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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

2. Science Says: DNA Test Results May Not Change Health Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy?

You'd quit smoking, eat better, ramp up your exercise, or do whatever else it took to improve your odds of avoiding maladies like obesity, diabetes, heart disease or cancer, right?

3. On a Chaotic Day in DC, Trump Goes After Amazon, Again -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump renewed his attacks on e-commerce giant Amazon, saying Wednesday that the company is "doing great damage to tax paying retailers."

Trump, in a tweet, said that "towns, cities and states throughout the U.S. are being hurt – many jobs being lost!"

4. SBA Head Sees Businesses Held Back by Lack of Loans, Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Six months into her tenure as head of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon sees a split among small business owners – they are increasingly optimistic, she says, but many are held back by their inability to get loans or find the right workers for jobs that are staying open.

5. Tigers’ Ferguson Named To Manning Award Watch List -

University of Memphis senior quarterback Riley Ferguson was one of 30 quarterbacks named to the Manning Award watch list. Ferguson is also a candidate on the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm watch list, the Davey O’Brien watch list and the Maxwell Award watch list.

6. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

7. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

8. Several FedEx Drivers Win Big at Competition -

Nine drivers affiliated with FedEx have taken home top honors at the 2017 National Truck Driving Championships in Orlando, Florida.

Six FedEx drivers from around the United States won the national championships in their respective classes. In addition to winning in his class, FedEx Express driver Roland Buldoc of Windsor, Massachusetts, was named the Bendix National Truck Driving Championships Grand Champion, the top award.

9. Grizzlies' Schedule Offers Good Chance to See LeBron In Memphis This Season -

The Grizzlies’ 2017-2018 schedule is highlighted by the return of the MLK Game on MLK Day (imagine that) and the one and only visit from the defending NBA champion Golden State Warriors before Halloween.

10. One Decade Later: Effects of Financial Crisis Still Linger -

Ten years removed from the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, the banking industry has transformed itself and wealth managers say investors remain leery.

Among other things, First Tennessee Bank jettisoned its national mortgage operation in the wake of the crisis. It refocused its attention and efforts around being a strong regional bank, as opposed to one with aggressive national ambitions. It trimmed headcount, boosted investment in technology and began to specialize, creating new industry-specific teams in verticals like health care and music-industry banking.

11. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

12. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

13. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Aug. 16, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in NovaCopy’s conference room, 7251 Appling Farms Parkway. Representatives from the University of Tennessee Extension’s Shelby County office will present “Shelby County Extension – Focusing on Families, Fitness, Food & Finances.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

14. Shakespeare Co. Partners With Germantown Schools -

Tennessee Shakespeare Company and the Germantown Municipal School District a partnering on a multi-year education initiative that will bring an immersive Shakespeare curriculum to all fifth-, seventh- and ninth-graders.

15. Events -

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer will host its kickoff breakfast Thursday, Aug. 17, at 7:15 a.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road. Find outhow to join the walk and what impact the organization is making, and receive tips for raising funds and awareness. Learn more about the walk at makingstrideswalk.org/memphistn; RSVP for the breakfast to memphistnstrides@cancer.org or 901-278-2091 by Monday, Aug. 14.

16. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

17. Postal Service: More Red Ink, Missed Payments as Mail Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service warned Thursday that it will likely default on up to $6.9 billion in payments for future retiree health benefits for the fifth straight year, citing a coming cash crunch that could disrupt day-to-day mail delivery.

18. Separated at Birth: Defensive Backs & Wide Receivers -

The wide receiver and the defensive back are exactly the same – until that point when the ball is in the air and then they are totally different.

The wideout wants to catch passes, run free, score touchdowns, and prance and dance. The DB wants to knock down passes, intercept passes, deliver teeth-jarring hits, and posture and strut.

19. Shakespeare Co. Partners With Germantown Schools -

Tennessee Shakespeare Company and the Germantown Municipal School District a partnering on a multi-year education initiative that will bring an immersive Shakespeare curriculum to all fifth-, seventh- and ninth-graders.

20. A Million Reasons Not to Jump Into the Tennessee Governor’s Race -

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mae Beavers is banking on the idea wealthy candidates won’t be able to buy voters in 2018.

21. Opera Memphis Hires New Music Director -

No one really needed to twist Michael Sakir’s arm to sell him on the Bluff City in advance of taking the job Aug. 1 as Opera Memphis’ new music director.

For one thing, he’d already worked a little in the city as a kind of itinerant musician, helping out as guest director for Opera Memphis programs like its 30 Days of Opera series. Those visits also introduced him to what life in Memphis might be like, should he choose to live here, with Sakir building relationships and getting introduced to civic, artistic and cultural landmarks and institutions that he found himself falling in love with.

