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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Minority Business Mic Drop, Truckers & Taxes and Confederate Statues -

Quite the buzz around the minority business discussion on “Behind The Headlines” – notably the progress report from Greater Memphis Chamber board chair Carolyn Hardy about what’s working and, more to the point, what is not working. In Hardy’s view that would be general minority business goals that she said amount to black-owned businesses being left out some three years into the renewed push for minority business growth – in government contracts and private business-to-business contracts.

2. County Certified Property Tax Rate Comes In At $4.13 -

Shelby County Commissioners set the certified county property tax rate at $4.13 Monday, May 22, a 24-cent drop from the current tax rate of $4.37.

The resolution approved reflects the state-approved estimate of a tax rate that will produce the same amount of revenue for county government as the current tax rate once new property values from the 2017 countywide property reappraisal are factored in.

3. Trucking Companies Say Additional Fuel Costs Worth It for Improved Infrastructure -

Donnie Caldwell figures that the increase in the state gas tax that will begin this summer will cost his company more than $315,000 a year.

4. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

5. County Commission to Pick Up Budget Deliberations Monday -

Shelby County Commissioners meet Monday, May 22, and take up some budget and tax items on their way to a later final approval of all budget season matters at future meetings.

Among the items on the agenda is a resolution setting a recertified Shelby County property tax rate of $4.13. The new rate would be 24 cents below the current county rate of $4.37, reflecting changes in value from the Shelby County Assessor’s 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

6. Warehouse Portfolio Sells for $8.6 Million -

Huntington Industrial Partners, doing business as Artemis HIP Corporate Park LLC, has sold three warehouses in Southeast Memphis to a pair of West Coast investors for a combined $8.6 million.

7. Dream a Baseball Dream -

Memphis is Hoops City, a hotbed of premier basketball talent. That’s why University of Memphis basketball coach Tubby Smith is under pressure. The best of those hometown players on his team, Dedric Lawson, has transferred to the University of Kansas and everyone’s worried Smith won’t get the elite local talent going forward.

8. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

9. Road to WCWS Once Again Goes Through UT -

Several of Tennessee’s athletic teams would just be glad to get an NCAA Tournament bid. UT’s softball team expects a lot more. Like getting to the Women’s College World Series.

10. If Saban’s the Best, Why Aren’t His Protégés? -

In a recent article at CBSSports.com, Nick Saban was ranked the top coach in the so-called Power Five conferences.

No surprise there.

With all due respect to what Urban Meyer has accomplished at Bowling Green, Utah, Florida and now Ohio State, he’s still playing catch-up to Saban. The same can be said for Dabo Swinney and his recent run at Clemson.

11. The Press Box: Conley Finds His Best Game Starts with Him -

After Mike Conley signed the richest deal in NBA history last summer – five years and $153 million – his old coach with the Memphis Grizzlies, Lionel Hollins, made a couple of predictions during an interview on SiriusXM NBA Radio.

12. 'War' on Blight -

Attorney Steve Barlow has been working on blight issues for 20 years, which is to say he’s been working for two decades almost exclusively on the maze of rules, regulations and procedures that make blight possible and sustainable.

13. Warehouse Portfolio Sells for $8.6 Million -

Huntington Industrial Partners, doing business as Artemis HIP Corporate Park LLC, has sold three warehouses in Southeast Memphis to a pair of West Coast investors for a combined $8.6 million.

14. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

15. Fresh Market Updates Memphis-Area Stores -

The Fresh Market has unveiled a new look and shopping experience at its Memphis-area stores, part of changes the brand is rolling out company-wide through 2018.

The Memphis stores were part of the early rollout, which has already seen updates to Fresh Market stores in the company’s home state of North Carolina, as well as in Boca Raton, Florida, and Columbia, South Carolina. In general, the changes include a new look inside and expanded product offerings – at the company’s store at 2145 Union Ave., for example, a baby section greets customers for the first time.

