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Editorial Results (free)

1. Lehman-Roberts’ Moore Lauded By Asphalt Industry Group -

Rick Moore, who is retiring as chairman of Lehman-Roberts Co. March 31 after 46 years with the company, has been named the National Asphalt Pavement Association’s Man of the Year. 

2. Love Me Some Lent -

LENTEN LESSON. The Episcopal Church, with ancient roots in early Christianity, the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Church, has many arcane names and traditions in its liturgy derived from the many languages and practices of its long history.

3. Grizz Finally Win, Parsons Done for Season, NCAA South Regional Looks Spectacular -

The Memphis Grizzlies broke their five-game losing streak, 40-year-old Vince Carter had a historic offensive night, and we learned that Chandler Parsons had suffered a partial tear of the meniscus in his left knee (the right knee has endured two surgeries) and is done for the season.

4. How Cool is That? -

COOL ON CAMERA. In an earlier column, I recalled that Meg Ryan once walked by my house when I was on the porch and waved. After all, she and Dennis Quaid lived right down the street.

5. Muslims in Memphis Series Draws Increased Attendance -

It’s been 15 years since former Mayor Willie Herenton declared March the month to acknowledge Muslims in Memphis, and that celebration has grown substantially since then, especially in recent years.

6. Clayborn Temple Restoration Approaches One-Year Mark -

Box lunches and stained glass were the order of the day as developers of Clayborn Temple hosted the Rotary Club last month at the landmark Downtown church.

It was one in a series of events Frank Smith and Rob Thompson have hosted at the AME Church since they reopened its doors last October to explore uses for it and start a fuller renovation in time for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the spring of 2018.

7. Constitutional Amendment to Say Liberty Come From God Fails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A proposal to amend the state constitution to say that God is the source of Tennesseans' liberties has failed in the House.

The measure sponsored by Republican Rep. Micah Van Huss of Jonesborough received a 3-3 vote in the House Civil Justice Subcommittee on Wednesday. Measures need a majority vote to advance.

8. Living Well is Best Prescription for Dying Well, Morris Says -

Dr. Scott Morris never shies away from tough topics. His keynote address at the Professional Network on Aging Conference, with its theme, “Aging: The Rhythm of Life,” was no exception.

9. The Week Ahead: February 20-26 -

Enjoying that spring-like weather, Memphis? It’s another week of politics and music in the Bluff City, highlighted by the anticipated announcement Wednesday of acts that will be playing the Beale Street Music Festival in May. Here are some other highlights:

10. The Us of Us -

I AM US. I am Muslim. I am a COGIC Hindu Jewish WASP Jehovah’s Witness. I am a Roman Catholic Buddhist Satanist Seventh Day Adventist and Latter-Day Saint. I am an Atheist Agnostic Humanist Evangelist. I am a Sunni Shia Christian Rastafarian Taoist Sikh. I am a foot-washing, holy-rolling Jain spiritualist and whatever Lord Voldemort is – and I am not.

11. Temple Israel Expanding Into Crosstown Concourse -

495 N Watkins St.
Memphis, TN 38104

Tenant: Temple Israel

Details: In a letter that went out to its congregation over the weekend, Temple Israel announced plans to expand into the Crosstown Concourse this summer.
Officials said the new Crosstown campus won’t be a second synagogue, but will instead enhance the Temple’s community outreach programs.
“We believe that Temple will thrive in Crosstown and that you, the members, will be truly amazed by the collaboration in the years ahead,” Temple Israel president Elkan Scheidt said in the email. “Crosstown’s creativity, innovation, and social-action focus aligns seamlessly with Temple and Reform Judaism’s inclusive philosophy.”
Temple Israel formed a preliminary Crosstown committee, which included Cara Greenstein, Alex Shindler, Daniel Kiel, Meggan Kiel, Bruce Landau, Susanne Landau, Joanna Lipman, Josh Lipman, Liz Rudnick and Elton Parker to discuss the move before deciding to sign a lease for a 1,200-square-foot “Midtown Living Room” in the Concourse.
“By offering countless programming and Tikkun Olam opportunities, Temple Israel Crosstown will bring the celebrated Temple Israel spirit of 38120 to 38104,” the announcement went on to say. “It will also become a new member gateway for unaffiliated Downtown/Midtown Jews and newcomers to Memphis.”
“Tikkun Olam, Hebrew for “repairing this broken world,” expresses the fundamental Jewish idea that what we do to heal the hurt and help those who are suffering most – in our city and in this world – is what matters most to the one God who loves us all,” Rabbi Micah Greenstein, senior rabbi at Temple Israel, said.
The email outlined some of the programs Temple Israel could offer in Crosstown, such as partnerships with their Crosstown neighbors, lunch and learns, baby-and-me classes, Hebrew tutoring and Women of Reformed Judaism-Sisterhood knitting for the Manna House.
Temple Israel, which is located at 1376 E. Massey Road, was founded in 1854 as the first permanent Jewish house of worship in Tennessee and now serves 1,500 member families in the Memphis area. 

12. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

13. Temple Israel Announces Crosstown Expansion -

In a letter that went out to its congregation over the weekend, Temple Israel announced plans to expand into the Crosstown Concourse this summer.

Officials said the new Crosstown campus won’t be a second synagogue, but will instead enhance the Temple’s community outreach programs.

14. COGIC, First Tennessee Open Financial Center -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at the historic Mason Temple in Memphis is now home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small-business leaders and entrepreneurs, thanks to a partnership with First Tennessee Bank.

15. Through Banking and More, Williams Invests in Memphis -

Duncan Williams runs his investment bank the way others might run a family. “We do things differently around here,” he concedes. “When I walk out on the floor, nobody calls me ‘Mr. Williams.’ Mostly it’s, ‘What’s up, D.?’”

16. NBA Writer Sees Gasol, Conley as All-Stars -

At espn.com, senior writer Zach Lowe has made his All-Star reserve picks and he has deemed both point guard Mike Conley and center Marc Gasol worthy of representing the Grizzlies on the Western Conference team.

17. COGIC, First Tennessee Open Financial Center -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at the historic Mason Temple in Memphis is now home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small-business leaders and entrepreneurs, thanks to a partnership with First Tennessee Bank.

18. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “The Bodyguard: The Musical” Tuesday through Sunday, Jan. 24-29, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for show times and tickets.

19. Graves Named Director Of Downtown YMCA -

Angelic Graves has joined YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South as executive director of the Louis T. Fogelman Downtown YMCA. Graves, a Chicago native, comes to Memphis from the YMCA of Metro Chicago, where she most recently served as executive director of the South Side YMCA.

20. The Week Ahead: January 17-23 -

Good morning, Memphis! This is a good week to be inspired, as we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his courage to motivate and inspire change. Plus, UrbanArt Commission celebrates its 20th anniversary and the Brooks Museum of Art unveils an exhibition sure to make you hoppy – err, happy. Here’s what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

21. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

22. GOP Lawmaker Wants Tennessee Tags to Say 'In God We Trust' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican state lawmaker wants all Tennessee license plates to include the phrase "In God We Trust."

A bill sponsored by Rep. Bill Sanderson of Kenton would require the state Revenue Department to redesign license plates to include the language starting on July 1.

23. January 6-12, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1978: The Sex Pistols play Taliesyn Ballroom in Midtown – the second of seven stops on the original band’s one and only U.S. tour – with Memphis punk trip Quo Jr. opening. The British band’s reputation prompts Memphis authorities to look over the setting for the show as well as go see the performance for themselves.
The ballroom, an annex to the Nineteenth Century Club on Union Avenue, is a short-lived live music venue that already has hosted REO Speedwagon’s first Memphis show.
Mid-South Concerts founder Bob Kelley originally plans a show with no seats until police and fire officials insist there must be seats. The late change means more tickets have been sold for the show then there are seats and some ticketholders are locked out initially.
The Sex Pistols play a full set with police officials watching, ultimately concluding there isn’t anything particularly inflammatory or illegal about the band, whose best known song is “God Save The Queen.” Eight days after the Memphis show, the band plays its final date in San Francisco – and the Sex Pistols break up.

24. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

25. Herenton's First New Year's Remarks In A Decade Stir Pot -

It’s been 10 years since Willie Herenton delivered his last New Year’s Prayer Breakfast message – a political homily Herenton made an institution while serving as mayor of Memphis.

