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Editorial Results (free)

1. Freeze: If Ole Miss Did Wrong the Football Program Should Be Held Accountable -

HOOVER, Ala. – Ole Miss was getting top-tier recruits. Opponents and their fans were raising eyebrows or flat out making accusations against coach Hugh Freeze and the Rebels for cheating.

2. Freeze: If Ole Miss Did Wrong the Football Program Should be Accountable -

HOOVER, Ala. – Ole Miss was getting top-tier recruits. Opponents and their fans were raising eyebrows or flat out making accusations against coach Hugh Freeze and the Rebels for cheating.

3. Schism Among State Republicans Hits Critical Point With Resignation -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican Party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

4. ‘Throwback’ Something Special -

“I didn’t set out to write about the melancholy bewilderment of middle-aged men,” says Chris Bachelder of his fifth novel, “The Throwback Special.” “But that’s where I ended up.” And, IMO, he ended up with a very special book.

5. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 4 -

In the past three columns, I’ve told how, in February 2002, I had a major reminiscence of my role in saving the life of a heart attack victim-in-denial 20 years earlier. In March I received annoying emails about how to survive a heart attack while alone. In early April I dreamed of my heartland being under attack.

6. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

7. Pesce: ‘You’ve Already Heard the Worst’ -

What kind of gift do you give to the friends and family who have prayed for your sick baby daughter long enough to see her get well, grow up and go to high school?

In Cheryl Pesce’s case, the answer was also the beginning of her successful jewelry design business, which now fills an airy studio space Downtown with chunks of crystal and agate, freshwater pearls, leather hides, and gold, bronze and silver chains. Pesce, 56, who sells directly to customers from her website cherylpesce.com, is in the running for a FedEx Small Business Grant and has submitted a necklace design to Anthropologie.

8. From Exhaustion to Endurance -

Not long ago, while waiting in line at the grocery store, I overheard a very weary-looking young father with a baby in his arms and two toddlers sitting in the shopping cart say to the clerk, “My wife is sick, the kids are sick, the baby was up all night, and work is piling up on my desk. I feel like I’m 60.”

9. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

10. My Town Miracles Helping Those in Need, One Family at a Time -

Noel Fenderson, one of the founders of My Town Miracles, tells a story from Mark Allen, the group’s growth marketing secretary.

11. The Week Ahead: June 13-19 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from decisions about ServiceMaster incentives to the ultimate dodgeball tournament.

12. CHC Eyes Crosstown Move, Won’t Rush to Fill Sheehan’s Post -

The Church Health Center is gearing up to move into and begin seeing patients at the renovated Crosstown Concourse early next year, with no immediate plans to fill the vacant president’s position following the departure of Antony Sheehan last month.

13. Lehman-Roberts Investing in Memphis Roads, Community -

Lehman-Roberts Co. president Patrick Nelson is right when he says, “What we do is not terribly fancy or glamorous.”

14. UT’s Legislative Spanking Could Have Been Worse -

In a state where many people bleed orange, the University of Tennessee found itself in an unusual position during the 2016 legislative session: fighting for its life.

The folks representing Rocky Top, typically a sacred cow, had to battle for respect after emails surfaced from UT-Knoxville’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion urging teachers to use gender-neutral pronouns for transgender students and to downplay Christmas during holiday parties.

15. Tennessee Law Strips University Diversity Office Funding -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill to strip funding from the diversity office at Tennessee's flagship public university became law without Gov. Bill Haslam's signature on Friday.

Lawmakers had been angered by the University of Tennessee's diversity office recommendations to use gender-neutral pronouns for transgender students and to avoid religious-themed holiday parties. So they voted to remove about $446,000 in state funds for the office and instead use the money to pay for minority scholarships.

16. May 20-26: This Week in Memphis History -

2006: Shelby County’s reliance on manufacturing jobs is dropping, according to state labor figures, which show that 14 manufacturing companies have closed or cut back their workforces in Shelby County since January 2003. The closings and cutbacks account for the loss of 1,240 jobs.
The losses include 98 jobs at Coors Brewing Co., 5151 East Raines Road; 112 workers at Memphis Hardwood Flooring Co., 1551 Thomas St.; and 327 employees at Great Dane LP at 1095 Harbor Ave.

17. Baptist Executive Vaughn Receives U of M’s Highest Alumni Award -

Anita Vaughn’s notable 43-year career with Baptist Memorial Hospital started on a whim.