16. Ronald McDonald House Welcomes St. Jude Children, Families -

Jill Crocker knew of Ronald McDonald House Charities and its mission to provide a “home away from home” for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital families and their children receiving treatment. But she had not been there.

17. Last Word: Issues or Elections, City Impasse Decisions and Memphis Sk8s -

Those active in the Republican and Democratic parties at the local, state or national level will tell you their job is to elect candidates of their party to office at all levels of government. It's even in writing in just about any party's mission statement. And the inability of the local Democratic party to do that in countywide partisan elections is one of several factors that led to the state party disbanding the local party last year.

18. Progress Reducing US Uninsured Rate Comes to a Halt -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Five years of progress reducing the number of Americans without health insurance has come to a halt, according to a government report out Tuesday. More than a factoid, it shows the stakes in the Republican drive to roll back the Affordable Care Act.

19. Winning and Losing Legislation in Tennessee in 2017 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Here is a look and some of the winning and losing bills of the 2017 session of the Tennessee General Assembly:

WINNERS

ABORTION BAN-20 WEEKS: Enforces a 20-week abortion ban if the fetus is deemed viable. HB1189

20. More Than 2K Bills and Resolutions Considered in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – While much of the energy and attention of this year's legislative session was focused on Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's gas tax proposal, there were more than 2,000 other bills and resolutions considered by lawmakers before they concluded their business last week.

21. Local Democratic Party Organizers Grapple With Activism -

Once the new bylaws and a new executive committee is in place for the reconstituted Shelby County Democratic Party this summer, there will still be a fundamental question about the political strength of the new organization.

22. Cai to Lead Memphis Chamber’s International Business Efforts -

Jinliang (Jin) Cai has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as vice president of international business development. In that role, Cai will be directing efforts both to grow foreign direct investment in Memphis and Shelby County and to increase the volume of local exports to foreign markets. 

23. Last Word: "A Downward Spiral", Outdoors Pop-Up and Haslam in Raleigh -

At the end of another day of alarming news and denials from the White House, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee used a new phrase that has significance in a cycle of action and reaction and more action in which many of us gauge reaction by whether the person speaking has an R or a D after their name. The lines are that clearly drawn.

24. Childers To Retire As Circuit Court Judge -

After 33 years with an office at the courthouse, Circuit Court Judge Robert Childers is retiring.

Childers announced his retirement Monday, May 15, effective at the end of June.

25. Who are the Lawyers and Judges Debating Trump Travel Ban? -

SEATTLE (AP) – Two lawyers with broad experience before the U.S. Supreme Court argued for and against President Donald Trump's travel ban Monday before a panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Three judges appointed by President Bill Clinton heard the case over the executive order that targets six predominantly Muslim countries.

26. Cyberattack Wave Ebbs, But Experts See Risk of More -

LONDON (AP) – The "ransomware" cyberattack that has hit companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.

27. Report: Tennessee Economy Growing -

Tennessee’s economy continues to grow with a robust start to 2017, according to a report released by Secretary of State Tre Hargett’s office Monday, May 15.

There were 10,372 new business entity filings in the first quarter of 2017, an 8.7 percent increase over the same time last year.

28. Haslam: Achievement School District Still Needed, But Changes Near -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says there is a continuing need for the state-run Achievement School District. But the school district for the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state, in terms of academic achievement, is being “streamlined,” Haslam said last week during a visit to the Aspire Coleman Elementary School in Raleigh.

29. AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans Feel Fine About School Choice -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even as fierce political battles rage in Washington over school choice, most Americans know little about charter schools or private school voucher programs. Still, more Americans feel positively than negatively about expanding those programs, according to a new poll released Friday.

30. Tennessee Legislature Passes Free Tuition Program -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's new plan to allow older adults without a college degree or certificate to attend community college free of charge will serve as a model as more states con-sider similar policies, experts and school administrators said Friday.

