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Editorial Results (free)

1. London Cathedral Choir To Perform at Calvary -

St. Paul’s Cathedral Choristers from London will perform for free at Calvary Episcopal Church in Memphis on April 23 as part of an eight-venue tour of the U.S.

The tour is part of the Cathedral’s 60th anniversary of the American Memorial Chapel – a tribute to U.S. servicemen who gave their lives in World War II. The chapel was created by Dwight Eisenhower and Winston Churchill, and opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1958.

2. London Cathedral Choristers To Perform at Calvary Church -

St. Paul’s Cathedral Choristers from London will perform for free at Calvary Episcopal Church in Memphis on April 23 as part of an eight-venue tour of the U.S.

The tour is part of the Cathedral’s 60th anniversary of the American Memorial Chapel – a tribute to U.S. servicemen who gave their lives in World War II. The chapel was created by Dwight Eisenhower and Winston Churchill, and opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1958.

3. George W. Bush Says His Mother Didn't Fear Death -

HOUSTON (AP) — Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday that his mother, Barbara Bush, didn't fear death because she believed in an afterlife and that she would be "wonderfully received in the arms of a loving God."

4. The Week Ahead: April 16-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s time for Africa in April, which in the minds of many Memphians, is the seasonal kick-off for festivals. The annual Southern Hot Wing Festival comes this weekend on Tiger Lane, so get ready for good times to replace that winter weather. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

5. Ryan Bowing Out, Sending Ripples of Uncertainty Through GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will retire rather than seek another term in Congress as the steady if reluctant wingman for President Donald Trump, sending ripples through a Washington already on edge and spreading new uncertainty through a party bracing for a rough election year.

6. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

7. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

8. Commitment to King's Unfinished Work Remains 50 Years Later -

ATLANTA (AP) – Tyrone Brooks was 22 years old and 400 miles away, seeking clues to an unsolved lynching as old as he was, when he got the news that Martin Luther King Jr. was dead. Stunned, Brooks dropped everything and drove to Memphis, crying all the way.

9. Events -

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees holds the I AM 2018 “Mountaintop” Speech Commemoration Tuesday, April 3, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Mason Temple. The program will include Bernice King and Martin Luther King III, the children of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; ambassador Andrew Young; COGIC bishop Charles Blake; AFSCME president Lee Saunders; and other dignitaries. Seating at Mason Temple is by invitation only; overflow seating at Temple of Deliverance, 369 G.E. Patterson Ave., is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Visit iam2018.org.

10. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

11. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

12. Editorial: 50 Years After King's Death, What Have We Learned? -

When sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker were crushed by a garbage truck compactor on Feb. 1, 1968, it sparked a 64-day strike that reverberated throughout Memphis and beyond.

13. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

14. Gun Violence March About More Than School Safety -

The Memphis “March For Our Lives” that drew several thousand people Downtown Saturday, March 24, focused on gun violence beyond the Parkland, Florida, school massacre that prompted the national movement about a month ago.

15. Dems Need Viable Candidates to Catch Blue Wave -

Republicans called it the “kickoff” to what they hope will be a great election season.

Democrats are downplaying a lopsided loss in the 14th Senate District special election, saying it won’t represent results later this year in President Donald Trump’s midterm.

16. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input on several topics as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

17. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present “James and the Giant Peach” Friday, March 16, through April 8 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

18. Florida’s Epiphany On Guns Means Little in Tennessee -

Memphis resident Stevie Moore has been waging a war to take illegal guns off the streets since someone shot his son in the head with an AK-47 15 years ago.

“It’s my mission to fight these guns whatever way I can,” says Moore, who founded the organization Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives in an effort to steer youth away from violence.

19. AP: Pentagon Often Fails Young Sex Assault Victims on Bases -

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) – A decade after the Pentagon began confronting rape in the ranks, the U.S. military frequently fails to protect or provide justice to the children of service members when they are sexually assaulted by other children on base, an Associated Press investigation has found.

20. US Sets New Record for Censoring, Withholding Gov't Files -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government censored, withheld or said it couldn't find records sought by citizens, journalists and others more often last year than at any point in the past decade, according to an Associated Press analysis of new data.