“I went to University of Memphis for a year thinking I was going to be a commercial artist,” Vaughn said. “Then a friend just happened to say, ‘You know what? I’m going down to Baptist School of Nursing,’ and I said, ‘Well, OK. Me too!’

18. New Schools Giving Memphis Suburbs More Autonomy -

Some of the trees along East Shelby Drive on the 158 acres at Sycamore Road are in rows. It’s the unmistakable sign of a tree nursery. And before that it was considered a prime dove hunting location.

19. Kyles' Services May 6 At Mason Temple -

Retired Monumental Baptist Church pastor and Memphis civil rights leader Samuel Billy Kyles will be remembered Friday, May 6, with a community celebration of his life at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ, 930 Mason St.

20. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

21. Kyles Services Friday At Mason Temple -

Retired Monumental Baptist Church pastor and Memphis civil rights leader Samuel Billy Kyles will be remembered Friday, May 6, with a community celebration of his life at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ, 930 Mason St.

22. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

23. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

24. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

25. Grinding Recovery -

Michael Drury is watching the current U.S. presidential season with a combination of professional detachment and an air of resignation.

Detachment, because part of his job as chief economist at Memphis-based McVean Trading & Investments is to keep abreast of what makes economies around the world tick. Part of that, of course, means at least some degree of focus on the man – or, possibly a few months from now, the woman – who sits astride the dominant global economy.

26. Tennessee Legislature's 2016 Session: Unbelievable -

THE STATE OF UN. In this nadir of presidential elections with everyone awash in slimy sound bites, with Congress and a Supreme Court nominee stuck in the mud, it takes truly jaw-dropping state legislative idiocy to draw the attention of the national media, make the monologues of late-night hosts and inspire “Saturday Night Live” skits.

27. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

28. SCS Board Eyes Three Charter School Closings -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Tuesday, April 26, to close three Memphis charter schools performing in the bottom 5 percent of all schools statewide in terms of student achievement.

And the board set in motion a series of public hearing on closing two conventional high schools – Northside and Carver – as well as the Messick Adult Center.

29. SCS Board Votes To Close Three Charters -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Tuesday, April 26, to close three Memphis charter schools in the bottom five percent of all schools state wide in terms of student achievement. And the board set in motion a series of public hearing on closing two conventional high schools – Northside and Carver -- as well as the Messick Adult Center.

30. Legislature Votes to Strip Funding From UT Diversity Office -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers voted to send a message that they don't agree with the sexually open and progressive views of the Office for Diversity and Inclusion on the University of Tennessee campus. So the Legislature on Thursday passed a bill stripping it of state funds — a total of nearly $337,000. The money will be used to fund minority scholarships instead.

31. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

32. Veto Of Bible As Official Tenn. Book Survives Challenge -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee has a state reptile, a state rock and a state song in the moonshine-themed "Rocky Top." For now, though, the Bible will not be its official state book.

33. Mississippi Governor Signs Law Allowing Armed Church Members -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A holstered gun sat on top of a Bible on Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant's desk Friday when he signed a law allowing guns in churches, which he said would help protect worshippers from potential attackers.

34. Haslam Vetoes Bible Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Thursday vetoed a bill seeking to make Tennessee the first state to designate the Bible as its official book.

Haslam, who as a college graduate considered going to seminary before deciding to join the family truck stop business, said in his veto message that the bill "trivializes the Bible, which I believe is a sacred text."

35. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

36. Palmer Home for Children Expanding in Hernando -

On Tuesday, April 12, Palmer Home for Children will break ground on a $10 million expansion of its Hernando, Miss., campus to include three new cottages and a wellness center.

With campuses in Columbus and Hernando, Palmer Home provides residential care for children while introducing the love of God through service. Operating in Columbus since 1895, the organization expanded its reach to DeSoto County in 2003.

37. Palmer Home for Children Expanding in Hernando -

On Tuesday, April 12, Palmer Home for Children will break ground on a $10 million expansion of its Hernando, Miss., campus to include three new cottages and a wellness center.

With campuses in Columbus and Hernando, Palmer Home provides residential care for children while introducing the love of God through service. Operating in Columbus since 1895, the organization expanded into DeSoto County in 2003.

38. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

39. Jesse Jackson Calls for Passion to Continue Dr. King's Work -

He was 26 years old in 1968 when he was a guest at the Lorraine Motel with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and one of the younger members of King’s inner circle.