26. Strickland, Herenton Seek Larger, More Focused Volunteerism Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton pointed to a better coordinated form of volunteerism in 2017 at Strickland’s first annual New Year’s Prayer Breakfast.

27. 'Nashville' Returns With Transgender Actress, New Plot Lines -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The new season of "Nashville" starts with traditional songs rooted in gospel and folk music rather than big production country songs.

Rayna, played by Connie Britton, finds a revelation after hearing a blind man singing "Wayfaring Stranger," an Appalachian tune estimated to be two centuries old. And Juliette, played by Hayden Panettiere, sees an angelic vision in white singing the hymn "God Shall Wipe All Tears Away."

28. Parting Words, Growing Orbits -

As I read of “Right Stuff” astronaut John Glenn’s Dec. 8 death in Columbus, Ohio, a poem by Rainer Maria Rilke runs through my head. The first stanza goes:

I live my life in growing orbits,

29. Frayser Store Closed As Nuisance Will Reopen -

A Frayser convenience store closed last week as a public nuisance because of ongoing drug trafficking and other criminal activity will be allowed to reopen after taking steps to improve security, Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich said Wednesday, Dec. 14.

30. Frayser Store Closed As Nuisance Will Reopen -

A Frayser convenience store closed last week as a public nuisance because of ongoing drug trafficking and other criminal activity will be allowed to reopen after taking steps to improve security, Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich said Wednesday, Dec. 14.

31. HopeWorks Busy Helping People While Staying Grounded in Faith -

As executive director of nonprofit HopeWorks, Ron Wade has to be practical. And helping people get their education and find employment is about as practical as it gets.

32. GCT Promotes Asher To Artistic Director -

Justin Asher has been promoted to artistic director of Germantown Community Theatre. Asher joined GCT in January 2015 as technical director. He was promoted to associate producer in July 2016 and has assisted in the productions of the titles in GCT’s 45th season.

33. Justice Department Begins Yearlong Investigation of MPD -

In some ways, a year and a half of local protests, turbulence and questions about police conduct came full circle Wednesday, Nov. 30, in Hickory Hill.

A U.S. Justice Department panel investigating the Memphis Police Department heard from more than two dozen people among a room of 50 at Hickory Hill Community Center.

34. Rocker Leon Russell Dies in Nashville -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Leon Russell, who performed, sang and produced some of rock 'n' roll's top records, has died. He was 74.

35. Last Word: The Long Count, Bigger Than Boutiques and God's View of the NBA -

It's Veterans Day with the annual Downtown parade starting at 10 a.m. Friday and a wreath-laying ceremony an hour later at the Doughboy Statue in Overton Park.

The long local vote count since Tuesday is still underway as Thursday becomes Friday. It should wrap up Friday with the provisional ballot count completed.

36. Grizzlies, Fizdale Learning More Than One Way to Win -

Denver Nuggets guard Emmanuel Mudiay and teammate Gary Harris had trapped the Grizzlies’ Mike Conley as he received an inbounds pass with less than 11 seconds left in the game. Harris stripped the ball from Conley – perhaps fouling him, though there was no foul call – and passed the ball ahead.

37. Rykhoek’s College Basketball Life Reborn at Memphis After Multiple Surgeries -

In November, before the first game of the season, a 23-year-old college basketball player should be talking about what he wants to accomplish in his last year. He should be talking about the best moments of his career to date, what he has learned in the 100 or so games that have come before, and how he wants to make a few more memories.

38. What’s Expected of Dedric Lawson This Season? More Versatility, Fewer Hot Wings -

Dedric Lawson’s accomplishments last season are well-documented. Tied Keith Lee’s University of Memphis record for doubles-doubles by a freshman with 17. Averaged 15.8 points and 9.3 rebounds per game. Blocked 55 shots.

39. For Fountain, Three Years Became a Lifetime -

Three years, he told himself. Three years and Scott Fountain would move back to Florida. It was 1991, and Fountain had recently relocated to Memphis. He was the new vice chancellor of development and alumni relations at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center – the youngest person ever to hold the job. His wife soon followed, and two weeks later, their daughter was born.

