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Editorial Results (free)

1. New For-Profit Medical Schools Springing Up Across US -

BOISE, Idaho (AP) – For-profit medical schools are starting to pop up around the country, promising to create new family doctors for underserved rural regions.

Rural states like Idaho need more general practitioners, with the baby boom generation aging and expanded insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act making health care more accessible. But critics of the new schools question whether companies can properly train the nation's next crop of doctors.

2. Regional One Health Continues Building Out New East Campus -

One of the first indications that Regional One Health’s 50,000-square-foot East Campus does things a little differently is the digital map near the nurse’s station with rooms lit up in different colors and names moving around the image.

3. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

4. Family Planning – Beyond the Diaper Fund -

Ray’s Take: So, you’re planning to start your family. Have you considered the finances involved beyond painting a room and knowing it’s going to take a lot of diapers? Three can certainly live as cheaply as two – as long as one of them doesn’t eat or wear clothes.

5. Mike Conley Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

6. Mike Conley a Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

7. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

8. Editorial: Memphis Police Director Search Needs Better Sense of Urgency -

Sixty-one homicides in 90 days, including a March death that was classified as a homicide by police on the other side of April.

This will likely get worse before it gets better because there is no quick fix.

9. SweetBio Reaches $1 Million in Secondary Funding -

The dust has settled after New Orleans Entrepreneurship Week, and several Memphis startups have returned home as winners.

“It’s like South by Southwest, but for entrepreneurs in the South,” said Kayla Rodriguez, co-founder and chief operating officer of SweetBio, of the week-long event.

10. CDC Guidelines Aim to Curb Painkiller Prescribing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin.

11. Events -

University of Memphis Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music will host Jazz Week 2016 with nightly concerts Tuesday through Saturday, March 1-5, at 7:30 p.m. in Harris Concert Hall, 3775 Central Ave. Most concerts are free. Visit memphis.edu/music for a schedule.

12. Events -

Hard Rock Cafe Memphis and On Location: Memphis will host an Oscar Night Watch Party on Sunday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m. at Hard Rock, 126 Beale St. Activities and promotions are scheduled throughout the Academy Awards broadcast. Admission is free; suggested donation to Ronald McDonald House Charities of Memphis. Visit hardrock.com/memphis for details.

13. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from circus clowns to Republican senators…

Both U.S. Senators representing Tennessee will be in Memphis Saturday for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, historically the local party’s largest annual fundraising event.
Sen. Bob Corker is the keynote speaker with Sen. Lamar Alexander as a special guest.
The Lincoln Day gatherings are county-by-county events across the state that can extend far beyond the shadow of Presidents Day: A few of the Lincoln Day dinners have been known to find a place on the calendar in April.
This is the 41st Lincoln Day event in Shelby County, which puts the local event’s origins squarely in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, a low-point for Republican fortunes nationally after the state’s modern Republican party was formed and prospered in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
The event always comes with a large helping of local candidates testing the political waters among the dinner tables between podium speeches.
This year, the Shelby County event is sure to feature partisans from the various Republican presidential campaigns because of its place on the February calendar during the early voting period before the March 1 election day.

14. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

15. Last Word: Winter Pre-Game Show, The Zoo Goes To Court And Hotel Fever -

You wouldn’t call this the eye of the storm, would you? We’ll go with calling this the pre-game show for the winter storm that is supposed to show up in Memphis at around 7 a.m. Friday morning. Think Super Bowl pre-game.
There is so much that’s been said in advance of this that whatever happens, it might be hard to live up to the preparation.
Much of the rest of this is like an arms race of sorts.
Consider the equipment list from Memphis International Airport.
10 snow brooms, 12 plow trucks, four de-icing trucks each with 40,000 gallons of deicer, four 2-ton salt spreaders and four tractors to keep the runways clear.
The city of Memphis Public Works division has eight snow plows ready to roll on major thoroughfares if the snow gets within the three-inch mark. A set of 16 salt trucks were to load up at 11 p.m. Thursday evening to begin applying salt and sand when needed, with continual inspections of road conditions. And that includes some pre-treated priority areas.
And then there was this truly unusual announcement from Shelby County Schools: the optional school parent camp-out was suspended Thursday evening because of the weather.
This is the camp out the school system tries its best to discourage each and every year at this time. That includes bar-coded applications and repeatedly emphasizing that 99.9 percent of those with the bar-coded applications get their first choice of optional schools, making the camp-out unnecessary. The applications are handed out over several days and are then time-stamped when they are turned in for consideration.
Nevertheless, the tents go up each year and voices are raised in the debate about whether this is parents who care more or parents who are carried away.
This year, the school system, while emphasizing that it “does not authorize or direct” the camp-out, says the line will resume Sunday at 7 a.m.
The school system also adds: “The current process being managed by parents will be recognized due to potential health and safety risks related to forecasted inclement weather.”
But is there a line to get back in line? And when does that start?