40. Bill to Make Bible Tennessee's State Book Heads to Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Derided by critics as everything from unconstitutional to sacrilegious, Tennessee lawmakers nevertheless plowed ahead with designating the Holy Bible as the state's official book.

41. Haslam Remains Opposed to Making Bible Official State Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam said Wednesday that he remains opposed to a renewed effort to make the Holy Bible the official state book of Tennessee.

Haslam initially voiced opposition to the measure before it was derailed over constitutional concerns in the state Senate last year, and sent back to committee. The bill is now awaiting a new vote in the upper chamber of the Legislature.

42. Tony Allen Sees his Bleak Chicago Existence in JIFF Kids -

As Tony Allen tells it, “I grew up in some of the hardest parts of Chicago.” And when he says “grew up,” he means survived.

43. Bill Seeking to Strip UT Diversity Office Funding Withdrawn -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill seeking to strip funding from University of Tennessee's diversity office has been withdrawn in the Senate.

Republican Sen. Todd Gardenhire of Chattanooga withdrew the bill from consideration on Wednesday. Supporters had been upset at the state's flagship university for promoting an annual Sex Week and for recommending the use of gender-neutral pronouns on campus and advising against religious-themed parties and decorations.

44. Bill: Swap UT Diversity Money For 'In God We Trust' Stickers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill advancing in the state House would redirect money from the University of Tennessee's diversity office to pay for "In God We Trust" decals for law enforcement vehicles.

45. Sports Notebook: Memphis, UT Vols Shut out of NCAA Tourney; Grizz Keep Grinding; Waino Bullish on Cards -

The University of Memphis won two American Athletic Conference Tournament games but lost to Connecticut for a third time this season in Sunday’s title game. The Tigers were close enough to the Big Dance to hear the music and smell the punch, but nowhere close to getting an at-large invitation.

46. Healthy Tennessee Fair Slated for Saturday -

The nonprofit Healthy Tennessee is holding its first health fair in Memphis Saturday, March 12, from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m. at Raleigh Assembly of God, 3683 Austin Peay Highway.

The statewide group focused on health training and preventive care is providing medical tests and screenings as well as broader medical advice aimed to keeping chronic conditions under control, said Dr. Manny Sethi, the founder of the four-year-old organization and a Nashville surgeon.

47. The Audible: Still Peyton Manning’s Best Weapon -

It was, of course, the closing of Peyton Manning’s recent retirement speech that provided the sound bite and made the headlines.

Quoting 2 Timothy 4:7, Manning said: “I have fought the good fight and I have finished the race. I have kept the faith.” He then added: “Well, I have fought the good fight. I’ve finished my football race and after 18 years, it’s time. God bless all of you and God bless football.”

48. Kilzer on a New Pulpit But Still Finding Sanctuary in Music -

“I died in Paris,” said John Kilzer, who spoke from the pulpit of Calvary Episcopal Church as part of the church’s annual Lenten Preaching Series.

The 50-something singer-songwriter and Methodist minister was telling the story of his spiritual death in November 1991 while on a European tour for Geffen Records and Peter Asher Management.

49. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

50. Healthy Tennessee Fair Slated For Saturday -

The nonprofit Healthy Tennessee is holding its first health fair in Memphis Saturday, March 12, from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m. at Raleigh Assembly of God, 3683 Austin Peay Highway.

The statewide group focused on health training and preventive care is providing medical tests and screenings as well as broader medical advice aimed to keeping chronic conditions under control, said Dr. Manny Sethi, the founder of the four-year-old organization and a Nashville surgeon.

51. Malaprop Revisitation -

“I’m uphauled!” read the note. “Anyone with a social conscious would be ashamed. People are always ready to blame things on an escape goat, but for all intensive purposes, it’s a doggy-dog world out there. The underline meaning is clear, but don’t take a fence; this is just my too cents worth. Anyway it’s a mute point.”

52. Last Word: Carson Cancels, Haslam Endorses, Bank Numbers and Kobe's Exit -

Presidential campaigns and the security concerns that come with them aren’t something that comes up a lot in terms of press coverage in this election cycle.
But it has come up leading into what will be a busy weekend locally and in the region among the presidential contenders.
Republican candidate Ben Carson was scheduled to attend both Sunday services at Highpoint Church in East Memphis.
Leaders of the church emphasized it was a non-political event in which Carson would talk about his personal story and his faith but would not make a political pitch.
This is not unprecedented.
In 2008, Republican contender Mike Huckabee attended an ordination ceremony for two ministers at Bellevue Baptist Church in Cordova – an event that was billed also as a nonpolitical event.
And so the reporters who came to cover the candidate who would win the Tennessee Republican primary days later watched not from the sanctuary but from the room where Bellevue’s video and audio feeds are coordinated. Huckabee talked politics with reporters after the service as he made a run for some barbecue to-go from Corky’s on his way to another city on the campaign trail.

