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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: T.A. Talks Memphis, EDGE Debate and Politics, Lots of Politics -

Grizz season opener at the Forum Wednesday is a win over NOLA 103 – 91. And Tony Allen’s Grizz jersey is retired. The day before, Allen wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune on the Memphis experience and it is just about the best thing that will happen to you all day. He just walks right off the court and into the soul of this place.

2. City Lays Out Numerous Paths to Statue Removal -

City officials laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

3. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

4. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

5. Editorial: Ways Forward in the Age Of the Active Shooter -

When the word “numb” starts to show up a lot as the reaction to a mass shooting in which 59 people were slaughtered even as time passes – when the incident very quickly goes into the timeline of such incidents and is then filed away for the next time it happens – we have a problem.

6. Paying Beale Street Security Costs Raises Lease Questions -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, on whether the city should start using some of the $378,000 in Beale Street cover charge funds the Downtown Memphis Commission has been holding in two bank accounts since June.

7. VA Running Out of Money for Private Health Care Program -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Weeks after a veterans' health initiative received $2.1 billion in emergency funding, the Trump administration says the private-sector Veterans Choice health care program may need additional money as early as December to avoid a disruption of care for hundreds of thousands of veterans.

8. Epidemic at Work? Businesses Forced to Deal With Drug Abuse -

NEW YORK (AP) – After a troubled youth himself, Phillip Cohen made it a practice to hire people at his woodworking business who have also struggled with addiction and mental health issues. But when an employee died from a drug overdose, he adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

9. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

10. Last Word: Football In The Rain, Shakespeare in Cordova and The Grizz Roster -

There are moments in the history of sports amateur and professional that involve turn outs like the one Thursday at the Liberty Bowl for the Tigers football season opener. There were the people who ran the St. Jude marathon in the ice several years back even after the race was cancelled. Going back to the 1980s, there were those who came out in below freezing temps for Alabama Coach Bear Bryant’s last game that came at the annual Liberty Bowl.

11. Trump Says Tax Overhaul Will 'Bring Back Main Street' -

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) – President Donald Trump declared Wednesday that his push to overhaul the nation's tax system would "bring back Main Street by reducing the crushing tax burden," offering a populist appeal to a still-forming tax plan that would heavily benefit corporate America.

12. What Memphis Parents Should Know About How Schools Share Student Information -

The sharing of student information is at the center of the latest squabble between Shelby County Schools and state-authorized charter schools — making it more important than ever for Memphis parents to know what’s at stake.

13. Boyle Insurance President Gresham A Trailblazer for Women in Industry -

In 1973, Cindi Gresham was a biology major at the University of Memphis – then called Memphis State University – when she was offered a part-time job, and later a full-time job, at a now-defunct Memphis insurance agency.

14. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

15. A Million Reasons Not to Jump Into the Tennessee Governor’s Race -

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mae Beavers is banking on the idea wealthy candidates won’t be able to buy voters in 2018.

16. Problems Adrift -

David Ciarloni plants about 140 acres of soybeans on his 925-acre farm that straddles Shelby and Fayette counties. Those acres of beans are safe right now, but Ciarloni, who took over the family farm after his father recently retired, worries about a recent phenomenon that’s being called “dicamba drift.”

17. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

18. Marching Band to NFL: Vanderbilt Doctor’s Unlikely Path -

When the NFL sought a worthy selection for the first chief medical officer in league history, it turned its eyes to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

In hiring Dr. Allen Sills earlier this year, the league brought on a whirlwind of intelligence and energy with a lengthy curriculum vitae.

19. Trump Says Transgender People Should be Barred From Military -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump said Wednesday he wants transgender people barred from serving in the U.S. military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

20. House Moves to Fill VA's Budget Gap Despite Vets' Objections -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-led House is moving to allow the Department of Veterans Affairs to shift $2 billion from other programs to cover a sudden budget shortfall in its Choice program of private-sector care. But the plan was meeting resistance from many Democrats following stiff protests from veterans' groups.

21. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

22. Grizzlies Paradox: Get Younger, Get Older, Stay Relevant -

The Memphis Grizzlies continue to walk dual trails. It is what they must do, even if such hedging threatens to constrain both their immediate and long-range future.

