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Editorial Results (free)

1. Red State, Blue Mayors -

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, a Democrat in Tennessee’s sea of red, finds herself adapting to the control Republicans hold over the state Legislature.

2. Pinnacle Financial to Anchor Boyle’s Building -

Pinnacle Financial Partners will be an anchor tenant in Boyle Investment Co.’s long-awaited office building in Ridgeway Center.

3. Pinnacle Financial Anchor Tenant in Boyle's New Office Building -

Pinnacle Financial Partners will be an anchor tenant in Boyle Investment Co.’s long-awaited office building in Ridgeway Center.

4. Memphis Baby Boomers Seek Support Of Local Organizations to Age in Their Homes -

Advancements in technology and medicine have contributed to an increased lifespan and adults are living well beyond retirement years.

As baby boomers reach retirement age, AARP predicts that the population of adults older than 65 will surpass 70 million people by 2030. Memphis is experiencing the growth firsthand – the only age group with significant growth in Memphis since the 2010 census is the 65+ age group, which saw an 18 percent increase in just five years.

5. Gannett to Restructure Commercial Appeal -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

6. Rating Agencies, State Comptroller Tout Improved City of Memphis Finances -

The most outspoken critic of the city’s financial condition said Monday, July 25, that Memphis leaders have made a “remarkable achievement.”

“Just three years ago there was a serious question about whether the City Council would take the necessary steps to control its budget and determine Memphis’ future,” Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson wrote Monday to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Memphis City Council chairman Kemp Conrad. “If you continue on this path, Memphis will reclaim its rightful place among the truly vibrant cities of the world.”

7. Methodist South to Launch ICU Renovation -

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare is preparing to start work on a new part of its Whitehaven hospital as part of its ongoing comprehensive renovation that’s been underway for the past couple of years.

8. Gannett Plans Restructure of Commercial Appeal Newsroom -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

9. Verizon Buys Yahoo for $4.83B, Marking End of an Era -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Verizon is buying Yahoo for $4.83 billion, marking the end of an era for a company that once defined the internet.

It is the second time in as many years that Verizon, extending its digital reach, has snapped up the remnants of a fallen internet star. The nation's largest wireless carrier paid $4.4 billion for AOL last year.

10. Last Word: Substation 68, Akbari's Convention Slot and Heartbreak Hotel -

Relief came on Sunday for Memphis Light Gas and Water customers in Arlington, Lakeland and a part of Bartlett who have been enduring the possibility of rolling blackouts and voluntary conservation measures in the worst heat of the summer for just shy of two weeks.

11. The Daily News Claims Tennessee Press Association Honors -

The Daily News claimed two first-place awards in the annual Tennessee Press Association newspaper contest, co-sponsored by the University of Tennessee.

The Daily News claimed first-place honors in its division for best business coverage, based on the newspaper’s overall coverage as judged by a review of 10 editions of the paper during 2015.

12. The Week Ahead: July 25-31 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! We’re wrapping up July with an eclectic mix of local happenings, from political campaigning to a celebration of all things Harry Potter. Plus, what you need to know about Tennessee sales tax holiday and much more…

13. Beer Festival Coming To Collierville Sept. 24 -

The Shops at Carriage Crossing has announced the launch of a new signature event: Collierville BrewFest, presented by RE/MAX.

BrewFest, which the lifestyle center says is the first event of its kind in Collierville, is taking place Sept. 24 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Carriage Crossing, 4674 Merchants Park Circle.

14. Last Word: A Robust 2nd Quarter, Marshall and Union and the Code Crew -

Last Word is more like First Word because of a blink of the computer overnight at around 11 p.m. that left us able to create and report but not to post. But not to worry, we will resume our night owl habits Sunday into Monday after this brief reminder of the way things used to be when the deadline was when the presses stopped.

15. Business Formed to Finish Germantown’s Enclave -

Builder-developers John Duke, Mike Murphy, Chip Tayloe and Frank Uhlhorn, along with developer Dan Turley, formed a joint venture business to finish out The Enclave, a luxury estate home infill project they saved in Germantown after it had stalled during the Great Recession.

16. ‘Why Don’t We Start Our Own?’ -

The diner-style restaurant planned for 2657 Broad Ave. is a bit unique as far as commercial real estate projects go.

