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Editorial Results (free)

1. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

2. Growing Pains -

First came the ho-hum start that left open the possibility the Grizzlies’ harshest critics might be right: This season could be the fast-forwarded beginning of an end, a sad narrative that could leave the Grizzlies on the outside of the postseason after a thrilling six-year run.

3. Elvis Presley Among 5 Chosen for Mississippi Hall Of Fame -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The King of Rock 'n' Roll and four others are being named to the Mississippi Hall of Fame.

The board of the state Department of Archives and History met this month and selected the inductees: Evelyn Gandy, the first woman elected lieutenant governor of the state; Dr. James Hardy, who was a transplant surgeon; former state Rep. Aaron Henry, who was a civil-rights activist; rocker Elvis Presley; and Ida B. Wells, a journalist and women's rights advocate.

4. How a Trump Administration Could Shape the Internet -

Under a President Donald Trump, cable and phone companies could gain new power to influence what you do and what you watch online – not to mention how much privacy you have while you're at it.

5. Harwell Learning How to Dodge Challengers -

Beth Harwell has been called a lot of things over the last few years, “trailblazer” chief among them as Tennessee’s first female House speaker. 

Now she’s a “survivor” after eking out a Republican Caucus victory as speaker nominee to continue leading the lower chamber in the 110th General Assembly.

6. Arkansas Lawmakers Weigh Launch Delay, Taxes for Medical Pot -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas lawmakers are considering delaying the launch of the first medical marijuana program in the Bible Belt as well as an effort to impose taxes on the drug, as they work on legislation for next year's session spelling out how pot would be made available to patients.

7. The Week Ahead: November 21-27 -

Good morning, Memphis! As you put the finishing touches on your Thanksgiving plans, take a moment to check out what’s happening in The Week Ahead. From honoring Memphians who have fought injustice to supporting local small businesses, there are plenty of ways to celebrate what you’re thankful for in the Bluff City.

8. Early Sign-Ups for Health Care Law are Steady, But No Surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A little more than 1 million people renewed health coverage or signed up for the first time through HealthCare.gov around the start of open enrollment, which coincided with a GOP election sweep likely to scramble President Barack Obama's signature law.

9. Fred’s Offering Military Discount on Veterans Day -

Fred’s Pharmacy will honor the more than 1 million people serving in the U.S. armed forces and more than 20 million veterans by offering a 15 percent discount on purchases on Veterans Day Friday, Nov. 11.

10. At Least 7 Lawmakers Had Financial Ties to GOP Donor Miller -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – At least seven current and former Republican lawmakers in Tennessee had financial ties to a prominent GOP donor who recently settled a federal fraud case involving the military health care program.

11. Last Word: The Day After Big River, Freedom Awards Shift and Tubby & Fiz -

Once the ribbons were cut, the speeches made and all of the players on both sides of the river were thanked, Sunday was the day those who put the Big River Crossing project in motion waited for to see what the public’s verdict would be on the boardwalk crossing the Mississippi River.

12. Freedom Awards Explore New History -

In the sanctuary of Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church last week, with former Mississippi Gov. William Winter and some students who racially integrated Memphis public schools in 1961, Swin Cash talked about memories of her last season as a professional athlete.

13. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Oct. 19, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the University of Phoenix’s Memphis campus, 65 Germantown Court, first floor. Glen Fenter of the Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce will present “Our Newest Workforce Development Tool – Memphis Works.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz or call Jo Garner at 901-482-0354.

14. US Removes Limits on Bringing in Cuban Rum, Cigars -

The Obama administration announced Friday that it is eliminating a $100 limit on the value of Cuban rum and cigars that American travelers can bring back from the island.

The administration is also lifting limits on cargo ship travel between the U.S. and Cuba and eas-ing U.S. and Cuban researchers' ability to conduct joint medical research. The measures are con-tained in a new round of regulatory changes meant to ease U.S. trade with Cuba.

15. The Week Ahead: October 17-23 -

This will be a historic week for Memphis, so mark your calendar for Saturday, Oct. 22, when a boardwalk across the Harahan Bridge opens to the public that will give Memphians and visitors alike an intimate experience with the Mighty Mississippi. The Big River Crossing also will link Memphis to West Memphis, Arkansas, and provide bicycle enthusiasts miles of trails along the river levee that will be unique in the world. There’s only one Mississippi River, the world’s second-largest inland waterway, and there’s only one Memphis! This crossing will be an unmatched amenity for the city for years to come.   

