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Editorial Results (free)

1. Loeb Properties to Reposition YoLo, Kwik Shop Grill -

YoLo Frozen Yogurt in Overton Square and the Kwik Shop Grill at Central Avenue and East Parkway are both on their way out.

Property owner Loeb Properties will soon undertake significant remodels at the locally-owned Midtown restaurants to attract other restaurant tenants.

2. Frayser Targeted as Pilot Area for Citywide Fight Against Blight -

Last week, a wrecking team demolished a single-family home in the Washington Heights neighborhood in South Memphis. The effort, organized by United Housing Inc. and backed by the U.S. Department of Treasury, was the first of its kind to take place.

3. Online Tax Sale Begins Wednesday -

Shelby County government’s third online sale of tax-delinquent properties begins Wednesday, June 22, at 8 a.m. and runs through Friday, June 24, at 8 p.m.

The sale is one of four each year conducted by the Chancery Court clerk and master and the Shelby County Trustee’s office.

4. Last Word: A Distinct Reaction, City Hall's Budget Season and BreakFest On Broad -

Funeral services for Memphis Police Officer Verdell Smith are set for Friday at Hope Presbyterian Church in Cordova.

The day before that Downtown leaders will gather in Handy Park on Beale Street to talk about new measures to make the district safer.

5. Attorney Schattgen Joins Bass, Berry & Sims -

Shine Chen Schattgen has joined the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims LLP as an associate in the law firm’s health care group. Schattgen, who previously practiced in the Boston office of Ropes & Gray LLP, counsels health care clients on a range of operational, regulatory and transactional matters.

6. Caesars Donates 50 TVs To Harrah’s Hope Lodge -

Caesars Entertainment employee volunteers from Horseshoe Tunica and Tunica Roadhouse casinos installed 50 donated television sets at the American Cancer Society Harrah’s Hope Lodge on June 1.

7. The Week Ahead: May 30-June 5 -

It's time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from a Funkadelic party at the New Daisy to a Day of Merrymaking on the Greensward... 

8. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

9. Demolition Begins On Raleigh Springs Mall Property -

With the business end of a Volvo crawler excavator, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison kicked off the start of demolition Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall.

10. Raleigh Mall Demolition Begins Saturday -

The city begins demolition of the Sears Auto Center Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall even though the city is still in court with the owners of the main mall building itself in eminent domain proceedings.

11. French Fort Motel Compromise Hard-Fought -

The developer of the old Marine Hospital south of E.H. Crump Avenue at the Memphis-Arkansas Bridge across the Mississippi River and the leader of the French Fort neighborhood association never actually talked to each other Wednesday, May 4.

12. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

13. Editorial: Unlocking the Real Benefits of Regionalism -

It’s easy to say regionalism should be a goal – that the leadership of all of our communities should work together for the common good of the region.

And it’s been said so often that general appeals for regionalism have become meaningless.

14. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

15. Last Word: The Zoo's Proposal, Health and Ed In Limbo and Annexation's Effect -

A busy weekend on several fronts not the least of which was Overton Park and the Greensward controversy.
The Greensward itself was pretty subdued on a chilly Saturday.
The action was to be found in an email the zoo sent out Saturday making some proposals and offering some thoughts on the traffic and parking study the Overton Park Conservancy released last week.
Here is our summary
of what the zoo is offering in what may be a new effort in the public discussion.
Of course, the private discussion which is the mediation effort continues. But it sounds like some of the mediation discussions may be finding their way into the public discussion.
The public discussion has been sporadically active but very muted so far. For instance there has been talk before of zoo parking on the eastern side of the park in what until recently was a city maintenance yard.
The proposal by the zoo was shot down pretty quickly because it included running a tram through the Old Forest.
But there are some scenarios that wouldn’t take such a tram through the Old Forest.
The zoo email from Saturday isn’t specific on how the folks who would park at the maintenance yard would get from there to the zoo.
Presumably that is grounds for some type of discussion.

16. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

17. Genome Explorations Leads Push To Bring Personalized Medicine to Patients -

Memphis-based Genome Explorations is hoping to take 15 years of genetics and pharmacogenetics research and translate it into personalized medicine that will fundamentally change the way prolific diseases like cancer and heart disease are treated.

18. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

19. Millionaires: Raise Our Taxes to Address Poverty, Fix Roads -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) – More than 40 millionaires, including members of the Rockefeller and Disney families, are asking to have their taxes raised to help address poverty and rebuild failing infrastructure.

20. Sweetening the Pot -

The role of the private and public sectors in growing minority wealth came to a head at the March 16 board meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

EDGE says that requiring companies that are receiving tax breaks to contract with minority- and women-owned companies makes for good public policy.

21. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

22. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

23. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

24. Poplar Opens Up -

The prized retail stretch of Poplar Avenue between Perkins Road and Interstate 240 is shaking up in a way the area hasn’t seen in several decades. Within the next two years, more than 230,000 square feet will be made available in what has historically been a tight trade area.

25. Medical Startup Trades Texas for Germantown -

David Leon’s medical device startup is the latest addition to a rapidly expanding health care, biotech and life sciences landscape in the Memphis area.

26. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

27. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

28. Memphis' Mow-to-Own Program Scheduled to Launch in 2016 -

MEMPHIS (AP) — One of the city of Memphis' newest initiatives to aid in fighting blight is scheduled to launch in 2016.

The mow-to-own ordinance is an avenue for property owners to mow an adjoining city- or county-owned vacant lot to earn credits toward buying it, The Commercial Appeal reported. Property owners can register, pay a $175 fee and maintain the vacant lot adjacent to their own property over a period of up to three years.

29. Board Denies Plans for Used-Car Lot in South City -

Plans for a used-car lot on Vance Avenue have been shot down by the Shelby County Board of Adjustment.

The half-acre lot at 704 Vance was the center of controversy at the board’s Wednesday, Dec. 16, meeting, drawing opposition from residents, stakeholders, developers and the Memphis Housing Authority.

30. Visible Music College Endowment Reaches $2.5M -

Thanks to an anonymous donor, Visible Music College now has a $2.5 million endowment at the Hope Christian Community Foundation, which the college will use to support $200,000 in scholarships annually for students at the Memphis campus.

31. Competition for Jones Lang Lasalle in Tennessee -

Amid debate about privatization within state government, legislators are glad to see Tennessee seeking competition in its building leasing program.

“To me, when you’ve got competition, you’ve got people who may do something for next to nothing just to get their foot in the door,” says state Rep. Mike Sparks, who raised questions about the state’s leasing program and contract with Jones Lang Lasalle, which started charging commissions when it got involved in 2012.

32. Visible Music College Endowment Reaches $2.5M -

Thanks to an anonymous donor, Visible Music College now has a $2.5 million endowment at the Hope Christian Community Foundation, which the college will use to support $200,000 in scholarships annually for students at the Memphis campus.

33. Study: Medical Devices Bear $2.7B Impact in Shelby County -

A new study released by the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council finds that the medical device industry makes up nearly 4 percent of the total GDP of Shelby County.

According to the study, the county’s medical device industry accounts for $2.7 billion in economic impact; 16,823 direct and indirect jobs; $1.2 billion in wages and more than $46 million in local property taxes.

34. Council Delays Central Station and Graceland West Votes -

Memphis City Council members delayed approval Tuesday, Nov. 17, of the lease agreement and financing of the Central Station redevelopment project for two weeks. And it also delayed a vote on the Graceland West renovation and expansion.

35. Study: Medical Devices Bear $2.7B Impact in Shelby County -

A new study released by the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council finds that the medical device industry makes up nearly 4 percent of the total GDP of Shelby County.

According to the study, the county’s medical device industry accounts for $2.7 billion in economic impact; 16,823 direct and indirect jobs; $1.2 billion in wages and more than $46 million in local property taxes.

36. Medical Center Event Highlights New Vision -

Micro changes are making way for a new identity for the Memphis Medical District.

On Friday, Nov. 6, food trucks, live music and art installations came together at Health Sciences Park for a rare community-wide event.

37. New Mayor in Town -

Jim Strickland has some big decisions to make.

At the top of the list: make sure the toilets are flushing, the lights are coming on at night and the stoplights are flashing red, yellow and green.

38. Developers Threaten to Pull Out of Mall of Memphis Site -

Developers of the former Mall of Memphis site were again delayed as the board of the Economic Development Growth Engine tabled a vote on a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes benefit for the speculative industrial site.

39. Vanderbilt's Wireless ECG: Real Lifesaver for Heart Attack Victims -

Susan Eagle, M.D., didn’t necessarily see herself as an inventor, but she recognized a problem in her field and she just couldn’t live with it.

40. From University Labs to the Marketplace -

The health care industry contributed $38.8 billion to Middle Tennessee’s economy in 2014, according to a study released by the Nashville Health Care Council, which is a 32.9 percent increase from the 2010.

41. Leco Realty Credits Success To Hands-On Approach -

Over the past 33 years, Bert Less has weathered many financial storms with his property management company Leco Realty Inc.

42. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

43. Ikea Seeks $16 Million Permit For First Memphis Store -

Future Ikea Store
On 42 Acres In Cordova
Permit Cost: $16 million

Application Date: July 2015
Owner/Tenant: Ikea
Details: Ikea is moving forward with its massive retail store in Cordova.

44. Developers Still Interested In Midtown Hotel -

Yes, the development team that had proposed replacing the French Quarter Inn at Overton Square is selling the property to Ballet Memphis, which plans on building a new performance center there.

But they say they still want to build a hotel in Midtown, according to a statement they provided to Brenda Solomito Basar, owner of Solomito Land Planning.

45. Developers Still Interested in Midtown Hotel -

Yes, the development team that had proposed replacing the French Quarter Inn at Overton Square is selling the property to Ballet Memphis, which plans on building a new performance center there.

But they say they still want to build a hotel in Midtown, according to a statement they provided to Brenda Solomito Basar, owner of Solomito Land Planning.

46. Blight Fight -

Somer Smith and three colleagues were busy Thursday, June 11, cruising around the South End portion of Downtown on the lookout for neglected properties.

Smith, an associate at Brewer & Barlow PLC and a second-year student in the City and Regional Planning graduate program at the University of Memphis, was canvassing the area around Crump Boulevard and West Virginia Street as part of a volunteer force organized by the Downtown Memphis Commission to conduct a sweeping survey of property conditions.

47. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

48. Germantown Leaders Exploring Elementary School Possibilities -

When Germantown Municipal School District leaders began talking openly last week about new school construction, they did so cautiously, keeping in mind similar recent discussions in Lakeland and Collierville.

49. Sutton Joins Dixon Hughes Goodman -

Giles Sutton recently joined Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP as a partner in the firm’s tax practice, where he will focus on issues pertaining to state and local tax.
Sutton, an established attorney and certified public accountant, brings more than 25 years of business tax experience, with a focus on state and local tax issues within the food and beverage, health care, transportation and energy industries.

50. Harold Ford Sr. Returns to Memphis Funeral Business With New Concept -

In his years as a political force in Memphis, Harold Ford Sr. was known for his attention to detail.

The former Congressman would brush past campaign workers and climb a ladder to level a campaign banner or change the layout of “the Ford ballot,” sought by everyone from presidential candidates to court clerks.

51. At Long Last -

It’s taken the city of Memphis 10 years to reel in Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, and business owners in the nearby Pinch District hope it will be a catalytic force they’ve been waiting for.

52. Project on South Front Moves Closer to Launch -

Developers are inching closer to launching a mixed-use project on a strategic corner of South Front Street Downtown.

The development team of Robert E. Mallory, John H. Dicken Jr. and Vince Smith Jr. hope to raze an aging, low-density one-story office building at 266 S. Front Street and erect a mixed-use project featuring multi-story apartment buildings and commercial space.

53. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

54. Tennessee Cemetery Owner Agrees to Probation in Plea Deal -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee cemetery owner accused of burying up to 200 bodies on land not owned by the business pleaded guilty Friday in exchange for 10 years' probation.

Jemar Lambert, the owner of Galilee Memorial Gardens in Bartlett, entered an Alford plea in Shelby County Criminal Court. Under an Alford plea, a defendant doesn't admit guilt but acknowledges there is enough evidence to convict.

55. Tanger Outlets to Open Southaven Mall in November -

What is now a field near Interstate 55 and Church Road in Southaven, Miss., soon will become an outlet-shopping destination.

The 310,000-square-foot Tanger Factory Outlets Centers Inc. shopping center should be ready for shoppers by Nov. 19, just in time for Christmas.

56. Leaving a Life They Love at Nashville Farmers’ Market -

Charles Hardy needs help loading a huge piece of his life: a massive white refrigerator that was part of the Nashville Farmers’ Market home he’s leaving – likely for good – after almost a half-century.

57. Game On -

Almost as soon as Casey Hill and his father Wilton “Chick” Hill began redeveloping the old Toof building adjacent to AutoZone Park, the younger Hill began contemplating what the reinvented building would be called.

58. Affordable Housing Gets Foot in the Door in Mayoral Election -

In recent weeks, the mayor’s race has taken a new focus: Affordable housing.

Some in the community feel this is unwarranted and take issue with organizations such as NOAH (Nashville Organized for Action and Hope), which are forcing the candidates to spend more time on social issues, which I support.

59. Path to Crosstown Difficult, Unexpected -

When Staley Cates bought the Sears Crosstown building in 2007 and the development team behind what is now Crosstown Concourse was taking shape to redevelop the property, another developer dropped by Cates’ office.

