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Editorial Results (free)

1. T&B Granted 15-Year PILOT to Relocated Corporate HQ -

Memphis-based Thomas & Betts has been awarded a 15-year PILOT (payment-in-lieu-of-taxes) to relocate its corporate headquarters from Southwind to the Ridgeway Center in East Memphis and consolidate its regional research and development functions.

2. T&B Granted 15-Year PILOT to Relocated Corporate HQ -

Low voltage electrical and commutations products manufacturer, Thomas and Betts has been awarded a 15-year PILOT (payment-in-lieu-of-taxes) to relocated its corporate headquarters and consolidate its regional research and development functions.

3. Justices Uphold Refugee Ban But Say Grandparents Still OK -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court says the Trump administration can strictly enforce its ban on refugees, but is leaving in place a weakened travel ban that includes grandparents among relatives who can help visitors from six mostly Muslim countries get into the U.S.

4. Atlanta Retail Investor Makes $29M Purchase -

In this week’s Real Estate Recap, an 18-acre shopping center in the heart of Bartlett sells for $28.8 million, Ulta Beauty prepares to build out its space in Poplar Commons, and Dave & Buster’s continues work on its first Memphis location...

5. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

6. Mock Election In ‘19 Could Test Ranked Choice Voting -

The Shelby County Election Commission could hold a public mock election of what is called Ranked Choice Voting in 2019, ahead of city of Memphis elections that year.

But the earliest the election commission could move to new machines that would provide such an option is the 2022 elections, says Shelby County Elections Administrator Linda Phillips. And that’s provided the state certifies the use of a voting system that includes the option, which it currently doesn’t.

7. AutoZone’s Engine Starting to Stall -

AutoZone’s stock price is pointed in the opposite direction it’s been accustomed to for years now. Shares of the Memphis-based auto parts retailer are down more than 30 percent since the end of January. Needless to say, that’s an unusual place for the company, which continues to open new stores at a steady clip.

8. Costa Brava Brings Spanish Coast to Life -

Calella de Palafrugell is an instance of pictures not doing a place justice, particularly the views from our Hotel Sant Roc perched on the rocks above the sea.

I knew this Spanish coastal village was beautiful, but as we sat at an al fresco lunch of seafood behind the hotel, we caught our first full glimpse of the blue Mediterranean Sea filled with dozens of bobbing fishing and sailboats buoyed in the bay.

9. Tigers Football Picked To Win AAC West -

The American Athletic Conference has released its football media poll, and for the second time in three years, the University of Memphis is the preseason favorite to win the league’s West Division. The preseason vote was released at the league’s annual media days.

10. The Redbirds’ Dream Season is Not Being Duplicated in St. Louis -

On Monday, July 17, in Oklahoma City, the Memphis Redbirds pulled off their third win in their last at-bat as Patrick Wisdom hit a ninth-inning home run in a 5-3 victory. It was their seventh straight win and their 15th in their last 17 games.

11. Last Word: The TNT Virus, Tax Compromise and The Race for Governor Gets Active -

FedEx filed a notice with the SEC Monday that indicates its TNT Express subsidiary is still feeling the effects of a cyber attack late last month. And FedEx has traced the Petya virus to its operation in the Ukraine and spreading from there to the whole system.

12. Subway Looking to Update Stores' Not-So-Fresh Look -

NEW YORK (AP) – Subway wants to freshen up the look of its stores as it tries to stem a sales decline.

The sandwich chain says the redesign – which includes a brighter atmosphere, displays of vegetables behind the counter and ordering tablets – is the first major revamp since the early 2000s. The changes will take place as stores around the country are remodeled and new ones are built.

13. Tennessee County's Schools Cancel Class for Eclipse -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Students in a Tennessee school district won't have to skip class to catch next month's solar eclipse.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports that Superintendent Bob Thomas has announced that Knox County school will have the day off for the Aug. 21 eclipse.

14. Alabama is Media’s Overwhelming Pick To Win SEC Title -

Twice in the previous three years, SEC media correctly predicted the SEC champion. Both times, they did it by picking Alabama (2014, 2016). They went with Alabama again this year, predicting the Crimson Tide to defeat Georgia in the SEC title game.

15. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

16. Saturday Night Scenes on Beale Street -

Some observations from three consecutive Saturday nights on Beale Street at and after 10 p.m.

Beale Street just before 10 p.m. is about bubbles. Street vendors selling bubble guns – toy guns that shoot bubbles – do a brisk business before 10. A girl in a stroller watches with wide eyes as her finger is locked on the trigger and bubbles spew forth. By the time she reaches the middle of the block between B.B. King Boulevard and Second Street, the stream of bubbles begins to slow.

17. Thomas & Betts to Invest $20.7 Million in Expansion -

Thomas & Betts plans to add 75 employees and invest $20.7 million in its headquarters relocation in Memphis and is seeking a 15-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) incentive to help defray those costs.

18. Three Local Developers Seeking DMC Grants to Attract New Tenants -

Three new redevelopment projects are seeking Exterior Improvement Grants from the Downtown Memphis Commission in the hopes of attracting new tenants.

The first applicant, Janice Holder, is a retired Tennessee Supreme Court Justice, seeking to restore the façade of her building, located 55 S. Main St., back to its Gilded Age roots.

19. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

20. NAACP Asks for Removal of Confederate Statue From Courthouse -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee chapter of the NAACP is urging officials to remove a statue of a Confederate general from in front of a county courthouse, echoing similar efforts throughout the South.

21. Events -

L’Ecole Culinaire will host its “Date Night: Tour of Foods From Napa” cooking class Friday, July 14, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at L’Ecole, 1245 N. Germantown Parkway. Whether this is your first date or anniversary, this unique dining experience explores Napa wines and the foods that go with them. Cost is $95 per person; includes instruction, three-course meal and wine. Register at lecole.edu.

22. National Title is Success for Alabama, Not Other SEC Teams -

HOOVER, Ala. – They play in the same conference, but in different worlds. Alabama defines success as winning a national championship.

The rest of the Southeastern Conference?

If they’re honest, those teams now define success as how close they can come to Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide. They define success with the knowledge that there is the preeminent program in college football – winners of four national titles since 2009 and only a play away in 2016 – and then there are the other 13 teams in the SEC.

23. Events -

L’Ecole Culinaire will host its “Date Night: Tour of Foods From Napa” cooking class Friday, July 14, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at L’Ecole, 1245 N. Germantown Parkway. Whether this is your first date or anniversary, this unique dining experience explores Napa wines and the foods that go with them. Cost is $95 per person; includes instruction, three-course meal and wine. Register at lecole.edu.

24. Climbing Out When Stuck In Comfort Zone -

We all have them. We often go there looking for safety, acceptance, understanding or just a sense of the familiar. Our comfort zones are natural, but living there can keep you from fulfilling your purpose in life. A comfort zone, if you burrow in too deep, can become a rut you get stuck in.

25. Reviving Prospects That Go Dark -

If you’ve been in sales, you’ve found yourself wondering about a prospect who was highly interested in your offering – and for whom you invested significant time – only to find them suddenly incommunicado.

26. Crust Named MSO Assistant, Youth Symphony Conductor -

Andrew Crust, who recently was named assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Memphis Youth Symphony, shares why young musicians inspire him and how orchestras can reach a younger audience in this week's Newsmakers Q&A.

27. Stern Working to Expand UTHSC’s Community Reach -

When the University of Tennessee Health Science Center launched its Center for Addiction Science in the College of Medicine last year, it represented an ambitious bid by the school to help people beat a variety of addictions and to research the causes of substance abuse.

28. Canadian Delegation Hears Border Concerns During Memphis Visit -

Business crossing the U.S.-Canadian border and the uncertainty about U.S. immigration policy six months into President Donald Trump’s administration dominated a meeting last week between about 30 Memphis business leaders and the head of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

29. The Week Ahead: July 10-16 -

Hello, Memphis! This week, a supercentenarian World War II veteran visits the Bluff City, a classic film flies into the Orpheum, and a piece of the Downtown skyline hits the auction block again. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

30. Germantown Turning Borrow Pit Into Youth Education Pond -

The borrow pit off Wolf River Boulevard at Riverdale Road in Germantown already is a fishing hole that anglers have known about for quite a while.