16. Events -

Southwest Tennessee Community College and Operation Hope will host a “Take Your Life Back” credit and money-management workshop Tuesday, Oct. 18, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Whitehaven Center, 1234 Finley Road. Topics include saving money, understanding your credit score, settling accounts, consumer rights and disputing inaccurate information. Free and open to the public. RSVP to nlashford@southwest.tn.edu or 901-333-4287.

17. Last Word: Memphis-Temple, Southwest's Remake and Death Penalty Arguments -

Memphis 34 –Temple 27 Thursday evening at the Liberty Bowl and on ESPN. Whatever happened during halftime, the Tigers were a very different team from the first half when they emerged.

18. Could Fizdale Be the Wind Beneath Grizzlies’ Wings? -

Preseasons are based on optimism, on fresh starts, on positive change and on the belief that anything is possible. So, yes, it was all ice cream and sunshine at Grizzlies Media Day; actually, a slimmer Zach Randolph was seen helping himself to a slice of the media’s pizza, but the point is unbridled hope is the oxygen that sustains teams – and fans – before the games start for real.

19. Ellis Haguewood Enjoying His Final Year as MUS Headmaster -

For Ellis Haguewood, headmaster at Memphis University School (MUS) for the past 22 years, the relationships he has forged with students and colleagues during his 48 years at the school are the things he holds most dear. Haguewood will retire at the end of the school year, marking the end of an era in which MUS has prospered both inside and out of the classroom.

20. Basketball Aside, Fizdale Belongs in Memphis -

When he was growing up in South Central Los Angeles, a young David Fizdale couldn’t imagine that he would one day be in Memphis or an NBA head coach.

Sure, he played basketball. He had his dreams. But the real challenge was day-to-day survival. He saw friends shot and killed in the street. He once dove under a car to avoid stray gunfire.

21. Webb: ‘The Most Important Thing is Talent’ -

When Roblin Webb graduated from Rhodes College with an urban studies major, she knew she wanted to make a difference, and working as a civil rights lawyer seemed like the right way to do it. So she headed to law school and grad school at Rutgers, in New Jersey, then came back to Memphis and got a job at a law firm. 

22. Hooks Institute Selects National Book Winner -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis has selected “Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press” by James McGrath Morris as the winner of its National Book Award for 2015. The award recognizes publications that best advance an understanding of the American civil rights movement and its legacy.

23. Hooks Institute Selects National Book Award Winner -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis has selected “Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press” by James McGrath Morris as the winner of its National Book Award for 2015. The award recognizes publications that best advance an understanding of the American civil rights movement and its legacy.

24. Carter Says Disparities Keeping Underprivileged From Better Lives -

Last week, former President Jimmy Carter and nearly 1,500 volunteers flocked to Uptown to build 19 homes that will help improve the lives of underprivileged Memphians. In between swinging hammers, Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter took time to visit the blues bars of Beale Street. Carter said Beale Street bears commonalities with the National Civil Rights Museum in that both cultural touchstones have reclaimed the city’s history and bring local heritage into a greater context.

25. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

26. Tipper Teaches Parents to Raise Healthy Babies -

Smoking is bad for everybody – but it’s especially bad for babies. That’s the message Courtney Tipper has to convey when she speaks with expectant mothers.

“We’ve got to lead by example,” Tipper says. “Persuading parents to stop using tobacco reduces the risk that their child will ever try it in the first place.”

27. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

28. EU Says China Needs to Give EU Companies Fair Market Access -

BEIJING (AP) — The EU trade commissioner said Monday that China has to give European companies the same kind of market access that Chinese companies enjoy in Europe before discussions can start on a bilateral free trade agreement.

29. US Gives Tentative OK to Flights to Cuba From 10 US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government on Thursday tentatively approved scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities, further bridging the gulf between countries as close as 90 miles and an hour flight but long kept at a greater distance by the Cold War.

