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Editorial Results (free)

1. Available Class-A Office Space Scarce in Memphis -

ServiceMaster is looking to relocate its headquarters into a Class A office building, and Memphis just doesn’t have room.

“For the past two years, we’ve been using those phrases,” said Ron Kastner, senior vice president with CBRE.

2. City Sells Old Police Building to NCE Realty -

The company that had the only bid Tuesday, May 17, on the old Central Police Building at 128 Adams Avenue still has to close on the deal with the city of Memphis.

3. Bakers Whip Up New Downtown Business -

Mary Katherine Dunston and Courtney Lollar have built guitars, iPhones and motorcycles out of cake and icing.

This June, they’re getting out of their residential kitchens and setting up shop Downtown with a new bakery, Two Girls and a Whip.

4. HealthLink’s Medical Device Logistics Business Poised to Grow -

A Netherlands-based medical device logistics company has moved into the Lamar Avenue corridor.

Building on proximity to FedEx Corp. and Memphis’ emerging biosciences hub, HealthLink Europe & International made Memphis its latest flagstaff operation.

5. Congress Putting Daily Fantasy Sports Games Under Scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress on Wednesday launched a fact-finding mission into the loosely regulated world of fantasy sports games – a multibillion-dollar business that seemingly advertised everywhere during the pro football season.

6. Insure Tennessee: In Like A Lion, Out With A Committee -

What started with a roar is ending with a whimper.

On the first day of the 2016 legislative session, dozens of Insure Tennessee supporters rallied, shouted and sang songs outside the House chamber.

7. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

8. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

9. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

10. Mental Agility Is No Bad Goal -

“Mental agility” has been defined as “cognitive and psychological adaptability, or the ability to think rapidly and creatively under stress.” A site called “Mind Fitness Training Institute” says that “an agile mind … can anticipate or quickly adapt to uncertain or changing situations. …”

11. RedRover Hosts 10-Year Bash at FedExForum -

You know you’ve made it when you can throw a birthday party that draws guests like an NBA star in addition to a variety of high-powered business leaders.

Later this week, RedRover Sales & Marketing Strategy is hosting an invitation-only bash at FedExForum that will include a meet-and-greet session with Memphis Grizzlies guard Tony Allen. In addition to networking opportunities with the business crowd on hand, the firm will also give an early peek at its revamped website launching this month and will toast the release of CEO Lori Turner-Wilson’s new book, “WOOF! Why Ordinary Organizations Fail.”

12. Medicare Opens New Push on Hip, Knee Replacement -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From Akron to Tampa Bay, from New York City to San Francisco, Medicare on Friday launches an ambitious experiment changing how it pays for hip and knee replacements in an effort to raise quality and lower costs.

13. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

14. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

15. Changes to Memphis Airport Passenger Experience On the Way -

Some big changes are in the works at Memphis International Airport to modernize and improve the passenger experience, with a slew of new amenities planned.

They include a frequent parking program meant to give regular fliers like business travelers a way to get in and out faster.

16. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

17. Last Word: Drum Circles and Voting, Lincoln Day and Carolyn Hardy's Clients -

I think I may have stumbled upon a way to increase voter turnout in Memphis.
I would say nationally, but we all know what works in Memphis does not always work elsewhere and what works elsewhere does not always work in Memphis.
It came to me as I was at Overton Park ever so briefly Saturday. It’s part of my weekend run whenever the weather is spring-like or actually spring to see what will happen in the nearly three-year Greensward controversy.
Lots of people having fun and a few kite-flyers coexisting on the greensward with zoo overflow parking but no protest with brass band.
As I filed that away I wondered what happened to that park institution -- the drum circle.
Audubon Park had one too along with the Society for Creative Ananchronism – the folks who dress up like Game of Thrones only they were doing it before the television show.
Anyway, I started hearing the drums in my head as I imagined drum circles outside the early voting places because that's how my mind works in a career spent covering politicians since before I was old enough to vote.
Of course the drums would be outside the 100-foot limits for physical campaigning that state law requires.
But imagine you are in the area of let’s say Agricenter, maybe in Shelby Farms Park, and in the distance you hear drums. Wouldn’t you be curious? If you had the time would you try to find the source? And if you discovered it was outside an early voting place and you were of voting age and registered and if you had not already voted (for you may vote early but not often) would you not vote, once your curiosity had been satisfied?
I thought your answer to all of the above would be a resounding yes.