Yes, it’s of a piece with the rest of the groundswell of redevelopment and commercial activity that’s transformed Broad into a people-packed arts, retail and restaurant scene. One of those hotspots along the street is the combination coffee shop and retailer City & State, the owners of which have signed a lease at 2657 Broad for their next venture.

17. Egwuekwe: ‘Expand Your Networks’ -

As a kid growing up in Memphis, Meka Egwuekwe remembers his first computer clearly: It was from Texas Instruments, the kind Bill Cosby was selling on TV. He played games for six months, then, bored, he pulled out the instruction book and began learning to program in a language called BASIC. 

18. Will Mariota’s Second Season Resemble Luck or RG3? -

The Tennessee Titans’ offensive playbook has been rewritten. The verbiage for calling plays has been edited. The line has been revamped with three new starters.

Why? The team’s ownership and coaches desperately want to get the most out of quarterback prodigy Marcus Mariota.

19. 2nd Bona Fide Blues Festival Keeps Lineup Local -

John Gemmill, the president of the Memphis Blues Society, says there is a standard look to blues festivals – a poster with a guitar player and “fill-in-the-name-of-the-city blues festival,” and a lineup that includes performers from all over the place.

20. Astor Collection Documents Four Decades of Memphis’ Gay Community -

Vincent Astor knows his way around the Memphis-Shelby County Room at the Memphis Public Library’s Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library.

His 2013 book “Memphis Movie Theatres” relied heavily on the archive’s collection of photographs of long-gone movie palaces.

21. Leadership Allowed Durham Sleaze To Fester for Too Long -

The Tennessee attorney general’s sexual harassment investigation of Republican Rep. Jeremy Durham dragged halfway through the summer. Now we know why.

22. Oklahoma City Districts Worth A Visit -

Sitting under an umbrella at a little pizza joint in the Paseo Arts District it’s hard to imagine I’m in Oklahoma City.

With a locally brewed F5 Ale in hand, the ultra-hoppy beer feels more Pacific Northwest than American Heartland. But the scorching heat and hints of Southwest architecture places me in Oklahoma.

23. Beer Festival Coming To Collierville -

The Shops at Carriage Crossing has announced the launch of a new signature event: Collierville BrewFest, presented by RE/MAX.

BrewFest, which the lifestyle center says is the first event of its kind in Collierville, is taking place Sept. 24 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Carriage Crossing, 4674 Merchants Park Circle.

24. Threlkeld Says Metropolitan Bank Going Back In Time With New Advisory Service -

A conversation with Metropolitan Bank executives about a new business advisory platform the 9-year-old bank has just launched quickly turned into a talk about how much of a commodity business banking has become.

25. Paragon Bank: Not Too Big, Not Too Small, But Just Right -

Robert Shaw won’t say that big banks don’t have their place in the industry. He knows better.

26. Advance Memphis Aims to Provide Workers Economic Sustainability -

“I’m always thinking about things through an economic lens,” said Steve Nash, executive director of Advance Memphis, at a recent tour of the nonprofit’s new location at 575 Suzette St.

27. Kroger Expands ClickList Service to Southaven -

Kroger has expanded its ClickList online ordering service to Southaven.

The store at 3095 Goodman Road now lets shoppers there use the ClickList service to digitally “fill” up their basket and then set a time to arrive at the store to collect and pay for their purchases.

28. Saint Francis Starts Program For Heart Age Screening -

Saint Francis Healthcare has announced a new Heart Age Screening program.

Provided free to the public, the screenings will help individuals determine their risk for heart disease. Screenings will be held monthly, with the location alternating between the campuses of Saint Francis Hospital-Memphis and Saint Francis Hospital-Bartlett.

29. How safe is our food? -

It’s not easy being a food inspector in Tennessee, dealing with an updated statewide food code to protect the public from foodborne illnesses and educating restaurateurs, many with their own ideas about their cuisine, on following the rules.

30. Too Big To Ignore: The SEC and Its Ever-Growing Football Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – The SEC football preseason always has been loud. More than 30 years ago, the noise came via the Skywriters Tour and the rattle and roar of a DC-3 propeller plane carrying rumpled, hardworking – and often hard-drinking – sports writers to the 10 Southeastern Conference campuses for essentially unfettered access to the league’s coaches and players.