“I saw 11 or 12 absolutely huge catfish in there,” Dr. Phil Aronoff said of a stop there in June. “I mean really big catfish that were feeding on the surface.”

31. MATA Eyes Greener Future, Prepares For Upcoming Service Changes -

Despite being hampered by a tight budget, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is making strides to be more green and environmentally sensitive, including participating in National Dump the Pump Day in June and offering reduced fares on “Ozone Days” throughout the year, as well as recently collaborating with the EPA to install air pollution-monitoring stations.

32. Owners Invest $1.6 Million to Revive Memphis National Golf Club -

A golf club is not unlike a garden. It needs tending. Fairways, greens, bunkers – they all need attention. But so do the members, who have many choices throughout the Memphis area and want to feel like their presence matters no matter how low – or high – of a score they shoot.

33. Celebrating Our Independence -

As we celebrate the declaration of our independence from the British Empire, it is important to remember the history behind the holiday. While much of the focus is on BBQ, ball games and fireworks, it is important to reflect on the real meaning of the day.

34. Last Word: Corporate Musical Chairs, Another Dollar General and Ronnie Grisanti -

The three-way deal by which Memphis-based Fred’s was to buy hundreds of Rite-Aid stores from Walgreens just keeps getting worse for Fred’s even though the deal happened last week without Fred’s. An analyst says Fred’s got cut out because of questions about the corporation’s viability to enter into what is an ambitious change of course for the company on a large scale.

35. The Week Ahead: July 3-July 9 -

Hello, Memphis – and happy almost-Fourth of July. Not sure where to catch the fireworks this week? We have a few suggestions, plus more local happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

36. Sports Notebook: Grizzlies Sign Selden, Set Summer League Roster -

The Memphis Grizzlies and their notable free agents – JaMychal Green, Zach Randolph, Tony Allen and Vince Carter – have been fairly quiet. That could change at any moment, of course, and Randolph in particular is the subject of speculation that the Cleveland Cavaliers are in pursuit of one of the best sixth men in the NBA last season.

37. Three Redbirds Named To Triple-A All-Star Game -

The Pacific Coast League has announced that catcher Carson Kelly and pitchers Ryan Sherriff and Luke Weaver have been selected to represent the Memphis Redbirds at the 2017 Triple-A All-Star Game.

38. Analyst: Fred’s Not Seen as Viable Buyer of Rite Aid Stores -

Nick Mitchell, managing director and research analyst with Northcoast Research, didn’t have to do much work or analysis in the wake of news that Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has been cut out of a deal between Walgreens and Rite Aid.

39. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

40. Last Word: No Deal, Ivan Rabb and Intermodals in Overton Park -

And the winner is … not Fred’s. After months of speculation about the Memphis-based discount retail store’s transformation into a pharmacy-based enterprise with the purchase of hundreds of Rite Aid stores in a third-party divestment move, Fred’s was nowhere to be found when Walgreens announced a deal Thursday to buy the Rite Aid stores. The corporation told investors it will still pursue its strategy but acknowledged its trajectory is “stunted” – that as Fred’s got hammered on Wall Street.

41. Three Redbirds Named To Triple-A All-Star Game -

The Pacific Coast League has announced that catcher Carson Kelly and pitchers Ryan Sherriff and Luke Weaver have been selected to represent the Memphis Redbirds at the 2017 Triple-A All-Star Game.

42. New Grizzlies Ready to Work, Free Agent Picture Still Cloudy -

All across the NBA landscape, teams are trotting out their second-round draft picks and saying the same things: We had these players rated higher. We couldn’t believe they were still there. And the classic, “We’re so happy they fell to us.”

43. Man Destroys New Ten Commandments Statue at Arkansas Capitol -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A man yelled "Freedom!" as he crashed his vehicle into Arkansas' new Ten Commandments monument early Wednesday, nearly three years after he was arrested in the destruction of Oklahoma's monument at its state Capitol, authorities said.