18. New Numbers: Memphis Industrial Market Breaks Records -

The Memphis industrial sector had a banner year in 2015. According to year-end data from Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors, last year’s absorption level came in at 8.4 million square feet, 2 million square feet higher than 2006’s pre-recession levels and a record for the market.

19. Last Word: Early Voting Begins, Marc Gasol's Right Foot and TNReady's Problem -

Trump and Sanders win big in New Hampshire with a Republican scramble for second the only matter to be decided in the nation’s first Presidential primaries. That as the road to Tennessee begins to see some traffic in the distance.
Meanwhile, Marc Gasol goes from a “right mid-foot injury” on the Grizzlies DL to a fractured right foot.

20. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will hold the Green Your Home Winter Plant Sale on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 5-6, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at MBG, 750 Cherry Road. Garden staff and master gardeners will assist with plant care tips and purchases. Admission is free. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

21. MATA ‘Thinking Outside the Bus’ to Overcome Funding Shortfall -

To accommodate for a chronic budget shortfall, the Memphis Area Transit Authority said that it has to start “thinking outside the bus.”

In January, Memphis was announced as one of the pilot partners of a new app that coordinates public transit with private Uber cars.

22. Crime-Ridden, Neglected Apartments Come Under Fire -

Several Memphis apartment complexes with long records of neglect and crime issues are the targets of a renewed political and bureaucratic push to improve conditions.

The efforts are a new front in the recent city movement to tackle Memphis’ blight problem. And it’s a front that invites skepticism.

23. Editorial: New Challenges, Goals Come with New Year -

It’s always the stuff at the start of the year that gets short-changed 12 months or so later.

We remember best what is closest it seems.

So let’s acknowledge the present before it becomes the over-looked past.

24. Entrepreneurs Offer Ideas for 2016 -

New Year’s resolutions tend to run from the mundane – like exercise and eating better – to more profound life goals, professional ambitions and the like. The same is true when it comes to a city like Memphis, which stands on the precipice of what looks to be a new year of consequence on a number of fronts: political, civic, entrepreneurial and more.

25. App Explosion Projected for 2016 -

This column is the sixth in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Check back for the remainder of the series and a deep dive into each of these trends.

With our sights set on 2016, it’s the perfect time for reflection on your growth strategy. What marketing successes will you carry over from 2015 into the New Year, and which will you abandon? What marketing trends, anticipated for 2016, are worthy of consideration in your 2016 plan?

26. Sheffield, College Initiative Students Get Help on Path to Higher Ed -

Torisha Williams was an elementary school educator for six years. So when she began her position in August as a counselor at Sheffield High School, she brought some grade-school culture to the job of helping her students find a way to college.

27. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

28. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

29. Evaporcool Solutions Cools Off the Hot Air -

Evaporcool Solutions is doing its part for the environment from its home base in Memphis.

Founded in 2004, Evaporcool manufactures and sells energy efficient technology that is targeted for the commercial HVAC market across the U.S., with applicability around the world. Imagine a custom-built frame that is installed on the exterior of an air conditioning system.

30. Four Memphis Schools Join ASD in 2016-2017 -

Four Memphis schools will be added to the state-run Achievement School District in the 2016-2017 academic year. All four will be paired with charter operators.

Caldwell-Guthrie Elementary in North Memphis and Raleigh-Egypt Middle in Raleigh will be operated by Scholar Academies.

31. Four Memphis Schools Join ASD in 2016-2017 -

Four Memphis schools will be added to the state-run Achievement School District in the 2016-2017 academic year. All four will be paired with charter operators.

Caldwell-Guthrie Elementary in North Memphis and Raleigh-Egypt Middle in Raleigh will be operated by Scholar Academies.

32. Expert Says Changes to University Governance Take Years -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A higher education expert told lawmakers on Tuesday that big changes such as those Gov. Bill Haslam is proposing for six state universities take years to implement effectively.

33. ZeroTo510 startup SweetBio raises another $900,000 -

One of the most recent companies to participate in the Memphis Bioworks Foundation’s ZeroTo510 medical device accelerator program has raised another $900,000 in venture capital funding.