We learned this week that 31-year-old point guard Mario Chalmers is returning to the Grizzlies on a partially guaranteed one-year contract. Two seasons ago, Chalmers was an impactful backup for Mike Conley until a ruptured Achilles tendon ended his season.

23. Last Word: Closing the Door, Midtown Rents and Red West's Many Roles -

It didn’t take the Shelby County Commission very long Wednesday to close the door on its budget season – about 20 minutes in the day’s special meeting to approve a county property tax rate of $4.11 on third and final reading. That’s not a quick up or down vote. And it took just a bit longer because there is still some discussion about whether this was a reduction in the tax rate or a tax cut in the sense that a homeowner in Shelby County would understand the term.

24. Dean Touts ‘Middle Of the Road’ Focus For Democrats -

Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is making exactly the same observation in his bid for the Democratic nomination for Tennessee governor that Republicans are making on their side of the 2018 race.

25. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

26. Area’s Only Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Progressing in First Year -

With more than 30,000 epileptics living in the Memphis area, the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis, which opened nearly one year ago, is providing much needed specialized care and treatment for patients that previously were forced to drive to Jackson or Nashville for similar care.

27. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

28. Ole Miss Buys Baptist Hospital in $22 Million Deal -

2301 S. Lamar Blvd.
Oxford, MS 38655

Sale Amount: $22 million

Sale Date: June 15, 2017

29. Ole Miss Buys Baptist Hospital in $22 Million Deal -

Ole Miss is buying Baptist Memorial Hospital-North Mississippi for $22 million, the university announced Thursday, June 15.

Baptist Memorial Health Care reached the purchase and sale agreement with the University of Mississippi as it builds a new acute care facility that is one of the largest economic development projects ever in Lafayette County.

30. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

31. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

32. CNN Sacks Kathy Griffin Over Trump Video as Backlash Builds -

NEW YORK (AP) – Kathy Griffin has lost a decade-long gig ringing in the new year for CNN as a backlash builds over her video displaying a likeness of President Donald Trump's severed head.

33. View From the Hill: GOP Points True North on State’s Moral Compass -

It was billed as the start of the 2018 governor’s race, but the GOP’s Reagan Day Dinner in Murfreesboro last week often sounded more like a tent revival.

Vote for one of these candidates and you’re guaranteed a place in heaven, ran the subtext of the evening, because, after all, everyone knows only Republicans know the road to salvation.

34. States Struggle With Oversight of Online Charter Schools -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – As U.S. children flock to virtual charter schools, states are struggling to catch up and develop rules to make sure the students get a real education and schools get the right funding.

35. Poor and Disabled Big Losers in Trump Budget; Military Wins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The poor and the disabled are big losers in President Donald Trump's $4.1 trillion budget proposal while the Pentagon is a big winner.

Trump's plan for the budget year beginning Oct. 1 makes deep cuts in safety net programs, including Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. The proposal also includes big cuts in Social Security's disability program.

36. Last Word: Minority Business Mic Drop, Truckers & Taxes and Confederate Statues -

Quite the buzz around the minority business discussion on “Behind The Headlines” – notably the progress report from Greater Memphis Chamber board chair Carolyn Hardy about what’s working and, more to the point, what is not working. In Hardy’s view that would be general minority business goals that she said amount to black-owned businesses being left out some three years into the renewed push for minority business growth – in government contracts and private business-to-business contracts.

37. Another Round of Premium Hikes: Blame Trump or Obama? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another year of big premium increases and dwindling choice is looking like a distinct possibility for many consumers who buy their own health insurance – but why, and who's to blame?

38. Alexander: Senate Will Write Own Version of Health Care Act -

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee says the Senate will write its own version of the American Health Care Act that includes keeping coverage for pre-existing conditions.

“The Senate will write its own bill,” the Republican chairman of the Senate Health Committee said in Memphis Friday, May 5. “We’ve already started that. The House has passed its bill. If we find good ideas, we will borrow them and put them in our bill. But we’ll write our own bill. That’s why we have two houses of Congress.”

39. Americans Hang Up on Landlines as Cellphone Homes Dominate -

NEW YORK (AP) – Deborah Braswell, a university administrator in Alabama, is a member of a dwindling group – people with a landline phone at home.