21. Third School’s the Charm -

When Nick King signed with the University of Memphis, he had dreams of being the player he was at East High School: an impossible mismatch all over the floor. Problem was, coach Josh Pastner saw the 6-foot-7 King as a traditional power forward. The conflicting visions never meshed and after two seasons King transferred to the University of Alabama.

22. Payday Lenders, Watchdog Agency Exhibit Cozier Relationship -

NEW YORK (AP) – The former CEO of a payday lending company that had been under investigation by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has asked to be considered for the top job at the watchdog agency, The Associated Press has learned.

23. Grizzlies’ Rookies Ivan Rabb, Kobi Simmons Getting On-The-Job Training -

Back in late January, the San Antonio Spurs dropped by FedExForum to give the Grizzlies a 108-85 butt-kicking. But for one young Grizzlies rookie, there was associated value. Because if you’re paying attention, a loss like that is less a trip to the woodshed and more real-time tutoring with a little embarrassment added in so you don’t forget.

24. Early Lessons For Aspiring Entrepreneurs -

The entrepreneurial dream was to have my own business. I always had jobs, but I wanted the freedom to do them in a different way. I wanted to exercise the creativity to do them my own way.

It didn’t matter what the job was, I liked mentally dissecting the way it was being done and putting it back together in a way that would make it seem more doable, more efficient, more logical and more enjoyable.

25. Martin Meets Latest Challenge With ‘Umph’ -

It has been said that the difference between try and triumph is that little “umph.” If there was ever anyone that shows just what a difference that makes, it is Jay Martin, president of Juice Plus. He puts that “umph” in everything he does.

26. Here are Seven Memphis Charter Schools in Danger of Closing -

Seven Memphis charter schools could close in 2020 if they don’t improve, based on Shelby County Schools’ first report card comparing its schools.

The district’s newly released school performance scorecard rated seven of its 51 charters below 2 on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the top score. Under a new accountability system for charter schools, those that fall below 2 automatically begin a review process and must improve within two years or face revocation of their charters by the school board.

27. Tigers’ Parks and Brewton Works in Progress -

At Eastern Florida State, guard Kareem Brewton Jr. had a lot of freedom last season. He used it to average 19.9 points per game and hand out 159 assists on his way to being named a First-Team All-American by the National Junior College Athletic Association.

28. Tigers’ Parks and Brewton Works in Progress -

At Eastern Florida State, guard Kareem Brewton Jr. had a lot of freedom last season. He used it to average 19.9 points per game and hand out 159 assists on his way to being named a First-Team All-American by the National Junior College Athletic Association.

29. Tigers’ Parks and Brewton Works in Progress -

At Eastern Florida State, guard Kareem Brewton Jr. had a lot of freedom last season. He used it to average 19.9 points per game and hand out 159 assists on his way to being named a First-Team All-American by the National Junior College Athletic Association.

30. 'Mississippi Burning' KKK Leader Killen Dies in Prison at 92 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Edgar Ray Killen, a 1960s Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted decades later in the "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday.

31. Trump Suggests 2-Phase Immigration Deal for 'Dreamers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking a bipartisan compromise to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that an immigration deal could be reached in two phases – first by addressing young immigrants and border security with what he called a "bill of love," then by making comprehensive changes that have long eluded Congress.

32. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

33. Seeking Independence -

Former U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp of Chattanooga came to Memphis this week for the first time in seven years to call for a new generation of independent candidates for office he says can stop 20 years of elected leaders in Washington putting “party before country.”

34. John Lewis to Skip Civil Rights Museum Opening Due to Trump -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – U.S. Rep John Lewis announced Thursday that won't speak at the opening of Mississippi civil rights and history museums, saying it's an "insult" that President Donald Trump will attend.

35. Kennedy Wrestles With Wedding Cake Case at Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) – His vote likely to decide the outcome, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy voiced competing concerns Tuesday about respecting the religious beliefs of a Colorado baker who wouldn't make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, and the gay couple's dignity.

36. Postal Regulators Move to Let Stamp Prices Jump Higher -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking to bolster the ailing U.S. Postal Service, federal regulators moved on Friday to allow bigger jumps to stamp prices beyond the rate of inflation, a move that could eventually add millions more dollars to companies' shipping rates from prescription drugs to magazine subscriptions.