53. Trump Books Millington Rally Date -

Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump is bringing his campaign to Shelby County over the weekend.

Trump has booked a Saturday, Feb. 27, campaign rally for the Millington Jetport.

The event, in the gap between the Tuesday, Feb. 23, end of the early voting period and the March 1 election day in the Tennessee presidential primaries, was confirmed on Trump’s campaign website Monday evening.

54. The Original Pop-Up -

POP-UP WAFFLES. Pop-up concepts are hot. Popping up in spaces – Broad, the Edge, the Brewery, the Fire Station – reclaimed and repurposed to show what’s possible, the original character of the space adding flavor, the here-today-gone-tomorrow aspect adding spice, the unusual nature of the things served – things not seen every day and everywhere – adding adventure. Millennial curiosity addressed, the need for gratification met, the existential question asked and answered.

55. This week in Memphis history: February 12-18 -

2015: Business, government offices and schools that aren’t already out for Presidents Day close when temperatures fall well below freezing and rain moves in, creating about an inch of freezing rain, according to the National Weather Service.

56. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

57. Pearl Jam, Dead & Company, LCD Soundsystem to Play Bonnaroo -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Pearl Jam, Dead & Company and LCD Soundsystem will headline the 2016 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in June in Manchester, Tennessee.

The four-day festival revealed its musical lineup for its 15th year on TBS' "Conan" on Tuesday night, which also includes J. Cole, Ellie Goulding, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Tame Impala, Death Cab for Cutie, M83, Haim, Miguel and Chris Stapleton.

58. Daush Eyes Next Career Chapter -

On one hand, a long journey in the education profession will come to an end this spring for Barbara Daush.

Daush is president of St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School, a role she has served since 1994. She’ll retire at the end of this school year but it’s a short retirement; Daush begins work in fundraising at the University of Mississippi July 5.

59. Sea Isle Signs -

By the numbers, Sea Isle Elementary has 36 students out of 517 who are hearing-impaired or deaf. Some are as young as 3 years old. Some are fifth-graders who in August will leave the East Memphis campus and their status as “Islanders” for the new frontier of middle school.

60. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

61. New Routes to a Healthier New Year -

About a year ago, Christina Charley launched Love Yourself Fitness, a virtual at-home personal training and holistic coaching business.

Now a year later, Charley’s new business is thriving and she’s in the process of expanding it.

62. Last Word: Farewell For Now Midtown Kroger, Weather Hype and Tri-State Bank Clues -

A moment of silence for Midtown Kroger if you will, now that you’ve been through the New Year’s mountain of emails etc.
Where to shop with the Midtown supermarket landmark now closed was the water-cooler question of the day for those who have had a love-hate relationship with the store.
If you are a creature of habit and your habit is that store, you’ve known it by many names – Seesel’s, Seesel’s by Albertson, Schnucks and Kroger.
And as many bad names as you called its original parking lot, you came up with some new ones for the God-forsaken parking lot and its marked pedestrian walkway to hell built on the elegant ghost of the old Trousseau shop.
The store's interior wasn’t quite “Double Indemnity” tiny – think Barbara Stanwyck in cat sunglasses talking furtively over doll-like shelves to Fred MacMurray before “My Three Sons.”
But the “super” in its version of a supermarket was the 1950s black-and-white television Superman.
When Pau Gasol – the original Gasol -- was still playing for the Grizzlies, I ran across him on a late-night grocery excursion able to shop two aisles at once peering over his own aisle to the one I was on, suddenly having that feeling that someone was watching me.
An informal and decidedly unscientific sampling Monday found the alternative sites were the Kroger at Poplar and Cleveland, Cash Saver on Madison, West Memphis WalMart (a go to destination for left of Midtowners, otherwise known as Downtowners) and “I’m still waiting for Trader Joe's."
The old Midtown Kroger has closed as the new and bigger Kroger is starting to take shape behind chain link fences with tarps and other construction barriers just west of the original store but still within earshot of the Idlewild Presbyterian Church carillon.

