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Editorial Results (free)

1. Government Falls Short of Deadline to Reunite Kids, Parents -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Some immigrant toddlers are back in the arms of their parents, but others remained in government custody away from relatives as federal officials fell short of meeting a court-ordered deadline to reunite dozens of youngsters forcibly separated from their families at the border.

2. Unpopular Bill? Just Rebrand It With TRUMP -

Using what could be the political acronym of the year, two Republican state lawmakers with expertise in pain treatment are playing on the popularity of President Donald Trump to pass medical pot legislation.

3. Remarkable Recovery -

The dream had come true, at least part of it. Thirteen months after being struck in the head by a line drive while pitching for the Memphis Redbirds at Iowa, Daniel Poncedeleon was in the majors wearing a St. Louis Cardinals uniform. He hadn’t just recovered from a career-threatening injury, a life-threatening moment, he was in the big leagues.

4. Former Football Player Mario Reed Spreads Message of Never Losing Hope -

It took relatively little time for Mario Reed to figure out that to survive in a life without the use of his arms and legs – taken from him in a split second during a high school football game in 1997, he would have to look inward – as deep as he could go.

5. District 99 State Rep. Ron Lollar Dead at 69 -

State Rep. Ron Lollar, R-Bartlett, who had served Northeast Shelby County in the state Legislature since 2006, died Friday morning in his sleep. He was 69 years old.

Bartlett Mayor Keith McDonald, who was at Lollar’s house, was among several people who confirmed the representative’s death in the early morning hours.

6. Baseball Field in Arkansas Dedicated 21 Years After Tornado -

COLLEGE STATION, Ark. (AP) — A town in central Arkansas struck by a tornado 21 years ago finally has a new baseball complex.

U.S. flags were put out Wednesday for the Independence Day dedication of the College Station Community Sports Complex.

7. Protesters Flood US cities to Fight Trump Immigration policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They wore white. They shook their fists in the air. They carried signs reading: "No more children in cages," and "What's next? Concentration Camps?"

In major cities and tiny towns, hundreds of thousands of marchers gathered Saturday across America, moved by accounts of children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, in the latest act of mass resistance against President Donald Trump's immigration policies.

8. At hub for border crossings, families spread throughout US -

MCALLEN, Texas (AP) — Manuel Martinez, who fled Honduras because gangs were trying to recruit his 12-year-old son, was prepared to be separated from his child after paying a smuggler to cross the Rio Grande by boat and getting arrested by the U.S. Border Patrol.

9. What We’re Becoming -

WE’VE HIT A WALL. By the time you read this over breakfast, something may have happened about all those kids being separated from their parents at the border and warehoused like unwanted inventory.

10. Jones Finds New Way to ‘Give My All’ to UT -

They walked around the mall in a zombie-like trance, still trying to process what they’d just been told.

Nearly 15 years of blood, sweat and tears on the football field was put to end in just five minutes. Jack Jones and his parents had traveled to Dallas last October seeking a solution for Jones’ recurring neck and shoulder issues.

11. DHS Reports About 2,000 Minors Separated From Families -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their families at the U.S. border over a six-week period during a crackdown on illegal entries, according to Department of Homeland Security figures obtained Friday by The Associated Press.

12. Morris' Secret Helped Pass Civil Rights Cold Case Laws -

Charlie Morris was known for decades as a political operative who defined a brand of grassroots-style campaigning and political involvement in North Memphis. He and his late wife, Alma, operating out of a barber shop in a Quonset hut off Chelsea Avenue, endorsed candidates and worked for them at the polls – going door-to-door in their neighborhood in what was the most basic kind of political organizing.

13. Standing in the Gap -

There are statistics that tell a story. Always, there are statistics that tell a story. The city of Memphis’ story cannot be told without mentioning a poverty rate of 26.9 percent (Tennessee’s is 15.8 percent). The child poverty rate in Memphis is even more staggering, at 44.7 percent.

14. Tacos 4 Life Opening First Tenn. Location in Jackson -

Tacos 4 Life, an Arkansas-grown taco restaurant with a mission to help end world hunger, is opening its first restaurant in Tennessee in Jackson as part of the Columns II development. The restaurant is expected to open in late June.