According to a U.S. government study released Thursday, 50.8 percent of homes and apartments had only cellphone service in the latter half of 2016, the first time such households attained a majority in the survey. Braswell and her family are part of the 45.9 percent that still have landline phones. The remaining households have no phone service at all.

40. GOP-Led House Panel Votes to Overhaul Dodd-Frank -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans took a major step toward their long-promised goal of unwinding the stricter financial rules created after the 2008 crisis, pushing forward sweeping legislation that would undo much of President Barack Obama's landmark banking law.

41. Concourse Job Fair Gets Good Reviews from Employers -

Christene Arnold retired from a local hospital last June, a decision she says wasn't entirely her choice.

Now, she gets by on Social Security and a small pension, but for some months, that's just not enough.

42. Trump to Sign Order Creating Accountability Office at VA -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump planned to sign an executive order Thursday, April 27, that would create an accountability and whistleblower protection office at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

43. Overcoming Opioids: The Quest for Less-Addictive Drugs -

Tummy tucks really hurt. Doctors carve from hip to hip, slicing off skin, tightening muscles, tugging at innards. Patients often need strong painkillers for days or even weeks, but Mary Hernandez went home on just over-the-counter ibuprofen.

44. How Trump Insurance Changes Could Affect Coverage Next Year -

A much tighter sign-up deadline and coverage delays will be waiting for some health insurance customers now that President Donald Trump's administration has finished a plan designed to stabilize shaky insurance markets.

45. Starting Up -

Scott Vogel is part of a small but scrappy band of entrepreneurs in Memphis focused on building and launching startups. Some have come here from around the country to participate in any of the area’s startup accelerators. They’ve founded everything from innovative medical devices to enterprises built around new twists on old challenges.

46. Commission Debates Use of $20M Surplus -

The Shelby County Commission delayed a vote Monday, April 3, on a $120 million refinancing of the county’s capital bond debt for two weeks.

Commissioners are specifically eyeing a $20 million surplus in the county’s debt service fund – the fund that pays down the county’s debt.

47. Last Word: A New Chapter, The Kissell Dome and The New Bartlett High School -

Booksellers of Laurelwood is set to return in most of the same location with a smaller footprint and new owners. John Vergos of the Rendezvous and a former Memphis City Council member is among the investors bringing back the East Memphis institution that closed in February. No word on whether the new group will keep the name or go with a new name.

48. White House Calls for Domestic Cuts to Finance Border Wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is proposing immediate budget cuts of $18 billion from programs like medical research, infrastructure and community grants so U.S. taxpayers, not Mexico, can cover the down payment on the border wall.

49. From Bedroom to Boardroom, Supreme Court is in Your Business -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Quick, name a Supreme Court justice. OK, name three. One of the current justices, Stephen Breyer, once noted wryly that their names are less well-known than those of the Three Stooges.

50. 'Heartbeat Bill' Put Off a Year -

NASHVILLE – Legislation outlawing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected is being postponed until 2018, but a House panel voted Wednesday to restrict abortions after the 20th week, a shift from the 24-week period defining “viability.”

51. Business Economists Disagree With Trump on Trade, Budget -

NEW YORK (AP) – A majority of business economists disagree with the Trump administration on several key issues, notably immigration, trade and the budget, according to a survey by the National Association for Business Economics.

52. More Help Needed for Poor in Mississippi -

With an estimated 22 percent of Mississippi residents living below the poverty line (the highest in the nation) and a disproportionate share of their income going to basic necessities, anti-poverty advocates and government agencies are working to make sure more resources are reaching the people that need them most.

53. Pressure on GOP to Revamp Health Law Grows, Along With Rifts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump declared Monday that "Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated." Yet the opposite has long been painfully obvious for top congressional Republicans, who face mounting pressure to scrap the law even as problems grow longer and knottier.

54. New Book From Former AutoZone CEO Offers Public Policy Goals -

AutoZone has national cachet in part for its status as a leading retailer of car parts and accessories. Lately, though, the Memphis-based company has been part of the national discussion as its leadership works toward political ends as much as commercial imperatives.

55. Having It Their Way -

She was working for a major petroleum company and had just been transferred to Cody, Wyoming. She was relatively new to the industry and certainly to the boots-on-the-ground oil field where on Day One she got out of her SUV wearing a long skirt and flats.