31. Paragon Executive Touts Personal Touch of Community Banking -

Robert Shaw won’t say that big banks don’t have their place in the industry. He knows better.

“Larger banks do a lot of things very well,” said Shaw, CEO of Paragon Bank. “But community banks can do things on a more personal basis.”

32. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

33. Baptist Hires Disparity Coordinator For Breast Program at Women’s Center -

A 2014 study by the Avon Foundation found that black women in Memphis are more than twice as likely to die from breast cancer as white women. That helps convey why Venecia Harris is one of the newest hires at Baptist Women’s Health Center in Memphis.

34. Mahoro Lives the American Dream — and Pays It Forward -

Memphis stands at the threshold of incredible possibility. In this column, we introduce innovative Memphians who are driving our city forward and forging its future success.

Despite what you may have heard, the American Dream isn’t dead — he’s very much alive, and his name is Jean Francois Mahoro. Mahoro began life as a Rwandan refugee; today, he is a successful software engineer at a Fortune 1000 company. Now, through his volunteer work at Code Crew, he’s helping under-resourced Memphians follow in his footsteps.

35. To Zoo. Zooed. Zooing. -

YOU’VE BEEN ZOOED. That headline is indicative of the last few months. In fact, it’s the indicative present perfect usage of the new verb this city has created.

36. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

37. Last Word: At The Gates of Graceland, Domestic Violence at SEC Days and October -

Black Lives Matter at Graceland on Tuesday – the latest chapter in a story arc that is moving fast.

38. Saint Francis Starts Heart Age Screening Program -

Saint Francis Healthcare has announced a new Heart Age Screening program.

Provided free to the public, the screenings will help individuals determine their risk for heart disease. Screenings will be held monthly, with the location alternating between the campuses of Saint Francis Hospital-Memphis and Saint Francis Hospital-Bartlett.

39. Frustrations Aired After Bridge Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

40. Last Word: The Day After The Bridge, Big River Plans and the U of M Train Tracks -

The lure of the bridge was tempting some of the organizers of Sunday’s Black Lives Matter protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge on the day after the protest that drew thousands.

41. Frustration Day After Black Lives Matter Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

42. Kroger Expands ClickList Service to Southaven -

Kroger has expanded its ClickList online ordering service to Southaven.

The store at 3095 Goodman Road now lets shoppers there use the ClickList service to digitally “fill” up their basket and then set a time to arrive at the store to collect and pay for their purchases.

43. The Power of Words -

Editor’s note: Part one of a two-part series.

The life of an organization is defined and redefined by the language it chooses to use. More than any other factor, compliance around words conveys the values of a place where people work. Indeed, words are magic, carrying so much weight that they demand careful, conscious attention.

44. Last Word: The Path To The Bridge, Setting The Election Stage and Democrats -

The Black Lives Matter protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge Sunday was an unexpected milestone.

It was also part of a story that is still moving. As it moves, our views on what happened and what it means on the basic issue of police and their relationship with African-Americans will also shift.

45. The Week Ahead: July 11-17 -

Time to get your week started, Memphis! Our look at the week ahead includes several chances to indulge your inner art patron – from hanging out with a local comic book artist to being on stage at the Orpheum – plus other need-to-know happenings you’ll want to check out…

46. Last Word: Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis -

As I write this, I’m wondering if something else will happen once it goes up on our website that will render this irrelevant by the time you read it.

This time the datelines are Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis.

47. Editorial: What Is and Isn't on Shelby County's August Ballot -

Elections are never just about the names on the ballot. Less-obvious factors always come into play, and when it comes to primary matchups – like many of the races on the August ballot – more decisions lie ahead in the general election.

48. Events -

POTS@TheWorks will present the premiere of “Moonvine,” a winner of the 2014 NewWorks@TheWorks playwriting competition, Friday, July 8, through July 31 at TheatreWorks, 2085 Monroe Ave. Shows are Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Buy tickets at playhouseonthesquare.org.

49. Education Leaders Reboot TNReady Tests, Re-Examine Process -

The disastrous rollout of the new TNReady student achievement tests has gone from finding a new test vendor to a re-examination of the role such testing plays in public education.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Wednesday, July 6, the state has a letter of intent with the Minneapolis-based testing service Questar Assessment to develop and deliver both pen-and-paper and online student achievements tests starting in the school year that begins in August.

