands at 11.8 percent for borrowers who were required to start making payments during the 12 months prior to October 2012. While this is slightly lower than the previous report, it’s still not good. And the rate doesn't include borrowers who have been able to defer payments. Additionally, the most recent graduates will face the highest costs and will be emerging into what continues to be a very poor job market. We have every reason to believe that defaults are not only understated, but they will increase.

43. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

44. New Laws in 2016 Show States are Diverging on Guns, Voting -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Laws taking effect at the start of the new year show states diverging on some hot-button issues.

Restrictions on carrying guns will ease in Texas, for example, but will get tighter in California. It will be easier to register to vote in Oregon, but there will be another step to take at the polls in North Carolina.

45. Cybersecurity Starts With Employees -

Cybersecurity has been a hot topic for companies and individuals alike in recent years. Last month, the U.S. Senate passed the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, a new bill aimed to protect companies from hackers. The purpose is to allow businesses to communicate with each other and also share information with the government on cyber-criminal intelligence.

46. Pfizer, Allergan in Deal Talks to Create Drug Giant -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Pfizer and Botox maker Allergan are discussing a potential deal that could be the biggest of 2015, a year marked by a rapid-fire pace of megadeals, particularly in health care.

47. Report: Walgreens Nears Deal to Buy Rite Aid -

Shares of Rite Aid jumped nearly 40 percent Tuesday afternoon on a report that it may be gobbled up in the next major acquisition by Walgreens, the biggest U.S. drugstore chain.

The Wall Street Journal said Walgreens Boots Alliance is in advanced talks to buy Rite Aid, which is based in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. The deal would combine the largest and third-largest U.S. drugstore chains, based on store counts.

48. Better Titans Doing Nothing for Whisenhunt’s Record -

The whispers are already out there. How much job security does Ken Whisenhunt really have with the Tennessee Titans?

It seems a little soon for message boards and talk radio to be discussing the ouster of the Titans coach, but such is life in the coaching fish bowl when you lose games that should go into the win column, like the Titans have done in their past two games.

49. Heat Really On for Jones Against Arkansas -

It’s been a long week for Tennessee football coach Butch Jones.

Kickoff can’t come soon enough for Jones and his staff Saturday night when the Vols (2-2, 0-1 SEC) play host to Arkansas (1-3, 0-1) at Neyland Stadium.

50. After Trying to Just Fit In, Jeff Green Looks to Make Bigger Impact on Grizz -

Center Marc Gasol looks at Jeff Green and sees what does not exist anywhere else on the Grizzlies’ veteran, often plodding, roster.

51. Events -

High Point Terrace retailers will hold a fundraiser for the family of Memphis police officer Sean Bolton Thursday, Aug. 13, at 5:30 p.m. at High Point Pub, 477 High Point Terrace. The event will feature live music, and hot dogs, hamburgers and sides for sale. All tips and funds placed in the collection jar as well as a percentage of pub sales will be donated. For more information, call 901-237-1658.

52. Titans Announce Deal With Marcus Mariota -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Heisman Trophy winner Marcus Mariota signed with the Tennessee Titans on Tuesday, July 21, becoming the last of the NFL’s first-round draft picks to finalize his deal.

The former Oregon quarterback is expected to start immediately, with the timing of the contract keeping the No. 2 overall pick on track to open the season Sept. 13 at Tampa Bay against Jameis Winston – the No. 1 overall selection from the draft.

53. Dollar Tree Will Sell 330 Stores to Private Equity Firm -

NEW YORK (AP) – Dollar Tree said Friday that it has agreed to sell 330 of its stores to the private equity firm Sycamore Partners in order to get regulatory approval for its $8.5 billion purchase of Family Dollar.

54. Schumer's '12 Angry Men' Satire Stings -

A recent episode of “Inside Amy Schumer” parodies the 1957 Sidney Lumet movie “12 Angry Men.” A “jury” of dudes deliberate whether Schumer is “hot enough” to be on TV. Jeff Goldblum, John Hawkes, Paul Giamatti, Nick DiPaolo and Kumail Nanjiani are spot-on with their mimicry of the original actors from the movie – Henry Fonda, Ed Begely, Lee J. Cobb and others.

55. Tennessee Medical Association Unveils Legislative Agenda -

Ahead of its annual Day on the Hill next month and fresh off the legislative defeat of a Medicaid expansion in Tennessee, the state’s largest professional association for doctors has unveiled its wish list for the 2015 legislative session.

56. Old Favorites -

A few years ago, Tandy Wilson, chef and owner of City House, offered this tip about earning his respect as a diner: Don’t tell me you’re a foodie, he said, tell me you’re a “regular.”