That new equity financing raised by SweetBio, a medical device startup specializing in wound-healing biomaterials with a dental focus, brings the venture’s total raise to more than $1 million in the past six months.

34. Partners Bring Outdoor Classroom Design Challenge to Memphis Catholic -

Video game industry revenue is up. The time children spend outdoors is down. Young people’s recognition of corporate logos is up. Their ability to identify native species is down.

If that sounds like the groundwork for a nonprofit called Come Alive Outside, that’s because it is.

35. Payments Company Payscape Expands to Memphis -

The financial technology company Payscape has landed in Memphis, opening an office here with plans to ramp up quickly as it works to introduce the community to its merchant services and payment processing capabilities.

36. Cole Carves Community Role At Duncan Williams Asset Management -

The idea of “to whom much was given, much is required” comes from scripture.

It’s a philosophy for a number of organizations and individuals, and one that is important to Roland Cole, associate vice president of Duncan Williams Asset Management. He has served on boards of various nonprofit organizations in Memphis and served as a mentor to community youth.

37. Editorial: Memphis’ Next Top Cop Needs Long-Term Vision -

In the nearly six years that he has been the youngest Memphis Police director to come from the ranks of the MPD, Toney Armstrong has grown in a tough job.

As other cities struggled with violent reactions to deadly police encounters, Armstrong was a true blue, badge-wearing career law enforcement officer saying out loud that times were changing. He made a distinction between the police approach to legitimate, vocal peaceful protest and mob violence.

38. Hoops & Dreams -

They were but a few words, yet they seemed to capture the mindset of the University of Memphis basketball program’s high-expectation fan base.

“Get back to like it was,” said former Tigers guard Jeremy Hunt.

39. Editorial: The Authentic Success Of Whitehaven High School -

Whitehaven the community has been inseparable from Whitehaven the school for more than 100 years.

Whether it was Whitehaven Academy in the 19th century or Neel High School or the current Whitehaven High, the community and its hallmark educational institution always have been intertwined.

40. Andy Cates: Memphis in ‘Pivotal’ Time -

When more than 100 of the city’s most prominent developers and real estate professionals got together Tuesday, Nov. 3, at the Crescent Club in East Memphis, much of the focus was on a list of more than two dozen real estate projects.

41. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

42. Memphis Groups Sell City in Big Apple -

It’s a special week for Memphis in the Big Apple. Ballet Memphis, the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau, Greater Memphis Chamber and Choose901 are spending this week in New York City in hopes of putting the Bluff City’s best foot forward to attract visitors and attention.

43. LendMed Wants to Track Health Care Sharing -

Through conversations with health care industry professionals, Ryan Freiden saw a need he thought he could fill.

44. Memphis Cab Company Holds On Against Newer Upstarts -

Competition and the presence of new upstarts shaking up the status quo are par for the course when it comes to running a business over the long term.

Then there’s the situation that faces Ham Smythe IV, president of Premier Transportation Services, Yellow Cab, Checker Cab and Ride the Roo in Memphis.

45. Bring It Food Hub Looks To Expand Reach and Participants -

Operating adjacent to Trolley Stop Market, at 694 Madison Ave., a food-focused nonprofit has just kicked off the fall season of its work connecting Memphians to healthy food from local farms.

46. Six Sets Of Eyes For Innovation -

To successfully foster an innovation, you have to look through at least six different sets of eyes.

First, you have to unlearn everything you know. Admit it. You are biased, preprogrammed, and your bonus is tied into business results. Apply sincere empathy with people who do not know as much as you.

47. Study Examines Effectiveness of Tennessee's Pre-K Program -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he's still supportive of Tennessee's pre-kindergarten program despite a study that shows academic gains made by some of the children enrolled fade in early elementary grades.

48. Memphis Catholic Puts Education To Work -

Milestones are an important part of life that remind us of something that matters.

It’s a needed pause that says, “Look how far we’ve come, and we’re not finished yet.” That’s exactly what Memphis Catholic High School’s Education That Works program is doing this year as it marks its 10th year of operation.

49. From University Labs to the Marketplace -

The health care industry contributed $38.8 billion to Middle Tennessee’s economy in 2014, according to a study released by the Nashville Health Care Council, which is a 32.9 percent increase from the 2010.

50. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

51. Four Elements of a Successful Innovation Boot Camp -

After working with more than 100 organizations – from leading nonprofits to Fortune 500 companies – this hard-earned mantra about innovation has emerged: Concepts and culture are two critical factors necessary for successful innovation.

52. Shelby County Budget Summit Call Begins With Different Priorities -

Shelby County government’s financial needs have changed in the nearly two months since the new fiscal year began.

And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county trustee David Lenoir to explore the new budget realities.

53. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

54. Proposal Prompts Closer Look at Tax Breaks -

In recent years, the tax incentives used to bring economic development and jobs to Memphis have been a lightning rod.

The debate’s volume grew as it became apparent that Memphis was emerging from the national recession at a slower pace than other major cities as well as some parts of rural west Tennessee and north Mississippi.

55. Memphis Redbirds, Grizzlies Partner for ‘Grit & Grind Night’ -

The Memphis Redbirds and Memphis Grizzlies play in different sports and at different levels, but for years the people running the teams acted as though they were quasi-rivals.

Change has been in the works for a while – the annual Cardinals Caravan was at FedExForum this winter when AutoZone Park was getting a makeover – but now a growing partnership is in even greater evidence.

56. US Trade Gap Widens 7 Percent in June as Imports Jump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased in June as solid consumer spending pulled in more imports, while the strong dollar restrained exports.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday the trade gap jumped 7 percent to $43.8 billion in June, up from $40.9 billion in May. Imports increased 1.2 percent to $232.4 billion, while exports edged lower to $188.6 billion from $188.7 billion.

57. Memphis Sole -

The football field measurements are perhaps inevitable in describing just how big Nike’s Northridge distribution center in Frayser is after its $301 million expansion.

The 2.8 million-square-foot facility – the equivalent of 49 football fields – is Nike Inc.’s largest distribution center in the world.

58. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

59. Merger Creates Opportunities for Nonprofit Communities Unlimited Inc. -

If a small business is seeking a loan, nonprofit Communities Unlimited Inc. will sell the fuel along with a free diagnostic checkup.

60. Events -

Stax Museum of American Soul Music will host an opening reception for “Stax: Visions of Soul” Friday, July 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Stax, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Gallery talk begins at 6:45 p.m. The exhibit, which runs through Dec. 31, features contemporary works of art inspired by Stax Records songs. Visit staxmuseum.com.

61. Events -

The Pink Palace will host Young Professionals Beer/Wine and a Movie Night on Thursday, July 16, at 6 p.m. at the museum, 3050 Central Ave. Tickets are $15 and include food, drinks and a screening of “Groundhog Day.” Visit memphismuseums.org or call 901-636-2362.

62. Events -

Sales and Marketing Society of the Mid-South will meet Wednesday, July 15, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave. Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $35. Visit sms-midsouth.org.

63. Sisters Carry On Father’s Legacy at Bancroft Leasing -

For the Bancroft sisters, talking about best-fit leasing options for agricultural equipment comes as easily as navigating the Memphis streets they've known all their lives. Together, the pair make up the second generation of Bancroft Leasing, an equipment leasing brokerage company started by their father, Charlie Bancroft, in 1977.

64. Big Bins -

Joy Williams had an experiment over the Fourth of July weekend to test Memphis’ new 96-gallon recycling bins.

65. Certificate of Need Process Back in Spotlight -

The state-level approval process Methodist South Hospital recently cleared that allows it to pursue an $8.7 million emergency department expansion has been in legislative crosshairs in Nashville recently.

66. Cycling Ahead -

Unless you've seen the ubiquitous stations in cities like Knoxville and Nashville, it's difficult to imagine how bike sharing could connect Memphis.

Tourists and citizens can check out a bike on a per-ride or membership basis and return it to a separate station when they've reached their destination.

67. Building Ballet -

Ask Ballet Memphis CEO and founding artistic director Dorothy Gunther Pugh about her dance company's newly announced move to Midtown, and the conversation doesn't immediately turn to obvious things like the when and the why.

68. US Economy Not As Bad in First Quarter, Paving Way for Rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy contracted in the first three months of the year, just not as much as previously estimated. More recent data show that the weakness was largely temporary, with a rebound in the works for the April-June quarter.

69. Sales Volume Raises Risk of Closing Snafus -

The Greater Nashville Association of Realtors’ May sales data show sales continuing to rise.