31. The Week Ahead: May 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! This week, Downtown welcomes barbecue teams from around the world coming to compete in the Super Bowl of Swine. Plus, we’ve got details on the remembrance of a somber moment in Memphis history; a reading festival for kids of all ages; and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

32. CLERB Prepares Response to Rallings’ Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’ dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. Even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

33. Haslam Credits Republican Leadership for Budget, Economic Accomplishments -

With the legislative session finished, Gov. Bill Haslam is touting budget accomplishments and a strong economy as the result of Republican leadership.

In a Capitol Hill press conference shortly after the General Assembly adjourned for the year, the governor called passage of a $37 billion budget, the second consecutive one with no new debt, as the Legislature’s most important act.

34. Lamar Avenue, Austin Peay Highway Projects on Tap for Fiscal 2018 -

With a gas-tax increase approved as part of the governor’s IMPROVE Act, Shelby County will see several projects take off over the next three years, including the much-anticipated Lamar Avenue widening.

35. Last Word: Weekend Sonic Boom, CLERB's Response and Irvin Salky -

Yes, those were the United States Navy Blue Angels buzzing Downtown Thursday afternoon in advance of their appearance at the Memphis Airshow Saturday and Sunday in Millington. That sound you heard after the flyover wasn’t a sonic boom. I don’t think they have those anymore. It was the sound of a really busy weekend following close behind.

36. CLERB Prepares Response To Rallings Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’s dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. That’s even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

37. CLERB Prepares Response To Rallings Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’s dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. That’s even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

38. May 12-18, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: On the front page of The Daily News, a receiver is appointed by U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla for the Tulane and Warren apartments. The two apartment complexes owned by Global Ministries Foundation of Memphis are to be sold by the receiver, with proceeds going to bond holders represented by the Bank of New York, which has filed suit against GMF.
The bank’s lawsuit follows federal officials’ decision to cut off rent subsidies to the two complexes after they fail a second inspection of conditions ranging from bed bug infestations to broken plumbing

39. Murder Charges Raise Questions About Bounty Hunters -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – About three weeks ago, just after midnight, a group of seven bounty hunters surrounded a car in a Wal-Mart parking lot and blocked it from leaving, according to court documents. Authorities say the bounty hunters believed an ex-convict who had skipped out on several court appearances was one of four men in the parked car.

40. U of M Baseball Team Seeking Momentum Before AAC Tournament -

As the University of Memphis finishes out its regular season, there is no guesswork about what the Tigers must do to reach the postseason: win the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

Although the Tigers have beaten Ole Miss twice this season (they were ranked no worse than 11th each time), they have lost 14 of their last 20 games and are in seventh-place in the eight-team AAC with a 6-12 record heading into a three-game weekend series at last-place East Carolina (4-14).

41. New AD Fires Shot Easily Heard at Nelson Stadium -

Tennessee coaches of all sports were alerted last Thursday when Sam Winterbotham was fired after 11 seasons as the Vols’ men’s tennis coach.

No doubt UT baseball coach Dave Serrano got the alert. He could be next in line.

42. Time to Turn Down the Flame on Jones’ Hot Seat -

When it comes to Butch Jones and the recent NFL Draft, it’s a matter of perspective.

Remember, no Tennessee Vols were drafted in the previous two years, which is a reflection on the recruiting by Jones’ predecessor, Derek Dooley. The fact that Tennessee had six players picked this time around – all in the first four rounds – speaks volumes, to wit:

43. Legislature Passes Slate of Bills, Adjourns -

NASHVILLE – The Legislature wrapped up its business for the year, adjourning Wednesday after taking up a spate of last-minute bills, including postponing a bill increasing the amount of campaign contributions lawmakers could accept.

44. Southwest Tennessee Community College Moves Toward Change -

Kenyatta Lovett, the executive director of the nonprofit education advocacy group Complete Tennessee, says there is an old joke in higher education that sometimes comes to the surface when change is promised or pledged.

45. Last Word: Deeper on Beale, End of Session and Johnny Mathis -

Beale Street keeps its cover charge on Saturday nights during its Memphis In May peak. But the district has some complex questions to resolve about its future and who controls that future. If that wasn’t evident before, it became apparent at City Hall Tuesday. It wasn’t the council action on the Beale Street Bucks program that was significant as much as it was the council’s discussion.