We were having a conversation about overuse of the term “foodie,” and how even though it can be a well-meaning label to show a person’s interest in a particular topic, it also can carry the snobbish weight of those who salivate over the trendiest dishes – and then salivate over their keypads to type a Yelp review after just one visit.

57. Events -

Italian Winterfest, benefiting Ave Maria Home and the Catholic Education Scholarship Fund, will be held Sunday, Jan. 11, at 5 p.m. at The Racquet Club, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. The event will feature Italian cuisine and signature dishes from 15 Memphis restaurants, plus traditional Italian tableside music and a deejay. Tickets are $45. Visit avemariahome.org.

58. Events -

The Daily News offices will be closed Thursday, Jan. 1, for New Year’s Day. Offices will reopen Friday, Jan. 2, at 8:30 a.m.

T.O. Fuller State Park will hold a New Year’s Day hike on the 4.5-mile Discovery Trail Thursday, Jan. 1, starting at 9:30 a.m. at the visitors center, 1500 W. Mitchell Road. Members of the Tennessee Trails Association will be serving samples of black-eyed peas, cornbread, chips and dip and hot chocolate, and a ranger will be present to host a birds of prey program. Cost is free. Call the park office at 543-7581 for details.

59. Hillsboro High Land Sale: New School, Big Profit -

Merritt Rowe knows her children will never personally benefit from any changes to Hillsboro High School in Green Hills, but as the parent of two current students and another starting next year, it is something she is willing to fight for and encourages other parents – especially those of future students – to do the same.

60. Just When We Started to Feel Good About UT Football -

KNOXVILLE – All seemed so right for the University of Tennessee’s football team for 36 hours or so after last Saturday’s 50-16 victory over Kentucky at Neyland Stadium.

UT (5-5, 2-4 SEC) won its second straight conference game and moved within one victory of gaining bowl eligibility for the first time since 2010.

61. Top Advertising Week Trends -

Advertising geeks from across the nation unite annually at “Advertising Week” to hear industry experts share opinions on the current state of advertising and predictions for the future.

62. City: Rideshare Services Need Permits for Airport Use -

The city of Memphis will ask popular ridesharing services such as Uber and Lyft to cease and desist operations until they acquire city permits.

“We know (Uber and Lyft) are doing business in Memphis without the required permit,” said Memphis spokeswoman Dewanna Smith. “We will send them a cease-and-desist notice along with an application and links to our ordinances. That letter has only recently been approved by counsel and will be going out soon.”

63. City to Issue Cease-and-Desist Notices to Rideshare Services -

The city of Memphis will ask popular ridesharing services such as Uber and Lyft to cease and desist operations until they acquire city permits.

“We know (Uber and Lyft) are doing business in Memphis without the required permit,” said Memphis spokeswoman Dewanna Smith. “We will send them a cease-and-desist notice along with an application and links to our ordinances. That letter has only recently been approved by counsel and will be going out soon.”

64. Year on The Bridge -

In a tiny chapel at St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, a group of three people listened intently last week as traffic whizzed by an open door onto Poplar Avenue on the other side of a wrought iron fence.

65. Lake to Put Logistics Savvy to Use for Memphis World Trade Club -

Don Lake, vice president of international operations for Dunavant Logistics Group, will add another accomplishment to an already impressive and diverse logistics resume.

66. Supreme Court Term Begins Amid Government Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court began its new term Monday by turning away hundreds of appeals, including Virginia's bid to revive its anti-sodomy law.

The justices took the bench just past 10 o'clock on the first Monday in October, even as much of the rest of the government was coping with a partial shutdown.

67. Coopwood Lays Out Future of Health Care -

Health care was the hot topic Thursday, Sept. 19, as nearly 150 people gathered in the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art auditorium to discuss the current landscape and impending changes in that field.

Health Care: The State of the Industry – one of six seminars in The Daily News’ 2013 Seminar Series – attracted a variety of professionals, most of them from outside the medical realm. They included lawyers, architects, administrative professionals, Realtors, assisted-living specialists and bankers, among others, and most of them were eager to learn more about the Affordable Care Act and how it would affect them. Others came to be inspired.

68. Events -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center will host Line Dancing for BLUES, in recognition of Infant Mortality Awareness Month, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the student alumni center, 800 Madison Ave. The event will include a line dance-a-thon, and information on infant mortality and the BLUES Project. Suggested donation is $5. Visit uthsc.edu/blues for details.