There were 3,558 closings, up 15.6 percent from last May. In comparison, there were 1,783 closings in May 2009. So closings have almost doubled since the Recession. And, as everyone knows, inventory has dropped dramatically.

70. Q&A: Net Neutrality Rules Go Into Effect -

NEW YORK (AP) – New rules that treat the Internet like a public utility and prohibit blocking, slowing and creating paid fast lanes for online traffic took effect Friday.

Cable and telecom industry groups have sued to have the rules thrown out, arguing they are too onerous. But on Thursday, a federal appeals court declined to block the rules from taking effect as the industry litigation against them proceeds. A court could still eventually overturn the rules.

71. Tom’s Tiny Kitchen Gets a Whole Lot Bigger -

By adding a pinch of passion to a tried-and-true recipe, Tom Flournoy has grown a family-run business to having a five-state reach.

After he was unexpectedly laid off from his executive position in the automotive parts industry, Flournoy fell back on an appetizing venture: homemade pimento cheese. To make ends meet, he started preparing pimento cheese at home and selling it to friends and farmers markets under the name Tom’s Tiny Kitchen.

72. More Giving -

The most dedicated donors to the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis give with their hearts and their minds, striking a balance between real-time needs and the financial realities of any given moment.

73. Alexander, Corker Question Renewable Energy Plans by TVA -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's Republican U.S. senators, Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker, are questioning why the Tennessee Valley Authority is placing greater emphasis on renewable energy as part of its long-term plans.

74. Corker Talks Crossing the Aisle and ‘Generational Theft’ -

The problem with Congress isn’t a lack of civility, says U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee.

“There’s always been civility,” the second-term Republican senator from Chattanooga told a Greater Memphis Chamber luncheon last week. “It’s never been a situation of friction. It’s just been an atmosphere of people not having the willingness, the courage or whatever to step across the aisle and actually shake hands and do something that’s not exactly in their interest.”

75. Raising the Barre -

Memphis has always been known for its rich musical history, but another performing art is whirling across the city: dance.

Several collectives and companies are dedicated to making dance accessible to underserved communities and changing the perception that ballet is a dusty and stifled endeavor.

76. Investors Pumping Hundreds of Millions Into Tennessee Startups -

The assignment sounded simple enough: Find out whether more money is coming into Nashville for startups.

If so, where is it coming from and what does it means to entrepreneurs, investors and the rest of us?

77. Boat Boom -

The Mississippi River has been a vital channel for boats and barges for more than 250 years. These days, Memphis doesn’t do much in the way of cotton exporting and Mark Twain touring, but the $43 million Beale Street Landing is bringing a new wave of river-based commerce: cruise ships.

78. Rieger Begins Work at Memphis Chamber -

Tom Rieger recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as senior vice president of member development, a role in which he will oversee major fundraising activities, conduct membership drive campaigns and implement revenue enhancement opportunities.

79. Will McGhee Tyson Expansion Lure Southwest? -

With some of the preliminary work out of the way, the ambitious airfield reconstruction project at Knoxville’s McGhee Tyson Airport could begin in earnest as early as August.

The makeover is expected to bring in new business and support existing enterprise in East Tennessee and, airport officials say, help lure the popular carrier Southwest Airlines to Knoxville.

80. Memphis Aims to Expand Recycling Efforts -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

This Earth Day, the City of Memphis has much to celebrate. Over the last several years, we have seen a growing demand for walkable, healthy neighborhoods, vibrant public spaces, access to fresh foods, and energy efficient buildings. As mayor, I have worked to meet this demand and position Memphis to lead by example in environmental sustainability. This work is being recognized nationally as Memphis-Shelby County was recently designated a 4-STAR sustainable community, in the same company as places like Austin, Texas, and Portland, Ore.

81. City Blight Efforts Evolve Beyond Demolition -

The Frayser Community Development Corp. knew the house it wanted on University Street. There were plenty to choose from with multiple abandoned houses on the block. But it wanted the worst one, at 3200 University St.

82. Vanderbilt's Tim Corbin: Developing Champions ‘The Right Way’ -

For a baseball coach – one of the best in the business – Tim Corbin owes much of his career to influences from a different athletic endeavor.