46. Events -

Mothers of the Nile will hold its ninth annual banquet Thursday, May 11, at 5:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church Broad, 2835 Broad Ave. Those sharing their perspectives include state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, Hope Academy principal Michael Smith and essay contest participants from Hope Academy, whose students are in detention at Juvenile Court. Visit mothersofthenileinc.org for details.

47. View From the Hill: Gas Tax Rancor Lingers as Session Coasts to Close -

Remnants of rancor over Republican leadership roiled the House, a reminder of outrage over roguish behavior as representatives reached the finish line.

Alliteration is probably better suited for poetry. But in a case of what could be considered poetic justice, at least for some, this literary device – goofiness maybe – is suitable for legislative action requiring a score card to keep up with the characters and a bit of history to put it all together.

48. House Approves Education Fund Concept, But Senate Action Put on Hold -

House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh pushed his K-12 education fund to passage Tuesday, May 9, but the possibility of funding and Senate approval will have to wait until 2018.

Dubbed the “K-12 Block Grant Act,” the measure calls for setting aside $250 million in excess state revenue for interest-generating investment to provide grant money for school systems statewide. Each system could use the funds for state-approved programs such as reading coaches or dual enrollment, items not funded through Tennessee’s Basic Education Program.

49. City Council to Hold Railgarten Hearing May 23; Uses Impasse Panels for First Time -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

50. Tennessee Legislature Adjourns After Voting on Last-Minute Bills -

The Legislature wrapped up its business for the year, adjourning Wednesday after taking up a spate of last-minute bills, including postponing a bill increasing the amount of campaign contributions lawmakers could accept.

51. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

52. Council Hears Railgarten Dispute in 2 Weeks, Appoints Impasse Panels -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of the approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

53. House Takes First Step on ‘Almighty God’ Amendment -

The House of Representatives took the first legislative step Monday toward rewriting the state Constitution with a measure recognizing liberties come from Almighty God rather than governments.

In a 69-17 vote, the House passed the resolution by Rep. Micah Van Huss, an East Tennessee Republican, to amend the Constitution, a move requiring votes by consecutive General Assemblies and passage by the state’s voters.

54. Physical Education Bill Gets Tripped Up in Legislature -

Legislation requiring one hour of physical education per week for elementary students stumbled and fell Monday, May 8, when it hit a procedural hurdle.

The bill sponsored by Rep. Roger Kane went down in the House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee after a recount of sorts, one in which a member didn’t vote and then was allowed to cast a “no” vote killing the bill.

55. Bates Gold-and-Silver Fraud Case Includes Big Numbers -

At the end of a five-week trial in Memphis federal court this month, a jury convicted a former Tennessee state representative turned religious prophet and gold-and-silver broker on 46 counts of fraud.

56. Commission Chair: Not Enough Votes To Pass Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commission budget chairman Steve Basar doesn’t count seven votes on the commission at this point for a cut in the county property tax rate.

“I don’t think there’s seven votes right now to go lower than the certified tax rate,” Basar said Monday, May 8, following a weekend budget summit among commissioners at Shelby Farms Park.

57. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

58. First Tennessee Gets High Marks in Customer Satisfaction Survey -

Employees of First Tennessee Bank’s parent company got a company-wide email Thursday, May 4, that began: “This morning we are announcing the largest merger in our history.”

59. Last Word: BSMF, Budget Books and Milli Vanilli -

Three days of sun and mild temperatures for the Beale Street Music Festival. Not to be all “Dawn Lazarus” about the weather. Of course, it wasn’t just that way over Tom Lee Park. And many of us continue to find there is life outside after you have determined your festival days may be behind you. We were all over the place this weekend including Tom Lee Park and Shelby Farms Park and backyards and trails and on a rising river. Can you still claim you were at BSMF if you were within earshot of it?