22. Memphis-MidSouth Affiliate of Susan G. Komen Foundation Expanding Reach -

In 2017, there will be an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,610 breast cancer deaths. Those sobering numbers come from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the largest nonprofit source of breast cancer research.

23. Last Word: Megasite Prospect, Crosstown Opening Plans and New Chandler Numbers -

Tennessee is pursuing the new $1.6 billion assembly plant Toyota and Mazda announced just last week to turn out 300,000 vehicles a year and there is that regional megasite in nearby Haywood County that isn’t being used. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he wants to add the joint facility to the state’s auto industry.

24. Ten AGs Threaten Trump on Immigration -

The attorneys general of 10 states, led by Texas’ Ken Paxton with strong support from Tennessee AG Herbert Slatery III, are threatening to sue the federal government.

25. Home Sales Up, Price Slips in July -

As the housing market begins to head into a slower time of year with school restarting, home sales still continue to outpace last year’s figures despite a slight dip in average sales price.

The number of units sold in Shelby County was up 14 percent in July, with 1,808 sales recorded compared with 1,584 last July, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

26. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

27. What the CFRE?! -

In the nonprofit world money is almost always an issue. Where will it come from? When will it arrive? Is it restricted or unrestricted? These questions are accompanied by others such as, “How are we implementing our fund development strategy?” and, “Will we meet our fundraising goals?”

28. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

29. The Week Ahead: August 7-13 -

Hello, Memphis! While many local kids head back to school, plenty of Elvis fans are flocking to the city to celebrate The King’s life and legacy. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

30. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

31. CFB Scheduling: Alabama’s Saban Wrong as He is Right -

Riley Ferguson stands with American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco.

“I’m all about Power 6,” the University of Memphis quarterback said. “We’re definitely the top conference other than the Power 5.”

32. 2 Quarterbacks Are Seldom Better Than 1 -

The old adage holds that if you have two quarterbacks you really have none. Are you listening, Butch Jones?

Jones continues to send signals that Tennessee may proceed with a plan to use both junior Quinten Dormady and redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano in the opener against Georgia Tech. If the two-quarterback system is successful, the Vols could continue to play both in subsequent games.

33. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

34. First Alliance Bank Inks 10-Year Lease to Move to Clark Tower -

Memphis-based First Alliance Bank has signed a 10-year lease to relocate its Poplar Avenue branch into the recently remodeled Clark Tower office building.


5100 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38137

35. New St. Jude Grad School Welcomes Inaugural Class -

Following years of planning, development of curriculum and recruitment of staff and faculty, the first class of a dozen students has begun studies at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

36. Flying Ace Sully Makes Case Against Privatization -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Who are you going to trust when it comes to what's best for the flying public? Members of Congress or the hero of the Miracle on the Hudson, retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger?

37. Rough Start at Kansas for Dedric Lawson -

Admit it: If you first saw news of a Lawson suspended at the University of Kansas, you assumed it would be K.J. It was K.J, after all, who exited the University of Memphis giving coach Tubby Smith double-bird via social media, saying inappropriate things, and let’s not forget this: playing with a selfishness on the court that could make you wince.

38. Memphis Belle Taking Shape in Restoration With Tail Gunner -

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) – The tail gun turret of a fabled World War II bomber undergoing restoration at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Ohio has been re-attached.

The Memphis Belle is being restored at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton before going on display next spring. The B-17F "Flying Fortress" was the first Army Air Force bomber to complete 25 missions over Europe. It arrived at the museum a dozen years ago in pieces.

39. Tennessee Experts Spar Over Prison Terms for Juveniles -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – There is wide disagreement in Tennessee on whether the state is violating recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions banning mandatory life-without-parole sentences for offenders under 18. That's because judges and juries have a choice in sentencing, but that choice is between life in prison or life with the possibility of parole after serving 51 years – which one leading advocate calls cruel.

40. New Tiger Guard Kareem Brewton all about Slashing and Scoring -

Growing up, guard Kareem Brewton remembers watching the University of Memphis play via a small television in his kitchen. Well, actually, he doesn’t recall much about John Calipari’s team – that those Tigers could play lockdown defense was news to him – but he remembered how dazzled he was by Derrick Rose.

41. New Tiger Guard Kareem Brewton all about Slashing and Scoring -

Growing up, guard Kareem Brewton remembers watching the University of Memphis play via a small television in his kitchen. Well, actually, he doesn’t recall much about John Calipari’s team – that those Tigers could play lockdown defense was news to him – but he remembered how dazzled he was by Derrick Rose.