56. Chef Shuttle Teams With Memphis Nutrition Group -

Chef Shuttle has announced a partnership with Memphis Nutrition Group during February’s American Heart Month. The food delivery service and the nutrition and lifestyle counseling practice teamed up to challenge customers to protect their hearts by making smart choices – with a little incentive along the way.

57. Methodist North Taps New CEO -

In hindsight, it’s no surprise Florence Jones decided to pursue a career in health care more than four decades ago. A lot about the profession, of course, was different back then. But Jones – tapped in recent days as the new CEO at Methodist North Hospital after serving as chief nursing officer and interim CEO there – had the same motivation then as she does today.

58. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

59. Pence Breaks Tie as Senate Confirms DeVos for Education Post -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate on Tuesday confirmed school choice advocate Betsy DeVos as Education secretary by the narrowest of margins, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking a 50-50 tie in a historic vote.

60. Planned Parenthood Vote Draws On Political Divide -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar looked out at the audience in the commission’s chambers Monday, Feb. 6, and saw something the commission only sees once or twice a year – a standing room-only crowd with every seat taken and most there for a single issue.

61. 'Obamacare' Sign-Ups Show Slippage in Preliminary Report -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government says about 9.2 million people signed up for coverage this year through HealthCare.gov, the health insurance website serving most states.

62. Hart’s Tenure as AD Has Been Mostly Good for Vols -

While we wait – and wait and wait and wait – for the University of Tennessee to hire its next athletics director, let’s ponder the man who soon will walk out the door.

Dave Hart is leaving the UT athletics department better than he found it. He got things back on solid financial footing. He brought a measure of stability.

63. Drug Court Marks 20 Years of Helping Memphis Addicts Recover -

If you don’t know how difficult it is to deal with those addicted to drugs who have run afoul of the law, even if you are a judge, Bryan Owens might give you a good idea.

64. GOP Pushes 2 Top Cabinet Picks Through to Full Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans jammed two of President Donald Trump's top Cabinet picks through the Senate Finance Committee with no Democrats in the room Wednesday after suspending a rule that would have otherwise barred them from taking the vote. The tactic seemed a warning shot that they might deploy brute political muscle in the upcoming fight over the Supreme Court vacancy.

65. State Leaders Invite Block Grant Funding -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says a federal block grant to state government for health care under the right terms could allow the state to expand TennCare coverage.

“I think if they would give us that flexibility, we could take care of more people at lower cost. I just fervently believe that we could do that with the state,” Haslam said last week during a visit to Memphis. “But they have to give us the tools to do that with and give us the flexibility. Right now the federal government holds all the keys. … They don’t give us a lot of flexibility on how that works.”

66. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

67. Literacy Mid-South Building Network to Raise Reading Levels -

As a child, Knox Shelton witnessed first-hand the struggle to break a generational cycle of marginal literacy. He grew up in Jonesville, Virginia, a small Appalachian coal mining town.

“I mostly remembered the good times of being a kid,” said Shelton, who recently was promoted to the role of executive director at Literacy Mid-South. “But little memories come back that are very dark and scary, just to think of situations kids were in. I’m gonna make it sound like an awful town, but there were kids pulled out of school in first grade to work with their families.

68. Commuter Program Works With Employers to Alleviate Transit Troubles -

Despite a reinvestment in the development of urban centers across the United States, the average American commute time is still increasing, which is placing a strain on both commuters and their employers.

69. Memphis Bioworks Surpasses Goals of Labor Department Job-Training Grant -

The Memphis Bioworks Foundation is serious about workforce development and job training, along with the other high-profile work for which it’s known, like investing in companies related to bioscience and sustainability.

70. Last Word: New Rhodes President, Billy Hyman and the Fast Track -

The biggest political betting pool of the post-election season ends Tuesday as President elect Donald Trump said Monday by Twitter that he would name his nominee for Secretary of State Tuesday morning.

71. Ohio Lawmakers Pass Republican 20-Week Abortion Ban Proposal -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Abortions would be banned after 20 weeks under a bill Republican lawmakers passed Thursday, adding to legislation already on its way to Republican Gov. John Kasich that would prohibit abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

72. Americans' Odds of Earning More Than Parents Have Plunged -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The likelihood that young adults will earn more than their parents has plummeted in recent decades, a study has found, fueling concerns that the American dream of steady upward mobility is foundering amid a widening wealth gap.