60. Beyond Tax Bottom Line, County Budget Goes Deep -

On a sunny and clear opening weekend for the Memphis In May International Festival, Shelby County commissioners were in a conference room with a lake view at Shelby Farms Park crunching budget numbers.

61. Former Banker Pleads Guilty to Felony Theft -

A former lead bank teller pleaded guilty Thursday, May 4, to systematically walking out of the bank with concealed cash that eventually totaled some $266,000 over a three-month period in 2009, according to Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich.

62. Tennessee Sen. Green Withdraws Nomination for US Army Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's choice for Army secretary withdrew his nomination on Friday in the face of growing criticism over his remarks about Muslims, and gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Americans.

63. Redbirds’ Voit Named Minor League Player of Month -

The St. Louis Cardinals announced that Memphis Redbirds first baseman Luke Voit has been named the organization’s Minor League Player of the Month for April.

Voit hit .360 in the season’s opening month with five home runs and 16 RBI in 23 games.

64. Another Juco Player Signs with Memphis Tigers -

University of Memphis head men's basketball coach Tubby Smith has announced the signing of Mike Parks Jr., a 6-9, 270-pound center from Southwest Mississippi Community College.

Parks joins the top-rated recruiting class in the American Athletic Conference, per 247sports.com.

65. Business Time -

Had the flattering comments come from the Memphis Grizzlies’ own content producers, Grind City Media, they would have been easy enough to dismiss. After all, that would have been like what center Marc Gasol said at season’s end when stressing the importance of candid evaluation.

66. ASD Loses 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in running the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant ever for the ASD, which takes over state schools in the bottom 5 percent in terms of academic achievement.

67. Last Word: RiverPlay, New City Property Tax Rate and House Republican Rift -

The Memphis In May International Festival arrives Friday with the Beale Street Music Festival and hopefully with warmer temperatures than the Thursday chill. Meanwhile, RiverPlay, the conversion of Riverside Drive between Jefferson and Court to a pop-up park linking up Memphis and Mississippi River Parks, makes its debut Friday afternoon.

68. ASD Sheds 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in the direct running of the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant change to the district for the bottom 5 percent of public schools in the state in terms of academic achievement.

69. Senate Sends $1.1T Spending Bill to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate has delivered to President Donald Trump the first significant legislation of his presidency, a bipartisan $1.1 trillion spending bill that would keep the government running through September – putting off, for now, battles over Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall and his promised military buildup.

70. Grizzlies Among 17 NBA Teams Participating in Debut Season of Gaming League -

NEW YORK (AP) – How about Cleveland against Golden State again – this time for the video game championship?

The Cavaliers and Warriors are among 17 teams who will participate in the NBA 2K eSports league that will debut in 2018.

71. Redbirds’ Luke Voit Named Minor League Player of Month -

The St. Louis Cardinals announced that Memphis Redbirds first baseman Luke Voit has been named the organization’s Minor League Player of the Month for April.

Voit hit .360 in the season’s opening month with five home runs and 16 RBI in 23 games. Overall, the 25-year-old led the Redbirds in average, hits (27), doubles (tie, 7th), home runs, OBP (.448), SLG (.680), and OPS (1.128) in April.

72. Another Junior College Player Signs with Memphis Tigers -

University of Memphis head men's basketball coach Tubby Smith has announced the signing of Mike Parks Jr., a 6-9, 270-pound center from Southwest Mississippi Community College. He joins the top-rated recruiting class in the American Athletic Conference, per 247sports.com.

73. Robinson Gives Mariota Weapons for Success -

Just when we think we’ve figured out Titans G.M. Jon Robinson, he reinvents himself.

On the first night of the recent NFL Draft, we assumed Robinson would play it safe, trading the No. 5 overall pick to acquire more draft capital.

74. Titans Draft About More Than Physical Skills -

It’s easy to look at the Tennessee Titans’ 2017 draft and conclude general manager Jon Robinson drafted for need.

After all, he took two wide receivers, a tight end and a cornerback among his first four picks. And all of those players will have better-than-average opportunities to earn early playing time.

