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Editorial Results (free)

1. Early Voting Nears 23,000 Six Days In -

Early voting turnout totals with all sites open across Shelby County jumped to around 6,000 a day on the first three days all 27 sites were open to citizens in advance of the Aug. 2 election day.

The Tuesday turnout was 6,464. Wednesday’s was 5,863 and Thursday's 6,348, according to figures from the Shelby County Election Commission.

2. Last Word: Early Voting Goes Bigger, Worst Kept Secret and Christmas on Carr -

By 9:30 p.m. Monday, 599 people were still without power from weekend storms, according to MLGW with crews working into Tuesday. Meanwhile, 4,324 citizens had voted early through Monday at five sites with early voting expanded to all 27 sites Tuesday. There has to be some kind of connection there but at the moment it eludes me. Meanwhile, here is the grid of early voting sites and their hours from the Shelby County Election Commission… grid, get it?

3. Bank of America Q2 Profits Boosted by Tax Law, Higher Rates -

NEW YORK (AP) – Bank of America's second-quarter profits jumped 33 percent from a year earlier, the company said Monday, as like nearly all other big banks, it benefited greatly from the new tax law. The bank also benefited from the recent rise in interest rates, allowing it to charge more for customers to borrow.

4. Efforts To Grow Black Business Face Wealth Gap -

The story of a business founded by maxing out personal credit cards or using home equity or both is usually told when that big financial risk works. You don’t hear a lot about when it doesn’t work.

5. Last Word: Storm and Early Voting Numbers, Frayser Revival and FCC at Baptist -

That was loud and wet. After the storms moved through the city Sunday evening, about 20,000 MLGW customers were without power. That was down to 5,000 by midnight. With that let’s begin with early voting turnout, shall we. Monday being the last day of early-early voting with five of the 27 sites across the county. The others open Tuesday with early voting running through July 28 and election day Aug. 2. Here is the list of early voting sites and their hours from the Shelby County Election Commission.

6. US Expected to Become World's Top Oil Producer Next Year -

The U.S. has nosed ahead of Saudi Arabia and is on pace to surpass Russia to become the world's biggest oil producer for the first time in more than four decades.

The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day.

7. Heat Wave -

After what was a banner year in many ways for Memphis commercial real estate in 2017, projections for this year were bullish. But at the halfway point of 2018, have expectations in the area risen with the temperatures or have they begun to dry out under the sweltering summer heat? 

8. Serena Williams Nears 8th Wimbledon Title, 24th Slam Overall -

LONDON (AP) — Yes, this will be Serena Williams' 10th Wimbledon final. Yes, it's her 30th title match at any major. And, well, sure, she's widely regarded as not just the best of her era, but any era.

9. US Soon to Leapfrog Saudis, Russia as Top Oil Producer -

The U.S. is on pace to leapfrog both Saudi Arabia and Russia and reclaim the title of the world's biggest oil producer for the first time since the 1970s.

The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day.

10. Trump Claims Germany 'Controlled' by Russia, Merkel Differs -

BRUSSELS (AP) — President Donald Trump barreled into a NATO summit Wednesday with claims that a natural gas pipeline deal has left Germany "totally controlled" and "captive to Russia" as he lobbed fresh complaints about allies' "delinquent" defense spending during the opening of what was expected to be a fraught two-day meeting.

11. Youth Academy of Dreams Opening in Frayser -

The Frayser community has a new innovative after-school program designed to help youth ages 5 to 18 reach their full potential through comprehensive programming that includes education, mentoring, discovery and sports.

12. Pitcher Earns All-Star Start With Great First Half -

As a high school senior in Dunlap, Tennessee, Dakota Hudson showed enough promise as a pitcher for the Texas Rangers to select him in the MLB First-Year Player Draft. And although the Rangers didn’t take him until the 36th round, Hudson says he was tempted to go.

13. Beale Hotel, South Main Mixed-Use Top Busy Week In Development -

It’s a busy week for the city of Memphis when it comes to economic development. The Downtown Memphis Commission has two of its affiliate boards, the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. and the Design Review Board, in action this week, while the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County is holding a meeting for its Economic Development Finance Committee.