42. First Horizon Pulls Permit for Ongoing HQ Renovations -

First Horizon National Corp. continues its floor-by-floor renovation of the First Tennessee Bank headquarters at 165 Madison Ave.

43. Tigers’ Men’s Tennis Earns Academic Honor -

The University of Memphis men’s tennis team has earned its 13th Intercollegiate Tennis Association All-Academic Team honor for having a team GPA of 3.2 or higher. Memphis also had four players honored as ITA Scholar-Athletes for posting a GPA of 3.5 or higher during the past academic year.

44. A ‘Life-Changing’ Trip To Vietnam for Midstate Vols -

Nashville’s Kyle Phillips never knew how good he had it as a University of Tennessee football player. Not until he went to Vietnam with The VOLeaders Academy for a 13-day study with numerous other student-athletes from UT. They left June 29 and returned two weeks later.

45. Remember Memphis? Titans Would Rather Not -

Time flies, doesn’t it? A lot can happen in 20 years. Think about it: In 1997, Bill Clinton was sworn in for his second term as president. Princess Di was killed in a car crash. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 8,000 for the first time. And the Tennessee Oilers played their home games in Memphis.

46. Tigers’ Men’s Tennis Earns Academic Honor -

The University of Memphis men’s tennis team has earned its 13th Intercollegiate Tennis Association All-Academic Team honor for having a team GPA of 3.2 or higher. Memphis also had four players honored as ITA Scholar-Athletes for posting a GPA of 3.5 or higher during the past academic year.

47. Shut Down The Rumor Mill -

My father, Joe Crowley, a very wise man, always had a response whenever anyone said they heard a rumor, and wanted to pass it on. He always stopped them short by saying, “Those who don’t know, talk. Those who know, don’t talk.”

48. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

49. Spicer Abruptly Resigns as Trump Press Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House press secretary Sean Spicer abruptly resigned his position Friday, ending a rocky six-month tenure that made his news briefings defending President Donald Trump must-see TV. He said Trump's White House "could benefit from a clean slate."

50. UAW, Nissan Pressing High-Stakes Campaign for Worker Votes -

CANTON, Miss. (AP) — The United Auto Workers faces a strong anti-union campaign from Nissan Motor Co. as it tries to gain a foothold in the union-averse South by organizing workers at the Japanese automaker's Mississippi plant.

51. FreezeFalling … Ole Miss Coach Exits in Disgrace -

A week before Hugh Freeze resigned his position, he stood at the podium at SEC Media Days, Ole Miss pin on his suit lapel, and delivered his last Sermon on the Mount.

52. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

53. Venezuela Strike Erupts Into Sporadic Violence -

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A nationwide strike against plans to rewrite the constitution shut down much of Venezuelan's capital Thursday before erupting into sporadic violence when protesters clashed with riot police and burned a post office near the headquarters of the main state-run broadcaster.

54. Vols Roster Gets Little Respect from SEC Media -

It was no surprise last week when Tennessee’s football team was picked to finish third by the media in the East Division at 2017 SEC Media Days.

Almost every national publication is picking the Vols third in the East behind Georgia and Florida, although not necessarily in that order.

55. SEC Hot Seat Index: From Saban to Sumlin -

When it comes to Southeastern Conference football coaches, there are three kinds of seats – hot, hotter and hottest.

There is, of course, one exception. You guessed it.

Nick Saban. To quote the late ESPN anchor Stuart Scott, Saban’s seat is as cool as the other side of your pillow.

56. Brain Scans May Change Care for Some People With Memory Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Does it really take an expensive brain scan to diagnose Alzheimer's? Not everybody needs one but new research suggests that for a surprising number of patients whose memory problems are hard to pin down, PET scans may lead to changes in treatment.

57. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

58. Lawsuit: New TennCare Rates Endanger Hemophilia Patients -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee lawsuit claims the state is breaking federal law and endangering people with bleeding disorders like hemophilia by reimbursing less for prescription blood-clotting drugs through its Medicaid program.

59. The Redbirds’ Dream Season is Not Being Duplicated in St. Louis -

On Monday, July 17, in Oklahoma City, the Memphis Redbirds pulled off their third win in their last at-bat as Patrick Wisdom hit a ninth-inning home run in a 5-3 victory. It was their seventh straight win and their 15th in their last 17 games.

60. Alabama is Media’s Overwhelming Pick To Win SEC Title -

Twice in the previous three years, SEC media correctly predicted the SEC champion. Both times, they did it by picking Alabama (2014, 2016). They went with Alabama again this year, predicting the Crimson Tide to defeat Georgia in the SEC title game.

61. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

62. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

63. First Horizon Sees Growth in Second Quarter -

First Tennessee Bank’s parent company saw net income climb 61 percent in the second quarter and First Tennessee itself announced the largest merger in its history, but company chairman and CEO Bryan Jordan characterized the period for analysts pretty much the way he always does during earnings presentations.

64. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

65. Saturday Night Scenes on Beale Street -

Some observations from three consecutive Saturday nights on Beale Street at and after 10 p.m.

Beale Street just before 10 p.m. is about bubbles. Street vendors selling bubble guns – toy guns that shoot bubbles – do a brisk business before 10. A girl in a stroller watches with wide eyes as her finger is locked on the trigger and bubbles spew forth. By the time she reaches the middle of the block between B.B. King Boulevard and Second Street, the stream of bubbles begins to slow.

66. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

67. NAACP Asks for Removal of Confederate Statue From Courthouse -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee chapter of the NAACP is urging officials to remove a statue of a Confederate general from in front of a county courthouse, echoing similar efforts throughout the South.

68. ‘Cheeseburger Buddies’ Make Nice for TV -

Tennessee coach Butch Jones passed his first test of the 2017 football season Monday. He made it through SEC Media Days.

There were no new catch phrases, although Jones did allude to the team’s “D.A.T.” (Details, Accountability, Toughness) motto. But nothing close to “champions of life” or “five-star hearts.”

69. Freeze Finds His Ground Game at SEC Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – Hugh Freeze reached into his playbook Thursday morning at SEC Media Days and pulled out the Football Filibuster. At the podium in a hotel ballroom filled with journalists, the Ole Miss football coach made an opening statement that went beyond 15 minutes.

70. National Title is Success for Alabama, Not Other SEC Teams -

HOOVER, Ala. – They play in the same conference, but in different worlds. Alabama defines success as winning a national championship.

The rest of the Southeastern Conference?

If they’re honest, those teams now define success as how close they can come to Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide. They define success with the knowledge that there is the preeminent program in college football – winners of four national titles since 2009 and only a play away in 2016 – and then there are the other 13 teams in the SEC.

71. Climbing Out When Stuck In Comfort Zone -

We all have them. We often go there looking for safety, acceptance, understanding or just a sense of the familiar. Our comfort zones are natural, but living there can keep you from fulfilling your purpose in life. A comfort zone, if you burrow in too deep, can become a rut you get stuck in.

72. New Memphis Plans to Expand Programming for Millennials -

Through the end of this month, the New Memphis Institute is continuing the yearly Summer Experience it hosts each year that’s comprised of free events for local and visiting college students and recent graduates, all with a view toward encouraging them to put down roots in Memphis.

73. Enough Expectations to Go Around as SEC Football Season Approaches -

HOOVER, Ala. – The countdown to the start of the next college football season is now measured in weeks, not months. But at an event such as SEC Media Days, the future is always framed by the past.

74. Takata Adds 2.7M Vehicles to Air Bag Inflator Recall -

DETROIT (AP) – Takata is adding 2.7 million vehicles from Ford, Nissan and Mazda to the long list of those being recalled to replace potentially dangerous air bag inflators.

The inflators are a new type that previously was thought to be safe. Vehicles affected are from the 2005 through 2012 model years.

75. Crust Named MSO Assistant, Youth Symphony Conductor -

Andrew Crust, who recently was named assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Memphis Youth Symphony, shares why young musicians inspire him and how orchestras can reach a younger audience in this week's Newsmakers Q&A.

76. SEC Commissioner Confident in Future of League and its Network -

HOOVER, Ala. – Before SEC commissioner Greg Sankey kicked off SEC Media Days Monday morning, a league official reminded everyone there wasn’t enough bandwidth to support live streaming.

77. Haslam Opens Alternative High School Equivalency Program -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has opened an alternative residential program operated by the Tennessee National Guard that gives some teens a chance to earn a high school equivalency diploma outside a traditional school setting.

78. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

79. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

80. UTHSC Faculty Members Win $1.9M Grant for Project -

Two University of Tennessee Health Science Center faculty members have won a grant of about $1.9 million for the funding of a database and open-source software project for web-based genetics research.

81. Memphis Nonprofits to Get $1.7M in AmeriCorps Funds -

Volunteer Tennessee, the governor-appointed commission on volunteerism and service, has been awarded more than $4 million in AmeriCorps funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service, with $1.7 million of that to go to Memphis nonprofits.

82. Memphis Researchers Planning Big Upgrades to Online Genetics Database -

A pair of scientists in Memphis is using almost $2 million in grant money to make improvements to an online database and open-source software system called GeneNetwork, used by researchers to study genetic differences and evaluate disease risk.

83. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

84. July 7-13, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1984: Armadillo Jack’s, a restaurant, opened in the Beale Street Landing building at Beale Street and Riverside Drive. The opening features armadillo races.

Meanwhile renovation and restoration work are underway at Calvary Episcopal Church, including a rebuilding of the church’s Aeolean-Skinner organ – the largest church organ in the Mid-South – and a renovation of Calvary’s Parish House to include an elevator, new library and courtyard. The church’s mural room, home to the Lenten season Waffle Shop, also doubles in size with the undertaking.

85. MATA Eyes Greener Future, Prepares For Upcoming Service Changes -

Despite being hampered by a tight budget, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is making strides to be more green and environmentally sensitive, including participating in National Dump the Pump Day in June and offering reduced fares on “Ozone Days” throughout the year, as well as recently collaborating with the EPA to install air pollution-monitoring stations.

86. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

87. Last Word: The List Lawsuit, Charlie Morris on 1939 and New Rules for Democrats -

This looks like the end of Grit ‘n’ Grind as we wait for the other shoe to drop following Zach Randolph’s exit from the Grizzlies to Sacramento. There were a lot of rumors Wednesday, the day after Randolph’s $24 million free agency deal, including some about Marc Gasol and the Celtics. And then Tony Allen dropped a Grizz reference from his Twitter account causing even more speculation.

88. UTHSC Faculty Members Win $1.9M for Database Project -

Two University of Tennessee Health Science Center faculty members have won a grant of about $1.9 million for the funding of a database and open-source software project for web-based genetics research.

89. Memphis Nonprofits to Get $1.7M in AmeriCorps Funds -

Volunteer Tennessee, the governor-appointed commission on volunteerism and service, has been awarded more than $4 million in AmeriCorps funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service, with $1.7 million of that to go to Memphis nonprofits.

90. Owners Invest $1.6 Million to Revive Memphis National Golf Club -

A golf club is not unlike a garden. It needs tending. Fairways, greens, bunkers – they all need attention. But so do the members, who have many choices throughout the Memphis area and want to feel like their presence matters no matter how low – or high – of a score they shoot.

91. The Week Ahead: July 3-July 9 -

Hello, Memphis – and happy almost-Fourth of July. Not sure where to catch the fireworks this week? We have a few suggestions, plus more local happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

92. Sports Notebook: Grizzlies Sign Selden, Set Summer League Roster -

The Memphis Grizzlies and their notable free agents – JaMychal Green, Zach Randolph, Tony Allen and Vince Carter – have been fairly quiet. That could change at any moment, of course, and Randolph in particular is the subject of speculation that the Cleveland Cavaliers are in pursuit of one of the best sixth men in the NBA last season.

93. June 30-July 6, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: On the first day of the NBA’s free agency period, the Memphis Grizzlies offer point guard Mike Conley $153 million over five years to stay with the team – an NBA record contract. The same day in a related move, the Grizzlies come to terms with power forward Chandler Parsons on a four-year $94 million contract.

94. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

95. Debt Deadline Now October, CBO Says As Deficit Spikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The drop-dead deadline for Congress to increase the government's borrowing authority and avoid a devastating economic default is early to mid-October, says a government estimate released Thursday that delivered another challenge to Republican leaders.

96. Alabama, Mississippi Drought-Free for First Time Since 2016 -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – Alabama and Mississippi are completely free from drought for the first time in more than a year.

A federal assessment released Thursday shows rains have eliminated a dry spell that began in April 2016, the last time Alabama was totally drought-free.

97. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

98. Intel Report: Kremlin Sees US Urging Regime Change in Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kremlin leaders are convinced America is intent on regime change in Russia, a fear that is feeding rising tension and military competition between the former Cold War foes, the Pentagon's intelligence arm has assessed.

99. Individual Giving Fuels Memphis, National Philanthropic Economy -

Americans give. So do Memphians. The “Giving USA 2017” report showed that in 2016 Americans gave $390.1 billion.

And while Memphis hasn’t had a separate report prepared since 2008 for 2007, it indicated that 83 percent of Memphis households gave to charities. By contrast, the 2017 Giving USA Report showed that 59 percent of the American population gave to charitable causes.

100. US to Syria: 'Heavy Price' Awaits Any Chemical Weapons Use -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration threatened Tuesday that Syria will pay "a heavy price" if it follows through on what the U.S. says are preparations for another chemical weapons attack — warning of action that could plunge America deeper into a civil war alongside the fight against Islamic State militants.