15. Tacos 4 Life Opening First Tenn. Restaurant in Jackson -

Tacos 4 Life, an Arkansas-grown taco restaurant with a mission to help end world hunger, is opening its first restaurant in Tennessee in Jackson as part of the Columns II development. The restaurant is expected to open in late June.

16. If Only Legislators Could Focus on Important Issues -

A year-old law enabling Tennessee colleges and universities to keep secret the “proprietary” fees they pay money managers for handling risky investments is likely to be reviewed this year.

17. Emergency 911 Technology Struggles to Keep Up With the Times -

ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) – High school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone.

18. Two Shots Didn’t Phase Lawmakers in Jack Daniel’s Case -

When Van Halen front man David Lee Roth opened a bottle of Jack Daniel’s on stage back in the ’80s, the last thing he thought about was taxes and court appeals when he took a big swig of whiskey.

19. Chicago Gets Tribute Before Orpheum Date -

The newest star on The Orpheum Theatre’s “Walk of Fame” sidewalk is for a horn band that built its sound on Memphis soul and rhythm and blues.

The Orpheum Theatre Group unveiled the star for Chicago on Tuesday, May 15, before the band played the theater to a sell-out crowd.

20. From Enduring to Thriving -

By fall 1967, Memphis had a diverse group of people of faith working on a plan to better the community. Diversity, back then, mainly meant black and white, and Christians and Jews. The notion of them working together was considered bold.

21. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

22. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

23. St. Jude Receives $1M Sickle Cell Grant -

The Links Foundation, one of the nation’s oldest and largest African-American women’s volunteer service organizations, awarded a $1 million Legacy Grant to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Thursday with a goal of jumpstarting three critical sickle cell disease initiatives.

24. East Meets West as 2 Legislators Run Out of Time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

25. Building Heritage -

The basement of the Universal Life Insurance building, a Memphis landmark at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, is still defined by the intersection of overhead ventilation shafts and pipes.

26. Tenn. Legislature Breaks TNReady Gridlock, Adjourns Session -

NASHVILLE – The House and Senate broke gridlock Wednesday night on problems stemming from the results of troubled TNReady testing by passing legislation saying no “adverse action” would be taken against teachers, students or schools for poor test scores.

27. TNReady Causes Gridlock in Tenn. Legislature -

NASHVILLE – The day after Republican House leaders called for a review of the state’s TNReady testing vendor, the House of Representatives and Senate got stuck on the impact of botched testing this spring and the potential for incorrect student scores affecting teacher evaluations.

28. TNReady Causes Gridlock in State Legislature -

NASHVILLE – The day after Republican House leaders called for a review of the state’s TNReady testing vendor, the House of Representatives and Senate got stuck on the impact of botched testing this spring and the potential for incorrect student scores affecting teacher evaluations.

29. Schools’ Success Too Dependent on Weak Vendor -

The “debacle” called TNReady, a standardized test ruling the lives of students, teachers and administrators, is the predictable result of brain drain – not by students but by Tennessee’s leaders.

30. MIFA Founders Day Celebration May 22 -

As the first of a several events to commemorate MIFA’s 50th anniversary, the nonprofit will hold its annual Founders Day celebration May 22 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Church of the Holy Communion’s Cheney Hall, 4645 Walnut Grove Road.

31. Outward And Visible Signs -

FAITH IN THE DAY.

I was recently asked to address “how my faith shapes what I do in the world” as part of a Spiritual Speakers Series. Me, people. In a chapel. The request alone passeth all understanding.

32. George W. Bush Says His Mother Didn't Fear Death -

HOUSTON (AP) — Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday that his mother, Barbara Bush, didn't fear death because she believed in an afterlife and that she would be "wonderfully received in the arms of a loving God."

33. MIFA Founders Day Celebration May 22 -

As the first of a several events to commemorate MIFA’s 50th anniversary, the nonprofit will hold its annual Founders Day celebration May 22 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Church of the Holy Communion’s Cheney Hall, 4645 Walnut Grove Road.