60. Goldman Sachs ‘Confident’ in Memphis -

In April, Rachel Diller, managing director of the urban investment group at Goldman Sachs, received a phone call in her New York office from officials at Phoenix-based Dudley Ventures.

The executives at Dudley Ventures, which specializes in large tax-credit supported projects, were arranging financing for the $200 million effort to transform the old Sears Crosstown property and wanted to know if the New York-based investment bank was interested.

61. Memphis Equipment's Roots Go Back to World War II -

To most Memphians driving past the Memphis Equipment Co. front lot on South Third Street near E.H. Crump Boulevard, the company appears to be a small lot of vintage U.S. Army vehicles.

62. Dream Realized -

Around 2010, Francis Ssebikindu saw people exploring the Sears Crosstown property, kicking the tires of the long-vacant retail and distribution building.

“Five years ago I saw a bunch of guys looking around in my area and I said, ‘what are they doing here?’” said Ssebikindu, pastor of Living Water Community Church near the Sears Crosstown building

63. Crosstown Project Named Crosstown Concourse -

Developers of the old Sears Crosstown building formally broke ground Saturday, Feb. 21, on the project that was five years in the planning and gave it a new name – Crosstown Concourse.

Nearly a thousand people packed a tent in the shadow of the mammoth 1.5 million square foot building on a rainy, cold and overcast day that marked 88 years to the day that ground was broken in 1927 on the original Crosstown structure including the tower that will serve as an apartment building in the multi-use redevelopment.

64. Crosstown Crossroads -

Richard Spore and his colleague at the Memphis office of the Bass Berry & Sims law firm have worked on several ambitious, game-changing projects like the transformation of Overton Square and Bass Pro Shops’ redevelopment of The Pyramid.

65. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

66. Haslam's Insure Tennessee Health Plan Fails in Legislature -

Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans has failed during a special legislative session.

The Senate Health Committee defeated the Republican governor's Insure Tennessee plan Wednesday on a 7-4 vote.

67. Berryhill Promoted at Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck -

Paul B. Berryhill has been promoted to tax partner at Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck PLC. In his new role at the certified public accounting and advisory firm, his primary responsibilities are developing and managing client relationships, developing and training staff members, being a technical tax resource for the firm and assisting in the management of the firm.

68. Council Gives Third Look at Beale Street Authority -

For a third consecutive session, Memphis City Council members are scheduled to vote Tuesday, Feb. 3, on establishing a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

The resolution establishing the authority to oversee and further develop the entertainment district was delayed two weeks ago as some council members, led by Harold Collins and Wanda Halbert, talked about the council approving actions of the development authority.

69. Renting Out Homes for Super Bowl Can Bring Big Bucks -

PHOENIX (AP) – Hundreds of people gather every year to hobnob with A-list celebrities at a charity bash thrown in the Super Bowl's host city. But instead of heading to a trendy nightclub or swanky restaurant, organizers this year are throwing the party inside a private home.

70. Settlement Could Fund I-Zone Schools -

With federal money about to run out for the Shelby County Schools Innovation Zone schools, the $8 million in cash due from the city of Memphis next month is most likely to land in the bank account for that effort.

71. Strickland In Mayor's Race, Wharton Responds -

After months of speculation, Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland confirmed Thursday, Jan. 15, he is in the 2015 race for Memphis mayor.

72. Executive Inn Demolition Long Time Coming -

The old Executive Inn hotel on Airways Boulevard where Brooks Road dead ends is the latest problem vacant property to be demolished and touted by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as another step in his administration’s anti-blight effort.

73. OK, It’s a Great House! Can We Please See It? -

In Nashville real estate circles, it is difficult to say goodbye to 2014. We loved that 2014 and she was wonderful.

Missing her already, we hope she returns in 2015. But for the current trend to continue, Nashville is going to need some inventory.

74. Creative Destruction -

For about three years Veronica Skinner called the two-story, 24-unit apartment building at 480 Tillman St. in the Binghampton neighborhood home.

75. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

76. Graceland Jets on Auction Block -

Two jets once owned by Elvis Presley that have been part of tours of Graceland since the mid-1980s are going on the auction block, the auction company authorized by Graceland announced Friday, Jan. 2.

77. Editorial: Pursuit of Authentic Memphis is a Winding Road -

Last year at this time, we talked about city finances and our pursuit of economic development. The year before, it was federal government shutdown.

This year, we will offer a change of pace from that and follow the lead of our cover story, which features suggestions about the city’s promise and its challenges in the year ahead and the year now in the books.

78. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

79. Goat Milk and Smart Marketing -

Maybe it was that last Facebook post that put them over the top. Or, maybe it was the #voteforgoats hashtag.

Little Seed Farm’s goats aren’t telling, but they do look a bit smug.

The goats, along with Little Seed Farm owners James and Eileen Ray, recently pulled in a cool $25,000 by snagging the top spot in furnishing retailer west elm’s, “We Love LOCAL Small Business’’ grant contest.

80. Ramsey an Important, Unfamiliar Pioneer -

In this season of thankfulness, Knoxvillians should pay homage to Francis Alexander Ramsey, but many people are probably not familiar with his name.

81. Deck the Halls -

It was early Tuesday, a little more than 48 hours before Overton Square was set to throw a major holiday celebration complete with a tree-lighting ceremony, school choirs and dozens of participating tenants.

82. Mid-South Grows in Popularity for Retirees -

Florida or bust?

Not necessarily, not anymore.

Retirees coming from the Midwest and Northeast are realizing they have other options, and increasingly they are acting on them. Several Mid-South states have developed formal recruitment programs with the hope of luring out-of-state retirees – new money, in economic development parlance.

83. ’Tis the Season -

After the recession struck, desperate retailers competing for a shrinking amount of shopping dollars and market share began tinkering with time-tested holiday marketing strategies.

Good prices, great values, unique offerings and convenience no longer were enough to boost retail sales.

84. After Overcoming Hurdles, Southwest Opens Nursing School -

More than four years after breaking ground for a new nursing building, leaders of Southwest Tennessee Community College last week formally opened the school’s new Nursing, Natural Sciences and Biotechnology Building.

85. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

86. Hillsboro High Land Sale: New School, Big Profit -

Merritt Rowe knows her children will never personally benefit from any changes to Hillsboro High School in Green Hills, but as the parent of two current students and another starting next year, it is something she is willing to fight for and encourages other parents – especially those of future students – to do the same.

87. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

88. Boyle Sees Opportunity in East Memphis -

Memphis-based Boyle Investment Co. hopes to break ground next year on a new office building at its Ridgeway Center complex near Poplar Avenue and Shady Grove Road, according to company officials.

89. Enjoy Low Interest Rates While They Last -

In what has become expected in this post-Recession boom, home sales continue to set records each month with no end in sight, based on October sales figures from the Greater Nashville Association of Realtors.

90. Former FedEx Headquarters Up for Auction -

This week you can acquire a sizeable piece of Memphis business history at a deep discount.

The Commerce Center complex on Lamar Avenue – former home to Memphis-based corporate titans Holiday Inn and FedEx – is on the auction block.

91. Downtown Knoxville Tourism Finally Finds its Stride -

When Kim Trent moved to Knoxville in 1990, she could stand along Gay Street on a Sunday and be the only soul in sight. Today, she’s a face in the crowd.

92. Room for Growth -

Sardor and Gulam Umarov are used to fighting battles with seemingly long odds.

Between 2005 and 2009, the brothers waged a high-profile human rights campaign against the authoritarian government in their native Uzbekistan for the release of their father, Sanjar Umarov, a Germantown businessman thrown into prison for opposing the regime.

93. Smart Growth Plan Sets Stage in Germantown -

In 2007, the city of Germantown adopted its Smart Growth plan and accompanying zoning regulations, which promoted more walkable, accessible mixed-use development in its central business district and surrounding neighborhoods.

94. Raising Concerns Over Education Coverage -

With just one person reporting on schools in a metropolitan area of more than 1.3 million people, The Commercial Appeal is forging ahead with a relationship with a nonprofit journalism organization dedicated to covering education.

95. Bloodworth: Greenways Increasing Residential Values -

The Memphis region’s existing 50 miles of greenways, paths and trails are responsible for some increase in property values, particularly residential property, says Rusty Bloodworth, vice president of Boyle Investment Co. and past chairman of the Urban Land Institute’s Memphis chapter.

96. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

97. Roast of the Town -

If you catch Jimmy Lewis these days and get him talking about coffee roasting, chances are he might never stop.

98. Midtown Corner Could See Turnaround -

While Midtown as a whole is experiencing a resurgence, two properties at the key intersection of Union Avenue and McLean Boulevard remain vacant, decaying eyesores.

But a real estate agent representing the owner of the vacant office building and hotel at the southwest corner of Union and McLean says both properties are under contract to be sold.

99. Business on Wheels -

When asked once by a reporter whether he’d consider supplementing his business with a food truck like many of his industry peers, the owner of a popular Midtown restaurant was matter-of-fact in his reply.

100. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.