40. Agape Able to Expand Mission of Helping Families With Building Donation -

Rex Jones, CEO and president of Hope Christian Community Foundation, describes what they do in the simplest of terms:

41. Sisterpact Fighting Breast Cancer One Promise at a Time -

July 3, 2008: the day my life changed forever. I was actually at work that day, expecting a phone call from my doctor. I had a biopsy done days earlier and was waiting for the results.

Even though it was possible that the doctor could call with bad news, I never thought that he would. I never for one moment thought that I would get a call saying that I had breast cancer, but I did get that call.

42. Hawes Takes on New Role At ACE Awareness Foundation -

Kiersten Hawes has been promoted to task force liaison and education coordinator at the Memphis-based ACE Awareness Foundation, which works to inform the community about the negative impact of adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs. Hawes will also continue to serve as a therapist at Universal Parenting Place’s Knowledge Quest location.
As the task force liaison, Hawes will engage the foundation board and task force in ongoing dialogue to build awareness around ACEs. Operating in a dual role as a therapist and education coordinator, she says, allows her the opportunity to speak to the impact that toxic stress and intergenerational ACEs have on a family system if not mitigated.

43. Petitions Fail to Strip Confederate Emblem From Mississippi State Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – An effort to erase the Confederate battle emblem from Mississippi's flag has failed because sponsors didn't collect enough signatures to put an initiative on the 2018 ballot.

44. Memphis Trucker Drives 5 Million Miles With No Accidents -

Joe Brown didn’t understand what the big deal was Wednesday, Oct. 5, at the YRC Freight Memphis terminal and distribution center in South Memphis.

45. First Tennessee Steps Up Financial Literacy Efforts -

Along with making loans, offering mortgages and the other banking basics that First Tennessee Bank stays busy with from one day to the next, the Memphis-based institution is in the process of stepping up its financial literacy offerings in a major way.

46. Power of the Mighty Mississippi Rushes Below Big River Crossing -

Autumn is a few days late in arriving, but just in time for a stepped-up schedule of tours of the Big River Crossing this week.

The bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk on the northern side of the Harahan Bridge opens to the public Oct. 22.

47. The Crooked Path to Durham’s Ouster -

State Rep. Kevin Brooks set the tone for Jeremy Durham’s ouster in prayer, of all places. Quoting from Luke, the Cleveland Republican opened the recent extraordinary session of the General Assembly saying, “Heavenly Father, you’re very clear in your word when you say that every valley will be filled, every mountain and hill brought low and the crooked places made straight and the rough places made smooth.

48. COGIC, First Tennessee To Offer Financial Counseling -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at Mason Temple in Memphis will soon be home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small business leaders and entrepreneurs, courtesy of First Tennessee Bank.

49. Webb: ‘The Most Important Thing is Talent’ -

When Roblin Webb graduated from Rhodes College with an urban studies major, she knew she wanted to make a difference, and working as a civil rights lawyer seemed like the right way to do it. So she headed to law school and grad school at Rutgers, in New Jersey, then came back to Memphis and got a job at a law firm. 

50. COGIC, First Tennessee To Offer Financial Counseling -

The Church of God in Christ’s world headquarters at Mason Temple in Memphis will soon be home to free financial literacy counseling for consumers, small business leaders and entrepreneurs, courtesy of First Tennessee Bank.

51. Mason Village Start Seven Years In The Making -

On a hot day in South Memphis, Charles E. Blake, the presiding Bishop of the Memphis-based Church of God in Christ looked through several chain link fences onto open land on both sides of Mason Street – the street named for COGIC founder Charles Mason – and said, “We’ve got space to grow – room to grow.”

52. Foundation to Evaluate After-School Programs -

The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis is putting up $300,000 to measure the results of five local nonprofits offering after-school and summer education programs for children.

The first-year funding of a multiyear “Beyond The Classroom” effort announced Tuesday, Sept. 13, is an indication that education reform efforts locally continue to move into what happens outside the classroom.