16. 8 Games Behind Where They Were Last Year, Grizz Need Z-Bo More Than Ever -

You can’t say the sports gods don’t have a sense of humor. On Jan. 12, 2015, the Grizzlies made a three-way trade with Boston and New Orleans that sent away the team’s designated whipping boy with fans (Tayshaun Prince) and the pouty Quincy Pondexter and brought in the athletic, the dynamic, the difference-making, Jeff Green.

17. New Routes to a Healthier New Year -

About a year ago, Christina Charley launched Love Yourself Fitness, a virtual at-home personal training and holistic coaching business.

Now a year later, Charley’s new business is thriving and she’s in the process of expanding it.

18. Strickland Names 6 Chiefs to Report Directly To Mayor -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland rounded out his team of top advisers and division directors with six appointees who will report directly to him – a structural change to how previous mayoral administrations have worked.

19. Vanderbilt Poll Finds Support for Modest Gas Tax Increase -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As Gov. Bill Haslam crisscrosses the state trying to build support for a gas tax increase, a new Vanderbilt University poll finds voters are willing to pay more to improve roads and bridges.

20. Tennessee’s Landlords Find Hidden Costs of Privatization -

Murfreesboro businessman Tom Hyde felt the sting of Tennessee’s privatization practices two years ago when a representative of Jones Lang Lasalle notified him he would have to pay the company a commission as part of his next lease agreement.

21. Empty Bowls Project Uses Art to Feed City -

Hunger and homelessness are problems plaguing the Mid-South, and the Memphis Empty Bowls Project hopes to play its small part in addressing the larger issue.

On Sunday, Nov. 8, art in the form of handcrafted bowls and a sampling of soups from several Memphis restaurants will be the centerpiece of an effort to raise money to feed area children in need. The event is slated for 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Church Health Center Wellness, 1115 Union Ave.

22. Health Law Fine on The Uninsured Will More than Double -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The math is harsh: The federal penalty for having no health insurance is set to jump to $695, and the Obama administration is being urged to highlight that cold fact in its new pitch for health law sign-ups.

23. Bass, Berry & Sims Launches Nonprofit Practice Group -

The nonprofit sector represents a sizable chunk of the Memphis-area economy – some 8 percent of total employment, with almost 45,000 jobs.

That’s according to former Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper, citing figures from the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence to explain why the law firm Cooper is back practicing with, Bass, Berry & Sims PLC, has started a practice group focused on nonprofits. Cooper has been tapped to lead that group, following his service as the state’s attorney general from 2006 to 2014.

24. Clinton Adds Details to Plans on Prescription Drug Costs -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Vowing to build upon President Barack Obama's signature health law, Hillary Rodham Clinton is unveiling a sweeping plan to hold down the rising cost of prescription drugs and target pharmaceutical companies that flood the airwaves with ads.

25. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

26. Mayoral Contenders Break New Ground In Last TV Debate -

Even after numerous debates, including three on television, it turns out the four major candidates for Memphis mayor did have a few new things to say during the last televised debate of the 2015 election year.

27. ULI Panel Tackles Soulsville’s Dilemma as Shadyac Reveals Concept -

Local shareholders and national development leaders got deep in the heart of Soulsville USA this week with an all-day deliberation on how to bring placemaking to one of Memphis’ struggling historical areas.

28. Rocking for Love -

When Lahna Deering and Jason Freeman join the other musicians performing at the Rock for Love music festival next week, the gig will be a bit more meaningful for them than the shows they normally play.

29. Memphis Mayoral Endorsements Split -

The first wave of endorsements in the 2015 Memphis elections finds no mayoral contender with a sweep, one of the four major contenders without an endorsement so far and two of the big three municipal unions backing different mayoral candidates.

30. Hooker Fights for Right to Die on His Terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

31. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

32. Events -

Stax Museum of American Soul Music will host an opening reception for “Stax: Visions of Soul” Friday, July 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Stax, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Gallery talk begins at 6:45 p.m. The exhibit, which runs through Dec. 31, features contemporary works of art inspired by Stax Records songs. Visit staxmuseum.com.