37. Postal Service: Red Ink for 11th Year in Row as Mail Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The beleaguered U.S. Postal Service reported a financial loss Tuesday for the 11th straight year, citing declining mail volume and costs of its pension and health care obligations even as it predicted another strong holiday season of package deliveries.

38. Bench Power -

Through games of Nov. 7, the Memphis Grizzlies were 7-4. You probably knew that. You recall the thrill of taking down the reigning NBA champion Golden State Warriors at FedExForum and beating the much-hyped Houston Rockets twice – on the road and at home.

39. After Hot Start, Grizzlies Show Cracks In Foundation -

As calculated decisions go, it seemed like a good one. Probably, it was a smart decision despite the unhappy result.

With the Grizzlies wrapping up a homestand, coach David Fizdale determined the last game against the Orlando Magic was an opportune time to get point guard Mike Conley and his sore Achilles a little extra rest before starting a five-game road trip.

40. The Week Ahead: Oct. 16-22 -

Hey, Memphis! Fall is definitely in the air now, as the slate of festivals and fun outdoor activities continue to roll on in the Bluff City. The Memphis Grizzlies open their 2017-2018 season at FedExForum against Tony Allen’s new team and don’t be surprised if you start seeing some ghosts and goblins by this weekend.

41. Events -

The National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award ceremony will be held Thursday, Oct. 19, starting with a 5 p.m. red carpet event and 5:30 p.m. pre-show gala at the Halloran Centre, 225 S. Main St., followed by the 7:30 p.m. award ceremony at the Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org for tickets and info on this year’s honorees.

42. US, Israel to Exit UN Agency Over Alleged Anti-Israel Bias -

PARIS (AP) – The United States announced Thursday it is pulling out of the U.N.'s educational, scientific and cultural agency because of what Washington sees as its anti-Israel bias and a need for "fundamental reform" in the agency.

43. Freedom At Work -

One of the worst feelings you can feel at work is trapped with no way out. I meet professionals every day who feel chained to their job. They are very often in unhealthy situations that make them miserable each and every day. Some have an abusive boss. Others work for a company they no longer believe in. But because they rely on the income, they’re stuck. It feels like a dead-end road with no way out. It can be stressful and emotional.

44. Bandele Crafts Cultural Hub for Black Artists -

Early one clear September morning, Overton Square is still half-asleep, the parking lot next to Hattiloo Theatre empty save a few cars. In 12 hours, Hattiloo’s lobby will pulse with a throng of guests at the opening night of “Fetch Clay, Make Man,” the theater’s current production. But for now, Ekundayo Bandele, Hattiloo’s founder and CEO, is leaning back in a desk chair, dreaming aloud about the year 2022.

45. House Overwhelmingly Passes $7.9 Billion Harvey Aid Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly passed $7.9 billion in Hurricane Harvey disaster relief as warring Republicans and Democrats united behind help for victims of that storm as an ever more powerful new hurricane bore down on Florida.

46. Comedian, Civil Rights Activist Dick Gregory Dies at 84 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Dick Gregory, the comedian and activist and who broke racial barriers in the 1960s and used his humor to spread messages of social justice and nutritional health, has died. He was 84.

47. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

48. Tech Companies Banishing Extremists After Charlottesville -

NEW YORK (AP) – It took bloodshed in Charlottesville to get tech companies to do what civil rights groups have been calling for for years: take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence.

49. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

50. Postal Service: More Red Ink, Missed Payments as Mail Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service warned Thursday that it will likely default on up to $6.9 billion in payments for future retiree health benefits for the fifth straight year, citing a coming cash crunch that could disrupt day-to-day mail delivery.

51. Postal Service May Get More Freedom To Raise Stamp Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may be time to stock up on Forever stamps.

Regulators appear likely to accept the financially beleaguered Postal Service's request for more freedom to raise the price of mailing letters. It would be the biggest change in the Postal Service's pricing system in nearly a half-century, allowing stamp prices to rise beyond the rate of inflation.

52. Editorial: The Ultimate Sustainability At the Corrections Center -

A life is a natural resource, more valuable than the resources being conserved at the Shelby County Corrections Center to great effect. So, with inmate levels at the corrections center currently at a relatively low level, we think there is another kind of opportunity for the aging prison.