14. Fed Officials Discuss Rate Hikes That Could Slow Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials last month said they expect to keep raising interest rates and suggested that by the next year, they could be high enough that they could start slowing growth, according to minutes of their discussion released Thursday.

15. Stocks emerge from wild, unpredictable first half with gains -

NEW YORK (AP) — The first half of the year was full of surprises on Wall Street.

Even experts and investors who expected more volatility after a historically calm 2017 were caught off guard by many of the developments inside and outside the markets this year, including the rapid gains stocks made in January, their abrupt descent into a "correction," and the ongoing trade tensions that threatened to undo the benefits of the GOP tax overhaul and strong corporate profits. Still, consumer-focused companies like retailers had a strong start to the year and technology companies continued to rally, while high-dividend stocks, especially phone companies and household goods makers, lagged behind.

16. Where the Jobs Are -

Out of more than 15,000 Shelby County Schools students who took some kind of career and technical education, or CTE, courses in the 2015-2016 academic year, only 1 percent – roughly 150 – completed those classes to get some kind of work certification.

17. Binghampton Apartments, Parkside TIF Get EDGE Greenlight -

Several hundred new apartments, a South Memphis grocery store and a new TIF district were all given the green light by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County during a busy Wednesday, June 20, board meeting. 

18. In Tit-for-Tat, Trump Threatens More Tariffs Against China -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has directed the U.S. Trade Representative to prepare new tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese imports as the two nations move closer to a trade war.

19. County Commission Leaves Only Tax Rate Undone In Budget Season -

Shelby County commissioners took final action Monday, June 18, on every item in its budget season except a final approval of a $4.05 county property tax rate.

The approval of a $1.3 billion county consolidated operating budget and a $90.2 million capital budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1 came with unanimous votes by the 13-member body.

20. County Commission Leaves Only Tax Rate Undone in Budget Season -

Shelby County commissioners took final action Monday, June 18, on every item in its budget season except a final approval of a $4.05 county property tax rate.

The approval of a $1.3 billion county consolidated operating budget and a $90.2 million capital

21. Raised in the projects: San Fran elects black woman mayor -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco's incoming mayor knows the yawning gap between rich and poor firsthand, having been raised by her grandmother in the city's drug- and violence-riddled projects.

22. Last Word: Kiwanis Debate, Haslam on the Gov. Race and Street Work -

For the last couple of days there has been this brewing story that Kim Kardashian West was on her way to the city to meet with Alice Marie Johnson, the convicted drug dealer sentenced to life in prison who was pardoned by President Donald Trump last week after serving 21 years in federal prison. And that is just what happened Wednesday – almost. The meeting was in Southaven. And, according to People, it included lessons in how to use Snapchat. The meeting included an interview with the Today show that will air Thursday morning.

23. Standing in the Gap -

There are statistics that tell a story. Always, there are statistics that tell a story. The city of Memphis’ story cannot be told without mentioning a poverty rate of 26.9 percent (Tennessee’s is 15.8 percent). The child poverty rate in Memphis is even more staggering, at 44.7 percent.

24. Luttrell, Jones: County Budget Talks Center on Property Tax Allocation -

Shelby County government’s budget season turns on the county’s property tax rate. It’s not about decreasing the current $4.11 rate to $4.05, as proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell. It’s about how the $4.05 rate would be allocated among various county uses.

25. Going Global -

Over the past two years, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has extended its global reach in a variety of ways, forging new partnerships and alliances to further research efforts for pediatric cancer and blood disorders while investing more than $1 billion to substantially grow its Memphis headquarters.

26. Trump Orders 'Immediate Steps' to Boost Coal, Nuclear Plants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Friday directed Energy Secretary Rick Perry to take "immediate steps" to bolster struggling coal-fired and nuclear power plants to keep them open, calling it a matter of national and economic security.