33. Building Blocks of Estate Planning -

Ray’s take: Estate planning is one of the most important steps any person can take to ensure their final property and health care wishes are honored when the time comes. You may not be able to take it with you, but you can have a say about where it goes.

34. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

35. US Unemployment Falls to 7-Year Low, But Wages are Flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. unemployment fell to a seven-year low of 5.3 percent and employers hired at a solid pace in June, but other gauges of the job market drew a bleaker picture: A wave of people stopped looking for work, and paychecks failed to budge.

36. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

37. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

38. Supreme Court Upholds Nationwide Health Care Law Subsidies -

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

39. Tennessee State Employees Slighted by 'Voluntary' Buyout -

More and more, Tennessee’s state employees are feeling the same harsh realities of those working – or formerly working – in corporate America.

On the heels of 1,500 buyouts under the Bredesen administration in 2008 and 850 layoffs in 2010, Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 2,000 employees in the executive branch.

40. Data Warehouse Raises HealthCare.Gov Privacy Concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A government data warehouse that stores information indefinitely on millions of HealthCare.gov customers is raising privacy concerns at a time when major breaches have become distressingly common.

41. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

42. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

43. Crone Joins Council, City Buys State Office Building -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party who has worked in the nonprofit sector for the last decade was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19, to fill the vacancy.

44. Greenstein Touts Doug Carpenter & Associates' ‘Connection Factor’ -

Cara Greenstein serves as public relations coordinator of doug carpenter & associates, where she practices her passion for connection through the pen, on the screen and at the table. Equal parts researcher, writer, administrator and collaborator, Greenstein advances social media engagement and helps cultivate relationships between clients, media and the community.

45. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

46. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

47. Making Memphis Clean by 2019 -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

When guests are expected, one of the first things we do is clean up our home. We want our home to feel safe, warm and inviting. After all, our home directly reflects what we think about ourselves, and how others formulate their opinions about us.

48. Tennessee Agrees to Let Couple Give Child Chosen Surname -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The state Department of Health has agreed to let a Brentwood couple give their child the surname of their choice, bringing to an end a contentious legal battle that began last year.

49. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

50. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

51. HealthChoice CEO Touts Data-Driven Care -

Mitch Graves thinks there’s a better approach to health care than the model built around patching people up once they show up at their doctor’s office or in the emergency room.

And as CEO of HealthChoice LLC, an organization celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, he’s in a position to do something about that, and to help others in his field do something about it.

52. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

53. Work Begins on Insure Tennessee Plan -

The first House session of the Tennessee legislature’s special session begins Wednesday, Feb. 4, after committee work on the only piece of business before the General Assembly – the Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal.

54. Wharton Defends, Touts Record at State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. defended and touted Thursday, Jan. 29, his administration’s pursuit of the economic development projects that his challengers in the October city elections will likely use to make their case.

55. Haslam Calls Special Session on Medicaid -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has set Feb. 2 as the date for a special session of the Tennessee Legislature on his Medicaid expansion proposal.

The proclamation issued Thursday, Jan. 8, includes more details that legislators have been awaiting since Haslam announced the general terms of his proposal in December.

56. Batts Joins HealthChoice as Complex Care Manager -

Kenneth Batts has joined HealthChoice’s new Population Health team as complex care manager. In his new role, Batts will reach out to patients identified with complex medical needs to schedule home visits, where he’ll provide customized intervention and condition education, including goal setting, care coordination, and long-term support with the goal to achieve improvements in their health.

57. Poll: Americans Support Menu Labeling -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than half of Americans say they already have enough information at restaurants to decide whether they are making a healthy purchase. But they want even more.

According to an Associated Press-GfK poll conducted in December, most Americans favor labeling calories on menus in fast food and sit-down restaurants. Most favor labels for prepared foods in the grocery store, too.

58. How Wealth Gap Complicates Sibling Relationships -

NEW YORK (AP) – When Jayson Seaver thinks about why he makes so much money while some Americans can't catch a break, he thinks of the sacrifices he's made, the jobs he worked to pay for college, the 12-hour days he spends at the office now.

59. Totty Joins Gateway Group Personnel -

Justin Totty has joined Gateway Group Personnel as a research associate in the company’s executive search division. In his new role, Totty focuses on sourcing the best candidates for clients across numerous fields and industries, specifically targeting accounting, finance and engineering.

60. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

61. Tennessee Joins Multistate Lawsuit Over Immigration -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee is joining a multistate lawsuit seeking to halt President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration, state Attorney General Herbert Slatery announced Monday.