69. New York Transplant Campbell Takes Over Health Law Institute -

In her new office at The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law on the bluffs of the Mississippi River, a thousand miles from where she grew up in Ithaca, N.Y., Amy Campbell is getting used to all things Southern.

70. Cyber Crime Growing Priority for FBI -

Glankler Brown PLLC attorneys on Wednesday, Sept. 11, welcomed FBI Supervisory Special Agent Scott E. Augenbaum as the guest speaker for a cyber crime seminar for staff and clients at its East Memphis office.

71. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will host a conversation with Bill Strickland, CEO of Manchester Bidwell Corp. and author of “Making the Impossible, Possible,” Wednesday, Aug. 21, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Peabody, 149 Union Ave. Strickland’s topic is “The Art of Leadership & The Business of Social Change.” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. Visit memphischamber.com or call 543-3571.

72. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will host a performance of “Les Miserables” to benefit the Memphis Child Advocacy Center Saturday, Aug. 17, at 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. A pre-performance reception and silent auction begin at 6 p.m. Tickets are $60 and are available through MCAC, 888-4342.

73. Events -

Graceland will host the Elvis Week candlelight vigil Thursday, Aug. 15, at 8:30 p.m. at the gates of Graceland, 3717 Elvis Presley Blvd. Admission is free. Visit elvis.com/elvisweek for more information. More Elvis Week events are listed below.

74. Marshall ‘Connects Dots,’ Keeps State Beautiful -

Missy Marshall, who has spent the past 20 years working in state government, was recently named executive director of Keep Tennessee Beautiful.

The public service organization is a partnership with the Tennessee Department of Transportation and the University of Memphis Extended Programs, and is funded by the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission.

75. Banks' Earnings Pop Masks Deeper Concerns -

NEW YORK (AP) – Major U.S. banks have turned in big profit gains this season, but the news isn't all good.

Much of the earnings increase is coming from cutting costs, rather than growing their core lending businesses. A boom in mortgage refinancing looks like it's about to peter out. And regulators are considering stricter new rules that would force the banks to shore up their cash.

76. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, June 26, from noon to 1 p.m. at The University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. District Attorney General Amy Weirich will speak. Cost is $18 for nonmembers.

77. Daily News Seminar Spotlights Financial Hot Topics -

Craig Dismuke, the chief economic strategist of Vining Sparks IBG LP, opened his keynote address at The Daily News’ “Money and Markets” seminar Thursday, June 6, with a story that brought some insight into the wisdom that people – often erroneously – ascribe to experts in various fields, including economists.

78. Answering Memphis’ Hot Sports Topics -

In a week with too many worthy column topics and too many valid questions deserving answers, let’s spend a few moments with each one.

First up, “The Lionel Hollins Situation.” The very name tells you what a mess it has become. There are many questions here, but let’s focus on these three:

79. UT Health Science Center Revives Bachelor of Nursing Program -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center plans to reactivate its baccalaureate program for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing beginning in the fall. The program was suspended in December 2009.

80. Law Review Symposium Addresses Human Trafficking -

A 2011 report from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on human sex trafficking put it bluntly:

“The results … are shocking. Human trafficking and sex slavery in Tennessee is more common than previously believed possible.”

81. First National Expanding Into Memphis-Area Walmart Stores -

The New Year marks a major milestone for First National Realty Inc., as the Memphis-based residential real estate brokerage firm has plans to expand branch offices into 13 Walmart Supercenters in the Memphis metro area.

82. Webinar Looks at Employment Law -

At least from a regulatory perspective, the fog is starting to lift on what the next several years will bring in the way of employment law changes and updates.

With that in mind, the labor and employment law firm of Fisher & Phillips LLP is hosting two separate hour-long webinars this month for employers to get a sense of what change might be on the horizon. Especially of interest to employers will be insights from Fisher & Phillips attorneys on what to expect from agencies like the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Labor Relations Board and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

83. Bar Seminar to Discuss Latest Labor Issues -

Talk of several prominent employment law issues and challenges – with insight gleaned from leading national legal figures – will be part of next week’s daylong annual seminar of the Memphis Bar Association’s Labor & Employment Law Section.

84. Full Docket -

Here’s a look at what’s going on at the moment in the city’s legal community and some things that are on the horizon.

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law is celebrating its golden anniversary this year. On Oct. 27, the school held its 50th anniversary celebration for the Downtown facility, which opened in 2010 and marked a new chapter for a building that once was the Front Street post office for nearly 40 years and a federal courthouse before that.

85. Bar Launches Health Care Law Section -

The Memphis Bar Association has a new section of attorneys dedicated specifically to health care law.