63. Q&A With Seth Godin -

Seth Godin is the author of 18 books. His blog is one of the most popular in the world. After a keynote about the Connection Economy, Godin made time for a Q&A for 50 people.

At the foundation of the Connection Economy lies weirdness and art, an authentic humanness.

64. Cruz Touts Support for Arming Service Members in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz on Tuesday touted his support for allowing service members to be armed following last summer's shootings in Chattanooga.

65. Resurrection Health to Open New Clinics in 2016 -

As Resurrection Health, a faith-based, evangelical health service organization, prepares to celebrate its first birthday, the enterprise is already planning to roll out two more clinic sites in 2016.

66. Knee-Jerk Outbreak -

A SAD STATE OF AFFAIRS. WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States government has mobilized against a clear threat to the country.

Troops have been sent to identify and capture members of an ersatz government openly operating here in defiance of federal law. This group claims theirs as the only true religion, and that laws be based on it as prescribed in the tome of that religion. They believe no other laws to be valid in the eyes of God, and no rights assigned or any authority recognized if any are based on such godless laws. They seek to prohibit the teaching, or even mention, of any other religion in schools.

67. Angels Of Our Better Nature -

SPIRITS OF A CITY. Emily Sutton and Annie Cook were prostitutes. And angels.

68. SRVS Program Helps People With Disabilities and Employers Who Hire Them -

Mike Harris is production manager at American Stairways Inc. on Lamar Avenue. He has a warehouse full of employees and, just saying it like it is, some are happier to be there than others.

69. DMC’s Morris Touts ‘Radically Different’ South Main -

One of Paul Morris’ first speeches as president of what was then the Center City Commission was to the South Main Association.

70. Business-Nonprofit Partnerships Crucial to Transforming Communities -

Whether in Memphis, Nashville or metro Denver, there are success stories. Businesses and nonprofits coming together not just to create jobs, but to forge life-changing opportunities that turn out to be positive for everyone involved.

71. NexAir’s Sam Noland Brings Female Touch to Heavy Industry -

NexAir’s Sam Noland isn’t a typical welder, not exactly lining up with the male-dominated industry stereotype. Noland is a woman but she’s an industry leader, working in nexAir’s department of technical specialists where she deals with automating, robotics welding and training. She runs the company’s weld lab in Memphis.

72. Jimmy Carter Swings Habitat for Humanity Hammers in Memphis -

Former President Jimmy Carter had planned on being in Nepal Monday, Nov. 2, to build homes for the poor.

73. Tennessee Pewter Keeps Rare Art Alive -

Kathleen Armour Walker’s heart might’ve dropped to the floor when she saw Rolling Stones’ guitarist Keith Richards drop her artwork.

74. Sheriff Refuses Request to Remove 'In God We Trust' Motto -

LEXINGTON, Tenn. (AP) — A West Tennessee sheriff is refusing to remove the phrase "In God We Trust" from his patrol cars.

Henderson County Sheriff Brian Duke told WBBJ-TV that he got a letter from the Freedom From Religion Foundation saying that the phrase doesn't belong on government vehicles and asking him to remove it.

75. A Steeple in Hell -

THE CHURCH OF GROUND ZERO. Headed to my desk, I passed a photograph on the wall. I pass it several times every day, but when I typed 9/11 at the top of the page, the date this column would run in The Daily News, I realized what the column would be about:

76. Memphis Representative -

4,880 MILES MORE SOUTHERN. There he was again. Nora and I were watching a show about historic homes in Memphis on WKNO and when they paused to pitch for support, he was one of the volunteers manning the phone bank behind those pitching.

77. Union University Leaves Council Over Same-Sex Marriage -

JACKSON, Tenn. (AP) — Union University has withdrawn from the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities after two schools that are members of the organization endorsed same-sex marriage.

78. Hooker Fights for Right to Die on His Terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

79. Greatest Restaurants in Nashville? Too Many Choices -

Country music isn’t the only big draw in Nashville these days. The city is at the top of its food game and has become a popular destination for food lovers across the country.

But where do you go when you want to experience the best of the best?

80. Greatest Restaurants in Nashville? Too Many Choices -

Country music isn’t the only big draw in Nashville these days. The city is at the top of its food game and has become a popular destination for food lovers across the country.

But where do you go when you want to experience the best of the best?

81. Greatest Restaurants in Nashville? Too Many Choices -

Country music isn’t the only big draw in Nashville these days. The city is at the top of its food game and has become a popular destination for food lovers across the country.

But where do you go when you want to experience the best of the best?