34. Sex Week Seems Tame Compared to Session Antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

35. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

36. GoFundMe Page Seeks to Reimburse Memphis for State Money Withdrawal -

NASHVILLE – A GoFundMe page has been started on Facebook to raise funds to make up a $250,000 budget cut the Tennessee Legislature levied against the city of Memphis for removing Confederate monuments from two city parks late last year.

37. Prosterman Talks Trends for Wonder Bread Project and Phase Two ‘Jewel’ -

As a fourth-generation Memphian, Gary Prosterman is familiar with the drive to and from work on Union, Monroe or Madison avenues.

He called for an informal show of hands at the Memphis Rotary Club luncheon Tuesday, April 10, of how many also drive the streets daily and a lot of hands went up.

38. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

39. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

40. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

41. April 6-12, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

2008: The University of Memphis Tigers play Kansas at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, for the NCAA men’s basketball championship. The Tigers, led by coach John Calipari and Derrick Rose in his one and only year of college basketball, lose 75-68 in overtime. It marks the first time the Tigers have played in the NCAA championship since the 1973 finals won by UCLA, and it is Calipari’s first time back at the championship since his University of Massachusetts team won in 1996.
The NCAA stripped UMass of that title after star player Marcus Camby admitted he took money and other gifts from an agent during the season. The Tigers’ entire 2008 season was vacated by the NCAA after its investigation concluded Rose had someone else take his SAT to attend the University of Memphis. By then, Calipari had left Memphis to become Kentucky’s head basketball coach.

42. Move to Declare That God is the Source of Liberty Advances -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A resolution that would change the Tennessee Constitution to say that God is the source of liberty for the state's citizens is gaining momentum.

The House passed the measure last year and it will go before a full Senate vote after clearing a judiciary committee this week.

43. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

44. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

45. Tracing Civil Rights Struggle Through Travel -

Attention is on Memphis this year with the MLK50 commemoration to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on April 4, 1968. Keeping this focused on travel, I believe it’s a good time to point out some of the newer civil rights sites across the U.S., along with a few that have been around for a while – all opportunities to honor King’s legacy while trying to better understand the struggle.

46. A Place to be Heard -

On a recent weekday afternoon at AngelStreet in North Memphis, dozens of girls age 8-18 are practicing a song, “We Are the World.” Their voices seem to blend together naturally. It takes but a few seconds to hear the talent that’s in the room.

47. Anniversary of King's Assassination Marked With Marches, Rallies -

Several thousand people marching under the banners of unions and civil rights organizations marched peacefully Wednesday, April 4, from the headquarters of the American Federal of State County and Municipal Employees at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard to Mason Temple Church of God in Christ.

48. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

49. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

50. ‘Revolutionary Times’ -

The youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. hopes to prove him wrong in only one respect. The Rev. Bernice King has been talking about the quote from one of her father’s now institutionalized speeches for at least the last two years.

51. Tennessee Lawmaker Questions Motives of Female Accusers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee lawmaker on Wednesday questioned the motives of three women who accused him of sexual misconduct as their high school basketball coach decades ago, but he didn't outright deny the accusations.

52. State Lawmakers Pass ‘In God We Trust’ Bill -

Tennessee lawmakers have passed a bill to require public schools to prominently display the national motto, “In God We Trust.”

It would take effect immediately if Republican Gov. Bill Haslam signs it. The legislation passed the Senate unanimously and cleared the House in an 81-8 vote, with both chambers controlled by Republicans.

53. State Lawmakers Pass ‘In God We Trust’ School Bill -

Tennessee lawmakers have passed a bill to require public schools to prominently display the national motto, “In God We Trust.”

It would take effect immediately if Republican Gov. Bill Haslam signs it. The legislation passed the Senate unanimously and cleared the House in an 81-8 vote, with both chambers controlled by Republicans.

54. Dems Need Viable Candidates to Catch Blue Wave -

Republicans called it the “kickoff” to what they hope will be a great election season.

Democrats are downplaying a lopsided loss in the 14th Senate District special election, saying it won’t represent results later this year in President Donald Trump’s midterm.

55. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

56. Olford Ministries Continues to Influence the World -

The man who reportedly most influenced the Rev. Billy Graham’s ministry left a legacy in Memphis that still impacts people from all over the world.

57. HBO Documentary Probes Real Life of Elvis Presley -

A Memphis screening of the three-hour, two-part HBO documentary on Elvis Presley over the weekend elicited cheers and applause with some somber moments .

“Elvis Presley: The Searcher” was shown at South by Southwest (SXSW) Conference & Festivals in Austin, Texas, and Saturday, March 17, at Guest House at Graceland – both in advance of its debut April 14 on HBO.

58. The 2018 NBA Draft Might be Deep, But It’s Not Mistake-Proof for Grizzlies -

In one analysis before the 2009 NBA Draft, nbadraftnet.com decided the pro player most comparable to Connecticut big man Hasheem Thabeet was Dikembe Mutombo. Each of them was at least 7-foot-2. Each played basketball. That’s where the similarities ended.

59. Dedication Of Plaza Among King Observances -

The city will formally dedicate a plaza in honor of the 1968 striking sanitation workers at an April 5 ceremony, one of numerous events surrounding the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

60. Tariffs Lift Hopes for Jobs in American Mill Towns -

In the heart of America's diminished steel country, support for President Donald Trump's tariffs on imports is broad and bipartisan. It is tempered, though, by a strong streak of realism.

Trump's tariffs are expected to raise U.S. prices for steel and aluminum. That would help domestic producers and create several hundred new steelworker jobs.

61. Blackmon Takes City to Task, Says Too Much Focus on MLK Mountaintop Imagery -

A United Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area who is active in protests and other social justice causes told an interfaith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago.

62. Blackmon Critical of City Grants and Mountaintop Imagery at MLK50 Gathering -

A Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area and active in protest and other social justice causes in the area, told an inter-faith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago next month.

63. Third School’s the Charm -

When Nick King signed with the University of Memphis, he had dreams of being the player he was at East High School: an impossible mismatch all over the floor. Problem was, coach Josh Pastner saw the 6-foot-7 King as a traditional power forward. The conflicting visions never meshed and after two seasons King transferred to the University of Alabama.

64. Republican Mayoral Candidates Find Ways to Differentiate -

The three contenders in the May Republican primary for Shelby County mayor didn’t disagree on much when they met this week at the Southwind clubhouse. But David Lenoir, Joy Touliatos and Terry Roland did try to distinguish themselves from the other two in a relatively spark-free first encounter as a trio.

65. Finding God In the Midst Of Cancer -

Anthony Maranise walked into my office to take over my job that day. He was 8 years old and had been battling cancer for the past three years of his young life. He carried an attaché case almost half his size and had a smile as wide as his face.

66. ‘Selfless Leadership’ -

Hard-working, compassionate, dedicated, deeply caring, honest. These were the words used to describe Shelby County chief administrative officer Harvey Kennedy and General Sessions Criminal Court Judge Tim Dwyer, the honorees at the 15th annual Dunavant Public Servant Awards luncheon.

67. 3 Memphis Sites Included On US Civil Rights Trail -

Clayborn Temple, Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum are among 10 Tennessee sites included on a new U.S. civil rights trail.

Gov. Bill Haslam, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and Tennessee tourism commissioner Kevin Triplett announced the landmarks Wednesday, Feb. 21, at the National Civil Rights Museum.

68. Trump Endorses Raising Minimum Age to 21 for More Weapons -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Thursday endorsed a higher minimum age for buying certain rifles and tighter background checks for purchasers, saying "there's nothing more important than protecting our children," amid a public outcry for action after the Florida school shooting.

69. Godspeed, Helen. We Were There -

A HAPPY DAY AT A FUNERAL. Her name was Helen Larkin. She was a couple of years younger than me when she started at the University of Tennessee and pledged the same sorority my wife did a few years earlier. Two of her three older brothers were in my fraternity there and one of her two sisters was in my high school class. Spring quarter of her freshman year, Helen would become a Little Sister of that fraternity.

70. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

71. 3 Memphis Sites Included On US Civil Rights Trail -

Clayborn Temple, Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum are among 10 Tennessee sites included on a new U.S. civil rights trail.

Gov. Bill Haslam, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and Tennessee tourism commissioner Kevin Triplett announced the landmarks Wednesday, Feb. 21, at the National Civil Rights Museum.

72. This Week In Memphis History: February 16-22, 2018 -

1978: A group of 50 local restaurant owners mail menus to the White House, along with letters opposing plans by President Jimmy Carter to limit business meal deductions in the federal tax code. It is part of a national “menu mail-in” protest by the National Restaurant Association. “If enough people respond, we can convince the president that business luncheons rarely exceed $5, much less the $55 mentioned during the discussion of the ‘three-martini lunch,’” says Herbert Anderton, president of the Memphis Restaurant Association. Meanwhile, Paul and Marti Savarin open Blues Alley Restaurant at 60 S. Front St. The Cotton Row nightspot becomes a home and outpost for such blues all-stars as Little Laura Dukes and Prince Gabe and the Millionaires in the years before the new Beale Street Entertainment District opens.

73. Success No Easy Road For Women In Business -

The inspiration was there early. It will seem strange at first, even Tannera George Gibson herself understands that. But all these years later, she can see the connection.

74. Governor’s Race Mixes Political Culture With Nuts-and-Bolts Policy -

As most of the other major contenders for Tennessee governor were on the same stage in Nashville last week, Republican Diane Black was in East Memphis meeting with a group of 15 local homebuilders. It was one in a set of meetings with small groups of potential supporters Black held in and around Memphis.

75. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

76. Nashville Mayor Admits Affair With Ex-Security Detail Chief -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville Mayor Megan Barry said she plans to continue serving in office after revealing that she had an extramarital affair with the former head of her security detail.

77. Moment of Silence Set to Honor Memphis Sanitation Workers -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Rain was falling in Memphis, Tennessee, when two sanitation workers picking up trash sought shelter in the back of a city garbage truck on Feb. 1, 1968.

The poorly-maintained truck's compactor malfunctioned, crushing Echol Cole and Robert Walker to death.

78. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

79. Citing Lack of Funds, Memphis Health Care Org Closes, New Group Steps In -

Knoxville-based Cherokee Health Systems has stepped in to continue operating the clinics of Memphis’ Resurrection Health, which closed its doors on Dec. 31 in part because of funding running out.

The Memphis-based health care organization had already agreed to merge with Cherokee in 2016. The closure, and Cherokee taking over operations, was a result partly of Congress in December approving a three-month continuing resolution that included less than half of the previous financial support that was available. According to a letter Resurrection distributed to supporters, an attempt at securing more federal funds for clinical care through other partnerships also fell through.

80. Former Memphis Tiger Billy Richmond Now Winning as Wing Guru -

It was early November, not really Christmas season yet, but Billy Richmond didn’t want to wait. So he’d wake up and start his day with his favorite Christmas music.

81. MLK’s Influence -

Penny Hardaway was born in Memphis on July 18, 1971, or more than three years after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

82. 'Mississippi Burning' KKK Leader Killen Dies in Prison at 92 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Edgar Ray Killen, a 1960s Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted decades later in the "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday.

83. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

84. Finding The Best in The Worst of Times -

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times” is the opening line of Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities.” The story, set during the French Revolution, centers on the possibility of resurrection and transformation both on personal and societal levels. Rooted in that transformation is the sacrifice and suffering that accompanies it.

85. Apple Investors Urge Action to Curb Child Gadget Addiction -

NEW YORK (AP) – Two major Apple investors have urged the iPhone maker to help curb smartphone addiction among children, highlighting growing concern about the effects of gadgets and social media on youngsters.

86. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

87. Strickland Touts 'Solidarity' Around Confederate Monuments Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland marked the halfway point in his four-year term of office Monday, Jan. 1, by calling on citizens to make use of the “spirit of solidarity” shown in the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments just before Christmas.