The bar’s newly formed Health Law Section held its organizational meeting Oct. 17 at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Officers were chosen at that time, including Robyn Diaz, deputy general counsel at St. Jude, who led the effort to form the section and who was nominated as the first chair.

86. High Court Begins New Term With Human Rights Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court opened its new term Monday with a high-stakes dispute between businesses and human rights groups over accountability for foreign atrocities.

The justices appeared ready to impose new limits on lawsuits brought in U.S. courts over human rights violations abroad.

87. Clearances, Heat Lured Shoppers to Spend in July -

NEW YORK (AP) – Americans shoppers proved resilient in July, driving a key sales figure up at retailers across the country, despite persistent worry about jobs and the global economy.

Results came in better than expected for many retailers, helped by hot weather and summer clearance sales, an encouraging sign as the back-to-school season, the second-biggest shopping season behind the holidays, kicks off.

88. Readers Have Their Say -

Viewer mail continues at a record pace. I love it! Phil Newman wrote, “Enjoyed your ‘Check please’ column in the Nashville Ledger, but would submit that you left out one of the most famous usages of the phrase. In “Dumb & Dumber,” after Harry and Lloyd kill the bad guy accidentally by slipping peppers into his burger, Jim Carrey raises his head from the chest of the bad guy and says, ‘Check, please!’ Perfect line and timing.”

89. Legend Retires From Bowen School of Law -

In 1975-76, I had Ken Gould for Torts. Two years later, I had him for Practice Skills. In the latter, he surprised us one day with a written exercise. “Take out a sheet of paper and write out, informally, what you think would be your ideal legal career. Take 15 minutes.”

90. Forum Addresses Latest HUD, Real Estate Trends -

People who receive housing counseling before they borrow are much less likely to default. Research shows that 75 percent of at-risk homeowners who meet with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development housing counselors and attend loss mitigation programs won’t be foreclosed.

91. Chandler Event To Highlight Q1 Housing -

Shelby County home sales increased 20 percent from January to March compared to last year, but that number requires some reading between the lines.

That’s why real estate information company Chandler Reports is hosting its “Master Your Market: First Quarter Update” event for local agents, appraisers, builders, investors and bankers Thursday, May 3.

92. Attorneys Warn Against Workplace Political Talk -

Memphis attorney Jeff Weintraub was involved in a case recently that involved an employee who took offense at some political comments her employer made.

93. 2012 Should Be Busy For Health Care -

This year is positioned to be very interesting in the world of health care. From the Supreme Court hearing in March until the presidential election in November, health care is guaranteed a place in the news for the rest of the year. In addition to the big stories, some smaller health care stories will also grab some of the limelight as the medical industry deals with changing trends and developments.

94. Companies Sue County Over Minority Contracts -

Giving minority contractors a bigger share of the pie in doing business with local government is a hot topic at the moment.

City and county officials, for example, have found themselves in recent days under pressure to explain low levels of minority participation in some of the area’s high-dollar capital investment projects.

95. MBA To Spend Year Educating Public on Law -

The Memphis Bar Association is gearing up for a major public outreach program in the form of an educational campaign.

Gary Smith, the 2012 president of the attorneys’ group, along with secretary Tommy Parker and member Porter Feild, have developed a program they’re calling “Law Rules: The Importance of the American Legal System.”

96. NLRB Faces Heightened Scrutiny in 2012 -

President Barack Obama made a series of recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board Wednesday, apparently staving off what would have been an inability for the board to function in 2012.

97. Smith Has Full Plate as 2012 MBA Prez -

The new president of the Memphis Bar Association said a hot topic in the coming year will be how appellate judges are selected.

Some of the debate about changing the process from one of appointment by the governor followed by the next scheduled retention election will come from Nashville, where the Tennessee Legislature will consider bills to change that.

98. Judicial Selection Topic of Debate -

A leading supporter and an opponent of the way judges are chosen in Tennessee will square off for a debate Friday, Dec. 9, in advance of what’s expected to be significant discussion about the topic among state lawmakers in 2012.

99. Community Banks Resist Fees For Debit Cards -

Community banks have always possessed a certain charm among American financial institutions, one embodied by personal touches, friendly service and fewer headaches and hassles than their bigger brethren.

100. Tattoo You With Personality -

It sure would make things easier if we had our personality types tattooed on our foreheads, wouldn’t it?

Last week, when it just wasn’t hot enough in Memphis, I went to Texas (112 degrees) to visit my brother, Sean, an entrepreneur who has about five employees and assorted subcontractors. We were discussing an age-old topic: Why don’t our employees see things the way we do?