50. Fed Minutes Show Worries About Job Slowdown, Brexit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers last month were unsure about the outlook for the U.S economy because of a sharp slowdown in job growth and the potential threat posed by a vote in Britain over leaving the European Union.

51. Events -

Attorney J. Anthony Bradley will present free seminar on VA Aid & Attendance Benefits on Thursday, July 7, at 2 p.m. at Berclair Church of Christ, 4536 Summer Ave. The seminar is geared toward World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War veterans as well as their spouses, surviving spouses and caregivers. RSVP to the church at 901-406-0310, or call the Bradley Law Firm at 901-937-2800.

52. ‘Throwback’ Something Special -

“I didn’t set out to write about the melancholy bewilderment of middle-aged men,” says Chris Bachelder of his fifth novel, “The Throwback Special.” “But that’s where I ended up.” And, IMO, he ended up with a very special book.

53. No Charges Recommended in Clinton Email Probe, FBI Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The FBI won't recommend criminal charges against Hillary Clinton for her use of a private email server while secretary of state, agency Director James Comey said Tuesday, lifting a major legal threat to her presidential campaign. But Comey called her actions "extremely careless" and faulted the agency she led for a lackadaisical approach to handling classified material.

54. Profile of a Winning Sales Team -

It’s no secret that quality of life among team members leads to higher retention and satisfaction. Sales rep satisfaction is directly linked to customer satisfaction, and both impact your bottom line.

55. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

56. Bridge Builders Creating Leaders One Cohort at a Time -

In the High Adventure Hall in the Bridges Center on North Fifth Street, more than 150 seventh- and eighth-graders, organized in groups designated by team-colored T-shirts, are collectively and enthusiastically practicing the Bridge Builders pledge:

57. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

58. The Week Ahead: July 4-10 -

Happy Fourth of July, Memphis! We hope you’re enjoying a long weekend – and if you do have to work today, we hope you’re able to sneak out early enough to watch some of the local fireworks displays tonight. Here are details on a few of them, plus other local happenings you need to know about this week…

59. Strickland Unveils Greensward Solution, Zoo Not Happy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has put forth his plan to end parking on the Overton Park Greensward.

60. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

61. Former Titan Dyson Finally Reaching His Goal -

When is it too late to go back to school and prepare for a new career? Most experts and older students who’ve returned to school at 30, 40, 50 – or even 60 and beyond – will tell you there’s really no limit as long as an older student is motivated and focused.

62. Hattiloo’s Bandele: ‘It’s a Supply and Demand Thing’ -

When you see Ekundayo Bandele in his sleek, contemporary Midtown office, dressed sharp in a tie and freshly shined shoes, phone dinging constantly, you might think he was born to be a theater impresario. 

63. Frank Stokes, Epitome of the ‘Memphis Sound,’ Given Just Memorial -

Nathaniel Kent remembers his grandfather as an older man in his 70s by the mid-1950s who came over with his guitar – ill and near the end of his life.

64. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

65. Loeb Properties to Reposition YoLo, Kwik Shop Grill -

YoLo Frozen Yogurt in Overton Square and the Kwik Shop Grill at Central Avenue and East Parkway are both on their way out.

Property owner Loeb Properties will soon undertake significant remodels at the locally-owned Midtown restaurants to attract other restaurant tenants.

66. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, June 29, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the University of Phoenix–Memphis Campus, 65 Germantown Court, first floor. The topic is The MasterMind Principle, based on the book “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz.

67. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

68. Kevin Dean Leaves Legacy at Literacy Mid-South for ‘New Adventure’ -

After five years of leading the charge for building a stronger community of skilled readers, Thursday, June 30, is Kevin Dean’s last day as executive director of Literacy Mid-South. He leaves behind a legacy of milestones he orchestrated for the nonprofit organization, which aims to provide literary resources to all backgrounds and ages.

69. Downtown Memphis Commission Creates Temporary Grant Program for Creatives -

The Downtown Memphis Commission is accepting applications for grants that will activate the street with creative meet-ups and art installations.

Up to $5,000 is available per grant for projects that bring about creative place-making and social and professional engagement.

70. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

71. Frayser Targeted as Pilot Area for Citywide Fight Against Blight -

Last week, a wrecking team demolished a single-family home in the Washington Heights neighborhood in South Memphis. The effort, organized by United Housing Inc. and backed by the U.S. Department of Treasury, was the first of its kind to take place.

72. Last Word: Pinch Plans, Beyond the Basics and the Golden Greek -

The future of the Pinch District looks to be Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s first venture beyond being “brilliant at the basics.”

73. Redbirds Manager Will Coach for PCL All-Stars -

Memphis Redbirds manager Mike Shildt, a Charlotte, N.C., native, will return home to help lead the Pacific Coast League All-Stars in the Triple-A All-Star Game at BB&T Ballpark in Charlotte July 13.

74. First State-Backed Blight Demolition Completed -

The first demolition sponsored by the state’s Blight Elimination Program took place June 22.

Memphis-based United Housing Inc. sent a wrecking crew to 1370 Mississippi Blvd. to demolish an abandoned home and make way for a green space.

75. Kicker Jake Elliott Earns All-America Third Team -

University of Memphis senior place-kicker Jake Elliott has been named to the Athlon Sports All-America Third Team.

Elliott returns to Memphis this fall after finishing last season as a finalist for the Lou Groza Collegiate Place-Kicker Award, and as the two-time, defending American Athletic Conference Special Teams Player of the Year.

76. Time Running Out to Save Aretha Franklin’s Birth Home From Demolition -

A local business owner has stepped up with $15,000 to save Aretha Franklin's birth home, but the effort may be too little too late.

The dilapidated house at 406 Lucy Ave. is headed for demolition unless a realistic and fully-funded plan emerges within the week, said Steve Barlow, an attorney with blight-fighting law firm Brewer & Barlow PLC.

77. Memphis Kicker Jake Elliott Earns All-America Third Team -

University of Memphis senior place-kicker Jake Elliott has been named to the Athlon Sports All-America Third Team.

Elliott returns to Memphis this fall after finishing last season as a finalist for the Lou Groza Collegiate Place-Kicker Award, and as the two-time, defending American Athletic Conference Special Teams Player of the Year.

78. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

79. Memphis’ ‘Rampage’ Jackson Fights On -

“I’m not a psychic, but I’m gonna predict I’m gonna whup his ass.” No, this was not LeBron James speaking of Draymond Green late in the NBA Finals – after feelings had been hurt with the B-word.

80. Redbirds Home-Game Attendance Ahead of Last Season -

As this baseball season was dawning, new Memphis Redbirds majority owner Peter B. Freund was at AutoZone Park and being made to field questions about the team’s sliding attendance.

As recently as 2013, the Redbirds had drawn nearly 500,000 fans – averaging 7,223 tickets sold – to finish fifth in the 16-team Pacific Coast League attendance standings.

81. Last Word: Lights, Camera, Demolition, Our Cautious Prosperity and City Hall Redux -

In south Memphis Wednesday, an old house on Mississippi Boulevard was demolished as part of a press conference to tout anti-blight measures in a city that has a lot of blight.

At times it seems like we have a different blight program for just about every blighted property.

82. Allegiant Reaches Contract Deal With Union Pilots -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Discount airline Allegiant Air has settled on a union labor contract with its pilots after more than three years of negotiations.

Teamsters Local 1224, which represents pilots, said Wednesday that the contract includes increases in pay, retirement and medical benefits. Allegiant said the contract would help pilots while allowing the airline to keep prices low.

83. New For-Profit Medical Schools Springing Up Across US -

BOISE, Idaho (AP) – For-profit medical schools are starting to pop up around the country, promising to create new family doctors for underserved rural regions.

Rural states like Idaho need more general practitioners, with the baby boom generation aging and expanded insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act making health care more accessible. But critics of the new schools question whether companies can properly train the nation's next crop of doctors.

84. Humane Society Launches Mobile Spay and Neuter Clinic -

The Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County is ramping up efforts to control the pet population by launching a mobile spay and neuter clinic.

And there’s good reason, said executive director Andrew Jacuzzi: Just one pair of unspayed, unneutered dogs and their offspring, based on the reproductive pace and the size of the litters, can produce 67,000 dogs in six years, according to the Humane Society of the United States.