73. Trump Taps Former Campaign Rival Carson as Housing Secretary -

NEW YORK (AP) – President-elect Donald Trump, moving closer to filling his Cabinet, chose former campaign rival Ben Carson on Monday to be secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

74. Refugee Lawsuit Proceeds in Spite of Obstacles -

Tennessee is going “full speed ahead” in a challenge of the federal Refugee Resettlement Program despite threats by President-elect Donald Trump to dismantle it or, at the least, stop the flow of refugees from terrorist-linked countries.

75. Last Word: Chattanooga's Tragedy, Elvis Presley's Memphis and Chandler Parsons -

A grim Monday in Chattanooga where, as we post this, six school children were killed in a school bus crash and the driver of the bus was charged late Monday with reckless driving and vehicular homicide.

76. CBU Health Care MBA Named Top 20 Program -

The Healthcare Master of Business Administration (HCMBA) at Christian Brothers University was named one of the Top 20 Graduate Programs in Healthcare Management in the South in 2016 by Healthcare Management Degree Guide

77. CBU Health Care MBA Named Top 20 Program -

The Healthcare Master of Business Administration (HCMBA) at Christian Brothers University was named one of the Top 20 Graduate Programs in Healthcare Management in the South in 2016 by Healthcare Management Degree Guide

78. Frustration Runs Deep for Customers Forced to Change Marketplace Plans -

Andrea Schankman’s three-year relationship with her insurer, Coventry Health Care of Missouri, has been contentious, with disputes over what treatments it would pay for. Nonetheless, like other Missourians, Schankman was unnerved to receive a notice from Coventry last month informing her that her policy was not being offered in 2017.

79. Events -

UT Health Science Center and its partners will hold a community event aimed at ending domestic violence Saturday, Oct. 1, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the UTHSC Student Alumni Center, 800 Madison Ave. “Bridging Troubled Waters, a Community Conversation” will feature a keynote by former Memphis reporter/anchor Dee Griffin, a domestic violence survivor, as well as breakout sessions. Seating is limited; registration encouraged. Visit uthsc.edu/btw or call 901-448-2704.

80. Last Word: RVC Drops Mud Island Proposal, Fizdale on Kaepernick and Carroll Cloar -

The Riverfront Development Corporation got a one-line email Thursday from Andy Cates, the RVC Outdoor Destinations CEO.

81. Behind Health Law's 'Growing Pains,' More Serious Problems? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama told insurers this week his health care overhaul has had some growing pains. But with premiums rising and marquee insurers bailing, could the real diagnosis be "failure to thrive?"

82. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

83. Government Survey Shows Health Insurance Gains Slowing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's progress in getting more people covered by health insurance slowed significantly this year, the government confirmed Wednesday in a report that tempers a historic achievement of the Obama administration.

84. New For-Profit Medical Schools Springing Up Across US -

BOISE, Idaho (AP) – For-profit medical schools are starting to pop up around the country, promising to create new family doctors for underserved rural regions.

Rural states like Idaho need more general practitioners, with the baby boom generation aging and expanded insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act making health care more accessible. But critics of the new schools question whether companies can properly train the nation's next crop of doctors.

85. Regional One Health Continues Building Out New East Campus -

One of the first indications that Regional One Health’s 50,000-square-foot East Campus does things a little differently is the digital map near the nurse’s station with rooms lit up in different colors and names moving around the image.

86. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

87. Family Planning – Beyond the Diaper Fund -

Ray’s Take: So, you’re planning to start your family. Have you considered the finances involved beyond painting a room and knowing it’s going to take a lot of diapers? Three can certainly live as cheaply as two – as long as one of them doesn’t eat or wear clothes.

88. Mike Conley Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

89. Mike Conley a Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

90. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

91. Editorial: Memphis Police Director Search Needs Better Sense of Urgency -

Sixty-one homicides in 90 days, including a March death that was classified as a homicide by police on the other side of April.

This will likely get worse before it gets better because there is no quick fix.

92. SweetBio Reaches $1 Million in Secondary Funding -

The dust has settled after New Orleans Entrepreneurship Week, and several Memphis startups have returned home as winners.