44. Events -

The Collierville Chamber of Commerce will host a Small-Business Lunch & Learn Thursday, June 29, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University of Memphis Collierville Center, 215 W. Poplar Ave. Courtney Orians, coordinator of external activities at the U of M, will discuss personality types in the workplace. Cost is free for members and $15 for nonmembers. Visit colliervillechamber.com for registration details.

45. Last Word: A Second Juvenile Court Letter, Fred Smith's Tax Plan and Memphis Hops -

A group of 19 organizations including the Memphis Branch NAACP and 28 citizens sent a letter Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urging him to keep in place Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. The 12-page letter is a point-by-point detailed response to the June 9 letter from County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham asking Sessions to end the memorandum of agreement between county government and the Justice Department.

46. Wield a Red Pen Like a Pro -

You’re probably thinking a lot about how your marketing looks. You’ve created a compelling brand, made videos to showcase your best work, and even tried Facebook Live to document exciting events.

With this focus on visual content, you may not be able to bring in a professional copywriter to go over every adverb and comma, even if you know that the last place you want your beautiful marketing to end up is on Buzzfeed’s latest list of “Funniest Grammar Mistakes.”

47. Opera Memphis Using Grant to Reach Mostly Absent Audience -

Innovation isn’t necessarily the first word that comes to mind to describe opera. That’s one reason Opera Memphis’ award of a $28,000 Innovation Grant – among the first to be handed out by OPERA America, funded by the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation – is interesting, to say the least.

48. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

49. Gibson Becomes First African-American Woman Partner at Burch, Porter & Johnson -

Tannera Gibson knew she wanted to be more than an attorney. She wanted to be an attorney at Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC, one of the city’s oldest law firms with a deep history in and out of court and the business of law.

50. Qatar Weighs Demands to End Crisis Amid Threat of Long Siege -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — With just days to decide, Qatar on Friday weighed an onerous list of demands by its neighbors as a way out of a regional crisis, and a top Emirati official warned the tiny country to brace for a long-term economic squeeze unless it is willing to acquiesce.

51. Arkansas Panel Approves Temporary Ban on Herbicide -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas took the first steps Friday toward temporarily banning the sale and use of an herbicide that has prompted hundreds of complaints and a federal lawsuit from farmers who say it has caused widespread damage to crops.

52. The Week Ahead: June 26-July 2 -

Hello, Memphis! The start of the fiscal year comes this week for local governments, but the county commission still has some work to do. A few other important government meetings are slated this week, as is some fun – Boston is in concert Saturday night at Live at the Garden.

53. County Commission Reviews Juvenile Court Moves as Monitors Say Issues Remain -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

54. $37 Million UTHSC Medical Simulation Facility Changing How Students Learn -

While learning on the job is pretty common in most professions, when it comes to health care the stakes are much higher, which is why the University of Tennessee Health Science Center decided to invest in new a $37 million medical simulation facility that will offer students unprecedented access to hands-on training.

55. Resource Label Group Paved a Road From Lamar to New Bartlett Facility -

After more than 20 years at their facility near Lamar Avenue, Resource Label Group officials wanted to move to a bigger and better place.

After looking around Shelby County, they settled on Bartlett, largely due to the suburban town’s atmosphere and family nature.

56. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

57. Bowen Relishes Passion of Tigers’ Fan Base, Supports Tubby -

Today we delve into Part 2 of our interview with University of Memphis athletic director Tom Bowen. If you missed Part 1, which covered his background, facilities upgrades, the upcoming football season, and scheduling and ticketing, go to https://bitly.im/JsafZ.

58. EDGE Gives Frayser Gateway Project Nod -

With all of the new development buzzing around Downtown, Midtown and East Memphis, it could be easy to overlook the addition of a new grocery store, but for some Frayser residents, it could mean everything.

59. Last Word: Cyber Attacks, Second Farmers Market Downtown and The Council Way -

It’s on. Shelby County commissioners coming out Wednesday in committee against the idea of ending Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. And the discussion was, as always, an interesting one including not only critics like commissioner Van Turner but commissioner Terry Roland and County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

60. Tyson Adopting Video, Welfare Checks in Poultry Operations -

PLUMERVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Tyson Foods has installed video cameras in key areas of its poultry operations and will test new ways to slaughter birds — not in response to previous "gotcha" moments but under a corporate philosophy that notes its role as a steward for millions of chickens, the company said.