53. The Week Ahead: September 12-18 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! There’s plenty of celebrating going on in the Bluff City this week, from COGIC’s annual Founder’s Celebration to the Cooper-Young Festival and The Peabody’s birthday bash. Check out details on those and other happenings to keep on your radar this week…

54. Photographer Steber Captures Fading Legends on Blues Highway -

Bill Steber stood at the crossroads in the Mississippi Delta and made a deal with the devil that would allow him to not only master his photographic skills but become one of the most respected documentarians of Mississippi Delta blues. And kind of make a living (or at least fashion his life) while he’s at it.

55. Parson: ‘Customer Service is a Big Deal’ -

It sounded like a wonderful gift – Tonya Parson had just sent her mother on a Mexican cruise to celebrate a big birthday. Parson, a nurse who was working on her master’s degree at the time, says her mother came back with general malaise. She just didn’t feel good.

56. Laws of Our Nature -

IT’S NOT YOU. IT’S THE LAW. You know that feeling when you’re in line … any line, including any lane for anything … that the line was moving faster until you got in it, and you wonder if it’s just you, subject of a cosmic conspiracy, or a karmic joke, or, like Job, a bet between God and Satan.

57. Starve The Egos. Feed The Love. -

GOODWILL IS AN ENDANGERED SPECIES. Remember how much we used to love the Memphis Zoo? I do.

“The Memphis Zoo is probably … aw, hell ... IS the best zoo of medium size anywhere. From the alabaster white animal statue sentinels out front to the last siamang scream in Primate Canyon. From the impressive entrance greeting of Egyptian columns, reflecting pools and hieroglyphics (Memphis on the Mississippi is named after ancient Memphis on the Nile) to the exotic temple and waterfalls in the tiger den. From the stately grizzlies and polar bears to the precious meerkats standing guard and shaggy orangutans just hanging around. Not just fun, this place is a certifiable blast. If you don’t like watching the animals, just watch the people. Watch the lions watching you. Watch the cheetahs track you across their lair. And watch that little girl over there when she discovers the leopard high up on the cliff, or that little boy and his grandfather when the alligator snaps, or the python uncoils, or the guerrilla charges. Recent venue additions and a complete redesign of the spectacular entrance area add a major attraction feeling to what was already a time-honored Mid-South must for almost a century of kids and their families. I turn back into a kid every time I go there. Newer venues include Cat Country ... just about everything in here thinks you’re lunch, Primate Canyon … look for cousins, some more distant than other, Creatures Of The Night ... bats, aardvarks, naked mole rats, generally spooky, and Once Upon A Farm ... charming, but you might want to watch your step. Don’t-miss favorites include the sea lions at feeding time and the – Oh my God, Harry, what is that? – reptile house with its oh-so-strange collection of snakes, spiders and technicolor frogs. The Memphis Zoo is always funky, always fascinating.”

58. Give Anger the Silent Treatment -

I heard a story recently about a woman whose husband was dead for three days before she called for help. When the paramedics arrived they asked her why she waited so long to call. “I didn’t realize he was dead,” she said. “I thought he was just giving me the silent treatment.”

59. Westminster Names Sparks Head of Upper School -

Amanda Sparks has joined Westminster Academy as the head of upper school for the 2016-17 school year. Sparks, who previously was principal of Haw River Christian Academy in Pittsboro, N.C., will lead the upper school faculty and staff in providing classical academics and a Christian culture for grades 7-12.

60. The Privilege of Legacy -

WE ARE PRIVILEGED TO BE HERE. As poor as we are, we are far richer than we may realize. As so many struggle to make ends meet, one may wonder why so many are drawn to us. As difficult as it is to breathe the air this time of year, there is music in that air, there is a world-famous beat to this city.

61. Freeze: If Ole Miss Did Wrong the Football Program Should Be Held Accountable -

HOOVER, Ala. – Ole Miss was getting top-tier recruits. Opponents and their fans were raising eyebrows or flat out making accusations against coach Hugh Freeze and the Rebels for cheating.

62. Freeze: If Ole Miss Did Wrong the Football Program Should be Accountable -

HOOVER, Ala. – Ole Miss was getting top-tier recruits. Opponents and their fans were raising eyebrows or flat out making accusations against coach Hugh Freeze and the Rebels for cheating.