30. Pat Summitt, Winningest Coach in D1 History, Has Died at 64 -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who lifted the women's game to national prominence during her 38-year career at Tennessee, died Tuesday. She was 64.

31. Career Independence Day -

The Fourth of July is just around the corner. It’s so close that you can almost smell the fireworks and taste the barbecue. But, before Independence Day was a family holiday, it was a commemoration of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It’s a celebration of the independence of the United States from Britain.

32. ServiceMaster Disrupting Its Culture With Move Downtown -

ServiceMaster is converting Peabody Place into a corporate headquarters that would rival a Silicon Valley tech outfit.

On Friday, June 3, ServiceMaster laid to rest months of speculation about whether the company would relocate to a larger city like Atlanta or Dallas. Memphis’ available Class A office space can’t currently accommodate ServiceMaster’s needs, so it looked to the retail sector for its new home.

33. New $60M Project to Fight for 1st Amendment in Digital Age -

NEW YORK (AP) – The First Amendment is getting a new champion, with some deep pockets.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Columbia University on Tuesday announced the launch of a $60 million project, the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, which would use litigation as well as research and education to fight for freedom of expression in an ever-evolving digital era.

34. Corker: No 2nd Thoughts Over Sitting Out Presidential Race -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he doesn't have any regrets about sitting out this year's presidential campaign.

The Tennessee Republican in 2014 floated his name as a potential candidate, but announced by early the next year that he decided against a bid.

35. ‘Underground’ Stars Surface in Memphis -

The last time fans of the television show “Underground” saw actor Alano Miller, his character, Cato, was believed to be dead. The unexpected twist for a complex and central character in the WGN America drama based on the Underground Railroad in pre-Civil War America was still generating plenty of social media disbelief nearly a week later.

36. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

37. Planning Your Second Act -

Ray’s Take When surveyed, many baby boomers say they plan to do some kind of work in retirement. The reality is that we are living longer, healthier lives than our parents and grandparents. When we reach the traditional retirement age, we probably have a lot of years of living (and spending) left. What to do with those years is changing with the retirement of the boomer generation.

38. Gasol on the Mend, Stephenson Looking For Home -

Struggling to get over the way the Grizzlies’ season ended – in a wave of injuries and 10-day contracts before the San Antonio Spurs hit them with that first-round broom?

Worried Mike Conley might leave as a free agent?

39. Kyles Played Big Role in Civil Rights Movement -

The world knows him through his story of standing near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in 1968 just seconds before King was assassinated.

40. Daughter of Duality, Gibbs is Building a Better Justice System -

Say you stole a television worth $300. How long should you be punished? A year? Five years? Whatever you answered, it probably wasn’t “for the rest of your life.” But that’s how the U.S. legal system currently treats many people who have been convicted of felonies.

41. The Evolving Role of Design, Part One -

Editor’s note: Part one in a two-part series. The role of design evolves at the speed of innovation, the dizzying, dynamic speed of the market. Design now has a seat at executive and board tables across the globe. More than ever, a holistic sense of design is valued as a legal means of significant competitive advantage.

42. US Government Sets Record for Failures to Find Files When Asked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration set a record for the number of times its federal employees told disappointed citizens, journalists and others that despite searching they couldn't find a single page requested under the Freedom of Information Act, according to a new Associated Press analysis of government data.

43. Clark Butcher is Pedaling to Glory -

It’s 6 a.m. on a rainy Wednesday morning. Outside, the sun has not yet risen. But inside Victory Bicycle Studio, they’re already playing Rihanna. “We’re gonna start with some two-minute openers,” shouts Clark Butcher, over the thump of the music. “I want you at 70 percent of your max. Let’s go!”

44. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

45. Anne Dixon Joins BRIDGES as CFO -

Anne Dixon has joined BRIDGES as vice president of finance and chief financial officer. Dixon, who is a Bridge Builders alumna, is responsible in her new role for financial reporting and analysis to help BRIDGES leadership in performing their responsibilities. 

46. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

47. Tennessee Lawmakers Return With Eye Toward Campaign Season -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for the second session of the 109th General Assembly with an eye toward quickly disposing of their business and heading home for election season.

48. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

49. Knee-Jerk Outbreak -

A SAD STATE OF AFFAIRS. WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States government has mobilized against a clear threat to the country.