83. Sparking Change -

Memphis is not Silicon Valley. And the nonprofit sector is not the tech industry. But nonprofits could perhaps learn something from companies large and small that make Silicon Valley the tech epicenter.

84. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

85. Hard to ‘Mansplain’ Workplace Gender Issues -

“Jane felt like screaming at Dick after he manterrupted her in the staff meeting, bropropriated her idea and then spent the afternoon mansplaining it back to her.’’

That’s an actual sentence – if people are willing to use gender-specific language that’s gaining popularity to describe unwanted workplace behavior.

86. Events -

Teach901 will host its third annual teacher job fair Tuesday, Feb. 10, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Central BBQ Downtown, 1247 Butler Ave. Candidates interested in pursuing a career as an educator in the Memphis area are invited. More than 20 organizations will be seeking hires. Visit teach901.com/job-fair to register.

87. Events -

David Lusk Gallery will hold an opening reception for Tyler Hildebrand’s “Granny Whitey” and Mary Sims’ “Zuma and the Bible” Friday, Feb. 6, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the gallery, 4540 Poplar Ave. Visit davidluskgallery.com.

88. Events -

Mid-South Area Business Travel Association will meet Thursday, Feb. 5, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Courtyard Memphis-Collierville, 4640 Merchants Park Circle. Phil Hammer, director of travel services for Runzheimer International, will present “Key Trends in Business Travel Costs.” Tickets are $25 for members and $40 for nonmembers. Visit msabta.org.

89. Leadership Lessons From the Duke -

The American Master of Music, Duke Ellington, also stands as an ideal role model of leadership for the emerging business and nonprofit world. As the global workplace moves toward open workspaces and sees the value of multidimensional team filled with hard-to-traditionally-manage creative professionals, a look into Ellington’s leadership style can inspire outstanding results.

90. Events -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East will meet Wednesday, Jan. 28, at noon at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Dr. James R. Downing, president and chief executive officer of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, will speak. Cost is $17. RSVP at Lee Hughes at lmhughes@bellsouth.net.

91. Three Ways to Evaluate Nonprofit Technology -

Part one of a two-part series. “The main reason nonprofits look to update or implement technology is to acquire additional functionality that will automate more tasks, which they hope will free up time to work on more strategic projects.” – Janna Finch

92. Community Building -

Almost three years ago, former elementary school art teacher Erin Harris saw a video about children in Memphis who were working with an artist to start a sculpture garden. She still recalls the happy sight of a few boys in the video throwing balloons filled with paint at an old fence, as well as the reaction the footage generated from her.

93. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

94. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

95. Bioworks Helped Spur Memphis Economy in 2014 -

In a variety of ways, the biosciences industry in Memphis helped lead the way in 2014 in terms of job creation and laying a foundation for economic growth in the future.

About that groundwork for growth to come, for example, the Memphis Bioworks Foundation got tapped early in 2014 to lead a new entrepreneurship venture in the city called The EPIcenter, with the goal of creating 1,000 entrepreneurs and 50 companies in the city over the next decade.

96. Being Uninsured in America Will Cost You More -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Being uninsured in America will cost you more in 2015.

It's the first year all taxpayers have to report to the Internal Revenue Service whether they had health insurance for the previous year, as required under President Barack Obama's law. Those who were uninsured face fines, unless they qualify for one of about 30 exemptions, most of which involve financial hardships.

97. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

98. Bigger LIFT -

The former Cadence Bank branch on Court Avenue Downtown is the new and bigger home for Community LIFT, the local intermediary with community development corporations founded by a coalition of nonprofits and the city of Memphis four years ago.

99. Minyard Joins Barge Waggoner -

Tom Minyard, a 31-year veteran of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as the civil works program manager. In his new role, Minyard’s responsibilities include the advancement of the firm’s strategic direction as it relates to its civil works program for local, state and federal governments. His areas of technical interest include flood risk reduction, navigation, ecosystem restoration and emergency response.

100. Government for the Prosperity of the People -

The reporting out of the US on China is uniformly downbeat. By applying our western perspectives, China appears inhumane, politically oppressive, over-indebted and fragile.

From the American perspective, functional nations should look more ... well ... like us. They should have democracy, inalienable property rights, free and open markets, freedom of expression, apple pie, etc. Our national belief in the ideology of American exceptionalism defines our worldview.