63. Schism Among State Republicans Hits Critical Point With Resignation -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican Party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

64. ‘Throwback’ Something Special -

“I didn’t set out to write about the melancholy bewilderment of middle-aged men,” says Chris Bachelder of his fifth novel, “The Throwback Special.” “But that’s where I ended up.” And, IMO, he ended up with a very special book.

65. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 4 -

In the past three columns, I’ve told how, in February 2002, I had a major reminiscence of my role in saving the life of a heart attack victim-in-denial 20 years earlier. In March I received annoying emails about how to survive a heart attack while alone. In early April I dreamed of my heartland being under attack.

66. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

67. Pesce: ‘You’ve Already Heard the Worst’ -

What kind of gift do you give to the friends and family who have prayed for your sick baby daughter long enough to see her get well, grow up and go to high school?

In Cheryl Pesce’s case, the answer was also the beginning of her successful jewelry design business, which now fills an airy studio space Downtown with chunks of crystal and agate, freshwater pearls, leather hides, and gold, bronze and silver chains. Pesce, 56, who sells directly to customers from her website cherylpesce.com, is in the running for a FedEx Small Business Grant and has submitted a necklace design to Anthropologie.

68. From Exhaustion to Endurance -

Not long ago, while waiting in line at the grocery store, I overheard a very weary-looking young father with a baby in his arms and two toddlers sitting in the shopping cart say to the clerk, “My wife is sick, the kids are sick, the baby was up all night, and work is piling up on my desk. I feel like I’m 60.”

69. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

70. My Town Miracles Helping Those in Need, One Family at a Time -

Noel Fenderson, one of the founders of My Town Miracles, tells a story from Mark Allen, the group’s growth marketing secretary.

71. The Week Ahead: June 13-19 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from decisions about ServiceMaster incentives to the ultimate dodgeball tournament.

72. CHC Eyes Crosstown Move, Won’t Rush to Fill Sheehan’s Post -

The Church Health Center is gearing up to move into and begin seeing patients at the renovated Crosstown Concourse early next year, with no immediate plans to fill the vacant president’s position following the departure of Antony Sheehan last month.

73. Lehman-Roberts Investing in Memphis Roads, Community -

Lehman-Roberts Co. president Patrick Nelson is right when he says, “What we do is not terribly fancy or glamorous.”

74. UT’s Legislative Spanking Could Have Been Worse -

In a state where many people bleed orange, the University of Tennessee found itself in an unusual position during the 2016 legislative session: fighting for its life.

The folks representing Rocky Top, typically a sacred cow, had to battle for respect after emails surfaced from UT-Knoxville’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion urging teachers to use gender-neutral pronouns for transgender students and to downplay Christmas during holiday parties.

75. Tennessee Law Strips University Diversity Office Funding -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill to strip funding from the diversity office at Tennessee's flagship public university became law without Gov. Bill Haslam's signature on Friday.

Lawmakers had been angered by the University of Tennessee's diversity office recommendations to use gender-neutral pronouns for transgender students and to avoid religious-themed holiday parties. So they voted to remove about $446,000 in state funds for the office and instead use the money to pay for minority scholarships.

76. May 20-26: This Week in Memphis History -

2006: Shelby County’s reliance on manufacturing jobs is dropping, according to state labor figures, which show that 14 manufacturing companies have closed or cut back their workforces in Shelby County since January 2003. The closings and cutbacks account for the loss of 1,240 jobs.
The losses include 98 jobs at Coors Brewing Co., 5151 East Raines Road; 112 workers at Memphis Hardwood Flooring Co., 1551 Thomas St.; and 327 employees at Great Dane LP at 1095 Harbor Ave.

77. Baptist Executive Vaughn Receives U of M’s Highest Alumni Award -

Anita Vaughn’s notable 43-year career with Baptist Memorial Hospital started on a whim.

“I went to University of Memphis for a year thinking I was going to be a commercial artist,” Vaughn said. “Then a friend just happened to say, ‘You know what? I’m going down to Baptist School of Nursing,’ and I said, ‘Well, OK. Me too!’

78. New Schools Giving Memphis Suburbs More Autonomy -

Some of the trees along East Shelby Drive on the 158 acres at Sycamore Road are in rows. It’s the unmistakable sign of a tree nursery. And before that it was considered a prime dove hunting location.