Troops have been sent to identify and capture members of an ersatz government openly operating here in defiance of federal law. This group claims theirs as the only true religion, and that laws be based on it as prescribed in the tome of that religion. They believe no other laws to be valid in the eyes of God, and no rights assigned or any authority recognized if any are based on such godless laws. They seek to prohibit the teaching, or even mention, of any other religion in schools.

50. Pound of Poetry, Part 3 -

In 1967, Ezra Pound told Allen Ginsberg, “The worst mistake I made was that stupid suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism.” Some say it was an apology. Pound died in Venice in 1972, shortly after his 87th birthday. In one of his final cantos, he wrote, “I have tried to write Paradise. … Let the Gods [and] those I love try to forgive what I have made.” The above was well after the treason case.

51. If Fear Is Goal, Terrorists Have Won in Tennessee -

The terrorists who struck Paris three weeks ago succeeded in more than killing and wounding hundreds of people. Their attack is pitting Americans against each other in how to respond, and Tennessee politicians are no exception.

52. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

53. Posturing Against Supreme Court Is a Waste of Money -

Legislation rejecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling faces major constitutional questions and, if passed, could put a financial burden on Tennessee taxpayers.

When the high court declared gay and lesbian couples have the right to be married across the United States, overturning state laws to the contrary, Tennessee’s Republican legislators started brainstorming for methods to work around the decision or to defy it. The Republican Caucus still hasn’t announced the outcome.

54. Hattiloo Forum Explores Black Generation Gap -

Always looking for a good topic of conversation, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele decided to put a group of millennials and active senior citizens together.

The Tuesday, Oct. 13, event was prompted by a dinner conversation Bandele had with his 21-year-old daughter.

55. Just City Taps Spickler as Executive Director -

Josh Spickler is the first executive director of the nonprofit criminal justice reform group Just City, which was formed earlier this year.

Spickler most recently served as director of the Defender Resource Network at the Shelby County Public Defender’s office, where he worked on community engagement initiatives and with the special litigation team.

56. This Week in Memphis History: October 9-15 -

2014: Stevie Wonder receives the first Epitome of Soul Award from the Consortium Memphis Music Town. The show, held at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, also featured performances by Chaka Khan, BeBe Winans, Jordan Sparks and Eddie Levert. It’s not the first award Wonder has received in Memphis; he was a recipient of the National Civil Rights Museum’s Freedom Award in 2006.

57. Just City Taps Spickler As Executive Director -

Josh Spickler is the first executive director of the nonprofit criminal justice reform group Just City, which was formed earlier this year.

Spickler most recently served as director of the Defender Resource Network at the Shelby County Public Defender’s office, where he worked on community engagement initiatives and with the special litigation team.

58. Spickler Tapped As Just City Executive Director -

Josh Spickler is the first executive director of the nonprofit criminal justice reform group Just City, which was formed earlier this year.

Spickler most recently served as director of the Defender Resource Network at the Shelby County Public Defender’s office, where he worked on community engagement initiatives as well as with the special litigation team. He also worked on the Jericho Project, a diversion program for special-needs inmates and prisoners.

59. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

60. Today’s Schools Need to Operate Like Independent Businesses -

“If you always do what you always did, then you always get what you always got.”

It is one of those truisms that seems to fit perfectly into the ongoing debate on the effectiveness of education in the United States. There is a multitude of critics who want schools to do what they did 50 years ago and get better results. The problem with that is that everything has changed.

61. Civil Rights Museum Names Freedom Awards Recipients -

Ava DuVernay, the director of the movie “Selma,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Ruby Bridges-Hall, who as a 6-year-old integrated schools in New Orleans, are the recipients of the 2015 National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Awards.

62. Fast Lane Flavor -

From a distance, Memphis' food truck operators like Terry and Allison LaRue might seem like the ultimate entrepreneurial renegades.

63. Civil Rights Museum Names 2015 Freedom Awards Recipients -

Ava DuVernay, the director of the movie “Selma,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Ruby Bridges-Hall, who as a 6-year-old integrated schools in New Orleans, are the recipients of the 2015 National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Awards.