85. First Fed-Backed Blight Demolition Takes Place in South Memphis -

The first demolition sponsored by the state’s Blight Elimination Program took place Wednesday, June 22. Memphis-based United Housing Inc. sent a wrecking crew to 1370 Mississippi Blvd. to demolish an abandoned home and make way for a green space.

86. Last Word: Farewell Northside, Roland's Stand and Wayne Jackson -

Northside High School is no more. The Klondike-Smoky City institution graduated its last class last month.

The Shelby County Schools board had voted that same month to give the high school one more school year.

87. White House Clears Small, Commercial Drones for Takeoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Routine use of small drones by real estate agents, farmers, filmmakers and countless other commercial operators was cleared for takeoff by the Obama administration Tuesday, after years of struggling to write rules that would both protect public safety and free the benefits of a new technology.

88. Is There Room for ‘Fair’ at Work? -

One of the worst things that can happen to any employee is to find out they aren’t being treated the same as their co-workers. We’ve all been there. Perhaps you didn’t realize the person who sits next to you gets a week more of vacation. Or, maybe they have special permission to leave early every day. Or, they make more money than you do. Perhaps their mobile phone is paid for.

89. Regional One Health Continues Building Out New East Campus -

One of the first indications that Regional One Health’s 50,000-square-foot East Campus does things a little differently is the digital map near the nurse’s station with rooms lit up in different colors and names moving around the image.

90. Last Word: Budget No Go, Largest Home Sale of 2016 and Crosstown Moves -

The Shelby County Commission probably has enough votes to approve the funding in the county budget the Shelby County Schools system wants, which includes $24.7 million on new funding.

Yet after about four hours of discussion, the commission didn’t take votes on any budget resolutions or the county property tax rate resolution Monday.

91. Fairgrounds Revitalization Efforts Start Slow and Anew -

The Fairgrounds and the Mid-South Coliseum aren’t a priority of the new administration at City Hall.

And that’s fine with groups trying to chart a future for both.

“The building is in good shape. It’s not in a condition that can’t be mothballed for awhile,” said Chooch Pickard of the Coliseum Coalition. “We can take our time in planning for the Coliseum and the Fairgrounds and do it right. There’s no need to rush. We can take our time, find out what everyone really wants to do with it and raise the money.”

92. Redbirds Manager to Be a Coach for PCL All-Stars -

Memphis Redbirds manager Mike Shildt, a Charlotte, N.C., native, will return home to help lead the Pacific Coast League All-Stars in the Triple-A All-Star Game at BB&T Ballpark in Charlotte July 13.

93. Cardinals Recall Kolten Wong From Triple-A Memphis -

ST. LOUIS (AP) – St. Louis Cardinals second baseman Kolten Wong has been recalled from Triple-A Memphis after a brief demotion, during which he played center field to add to his versatility.

94. The Week Ahead: June 20-26 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from a new headstone for one of the Beale Street Sheiks to an event to celebrate (and buy from) Memphis' maker community. 

95. Undercurrent Hosts 29th Gathering at Loflin Yard -

Loflin Yard will be packed Monday night with creatives and young professionals who for almost three years now have been gathering monthly for meetings at different hotspots around the city that follow the same format.

96. Events -

Soulsville Record Swap will take place Saturday, June 18, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Shop rare 45s, 78s and LPs, Memphis music and more. Dealers from throughout the South are planning to attend. The Stax Museum will be selling deeply discounted CDs, books, apparel, and souvenirs. Regular admission is $5 or free with museum ticket; early bird admission (10 a.m.) is $10. Visit staxmuseum.com.

97. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

98. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

99. Events -

The Summer Spectacular Party benefiting Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis, will be held Friday, June 17, from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave. Enjoy live music, silent auction, and outdoor putting and chipping contests. Tickers are $50 per person or $75 for a pair ($25 higher at the door). Visit bgcm.org.

100. Young Brings Data Focus to City Planning -

Want to gaze into the future? Hop into Paul Young’s Infiniti and ride around Downtown for an hour. “These three blocks will be something of a spine for the neighborhood,” he says, as a light rain falls on the windshield. “We envision five- or six-story buildings with restaurants and retail at street level, commercial and residential up top.”