27. Fallen Soldiers’ Families To Get Free Tuition at U of M -

The University of Memphis won’t charge the families of fallen soldiers tuition starting this fall.

The U of M is becoming the first higher education institution nationwide to partner with Folds of Honor, a nonprofit that provides scholarships for spouses and children of military members who are severely injured or killed while on active duty.

28. Editorial: 100 North Main’s Better Days Come With Lessons -

No matter what spot is chosen for Memphis’ second convention center hotel, what comes with it is certain to change the gap between Civic Center Plaza and a thriving residential and retail area on the Main Street Mall.

29. Need an Entry-Level Job at a Store? It Can Be Harder Now -

NEW YORK (AP) – Asia Thomas knew she was at a disadvantage. It had been 16 years since she quit a job at McDonald's to raise her kids. When she left, restaurants didn't have kiosks to take orders, people didn't use smartphones to pay, and job seekers did applications on paper.

30. Last Word: Kim Kardashian's Plea, The Duran Stay and Mid-Term Moves -

A drug case from Memphis federal court in the early 1990s was the reason Kim Kardashian West was at the White House Wednesday. Kardashian West is among those pushing for a presidential pardon for Alice Marie Johnson – serving a life sentence on a federal drug and money laundering conviction. Here is the Associated Press story.

31. U of M Won’t Charge Tuition For Fallen Soldiers’ Families -

The University of Memphis won’t charge the families of fallen soldiers tuition starting this fall.

The U of M is becoming the first higher education institution nationwide to partner with Folds of Honor, a nonprofit that provides scholarships for spouses and children of military members who are severely injured or killed while on active duty.

32. County Commission Asked to Fill SCS Budget Gap -

With the Shelby County Schools system’s $1 billion budget delivered to Shelby County commissioners Wednesday, May 30, county government’s consolidated budget started to come into focus.

33. Last Word: SCS Budget Travels, Carlisle on One Beale and Hickman's Comeback -

Shelby County Schools officials are Downtown Wednesday to formally present the school system’s budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission. The budget committee hearing Wednesday morning won’t see any decision just yet. But the school system’s ask of county government is a big part of the commission getting to a more complete view of county government’s budget since north of $400 million of the county’s $1.3 billion consolidated budget is funding for public education across seven school districts in the county.

34. St. Jude Global to Extend Hospital’s Reach -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is hoping the announcement of its St. Jude Global initiative Thursday, May 24, is just the beginning of many new partnerships to come. The hospital is investing more than $100 million to expand its reach and advance the survival rate of children with pediatric cancer and blood disorders around the world.

35. Agape Receives $50K Grant From Walmart Foundation -

Agape Child & Family Services has received a $50,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation.

The funds will go to Agape’s Families in Transition program, which serves homeless and imminently homeless families, particularly those fleeing domestic violence. Specifically, the grant will support Agape in providing homeless families with transitional housing, counseling, life skills, parenting skills, job readiness training, education support and budgeting guidance.

36. Businesses Need Purpose -

A talk from Haley Rushing, chief purposologist, The Purpose Institute, from the 2018 Conscious Capitalism Annual Conference.

Why purpose? Humans need purpose and meaning in life. For every venture there are both extrinsic and intrinsic aspirations. Purpose is an intrinsic aspiration. Years of research has shown that those who have only extrinsic goals suffer from anxiety and depression. Yet, those who have intrinsic goals have very low levels of depression and anxiety.

37. St. Jude: $100M for Children With Cancer Global Outreach -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has helped with the treatment of thousands of cancer-stricken children around the world. Striving to reach so many more, the Memphis, Tennessee-based hospital announced a $100 million plan Thursday to expand its global outreach.

38. Hopson’s Schools Budget Features $12.7M Gap for County to Consider -

The school year that ends Thursday, May 24, marks five years since the historic change in public education kicked off in August 2013.

First was the one-year merger of city and county schools, followed by the demerger into seven public school systems within Shelby County.