88. Heritage Trail Historic Effort Get $45K Federal Grant -

The National Park Service has approved a $45,000 federal grant to the city of Memphis for the continued development of the Memphis Heritage Trail area.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced the grant Thursday, Dec. 28.

89. His Way: Tubby Smith Figured Out Who He Was Long Ago and He’s Not Changing -

When his visitor was about to leave, Orlando Tubby Smith had one more story. About a time his father had given him an assignment on the family farm in Maryland. 

Tubby was one of 17 children. He had older siblings and younger siblings. He also, at age 12 or 13, already had a sense for what it was to lead and manage.

90. Robertson Reignites United Way’s Iconic Brand -

“All the women in my family are natural-born leaders,” Lori Spicer Robertson says as she leans forward in her desk chair. “To me, that was the norm – just what you did.”

91. John Lewis to Skip Civil Rights Museum Opening Due to Trump -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – U.S. Rep John Lewis announced Thursday that won't speak at the opening of Mississippi civil rights and history museums, saying it's an "insult" that President Donald Trump will attend.

92. Reminded Again -

WE NEED ADVICE, FROM OURSELVES. When I closed up my parents’ home some 30 years ago, I found myself in my old room, going through my desk drawers one more time. In the back of one, I found something I’d missed – a magnifying glass with a loose handle.

93. Tennessee Officials Settle for $81K in Inmate Program Suit -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee officials are settling a lawsuit for almost $81,000 over claims that an inmate coaching program was improperly religious.

WSMV-TV reports that the Tennessee Rehabilitative Initiative in Correction, or TRICOR, has settled the federal lawsuit.

94. Promote a Culture Of Everyday Gratitude -

Gratitude is our tradition. Giving thanks and recognition for the good in our lives, for the freedoms in our country and to all those among us who, by their words and actions, lift us all is part of our national culture, our country’s tradition. It was even declared a national holiday in 1941.

95. Hall Joins Arc Mid-South As a Case Manager -

De’Borah Hall recently joined The Arc Mid-South as a case manager, bringing with her nearly 15 years of experience in human resources. In her new role, Hall visits The Arc’s clients, who have intellectual and developmental disabilities, in their homes to determine if the organization’s direct support professionals are providing appropriate services, such as bathing, feeding and light housekeeping. The visits also help her evaluate staff members and determine if additional training or disciplinary measures are needed.

96. November 17-23, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1929: The Chicago Bears come to town to play the Memphis “Sole Owner Tigers” professional football team at Hodges Field – the city’s largest venue at 10,000 seats. The game is arranged by Clarence Saunders, owner of the Memphis team, and George Halas, the Chicago Bears owner and until recently a player.

97. Time for What’s Next -

A NEW LOOK AT OLD VIEWS. Just as we’re getting somewhere on Brady’s Parking Lot vs. Overton Park, Brooks decides to chase something bigger, shinier and newer on the bluff and the Memphis College of Art throws down their brushes.

98. Medical Marijuana Might Finally Get Past Objections -

Medical marijuana legislation is evolving, not to ease people’s debilitating pain but to help it pass the General Assembly, where it’s giving some lawmakers heartburn.

State Rep. Jeremy Faison, an East Tennessee Republican ferrying the bill through the House, is offering several changes to a bill he is sponsoring with Sen. Steve Dickerson, a Nashville Republican, to soothe the nerves of state bureaucrats and lawmakers who get shaky when the word marijuana is mentioned.

99. Memphis Tea Business Infused With Education and Fellowship -

One of Memphis’ greatest natural resources is its water, and an Orange Mound cottage industry is infusing it with uniquely Bluff City flavors, while providing neighborhood jobs.

Bluff City Chai, Riverboat Queen Strawberry Green, Memphis After-Dark Chocolate Mint, 901 Of A Kind Chocolate Almond and Blue Suede Shoes Organic Wild Blueberry are just a few of the teas packaged and distributed by My Cup of Tea, which claims to be Memphis’ only tea-based business.

100. Man survives 9/11, Las Vegas shootings -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Mike Dempsey never thought he would be a part of a second national tragedy.