75. How Did Vols Not Win More With This Talent? -

One check of the 2017 NFL Draft shows why Tennessee was the favorite to win the SEC East Division last fall.

UT had six players drafted in the first four rounds, the most for the program since 2002, breaking a two-year drought with no players. The six Vols drafted tied for the most since 2010 and 2007. Eight Vols were drafted in 2003 and 10 drafted in 2002.

76. NFL: OK to Hit a Woman, But You Better Stand for Anthem -

Well, at least Johnny Manziel doesn’t have an NFL job. If Colin Kaepernick is seeking solace from his place on the quarterback unemployment line, perhaps he can begin there. 

77. 'Who is a Democrat?' -

Through two meetings in less than a week, the leader of a reorganization of the Shelby County Democratic Party has heard one discussion more than any other issue raised in the gatherings.

“Who is a Democrat?” attorney and former local party chairman David Cocke said in defining the issue at the start of the second forum in Midtown Wednesday, May 3.

78. Shelby County Schools Head Discusses Stability, Next Steps -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson is always going to hear from parents. The only question day in and day out is how much he will hear from them.

The day after Germantown leaders offered Shelby County Schools $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools – known as the “three G’s” – Hopson heard a lot from parents of students in those schools.

79. Last Word: Three Gs React, More CA Changes and the Forrest Controversy Defined -

The day after Germantown leaders offered his school system $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High Schools, SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson was fielding calls from parents of students at the schools – the “three Gs” as they are known.

80. View From the Hill: Forrest Kerfuffle Might Be Sign of Bigger Problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

81. Resolution Targets California’s Proposed Travel Ban, Discourages Similar ‘Blackmail’ -

Despite a Memphis lawmaker's concerns about a “knee-jerk” reaction, the House passed legislation Monday, May 1, aimed at a California travel ban against states passing anti-gay laws.

Rep. Raumesh Akbari raised questions about the resolution brought by Rep. Tilman Goins, asking him if it would make Tennessee look as “petty” as California if California enacts a prohibition on state-funded travel to Tennessee and several other states that passed laws in 2016 considered unfair to the LGBT community.

82. Luttrell Shuns Tax Cut In Proposed $1.2B Budget -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has taken a $1.2 billion consolidated county government budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission that would maintain a stable property tax rate but shift a part of the tax rate to establish a capital projects pay-as-you-go fund.

83. Last Word: Budget Books and Line Items, Top of the Road List and Silencers -

The comforting thud of reams of bound printed paper hitting a wooden table top. The sound of pages turning as Power Points are read aloud. Yes, fellow citizens of the republic, it is budget season in Shelby County. The gavel fell on Memphis City Council budget hearings Tuesday at City Hall. And Wednesday morning Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes his budget proposal to the County Commission. A note about the city budget deliberations. Tuesday’s opening session saw the return of council member Janis Fullilove to City Hall after being out for a while due to an extended illness.

84. Luttrell Proposes $1.2 Billion County Budget with Stable Tax Rate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has taken a $1.2 billion consolidated county government budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission that would maintain a stable property tax rate but shift a part of the tax rate to establish a capital projects pay-as-you go fund.

85. Pay for News? More Than Half of Americans Say They Do -

NEW YORK (AP) – A battered news industry can find some flickers of hope in a survey that gauges public willingness to pay for journalism, as long as its leaders plan judiciously.

A little more than half of American adults regularly pay for news, through newspaper and magazine subscriptions, apps on electronic devices or contributions to public media, according to the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

86. Avoid Being a Labor Department Target -

Recently, The Daily News ran a story regarding the U.S. Department of Labor’s current investigation of Google. Specifically, the government allegedly discovered “systemic compensation disputes” across Google’s workforce. The dispute in this case, as with most pay equity cases, is what constitutes “comparable work.”

87. House Leader Casada Backs Towns’ Slavery Amendment to State Constitution -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to remove slavery from the state Constitution is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

88. NFL Draft’s Favorite Flavor? SEC, Heavy on Alabama -

Penn State won the Big Ten title in 2016, but the Nittany Lions didn’t score many recruiting points during the 2017 NFL Draft. They had just one player selected. And so did other traditionally stout football schools named Texas and Nebraska.