39. Last Word: Bike Second Line Protest, Loeb's Portrait and SCS Budget Notes -

“Get on your bikes and ride.” The local bike share program begins Wednesday at 60 different Explore Bike Share stations at different points around town. The bike rental program is considered a milestone in the city’s bicycle culture. And like all milestones there has to be a ceremony. This effort to make it easier to mix bikes into your daily journeys will kick off Wednesday morning in Court Square at 9:30 a.m.

40. Hopson's Schools Budget Features $12.9 Million Gap For County To Consider -

The school year that ends Thursday, May 24, marks five school years since the historic change in public education kicked off in August 2013 with the one-year merger of city and county schools followed by the demerger into seven public school systems within the county.

41. Agape Receives $50K Grant From Walmart Foundation -

Agape Child & Family Services has received a $50,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation.

The funds will go to Agape’s Families in Transition program, which serves homeless and imminently homeless families, particularly those fleeing domestic violence. Specifically, the grant will support Agape in providing homeless families with transitional housing, counseling, life skills, parenting skills, job readiness training, education support and budgeting guidance.

42. UT/West Institute’s Hayes Plays Critical Role in The Cancer Genome Atlas -

The Cancer Genome Atlas, a comprehensive map of the key genomic changes in 33 types of cancer, wrapped up a decade-long, $300 million national science project in April, with Dr. D. Neil Hayes, scientific director of the University of Tennessee/West Institute for Cancer Research, playing one of only a handful of leadership roles. 

43. A Better Ride -

The final phase of construction on the innovative Hampline will begin this summer, with a goal of completion by the end of the year. The protected bike path completes the missing link in the Greenline between Overton Park and Tillman Street, and has been an ongoing project since 2010.

44. Corporate Leaders Are True Partners -

“What can we do to help?” That was the question asked by a corporate representative at a conference we attended last week.

We were in Winston-Salem, participating in the State of Black North Carolina conference. We fell in love with the people, energy and positive, forward thinking. We were surrounded by people – including high school students and senior citizens – all of whom were asking questions, offering solutions, sharing history and strategizing.

45. Bill Gates Pumps $158 Million Into Push to Combat US Poverty -

SEATTLE (AP) – Bill Gates launched a new fight against systemic poverty in the U.S., with his private foundation on Thursday announcing millions of dollars toward initiatives ranging from data projects to funding for community activists.

46. The Kickoff is a Must-Keep Play in College Football, NFL -

October 6, 2016, at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. From the sideline, then-University of Memphis quarterback Riley Ferguson was watching as history disappeared under scorched earth. In other words, as Tony Pollard raced 95 yards and erased a 20-year gap between Memphis kick returns for touchdowns.

47. East Meets West as 2 Legislators Run Out of Time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

48. Opioid Treatment Gap in Medicare: Methadone Clinics -

One in three older Americans with Medicare drug coverage is prescribed opioid painkillers, but for those who develop a dangerous addiction there is one treatment Medicare won't cover: methadone.

Methadone is the oldest, and experts say, the most effective of the three approved medications used to treat opioid addiction. It eases cravings without an intense high, allowing patients to work with counselors to rebuild their lives.

49. Griffin Moves to Helm of Changing ASD -

Sharon Griffin wasn’t having any of the idea that she will be in competition with Shelby County Schools when she becomes the new leader of the state-run Achievement School District.

50. I-Zone Chief Griffin Named Head of State-Run School District -

The chief of schools for Shelby County Schools who was the founding director of Innovation Zone Schools is the new leader of the state-run Achievement School District.

Sharon Griffin was named Tuesday, April 24, as head of the turnaround district for some of the state’s lowest performing schools academically by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Tennessee Education Commission Candice McQueen.

51. US Brands Suffer Collateral Damage in Chinese Corporate War -

SHANGHAI (AP) – The rivalry is so notorious it's been called the "great cat-and-dog war." On one side towers Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., China's e-commerce market leader, embodied by the black cat mascot of its Tmall platform. On the other is JD.com Inc., a fast-growing upstart represented by its white dog logo.

52. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

53. Report: Many State Pension Systems Have Huge Funding Gaps -

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) – A public employee pension crisis for state governments has deepened to a record level even after nearly nine years of economic recovery for the nation, according to a study released Thursday, leaving many states vulnerable if the economy hits a downturn.

54. SXSW 2018: My First-Year Experience -

I recently had the opportunity to attend South by Southwest (sxsw.com) in Austin, Texas, for the first time. If you’ve never been, SXSW is a giant festival in downtown Austin that draws in thousands of people. Founded in 1987, SXSW has boasted an economic impact to Austin of over $300 million in past years.

55. Last Word: Pera's Move, The Catechism of 1968 and Whitehaven's ER -

A day ahead of the last game of the season for the Grizz on the road, the team’s majority owner, Robert Pera, acted Monday to clear up questions about the ownership of the team going forward. Pera emailed season ticket holders Monday evening that he will not be exercising a buy-sell agreement with his partners who have minority shares of the franchise.

56. Court: Women Can't be Paid Less Than Men Based on Past Wages -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Employers cannot pay women less than men for the same work based on differences in their salaries at previous jobs, a federal appeals court said Monday.

Pay differences based on prior salaries are discriminatory under the federal Equal Pay Act, a unanimous 11-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said.

57. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre presents “Something Rotten!” Tuesday through Sunday, April 10-15, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. This Broadway musical tells the story of two brothers who are desperate to write their own hit play while the “rock star” Shakespeare keeps getting all the hits. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

58. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20.  Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

59. ER Visits Show Methodist South Filling Primary Care Gap in Whitehaven -

Methodist South Hospital in Whitehaven has for more than a year been the site of a flurry of construction projects, including an $8.7 million expansion of the emergency department that wrapped up last year, while an upgrade of the intensive care unit is underway now.

60. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

61. Editorial: 50 Years After King's Death, What Have We Learned? -

When sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker were crushed by a garbage truck compactor on Feb. 1, 1968, it sparked a 64-day strike that reverberated throughout Memphis and beyond.

62. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

63. LITE Wins $20,000 Renewal Award -

Memphis nonprofit Let’s Innovate through Education (LITE) has been awarded a $20,000 Renewal Award – part of a national program by Allstate and The Atlantic to honor innovative nonprofit organizations solving some of their communities’ most pressing social and economic issues.

64. China Targets $3 Billion of US Goods in Tariff Spat -

BEIJING (AP) — China announced a $3 billion list of U.S. goods for possible retaliation in a tariff dispute with President Donald Trump and girded Friday for a bigger battle over technology policy as financial markets sank on fears of global disruption.

65. FedEx Rolls Out New Supply Chain Technology -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. has launched a comprehensive solution for returns management known as FedEx Returns Technology, which gives high-volume merchants and “e-tailers” the ability to quickly and easily improve their customer experience

66. FedEx Rolls Out New Supply Chain Technology -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. has launched a comprehensive solution for returns management known as FedEx Returns Technology, which gives high-volume merchants and “e-tailers” the ability to quickly and easily improve their customer experience

67. Why So Few Female Fund Managers? It's Not Their Performance -

NEW YORK (AP) – Why is just one of every 10 managers at the helm of U.S. mutual funds a woman?

Many reasons may be behind the disparity, but researchers at Morningstar say they have disqualified one as a possibility: performance. After measuring how 11,272 funds have fared since 2003, the researchers found no big, statistically significant difference in performance between those led by men, women or teams of mixed genders.

68. Blackmon Takes City to Task, Says Too Much Focus on MLK Mountaintop Imagery -

A United Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area who is active in protests and other social justice causes told an interfaith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago.

69. Blackmon Critical of City Grants and Mountaintop Imagery at MLK50 Gathering -

A Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area and active in protest and other social justice causes in the area, told an inter-faith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago next month.