“It’s like South by Southwest, but for entrepreneurs in the South,” said Kayla Rodriguez, co-founder and chief operating officer of SweetBio, of the week-long event.

93. CDC Guidelines Aim to Curb Painkiller Prescribing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin.

94. Events -

University of Memphis Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music will host Jazz Week 2016 with nightly concerts Tuesday through Saturday, March 1-5, at 7:30 p.m. in Harris Concert Hall, 3775 Central Ave. Most concerts are free. Visit memphis.edu/music for a schedule.

95. Events -

Hard Rock Cafe Memphis and On Location: Memphis will host an Oscar Night Watch Party on Sunday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m. at Hard Rock, 126 Beale St. Activities and promotions are scheduled throughout the Academy Awards broadcast. Admission is free; suggested donation to Ronald McDonald House Charities of Memphis. Visit hardrock.com/memphis for details.

96. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from circus clowns to Republican senators…

Both U.S. Senators representing Tennessee will be in Memphis Saturday for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, historically the local party’s largest annual fundraising event.
Sen. Bob Corker is the keynote speaker with Sen. Lamar Alexander as a special guest.
The Lincoln Day gatherings are county-by-county events across the state that can extend far beyond the shadow of Presidents Day: A few of the Lincoln Day dinners have been known to find a place on the calendar in April.
This is the 41st Lincoln Day event in Shelby County, which puts the local event’s origins squarely in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, a low-point for Republican fortunes nationally after the state’s modern Republican party was formed and prospered in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
The event always comes with a large helping of local candidates testing the political waters among the dinner tables between podium speeches.
This year, the Shelby County event is sure to feature partisans from the various Republican presidential campaigns because of its place on the February calendar during the early voting period before the March 1 election day.

97. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

98. Last Word: Winter Pre-Game Show, The Zoo Goes To Court And Hotel Fever -

You wouldn’t call this the eye of the storm, would you? We’ll go with calling this the pre-game show for the winter storm that is supposed to show up in Memphis at around 7 a.m. Friday morning. Think Super Bowl pre-game.
There is so much that’s been said in advance of this that whatever happens, it might be hard to live up to the preparation.
Much of the rest of this is like an arms race of sorts.
Consider the equipment list from Memphis International Airport.
10 snow brooms, 12 plow trucks, four de-icing trucks each with 40,000 gallons of deicer, four 2-ton salt spreaders and four tractors to keep the runways clear.
The city of Memphis Public Works division has eight snow plows ready to roll on major thoroughfares if the snow gets within the three-inch mark. A set of 16 salt trucks were to load up at 11 p.m. Thursday evening to begin applying salt and sand when needed, with continual inspections of road conditions. And that includes some pre-treated priority areas.
And then there was this truly unusual announcement from Shelby County Schools: the optional school parent camp-out was suspended Thursday evening because of the weather.
This is the camp out the school system tries its best to discourage each and every year at this time. That includes bar-coded applications and repeatedly emphasizing that 99.9 percent of those with the bar-coded applications get their first choice of optional schools, making the camp-out unnecessary. The applications are handed out over several days and are then time-stamped when they are turned in for consideration.
Nevertheless, the tents go up each year and voices are raised in the debate about whether this is parents who care more or parents who are carried away.
This year, the school system, while emphasizing that it “does not authorize or direct” the camp-out, says the line will resume Sunday at 7 a.m.
The school system also adds: “The current process being managed by parents will be recognized due to potential health and safety risks related to forecasted inclement weather.”
But is there a line to get back in line? And when does that start?

99. 8 Games Behind Where They Were Last Year, Grizz Need Z-Bo More Than Ever -

You can’t say the sports gods don’t have a sense of humor. On Jan. 12, 2015, the Grizzlies made a three-way trade with Boston and New Orleans that sent away the team’s designated whipping boy with fans (Tayshaun Prince) and the pouty Quincy Pondexter and brought in the athletic, the dynamic, the difference-making, Jeff Green.

100. New Routes to a Healthier New Year -

About a year ago, Christina Charley launched Love Yourself Fitness, a virtual at-home personal training and holistic coaching business.

Now a year later, Charley’s new business is thriving and she’s in the process of expanding it.