53. New Academic Year Brings Changes, Familiar Issues -

The school year for most students in Shelby County begins Monday, Aug. 7. But teachers and school administrators mentally remain at least a few weeks ahead, if not more – a permanent condition for educators.

54. U of M Grads Say Bye to Student Loan Debt -

Student loan debt looms large for most college graduates, but one local professional has created a system to knock out $150,000 in student loans in five years, and he wants to put those tools in the hands of a generation that is struggling toward financial freedom.

55. Civil Rights Marker Rededicated on Birthdate of Lynch Victim -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Mississippi historical marker about a notorious lynching that galvanized the civil rights movement was rededicated Tuesday, weeks after it was vandalized and repaired.

56. Jeremiah Martin: No Rest for The Memphis Tigers’ Weary Point Guard -

Forget the ugly recent past. Forget the final 19-13 record and surely forget those last two games of the season – the 103-62 humiliation at SMU and the 84-54 beat down from UCF at the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

57. Crust Named MSO Assistant, Youth Symphony Conductor -

Andrew Crust, who recently was named assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Memphis Youth Symphony, shares why young musicians inspire him and how orchestras can reach a younger audience in this week's Newsmakers Q&A.

58. Hobby Lobby Fined $3M for Smuggling Iraq Religious Artifacts -

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Hobby Lobby Stores has agreed to pay a $3 million federal fine and forfeit thousands of ancient Iraqi religious artifacts smuggled from the Middle East that the government alleges were intentionally mislabeled for import, federal prosecutors said.

59. Mississippi Demands $6.4M Back From Electric Car Maker, CEO -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's state auditor on Wednesday demanded that a troubled electric car maker or its leader repay $4.9 million in state and local aid the company received, plus $1.5 million of interest.

60. Celebrating Our Independence -

As we celebrate the declaration of our independence from the British Empire, it is important to remember the history behind the holiday. While much of the focus is on BBQ, ball games and fireworks, it is important to reflect on the real meaning of the day.

61. The Week Ahead: July 3-July 9 -

Hello, Memphis – and happy almost-Fourth of July. Not sure where to catch the fireworks this week? We have a few suggestions, plus more local happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

62. Man Destroys New Ten Commandments Statue at Arkansas Capitol -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A man yelled "Freedom!" as he crashed his vehicle into Arkansas' new Ten Commandments monument early Wednesday, nearly three years after he was arrested in the destruction of Oklahoma's monument at its state Capitol, authorities said.

63. Qatar Weighs Demands to End Crisis Amid Threat of Long Siege -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — With just days to decide, Qatar on Friday weighed an onerous list of demands by its neighbors as a way out of a regional crisis, and a top Emirati official warned the tiny country to brace for a long-term economic squeeze unless it is willing to acquiesce.

64. Memphis NAACP Marks Centennial With Challenge -

When the Memphis Branch NAACP holds its annual Freedom Fund Luncheon Saturday, June 24, there will be a lot of memories and a lot of history.

The Memphis Branch’s largest annual event this year marks the centennial of an organization founded in the wake of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons. James Weldon Johnson, the NAACP national office’s investigator who came to the city to gather facts on the incident, encouraged Robert Church Jr. to start a local chapter.

65. UK Moves to Ease Tensions After Van Attack on London Muslims -

LONDON (AP) — British authorities and Islamic leaders moved swiftly to ease concerns in the Muslim community after a man plowed a large van into a crowd of worshippers outside a north London mosque early Monday, injuring at least nine people.

66. The Week Ahead: June 19-25 -

Hello, Memphis! Summer officially arrives in our Central time zone at 11:24 p.m. on Tuesday, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac. Well, we know what summer in Memphis means – a heapin’ helpin’ of humidity. Stay cool with all these hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

67. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

68. Freedom Fund Luncheon Features Critic of NAACP's Relevance -

Melissa Harris-Perry, the former MSNBC host who last month penned a New York Times op-ed challenging the relevance of the NAACP, will be one of the keynote speakers at the Memphis Branch NAACP’s June 24 Freedom Fund Luncheon.

69. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

70. The Week Ahead: May 29-June 4 -

Hello, Memphis! Memorial Day is the unofficial start of summer, and there’s no shortage of activities to get you outside to celebrate. Whether you’re looking for something to do with the kids or already need a break to chill with other adults, we’ve got you covered in The Week Ahead…

71. Not Just 'Sgt. Pepper': Many 1967 Musical Firsts Echo Today -

NEW YORK (AP) – "Sgt. Pepper" was only the beginning. Half a century after the Beatles' psychedelic landmark, it stands as just one of many musical astonishments of 1967 that shaped what we listen to now.

72. AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans Feel Fine About School Choice -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even as fierce political battles rage in Washington over school choice, most Americans know little about charter schools or private school voucher programs. Still, more Americans feel positively than negatively about expanding those programs, according to a new poll released Friday.

73. Skydivers Plan ‘Boogie’ to Benefit Cancer Foundation -

She’s a third-grade teacher by day, but on weekends you can find her hurtling at more than 100 mph from 14,000 feet up in the sky.

Cancer survivor Elizabeth Young will host the second annual West Tennessee Sisters in Skydiving Boogie on May 12-14, and all proceeds will benefit the Foundation for Women’s Cancer.

74. Legend Johnny Mathis Still Going Strong, Coming to Memphis -

As the story goes, Johnny Mathis was 8 years old and living on Post Street in San Francisco when his father purchased a piano for $25 and brought it home. But there was a problem: Clem Mathis couldn’t fit the piano through the front door of their small flat.

75. House Takes First Step on ‘Almighty God’ Amendment -

The House of Representatives took the first legislative step Monday toward rewriting the state Constitution with a measure recognizing liberties come from Almighty God rather than governments.

In a 69-17 vote, the House passed the resolution by Rep. Micah Van Huss, an East Tennessee Republican, to amend the Constitution, a move requiring votes by consecutive General Assemblies and passage by the state’s voters.

76. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

77. Trump Limits IRS Action Over Church Political Activity -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is seeking to further weaken enforcement of an IRS rule barring churches and tax-exempt groups from endorsing political candidates, though his executive order on religious freedom is disappointing some of his supporters.

78. Financial Freedom -

Ray’s Take We have been trying to move away from using the word “retirement” and instead focus on achieving “financial freedom.” But have you ever asked yourself what financial freedom is? 

79. House Leader Casada Backs Towns’ Slavery Amendment to State Constitution -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to remove slavery from the state Constitution is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

80. Towns’ Slavery Amendment Gets Backing From House Leader -

Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to remove slavery from the state Constitution is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

81. If It’s the NBA Playoffs, It Must Be Grizzlies vs. Spurs -

For the fifth time in the 10 playoff seasons in franchise history, the Memphis Grizzlies will play the San Antonio Spurs. They have been swept them by them in the first round twice (2004 and 2016), swept in the Western Conference Finals (2013) and shocked the NBA by upsetting the Spurs as the No. 8 seed in the first round (2011).

82. GOP Happy to ‘Wait and See’ on Medicaid -

Republicans say ho, Democrats say go. In the wake of Trumpcare’s congressional crash, states such as Kansas and North Carolina are joining the majority of the nation in expanding Medicaid rolls.

83. Claiming Our Responsibility -

4,000, 801, 70, 24 AND COUNTING. It’s well past time to be honest about our numbers and their toll. About 4,000 people were lynched in the South between the Civil War and the civil rights movement, about 800 more than previously thought due to the research of the Equal Justice Initiative. The “about” part is significant since those kinds of statistics are more carefully hidden than proudly claimed. 

84. Memphis Police Surveillance Suits Remain Separate -

Two Memphis federal court lawsuits accusing the Memphis Police Department of conducting illegal surveillance of protesters will remain separate.

On Monday, March 27, U.S. District Judge Sheryl H. Lipman denied a motion by attorneys for the city to transfer the case of Antonio Cathey and the Mid-South Organizing Committee to federal judge Jon P. McCalla.

85. Police Surveillance Lawsuits to Remain Separate -

Two Memphis federal court lawsuits accusing the Memphis Police Department of conducting illegal surveillance of protesters will remain separate.