89. IMPROVE Act Addresses Backlogged Shelby County Projects -

Billed as a “once-in-a-generation” opportunity to increase state funding to address a backlog of roadway improvement projects in Tennessee, the recently passed IMPROVE Act is one of Gov. Bill Haslam’s signature pieces of legislation.

90. It’s Not Hogwash, State Approves Silencer Bill -

Tennesseans who want to shoot feral hogs won’t have to worry about scaring the critters now that they have permission to put a silencer on their rifle.

The House of Representatives passed legislation 74-18 Monday, May 1, ending the state’s prohibition on possessing, manufacturing, transporting, repairing or selling silencers. The Senate previously passed the measure 28-1.

91. Towns’ Slavery Amendment Gets Backing From House Leader -

Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to remove slavery from the state Constitution is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

92. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.

93. Medicaid Failure Behind Him, Governor Gets Road Funding Win -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Not long after seeing fellow Republicans in the Legislature reject his effort to expand Medicaid, Gov. Bill Haslam toured Tennessee to pitch another politically difficult proposal: a transportation plan that would end up including the state's first gas tax hike in nearly 30 years.

94. Tigers Golfer Earns NCAA At-Large Berth -

University of Memphis redshirt sophomore women’s golfer Michaela Fletcher has earned an NCAA at-large slot for the second time in as many seasons. Fletcher, who won her way to the NCAA Championships from the Notre Dame Regional with a top five individual finish in 2015, came back from missing all of last season due to injury and will compete May 8-10 in Columbus, Ohio, on the Ohio State University Golf Club’s Scarlet Course.

95. Sediver Opens $15 Million Facility in West Memphis -

Sediver USA has cut the ribbon on its $15 million facility in West Memphis, where the company will manufacture toughened glass insulators for high-voltage transmission lines.

Peter Baumgartner, chairman of Sediver USA and CEO of its Luxembourg-based parent company, the Seves Group, was joined by Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Clean Line Energy Partners president Michael Skelly and Seves Group chairman Joakim Olsson at the Friday, April 21, event.

96. Tigers Closer on List For Stopper of the Year -

University of Memphis junior closer Colton Hathcock has been named to the Midseason Watch List for the 13th annual National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association Stopper of the Year Award.

Hathcock picked up his 11th save of the season this week in a win at Arkansas State, moving him into a tie for eighth nationally in the save category. The 11 saves are the third most by a Tigers pitcher in a single season in school history. The single-season program record for saves is 14, set by Nolan Blackwood in 2015.

97. Tenn. Lawmakers Look to Void Resolution Honoring Forrest Biographer -

NASHVILLE – Memphis lawmakers blasted a Smyrna legislator Thursday morning, accusing him of violating their honor system by sliding a resolution through the House honoring an author they perceive as a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist.

98. Last Word: End of The Season, Honoring Forrest and MATA's Coming Campaign -

It’s over. No Game 7 for the Grizz and the off-season begins. Spurs advance after beating the Grizz at the Forum Thursday 103 – 96. But in the process, the Grizz created a chapter in Memphis basketball lore where it is about more than winning on the court.

99. Tennessee Lawmakers Condemn Resolution Lauding Forrest Biographer -

Memphis lawmakers blasted a Smyrna legislator Thursday morning, accusing him of violating their honor system by sliding a resolution through the House honoring an author they perceive as a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist.

100. Tigers Closer on List For Stopper of the Year -

University of Memphis junior closer Colton Hathcock has been named to the Midseason Watch List for the 13th annual National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association Stopper of the Year Award.

Hathcock picked up his 11th save of the season this week in a win at Arkansas State, moving him into a tie for eighth nationally in the save category. The 11 saves are the third most by a Tigers pitcher in a single season in school history. The single-season program record for saves is 14, set by Nolan Blackwood in 2015.