61. Organizers Mobilize Against Confederate Monuments -

If there was any doubt about the precise target of the still-forming movement to remove the city’s statues and monuments honoring Confederate leaders, that was dispelled Tuesday, June 20, as more than 300 people gathered at Bruce Elementary School.

62. Former St. Francis CEO Now Teaching at CBU -

Dave Archer has never followed a prearranged plan for his career. The former CEO of St. Francis Hospital has always taken the next step, whatever that next step is, on faith.

63. Downtown Core Attracting More Corporate Tenants -

Hamida Mandani, who with her husband Sunny owns City Market at the corner of Main Street and Union Avenue, is anticipating lots of potential new customers soon for her small grocery and deli enterprise.

64. Shelby County Commission to Probe Juvenile Court Moves -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

65. Supreme Court Pushes Redskins' Name Fight Back to Society -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Washington Redskins aren't in the clear with their team name just yet, even after the Supreme Court ruled Monday that the government can't block trademarks on the basis that they're offensive.

66. After Warmbier's Death, US Weighs Travel Ban on North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is considering banning travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea, officials said Tuesday, as outrage grew over the death of American student Otto Warmbier and President Donald Trump declared it a "total disgrace."

67. UK Moves to Ease Tensions After Van Attack on London Muslims -

LONDON (AP) — British authorities and Islamic leaders moved swiftly to ease concerns in the Muslim community after a man plowed a large van into a crowd of worshippers outside a north London mosque early Monday, injuring at least nine people.

68. Higher Prices Squeezing Both Renters and Would-Be Homeowners -

A diminished supply of available homes is swelling prices in large U.S. metro areas from New York to Miami to Los Angeles, squeezing out would-be buyers and pushing up rents as more people are forced to remain tenants.

69. Dixon Hosting Art Camp For Two Weeks in June -

The Dixon Gallery and Gardens is offering a free summer art camp for first- through eighth-grade students who attend Shelby County Schools in neighborhoods near the Dixon.

The camp’s main goal is connecting neighborhood families, students and schools with the local museum through art. For the third year in a row, the camp will take place in facilities of the University of Memphis.

70. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

71. Power Pitching, Hitting Goal Of New UT Baseball Coach -

Tony Vitello wants to put a Power T in Tennessee baseball, and with it a yearly contender for SEC championships and NCAA tournament bids.

The new UT baseball coach was introduced last Friday at Tennessee’s Lindsey Nelson Stadium. He emphasized power pitching and power hitting as part of his rebuilding plan.

72. June 16-22, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2008: The debut of The Memphis News, a weekly about “business, politics and the public interest” by The Daily News Publishing Co.

73. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

74. Dixon Hosting Art Camp For Two Weeks in June -

The Dixon Gallery and Gardens is offering a free summer art camp for first- through eighth-grade students who attend Shelby County Schools in neighborhoods near the Dixon.

The camp’s main goal is connecting neighborhood families, students and schools with the local museum through art. For the third year in a row, the camp will take place in facilities of the University of Memphis.

75. Sharing Yards and Roots -

ROOTS AND MONKEY GRASS. So I’m waiting in line at Booksellers to get my high school classmate, Cary Fowler, to sign my copy of his new book when a moment of quintessential Memphis broke out.

76. Facilities, Football Fever Growing At the University of Memphis -

Somewhere, in a long-ago Division I sports galaxy far away, an athletic director could catch his breath after his college baseball team made its last out and before his football team started practice. Not so much now.

77. ServiceMaster Opens ‘Ground Floor’ Innovation Center Downtown -

The Ground Floor, ServiceMaster’s 20,000-square-foot innovation center located in the former home of Tower Records, formally opened Thursday, June 15 – marking the first completed phase of the Memphis-based company’s Downtown relocation.

78. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

79. Key To Winning Job Candidate’s Heart? Flexibility -

I recently had the opportunity to travel to Austin, Texas, to meet a number of folks who work at the job website Indeed.com. If you’ve looked for a job in the last 10 years, there’s a good chance you’ve visited Indeed.

80. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

81. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

82. St. Jude Hosts Pediatric Palliative Oncology Symposium -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital welcomed 325 physicians, nurses and psychosocial professionals from around the world in recent days for the first Pediatric Palliative Oncology Symposium, the largest conference of its type that has been held in the U.S.

83. For St. Jude and Golf Fans, FedEx St. Jude Classic is Thriving -

Perspective can be too easy of a word. It can get thrown around casually, especially in big-time sports settings. But at the FedEx St. Jude Classic, “perspective” isn’t just a clichéd line for a moment in time.

84. Daniel Berger Makes it Back-to-Back Wins at FESJC -

When he won his first PGA Tour event here last year, young Daniel Berger celebrated. Maybe a bit too much at the cost of some sleep.

85. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

86. The Health Of Care -

There's a school of thought in some industries that says it's ideal to have a narrow focus, to pick just one or a few things to excel at and not try to be all things to all people – that when you do so and go broad, you’re likely to end up instead being a master of nothing.

87. Orpheum Raising Money to Fix Aging Organ -

Next year, Memphis’ historic Orpheum Theatre will celebrate its 90th birthday. So will the venue’s Mighty Wurlitzer organ, a $19,000 instrument built in North Tonawanda, New York, and originally bought to play for vaudeville shows and silent movies.

88. Lee Campaigns in Collierville After Nashville Fundraiser -

The night after he raised $1.3 million in Nashville at the first major fundraiser in his bid for Tennessee governor, Bill Lee was in Collierville for a local Republican Party gathering, along with a few hopefuls in countywide races on the ballot earlier in 2018.

89. Luttrell, Commission Working Out Details of 3-Cent Property Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commissioners have talked for several years about cutting the county’s property tax rate. But it’s never been more than talk and never had close to the seven votes necessary to drop the tax rate.

90. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

91. Redbirds’ Chad Huffman Grinding For a Return to Big Leagues -

The Memphis Redbirds had just finished a Tuesday afternoon game at AutoZone Park. Wednesday was a cherished off day at home. It was a good time for a player to exit quickly, to get the most of the down time before coming back for the next game on Thursday night.

92. East is West but SEC Knows What’s Best -

East is East and West is West – except where the Southeastern Conference is concerned.

The SEC politburo again has scoffed at the idea of adjusting its football divisions by true geographic standards, leaving Missouri, the third most westerly conference member in terms of longitude, in the Eastern Division.

93. Ole Miss Disputes NCAA Lack of Institutional Control Charge -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) – The University of Mississippi disputes the NCAA's charges of lack of institutional control and failure to monitor by head coach Hugh Freeze, along with allegations of a $10,000 cash payment to a recruit.

94. Last Word: Grade Tampering, The Tom Lee Storm and Fred's Strategy -

There are indications that allegations of grade-tampering at Shelby County Schools are not going to recede as rapidly as they did late last year when the allegations first came up. The first indication was word late last week that the state department of education will audit the grade transcripts of all SCS high schools. But there are still some fuzzy points in that about whether that is a new move or whether it is something that has been underway since last year.

95. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

96. Justices Side With Religious Hospitals in Pension Dispute -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Religious hospitals don't have to comply with federal laws protecting pension plans, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Monday in a case that affects retirement benefits for roughly a million workers nationwide.

97. The Week Ahead: June 5-11 -

Hello, Memphis! This week, we’re getting into the swing of things with the FedEx St. Jude Golf Classic, jumping into the ring at the Germantown Charity Horse Show and catching a free flick at an outdoor movie screening. Check out the rest of our top picks in The Week Ahead…

98. Trezevant High Principal Resigns, Renews Allegations of Illegal Activities -

When Ronnie Mackin, the principal of Trezevant High School, reported a discrepancy last September in the transcript grades of some football players, Shelby County Schools officials were quick to say the system had “the utmost confidence” in Mackin.

99. Memphis Banks Build Brand Awareness Via Marketing, Community Investments -

As a complement to traditional advertising, one way banks like Regions Bank, First Tennessee Bank and Pinnacle Financial Partners promote their brands in the local community is by spreading money around to everything from charitable causes to putting their name and logos on buildings and events.

100. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.