U.S. District Judge Sheryl H. Lipman ruled Monday, March 27, denying a motion by attorneys for the city to transfer the case of Antonio Cathey and the Mid-South Organizing Committee to federal judge Jon P. McCalla.

86. Health Bill Vote Delayed in House in Setback to Trump, Ryan -

WASHINGTON (AP) – GOP House leaders delayed their planned vote Thursday on a long-promised bill to repeal and replace "Obamacare," in a stinging setback for House Speaker Paul Ryan and President Donald Trump in their first major legislative test.

87. Grizzlies Can Never Have Too Much Forceful Big Spain -

The Grizzlies left behind a five-game losing streak by beating Milwaukee at home and then Chicago and Atlanta on the road in back-to-back nights. San Antonio was to play the Grizzlies at FedExForum on Saturday, March 18.

88. Obama's Final Year: US Spent $36 Million in Records Lawsuits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration in its final year in office spent a record $36.2 million on legal costs defending its refusal to turn over federal records under the Freedom of Information Act, according to an Associated Press analysis of new U.S. data that also showed poor performance in other categories measuring transparency in government.

89. Last Word: Binghampton Gateway, Beale's Baggage and SoundStage Memphis -

You’ve seen stories here about how difficult it can be to assemble land and financing for a hotel project. Supermarkets have proven much more difficult to pull off at least in Memphis where food deserts are a problem in several parts of town.

90. Daniel’s ‘Milo Bill’ Evolves In Freedom of Speech Debate -

NASHVILLE – A Knoxville lawmaker pushing free speech on college campuses stopped calling his legislation the “Milo bill” after a video resurfaced of now-former Breitbart News columnist Milo Yiannopoulos approving of pedophilia.

91. Beavers Shuts Down Office As Protesters Gather Outside -

NASHVILLE – The sponsor of two bills aimed at the LGBT community left the Legislative Plaza in a huff Tuesday, Feb. 21, as protesters gathered around her office to object to her “retaliation” in the wake of a short-circuited press conference.

92. County Commission Backs Medical Marijuana, Opposes School Vouchers -

Shelby County Commissioners endorsed state legislation Monday, Feb. 20, that would legalize marijuana for medical purposes, came out against a school voucher bill by state Senator Brian Kelsey of Germantown and turned away a social media use policy for county employees.

93. New Tri-State Defender Has Credibility, Influence in the Community -

When president and publisher Bernal E. Smith II speaks about his newspaper, The New Tri-State Defender, and how business is conducted today and what’s necessary for success going forward, he sounds like just about any other newspaper executive trying to navigate today’s quick-change media world.

94. Pence Breaks Tie as Senate Confirms DeVos for Education Post -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate on Tuesday confirmed school choice advocate Betsy DeVos as Education secretary by the narrowest of margins, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking a 50-50 tie in a historic vote.

95. Trump: Allow Those Into US Who 'Want to Love Our Country' -

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday vowed to allow into the United States people who "want to love our country," defending his immigration and refugee restrictions as he made his first visit to the headquarters Monday for U.S. Central Command.

96. Finances Can Impact Your Career Path -

As you grow in your career, finding a new job can become harder and harder. One of the big reasons for this has to do with salary. If you think about it, when you first started working, you were open to just about any job and would happily take a tiny paycheck. But as you’ve progressed in your career, your requirements have evolved.

97. Malone Takes Reins, Plans Changes At Memphis Branch NAACP -

The Memphis branch of the NAACP has one full-time employee and is looking for a new executive director in what amounts to a major overhaul of the chapter as it marks its centennial year.

The new president of the Memphis branch of the nation’s oldest civil rights organization told a group of 50 members Sunday, Jan. 22, that she is moving to rebuild and rebrand the chapter.

98. GOP Governors Who Turned Down Medicaid Money Have Hands Out -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – Republican governors who turned down billions in federal dollars from an expansion of Medicaid under President Barack Obama's health care law now have their hands out in hopes the GOP-controlled Congress comes up with a new formula to provide insurance for low-income Americans.

99. Pro Athletes Have Platform to Discuss Race -

After touring the National Civil Rights Museum Saturday, Jan. 14, before a forum on race and sports, journalist and commentator Marc Spears had an immediate thought as the panel discussed whether racism is becoming institutionalized in America.

100. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.