64. Lawyer: Tennessee Shooter's Uncle Detained in Jordan -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — An uncle of the man who killed four Marines and a sailor in attacks on Tennessee military sites has been in custody in Jordan since a day after the attack, a lawyer said Tuesday.

65. Disruptive Innovation Helps Fill in the Gaps -

Being out of work in today’s economy can be daunting. Even as things continue to improve, finding a job can be tough. In addition to the small number of new positions created each day, the entire hiring process takes longer – despite when you find the perfect job.

66. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

67. Developer Arranging Financing for 100 North Main -

The owner of the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. is closing in on a financing package to redevelop the building and will pay his utility bill as soon as the deal is complete, according to a review of public records.

68. School’s End -

When Catholic Bishop Terry Steib put on a hardhat a week ago to break ground on the Immaculate Conception Cathedral School’s new $4.2 million Cathedral Center, he had the attention of the school’s youngest students.

69. 'King of the Blues' B.B. King Dead at 89 at Home in Vegas -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – B.B. King, whose scorching guitar licks and heartfelt vocals made him the idol of generations of musicians and fans while earning him the nickname King of the Blues, died late Thursday at home in Las Vegas. He was 89.

70. What to Do After a Big Raise -

As today’s professionals are learning, the fastest way to get a big raise is to switch jobs. Often, staying at the same job will put an additional 2 to 3 percent in your pocket each year. That’s not enough to keep up with the rising costs of rent, food or much of anything.

71. On Second Thought -

“When is the law that is the law not the law? And vice versa.”

Yeah, I know, that was last week’s column. But it’s apropos of the rash of laws that have been bandied about, and passed in some states, recently. They’re called Religious Freedom Restoration Acts.

72. Memphis & The Law -

Over the long life of the city’s legal community, Court Square has been a place where attorneys and judges come together outside the courtroom and their law practices.

In many cases, it’s a chance encounter since no court has ever met in Court Square – despite its name and the intent of those who drew up the plan for Memphis nearly 200 years ago.

73. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

74. Lessons Learned from $800 Million Cookie Franchise -

I knew from the age of 7 that marketing was my destiny as I embarked on my first moneymaking venture, but I hadn’t really reflected, until recently, on the combination of forces that in all likelihood nudged me down that path.

75. On Saban, Calipari and NCAA grandstanding -

Hold up your hand if you’re an Alabama football player and you have not been arrested in the last week. Three Crimson Tide players were arrested, one on suspicion of domestic violence, another for driving under the influence and another on a marijuana charge.

76. Eastman Brings Military Experience to YWCA -

Any nonprofit’s operations can benefit from some military precision, and that’s what the YWCA of Nashville & Middle Tennessee is hoping for with the hiring of Marjorie Eastman as its first president and chief operating officer.

77. Finding the Right Work-From-Home Job -

Finding a work-from-home job (or WFH job as they’re sometimes called) can seem to be an impossible proposition. It’s like finding a unicorn. You’ve heard they exist, but you’ve never actually seen one.

78. Self-Employment and Retirement Planning Responsibility -

Ray's Take: Being self-employed has some great perks, such as the financial freedom to expand your business on your own terms. You decide about days off and holidays. You make all the executive decisions. But with those freedoms, comes responsibility.

79. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

80. The Ransom Note on Tennessee Public Records -

The fastest way to shut down access to government records is to charge fees people can’t afford to pay.

Another way is to simply ignore or delay responding to citizens or media who make requests under the Tennessee Public Records Act.

81. Roy’s Events Take Wine, Travel, Even Chocolate to New Audience -

Entrepreneur Maja Djorcev Roy knows the value of connecting people, sharing stories and developing an appreciation for artisan quality goods

Roy, a native of Slovenia, follows her passion and shares her knowledge of wine and the stories of the vineyards through her business, Wine Forté.

82. Desperate Families Plead for Cannabis Oil -

Josie Mae Mathes had her first birthday recently, but because she suffers from childhood epilepsy and infantile spasms, she’s so medicated she can barely move.

83. One Team, Two Coaches: Grizzlies A Product of Hollins-Joerger -

Lionel Hollins’ departure from the Grizzlies was awkward, messy, ill-timed and could have been the start of a very disheartening chapter in franchise history.