62. Haslam Reaches Agreement to Expand Medicaid in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam announced Monday that he has reached a deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee after more than a year of discussions with federal officials.

The Republican's administration touted the plan as an alternative deal with federal officials. The two-year pilot program, dubbed Insure Tennessee, would provide coverage for the state's uninsured without creating new taxes for Tennesseans.

63. Reinventing Retirement -

Ray’s take: At the turn of the 20th century, the average life expectancy was 47 years. Today, the average American can look forward to about 78 years of life. The average life expectancy for today's 65-year-old has increased to 84, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. I currently have twelve clients over 90.

64. Average Affordable Care Premiums Going Up in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people covered under President Barack Obama's health care law will face higher premiums next year, the administration acknowledged Thursday. While the average increases are modest, it's more fodder for the nation's political battles over health care.

65. Crafting the ‘Ask’ for This Giving Season -

It’s no secret that the holiday season offers the most opportune time for charitable organizations to capitalize on what is a perfect storm of the giving holiday spirit colliding with the year-end tax-deductible donation deadline. With so many organizations competing for donations at this time of the year, what sets any one organization’s “ask” apart from the rest? What is the key to crafting a message that hits the mark?

66. Page Robbins Provides Safe ‘Middle Ground’ -

The youngest is 53 and the oldest is 98. Some appreciate classical music and others prefer Elvis, the Mamas & the Papas or the Beatles, and others John Denver, Arlo Guthrie or Bruce Springsteen.

67. Poll: Employers Watching Insurance Costs Closely -

Despite years of rising medical costs and pressure from the health care overhaul, employers consider employee health insurance a priority. But new surveys suggest coverage may grow skimpier in the coming years.

68. Incumbent Council Members Weighing Choices -

The only open seat on the Memphis City Council in the 2011 city elections is once again an open seat going into the 2015 city elections.

Current council member Lee Harris was elected to the state Senate in the August elections and will resign effective Jan. 12. That means the remaining 12 council members will appoint someone to fill the year remaining in Harris’s four-year council term of office.

69. Soaring Generic Drug Prices Draw Senate Scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Some low-cost generic drugs that have helped restrain health care costs for decades are seeing unexpected price spikes of up to 8,000 percent, prompting a backlash from patients, pharmacists and now Washington lawmakers.

70. Small Business Insurance Exchanges Seek Rebound -

Early enrollment for the health overhaul's small business insurance exchanges fell far short of the 2 million workers who were expected to sign up this year. The shortfall calls into question the future of the exchanges as they begin accepting enrollment for 2015.

71. Utensil University -

It’s competitive out there. A new graduate, even one with great grades and real-world experience, still might have to make an additional good impression on a potential employer.

That’s one reason some employers, once screening out the first wave or two of applicants, might decide to continue the interview process over a lunch or dinner. On the one hand, this is a good sign for the applicant – he or she has made it deep enough into the process that the boss is willing to spend a little money and more time to continue the conversation.

72. Pension Reform Decision Back At Square One -

It happened in the shadow of a change in the pension reform proposal Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. had backed all through the summer and two of three council votes.

As the Memphis City Council got its first formal presentation Tuesday, Oct. 21, of Wharton’s new hybrid pension plan, it settled City Hall’s tumultuous discussion about changes to health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

73. GOP Governors Don't See 'Obamacare' Going Away -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While Republicans in Congress shout, "Repeal Obamacare," GOP governors in many states have quietly accepted the law's major Medicaid expansion. Even if their party wins control of the Senate in the upcoming elections, they just don't see the law going away.

74. No On One -

NO. IT’S HER DECISION, NOT YOURS. The Tennessee General Assembly is 83 percent male – and those big, strong men in the majority are convinced they know what’s best for the little ladies in the minority, in fact, what’s best for all the women of Tennessee.

75. Government Website for Doc Payments Not Up to Snuff -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another year, another headache for the Obama administration over a health care website.

This one is called "Open Payments." The goal was to allow consumers to find out if their doctors are getting drug company freebies, travel or other financial benefits that could create ethical conflicts. But since the site launched Tuesday, complaints have been piling up.

76. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

77. Ugwueke Makes Impact on Lives at Methodist -

Michael Ugwueke’s present life, as president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, and president and CEO of Methodist Healthcare Memphis Hospitals, is full of red tape.

It is a life of regulations wrapped around regulations, encased in codes and jargon and nourished by so much legalese.

78. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

79. New Chief Justice Echoes Haslam Mantra on Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – First, the state Supreme Court hired Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser as Tennessee's next attorney general. Now the high court's new chief justice is also adopting the Republican governor's rhetoric.

80. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

81. Survey: Americans' Pessimism on Economy Has Grown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are more anxious about the economy now than they were right after the Great Recession ended despite stock market gains, falling unemployment and growth moving closer to full health.

82. In Case of Incapacitation -

Ray’s take: A financial power of attorney is a powerful tool in your financial planning arsenal in the event your investments or other financial matters need action and you can’t do it.

83. Senate Confirms McDonald as Veterans Affairs Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Tuesday unanimously confirmed former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald as the new Veterans Affairs secretary, with a mission to overhaul an agency beleaguered by long veterans' waits for health care and VA workers falsifying records to cover up delays.

84. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

85. Chamber Head: Hard Choices on City Benefits Necessary -

The president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber says efforts by municipal union leaders to boycott business members of the chamber and get those businesses to drop their chamber membership is having only a minimal effect.

86. Health Choice Selects Abisch to Lead Population Health Services -

Ellen Abisch has joined Health Choice LLC as senior director of population health services. In the newly created position, Abisch will be responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness programs for the Health Choice network.
Prior to joining the physician hospital organization, she served as manager of benefits and wellness for ServiceMaster.

87. Gastro One Forms New Practice -

Gastro One and Memphis Gastroenterology Group have merged, creating the largest gastroenterology practice in the Memphis Metro area.

The merged practice, which will operate under the Gastro One brand name, features 35 doctors covering the spectrum of gastroenterology – the study, treatment and health of the digestive system (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine/colon, liver, pancreas and gallbladder). Each gastroenterologist is a medical specialist trained in internal medicine and in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases involving the digestive system.

88. Checkered Progress on Disabled Care Despite Ruling -

Brent Kaderli has a wheelchair-accessible van waiting in the driveway, a hospital bed in a spare bedroom and an electric lift that's left unused. If the 30-year-old quadriplegic had his way, he'd be living here, in his father's house, with help from aides. Instead, he is in an institution, hoping each day for a place that feels more like a home.

89. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

90. Fire, Police Union Brass Say Lawsuit is Coming -

The leaders of the Memphis police and fire unions say they will sue the city over changes in employee health insurance approved this month and are prepared to add pension changes to the litigation if the council approves those changes next month.

91. Health Choice Selects Jones to Lead Provider Engagement -

LaTasha Jones has been named director of provider engagement at Health Choice LLC, where she will be responsible for directing and managing the implementation of a clinical integration database for Health Choice providers and practices.

92. Shinseki Resigns Amid Veterans' Health Care Issues -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki apologized in public and then resigned in the privacy of the White House on Friday, driven from office by a mushrooming scandal over the agency's health care system that serves millions of the nation's former warriors.

93. Editorial: Wellness Programs Can Play Key Role in City -

Corporate wellness plans have come a long way in the last 20 years.

So has the idea of fitness and exercise in a city whose population is part of a region consistently near the top of national rankings for some significant health problems.

94. New Health Cost Controls Get Go-Ahead From Feds -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration has given the go-ahead for insurers and employers to use a new cost-control strategy that puts a hard dollar limit on what health plans pay for some expensive procedures, such as knee and hip replacements.

95. Consumers Losing Doctors With New Insurance Plans -

MIAMI (AP) – Some consumers who bought insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law are experiencing buyer's remorse after realizing that their longtime doctors aren't accepting the new plans.

96. Health Insurers Just Say No to Marijuana Coverage -

Patients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don't cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.

Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.

97. Medicare Database Reveals Top-Paid Doctors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare paid a tiny group of doctors $3 million or more apiece in 2012. One got nearly $21 million.

Those are among the findings of an Associated Press analysis of physician data released Wednesday by the Obama administration, part of a move to open the books on health care financing.

98. Lebanon’s Pody Works for Amendment Passage -

Helping people with insurance requires the ability to plan for multiple scenarios.

That’s something Rep. Mark Pody, a Republican from Lebanon, Tenn., has taken with him to the Tennessee General Assembly, and he says it helps even when everyone is in agreement on a bill’s final outcome.

99. Experts Highlight Health Care Game-Changers -

Both before the Affordable Care Act became law and after, consumers viewed health care costs differently than they do other costs.

So said Dr. Scott Morris during a panel discussion at The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc.’s Health Care Reform seminar Thursday, April 3, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

100. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.