70. Last Word: River Crests, Tigers Post-Season and Library Shift -

The slow fall of the Mississippi River begins. The river at Memphis crested at 39.2 feet over the weekend. By Friday it should be below flood stage, which at Memphis is 34 feet. The high river season here was marked mostly by a lot of watching by Memphis public works and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as the river and its tributaries moved into the bottom land it usually occupies at this time of the year.

71. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

72. AgLaunch Finds Traction In Intersection of Startups, Investors and Farmers -

Jan Bouten, a partner in Innova, the local early stage investment capital group, has some basic standards when deciding on startup companies to invest in.

He looks for “a solid team with a lot of experience in business” and the founders of AgriSync, an Iowa ag tech startup, checked that box.

73. Last Word: Forrest and Slavery, The Tariff Blitz and Angus McEachran -

The report on poverty in Memphis over the last 50 years is on its way to a Greater Memphis Chamber breakfast meeting Thursday. And Terri Lee Freeman, the president of the National Civil Rights Museum and Elena Delavega, the University of Memphis lead researcher of the report, say their message is that as goes Memphis in this regard so goes the nation. And if employers start with lower pay at hiring with percentage raises across the board they feed the racial income gap and bonuses do as well.

74. What’s a Volanthropist? A Dolunteer? -

More and more of us live a “mobile” lifestyle, using our devices for everything from grocery shopping to bill paying. Yet there is often a disconnect between mobile life and nonprofit life.

75. Freeman: Wide Income, Poverty Gaps Persist in Shelby County -

The president of the National Civil Rights Museum says the national attention that comes with the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers strike and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination can be a guide for the nation as well as Memphis.

76. Report Shows Gaps Between Black, White Memphians -

A detailed comparison of local poverty rates and other economic indicators in the 50 years since the sanitation workers strike shows persistent gaps between African-American and white Shelby Countians in just about every measure.

77. Report: Inequality Remains 50 Years After Kerner Report -

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Barriers to equality are posing threats to democracy in the U.S. as the country remains segregated along racial lines and child poverty worsens, says a study examining the nation 50 years after the release of the landmark 1968 Kerner Report.

78. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

79. Walmart's Bruising Battle With Amazon Saps Its Q4 Results -

NEW YORK (AP) – Walmart is getting bruised in its battle with online leader Amazon.

The world's largest retailer on Tuesday reported a smaller-than-expected fourth-quarter profit as it wrestled with slower e-commerce sales during the busiest time of the year. The results underscore the company's challenges in a fiercely competitive retail landscape.

80. Memphis College of Art Taps CW/CA for Sale -

Memphis College of Art has tapped real estate brokerage firm Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to handle the sale of its Midtown portfolio, including Rust Hall and a dozen other properties.

81. Agape Adding Staff as Services Grow -

Latoyia Morgan, left, of Agape Child & Family Services speaks to Yasmine Gregory at a Wednesday, Feb. 7, job fair. The nonprofit is filling more than 30 new positions after receiving a $12 million state grant last year to increase its two-generational services to Memphis families. (Daily News/Houston Cofield)

...

82. Slip Sliding Away … Tubby’s Tigers And Season On Downward Plane -

After his Tigers had suffered the ignominy of losing a college basketball game to East Carolina, Tubby Smith questioned his players’ sanity.

“We probably need some psychological help,” Smith had said after the 88-85 overtime loss at ECU on Saturday, Feb. 3. “Really, I’m serious. There’s some strange things.”

83. Cushman & Wakefield Tapped to Handle MCA Sale -

Memphis College of Art has tapped real estate brokerage firm Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to handle the sale of its Midtown portfolio.

The 80-plus-year-old institution announced in October it would be shuttering its doors for good in May 2020. Proceeds from the sale of MCA's real estate will create a reserve fund for the teach-out of the current students and retire the college’s real estate debt, according to MCA president Laura Hine.

84. Last Word: Super Bowl From A Distance, More School Plans and DACA -

Eagles over Patriots 41-33. Also at the Super Bowl – no Prince hologram in the JT halftime show but plenty of choreography and a nightclub beneath the stage … the NFL catch rule has its last hurrah – probably … Patriots-haters have the offseason to become Eagles-haters. And Philadelphia Police use hydraulic fluid to stop Eagles fans from climbing utility poles. Irony lives.

85. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

86. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

87. Three(i) Creative Evolving With A Focus on Political Communications -

Kenneth Worles Jr. has been passionate about politics since the 2008 election when he got involved in projects for former city Mayor A C Wharton and the congressional campaign of Ricky Wilkins. His friends describe him as an “urban politico.”

88. University of Memphis Baseball Team To Count More on Pitching in 2018 -

On April 5 last season, the University of Memphis baseball team owned a 20-9 record and twice had beaten Ole Miss – once when the Rebels were ranked eighth nationally and once when they were ranked 11th.

89. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

90. MEGA HYPE -

In physics the larger an atom is, the more polarizing it can become. The same can be said of real estate development. So it’s not surprising that something referred to as a megasite can incite a range of opinions that are as vast as the site itself.

91. State Voters Have More to Fear Than Russian Meddling -

About 30 years ago, my wife and I were hanging out with another couple and decided to make a big night of it. We’d go out for Mexican food and then rent a movie.

After we had some Mexican grub, we went to Kroger to find a flick. As we perused the selections, my friend said, “What about a Russian spy movie?” To which his girlfriend (future wife, now ex-wife) whined, “John, you know I don’t speak Russian.” (His name is changed to protect the innocent.)

92. Anti-Abortion ‘Heartbeat Bill’ Revived Despite Like-Minded Opposition -

An East Tennessee lawmaker is trying breathe life into his “heartbeat bill” this session of the General Assembly despite an odd mix of opposition from pro-life forces and Democrats.

State Rep. Micah Van Huss delayed the measure in a House committee until a Senate sponsor can be placed on it, but he confirmed he will present the bill as soon as the clerk’s office prepares it.

93. Facebook to Emphasize 'Trustworthy' News Via User Surveys -

Facebook is taking another step to try to make itself more socially beneficial, saying it will boost news sources that its users rate as trustworthy in surveys.

In a blog post and a Facebook post from CEO Mark Zuckerberg Friday, the company said it is surveying users about their familiarity with and trust in news sources. That data will influence what others see in their news feeds.

94. Editorial: Kroger’s Bottom Line Isn’t Ours -

The decision by Kroger’s Delta Division to close stores in Southgate shopping center and on Lamar Avenue west of Airways next month is probably based on dollars and cents – millions of dollars in losses at each store.

95. What a Kick -

Peter Freund is a baseball guy. Grew up on the New York Yankees. Today, not only is he principal owner of the Memphis Redbirds, he owns stakes in other minor league teams through his Trinity Baseball Holdings and even has a small slice of the Yankees. But make no mistake, he is a businessman. And it was the businessman in him that was convinced to bring a United Soccer League (USL) team to Memphis and AutoZone Park for the 2019 season.

96. Using Kids as Chips -

THIS ISN’T A GAME, KIDS AREN’T CHIPS. As I write this, 9 million low-income kids in America are at risk of losing their insurance, primarily because they aren’t the kids of Congress.

97. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

98. New Small Cars Unveiled at Auto Show, But Will Anyone Buy? -

DETROIT (AP) – Among the many shiny models vying for attention at Detroit's North American International Auto Show are the revamped Volkswagen Jetta, Hyundai Veloster and Kia Forte.

But cars – particularly small ones – are having a tough time getting buyers to look their way as SUVs grow in popularity.

99. Memphis Tilth Achieves USDA GAP/GHP Certification -

Memphis Tilth’s St. Paul Garden, Bring It Food Hub and St. Jude Garden have all received the first USDA GAP (Good Agricultural Practices)/GHP (Good Handling Practices) certification in West Tennessee.

100. Global Reach -

Jasbir Dhaliwal wears many titles – and carries many responsibilities – at the University of Memphis. He is vice provost of academic affairs and dean of the graduate school. He is chief innovation officer and the executive director of the FedEx Institute of Technology.