82. Armstrong Finds Voice In Volatile Times -

Four years ago, when Toney Armstrong became the youngest Memphis Police director from the ranks since the position was created in the 1970s, critics were quick to point out that the one-time homicide detective had a lot to learn about the job’s public face.

83. Council Redisricting Plan Raises Possibility of Unintentional District Shifts -

Memphis City Council members are reviewing a proposed redrawing of their district lines that would move 9,522 Memphians into different council districts a month and a half before early voting opens for the Oct. 8 Memphis elections.

84. The Corporate Inquisition Of Intuition -

While there are clear benefits of data and analytics when applied to growth efforts, a widespread, unhealthy dependence on a purely analytical approach to business cripples too many corporations.

While small- and mid-sized organizations still welcome some calculated risks backed by and bet on a team of spirited rising leaders, corporations appear more risk averse to their approach to launching new products in the market. In fact, the gestalt is that we’ve entered a second age of enlightenment where nothing gets signed into action unless analytic models, predictive tools, and others first bless it with a numerical score.

85. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

86. Mark Mosteller Joins Evolve Bank & Trust -

Mark E. Mosteller Sr. recently joined Evolve Bank & Trust as executive vice president, accounting and finance.
The new role includes a variety of responsibilities, including management of the accounting and finance department team, accounting internal controls, internal and external financial reporting, budgeting and forecasting, taxes and treasury management. Mosteller also works with senior and executive management and the board on accounting, finance and operational issues.

87. How Pope Francis’ Climate Encyclical Translates to Memphis -

On Thursday, June 18, the Vatican released Pope Francis’ much-anticipated encyclical, “Laudato si” (Praise Be to You: On the Care for Our Common Home). For some time now, Catholics, environmentalists and other Vatican watchers were aware that Francis was going to focus on the environment, especially the problem of global climate change.

88. In It Together -

WE’RE RELATED. For a few years, Nora was in a handbell choir at our church. The choir was invited to perform here and there. Being an Episcopal church, those trips were more a celebration than a solemn occasion, and, like the service itself, food and drink were central to the issue at hand. I tagged along because the here and there included roux-full places like Mobile and New Orleans.

89. Memphis Ends Budget Season, But the Arguments Aren't Over -

The end of the budget season at City Hall can be a festive occasion.

Weeks of line-item detail and swapping one amount with another in the budget, as well as the pressure of revenue and other projections that amount to moving targets in the fiscal year, give way to approved operating and capital budgets as well as a property tax rate.

90. Bishop Hears Stronger Call After ‘Fighting God’ -

The reason Richard Stika entered the seminary was to get thoughts of being a priest out of his system

It didn’t turn out that way.

On Dec. 14, the bishop of the Knoxville Catholic diocese will mark his 30th anniversary as a priest.

91. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

92. Climate Change as Faith Issue a Tough Sell -

It’s been a tough few years for Tennessee Interfaith Power and Light. The state affiliate of a national network of faith communities, the organization offers its members a spiritual way to respond to climate change issues and challenges from political and other sources.

93. The Irish in Us -

BOOM. HERE’S TO THE IRISH. Recently, Ireland became the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage by popular vote. Ireland. Stereotypically, a country where conservative is a matter of degree not choice, where killing each other over religion isn’t current news but DNA, where progress is measured in pints.

94. Sam’s Hamburgers in 100 N. Main Could Be Forced to Close -

Amjad “AJ” Odeh moved to Memphis in 1996 to partner with Osama Eltaych at the old Sam’s Hamburgers & More that was operating at 16 S. Front St.

95. Once Upon A Time at Work -

In business and daily life, we are wired for stories as a species. One creation myth begins by saying God created humans because he needed good stories. Stories bind us together, creating an emotionally connected narrative through which we make sense of the world. I want to share a “Here’s What I Love About My Career” story with you.

96. Republicans Hold On to North Mississippi House Seat -

Republican Trent Kelly says that as Mississippi’s newest member of the U.S. House, he will work to strengthen national defense, protect veterans’ benefits and reduce federal regulations.

97. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

98. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

99. Council Approves Brewery Parking Garage Loan -

Memphis City Council members gave the green light Tuesday, May 19, to a $5.1 million loan for the Downtown Parking Authority to build a 339-space parking garage on Tennessee Street across from the Tennessee Brewery.

100. Crone Joins Council, City Buys State Office Building -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party who has worked in the nonprofit sector for the last decade was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19, to fill the vacancy.