79. Kyles' Services May 6 At Mason Temple -

Retired Monumental Baptist Church pastor and Memphis civil rights leader Samuel Billy Kyles will be remembered Friday, May 6, with a community celebration of his life at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ, 930 Mason St.

80. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

81. Kyles Services Friday At Mason Temple -

Retired Monumental Baptist Church pastor and Memphis civil rights leader Samuel Billy Kyles will be remembered Friday, May 6, with a community celebration of his life at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ, 930 Mason St.

82. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

83. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

84. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

85. Grinding Recovery -

Michael Drury is watching the current U.S. presidential season with a combination of professional detachment and an air of resignation.

Detachment, because part of his job as chief economist at Memphis-based McVean Trading & Investments is to keep abreast of what makes economies around the world tick. Part of that, of course, means at least some degree of focus on the man – or, possibly a few months from now, the woman – who sits astride the dominant global economy.

86. Tennessee Legislature's 2016 Session: Unbelievable -

THE STATE OF UN. In this nadir of presidential elections with everyone awash in slimy sound bites, with Congress and a Supreme Court nominee stuck in the mud, it takes truly jaw-dropping state legislative idiocy to draw the attention of the national media, make the monologues of late-night hosts and inspire “Saturday Night Live” skits.

87. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

88. SCS Board Eyes Three Charter School Closings -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Tuesday, April 26, to close three Memphis charter schools performing in the bottom 5 percent of all schools statewide in terms of student achievement.

And the board set in motion a series of public hearing on closing two conventional high schools – Northside and Carver – as well as the Messick Adult Center.

89. SCS Board Votes To Close Three Charters -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Tuesday, April 26, to close three Memphis charter schools in the bottom five percent of all schools state wide in terms of student achievement. And the board set in motion a series of public hearing on closing two conventional high schools – Northside and Carver -- as well as the Messick Adult Center.

90. Legislature Votes to Strip Funding From UT Diversity Office -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers voted to send a message that they don't agree with the sexually open and progressive views of the Office for Diversity and Inclusion on the University of Tennessee campus. So the Legislature on Thursday passed a bill stripping it of state funds — a total of nearly $337,000. The money will be used to fund minority scholarships instead.

91. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

92. Veto Of Bible As Official Tenn. Book Survives Challenge -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee has a state reptile, a state rock and a state song in the moonshine-themed "Rocky Top." For now, though, the Bible will not be its official state book.

93. Mississippi Governor Signs Law Allowing Armed Church Members -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A holstered gun sat on top of a Bible on Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant's desk Friday when he signed a law allowing guns in churches, which he said would help protect worshippers from potential attackers.

94. Haslam Vetoes Bible Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Thursday vetoed a bill seeking to make Tennessee the first state to designate the Bible as its official book.

Haslam, who as a college graduate considered going to seminary before deciding to join the family truck stop business, said in his veto message that the bill "trivializes the Bible, which I believe is a sacred text."

95. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

96. Palmer Home for Children Expanding in Hernando -

On Tuesday, April 12, Palmer Home for Children will break ground on a $10 million expansion of its Hernando, Miss., campus to include three new cottages and a wellness center.

With campuses in Columbus and Hernando, Palmer Home provides residential care for children while introducing the love of God through service. Operating in Columbus since 1895, the organization expanded its reach to DeSoto County in 2003.

97. Palmer Home for Children Expanding in Hernando -

On Tuesday, April 12, Palmer Home for Children will break ground on a $10 million expansion of its Hernando, Miss., campus to include three new cottages and a wellness center.

With campuses in Columbus and Hernando, Palmer Home provides residential care for children while introducing the love of God through service. Operating in Columbus since 1895, the organization expanded into DeSoto County in 2003.

98. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

99. Jesse Jackson Calls for Passion to Continue Dr. King's Work -

He was 26 years old in 1968 when he was a guest at the Lorraine Motel with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and one of the younger members of King’s inner circle.

100. Bill to Make Bible Tennessee's State Book Heads to Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Derided by critics as everything from unconstitutional to sacrilegious, Tennessee lawmakers nevertheless plowed ahead with designating the Holy Bible as the state's official book.