“It could have been a train wreck, honestly,” point guard Mike Conley said.

84. Long Live the Pasquins -

Charlie Hebdo promotes itself as having a viewpoint that reflects “all components of left wing pluralism.” Its business is satire. It skewers Jews, Catholics, Protestants and Muslims. It has twice been attacked by terrorists. The attack in 2011 didn’t kill anyone.

85. Net Neutrality and What It Could Mean to You -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A top U.S. regulator just announced he wants more power to oversee Internet service, much in the same way that the government already regulates phone service and other public utilities. The goal is to prevent Internet service providers like AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Sprint and T-Mobile from blocking or slowing down Web traffic, or striking deals with companies that provide content like Amazon, Google or Netflix to move their data faster than others.

86. Panel Hears Testimony on EPA Regulations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee Republican senator has joined lawmakers in other states who have filed legislation that seeks to curtail federal regulation.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville discussed the resolution on Tuesday during a special joint committee meeting on the effect of Environmental Protection Agency regulations in Tennessee.

87. Ferguson and Freedom -

The two journalists honored in the annual Freedom Awards given by the National Civil Rights Museum had the most to say Tuesday, Dec. 2, about the broader impact of events in Ferguson, Mo.

The police shooting, grand jury decision and rioting that followed were an undercurrent at the annual awards public forum Tuesday at the Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ.

88. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

89. Patients Before Profit -

When Hillary Clinton visited St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 20 years ago to dedicate the then new patient care center, she was the first lady.

Clinton – the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state – was back at St. Jude on Thursday, Nov. 20, to attend the dedication of the hospital’s Marlo Thomas Center for Global Education and Collaboration.

90. Marlo Thomas Getting Medal of Freedom -

Marlo Thomas, who serves as national outreach director for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is getting a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The White House on Monday announced the names of 19 recipients getting the award, which is the nation’s highest civilian honor presented to “individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

91. Events -

Memphis Grizzlies and BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee will host a family-friendly event Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. near the giant Grizzlies jersey in Tom Lee Park Downtown. Attendees can register for a Fitness Trail Passport, and those who complete all six stations will be in the running for prizes, including tickets to Grizzlies opening night and autographed items. Visit getriverfit.com.

92. Marlo Thomas Getting Medal of Freedom -

Marlo Thomas, who serves as national outreach director for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is getting a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The White House on Monday announced the names of 19 recipients getting the award, which is the nation’s highest civilian honor presented to “individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

93. Marlo Thomas Getting Presidential Medal of Freedom -

Marlo Thomas, who serves as national outreach director for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is getting a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The White House on Monday announced the names of 19 recipients getting the award, which is the nation’s highest civilian honor presented to “individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

94. Entrepreneur Spirit Drives Owners of The Attic -

She was young and had a nice corporate career going straight out of school. So a lot of people would have traded places with Alexandra Nicole, who spent six years as a sales rep at International Paper.

95. Charter School Resistance Flares -

When leaders of the Yes Prep charter group walked into a hostile meeting at American Way Middle School Monday, Oct. 27, set up by the Achievement School District, they also walked into a “Save Our School” rally organized by opponents of the school’s takeover by the state-run district.

96. ASD Considers 12 Additional Memphis Schools -

The Achievement School District is considering adding up to 12 Memphis schools to the state-run school district that is now in its third school year.

Leaders of the school district released Wednesday, Oct. 15, the list of schools being considered for the 2015-2016 school year. The schools are taken from the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement test results.

97. I Choose Memphis: Lori Spicer Robertson -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Lori Spicer Robertson

98. African-American Icons Highlight Freedom Awards -

The National Civil Rights Museum will honor journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Freedom Summer icon Bob Moses and baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson at the 2014 Freedom Awards.

99. Government for the Prosperity of the People -

The reporting out of the US on China is uniformly downbeat. By applying our western perspectives, China appears inhumane, politically oppressive, over-indebted and fragile.

From the American perspective, functional nations should look more ... well ... like us. They should have democracy, inalienable property rights, free and open markets, freedom of expression, apple pie, etc. Our national belief in the ideology of American exceptionalism defines our worldview.

100. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.