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Editorial Results (free)

1. County Budget Vote Delayed But Government Continues To Operate -

Shelby County government’s fiscal year begins Saturday, July 1, but the county won’t have a new operating budget at least until July 10.

That’s when the Shelby County Commission meets in special session to take up an estimated $13 million in amendments various commissioners are proposing to the budget proposal of county mayor Mark Luttrell.

2. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

3. County Commission Opposes End To Juvenile Court Oversight, Delays Budget Vote -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, June 26, opposing an end to the Justice Department memorandum governing conditions at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court. And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said he will veto it.

4. Last Word: Cooper-Young Complications, The Mackin Investigation and Tuition Hike -

Landmarks status for Cooper-Young is on hold because part of the process for the status isn’t an official part of the application process. That would be the part that requires a certain number of signatures to get the status. And it has put on hold a similar process in Vollintine-Evergreen.

5. Memphis Getting Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

6. Arkansas Panel Approves Temporary Ban on Herbicide -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas took the first steps Friday toward temporarily banning the sale and use of an herbicide that has prompted hundreds of complaints and a federal lawsuit from farmers who say it has caused widespread damage to crops.

7. Budget Amendments, Tax Rate and Juvenile Court Top County Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners will have lots of amendments to the county’s proposed operating budget Monday, June 26, and at least one bid to change the proposed county property tax rate of $4.10 approved on first reading earlier this month.

8. County Commission Reviews Juvenile Court Moves as Monitors Say Issues Remain -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

9. June 23-29, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2014: Formal opening of the $301 million expansion of the Frayser Nike plant. As he tours the plant expansion, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam learns the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of same-sex marriage in an appeal of Tennessee’s constitutional amendment that specifically banned gay marriages.

10. Community Rx -

As one of the city’s premier medical institutions, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital stays as busy as you might expect for an organization that tries to operate on the leading edge of pediatric care.

11. Shelby County Commissioners Question Ending DOJ Agreement -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, June 21, commissioners complained of not being consulted before county Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

12. Juvenile Court Settlement Meets Resistance on County Commission -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, commissioners complained of not being consulted before County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

13. Juvenile Court Settlement Meets Resistance on County Commission -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, commissioners complained of not being consulted before County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

14. Groups File Lawsuits Over New Arkansas Abortion Restrictions -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Abortion-rights groups asked a federal court Tuesday to block Arkansas from enforcing new restrictions lawmakers approved this year, including a ban on a commonly used second-trimester procedure that the groups say would make it nearly impossible for many women in the state to have an abortion.

15. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

16. Last Word: Cooper-Young's Controversy, Harris and Norris and Fulmer Returns -

Shelby County Commissioners have at least two hot topics to talk about Wednesday at committee sessions that could take up most if not all of the work day. By the agenda, these sessions go from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. But they have been known to stretch into the afternoon quite a bit.

17. Memphis Gets Federal Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

18. Harris: Norris Law On Immigration Status Sends Negative Signal -

NASHVILLE – State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing a new law sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris enabling state judges to consider a convict’s immigration status during sentencing.

19. Shelby County Commission to Probe Juvenile Court Moves -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

20. Supreme Court Pushes Redskins' Name Fight Back to Society -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Washington Redskins aren't in the clear with their team name just yet, even after the Supreme Court ruled Monday that the government can't block trademarks on the basis that they're offensive.

21. Justices Say Law on Offensive Trademarks is Unconstitutional -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday struck down part of a law that bans offensive trademarks in a ruling that is expected to help the Washington Redskins in their legal fight over the team name.

22. Boyd Talks Gaps In Higher Ed During Whitehaven Stop -

Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd says there is a gap in the state’s Tennessee Promise plan and its reality.

23. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

24. County Seeks End to DOJ Memorandum -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the move by him and Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael to end a 5-year-old memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Justice Department over conditions at Juvenile Court indicated “significant progress,” but not that all of the problems at Juvenile Court are resolved.

25. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

26. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

27. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

28. Gov. Haslam Vows to Stay on Sidelines of Race to Succeed Him -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam won't endorse any of the Republicans seeking the nomination to succeed him, but said he has spoken to several potential candidates about the emotionally taxing nature of a running a statewide campaign in Tennessee.

29. Whitehaven Unveils New Development Direction -

It’s been 10 months since Rev. Earle Fisher was among the individuals turned away from Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil by Memphis police in a reaction to possible protests at the event.

30. Last Word: Disaster Paperwork, The Whitehaven Plan and Juvenile Justice -

On its way to Washington is the paperwork for a federal disaster declaration sent Wednesday by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam. It includes Shelby County and 11 other Tennessee counties. This is essentially federal funding that will reimburse local government for money they spend up front for these kinds of disasters. The state’s request also includes a call for individual assistance to Shelby County homeowners and business owners whose property was damaged in the Memorial Day weekend storms.

31. Whitehaven Leaders Unveil New Economic Development Group -

It’s been 10 months since Rev. Earle Fisher was among those turned away from Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil by Memphis Police in a reaction to possible protests at the vigil commemorating the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death.

32. Feds Point Fingers as 'Debt Relief' Cos. Prey on Students -

Fraudulent "debt relief" companies are preying on the most vulnerable of the 44 million people with student loans, as federal officials dispute who's to blame and what to do, a NerdWallet investigation has found.

33. Fed Raises Key Rate and Unveils Plan to Reduce Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve has raised its key interest rate for the third time in six months, providing its latest vote of confidence in a slow-growing but durable economy. The Fed also announced plans to start gradually paring its bond holdings later this year, which could cause long-term rates to rise.

34. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

35. Gag Clauses Outlawed -

BrightLocal, a search engine optimization consulting company, found that 91 percent of consumers regularly or occasionally read consumer reviews in making a buying decision. Its survey also revealed that 84 percent of people trust online reviews as much as a personal recommendation and that 74 percent say positive reviews make them trust a local business more.

36. Prosecutors' Lawsuit Says Opioid Drug Makers Deceived Public -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A new lawsuit invokes the plight of a baby born dependent on opioid drugs, as three Tennessee prosecutors and the baby's guardian accuse several drug manufacturers of unleashing an epidemic through deceptive marketing that downplayed the risks of addiction to painkillers.

37. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

38. County Commission Continues Tax Cut Calculations -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a three-cent reduction in the county property tax rate Monday, June 12, on the first of three readings but delayed a vote on the operating budget resolution for more discussion about how to account for a cut in the tax rate.

39. Fed is Set to Raise Rates This Week Despite Political Tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Washington political world is in disarray. Britain's election tumult has scrambled the outlook for Europe. And economies in the United States and abroad are plodding along at a pace that hardly suggests robust health.

40. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

41. 3-Attorney Panel to Review Mackin's Allegations Against Shelby County Schools -

A panel of three attorneys, including former U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton are investigating allegations of a cover-up, sexual harassment, theft and widespread grade tampering made last week by former Trezevant High School principal Ronnie Mackin.

42. Last Word: Easy Fishing on Big River, Competing City Priorities and Durham's Fine -

The Arkansas side of the Big River Crossing opened Wednesday for the first time since May 2 when a rising Mississippi River prompted its closing while the crossing proper on the north side of the Harahan Bridge remained open. There is still some of the muddy river left on the Arkansas flood plain and several dozen cranes stopping in Wednesday afternoon for some easy fishing in the shallow waters.

43. Justice Dept. Ending Settlement Payouts to Outside Groups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Justice Department will no longer allow big companies and banks to settle cases by donating to outside organizations, ending a little-known practice that had become a rallying cry for some conservatives.

44. Fred’s Reports Q1 Loss, Says Changes are Working -

During many of its recent quarterly earnings presentations, Memphis-based discount retailer and drugstore company Fred’s Inc. essentially had to ask analysts and investors to be patient – to stick with the company through a turnaround in which the only good news to report seemed to be the kind that was coming but not here yet.

45. Survey: Top CEOs Still Back Some of Trump Policy Priorities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Leading U.S. CEOs remain supportive of some of President Donald Trump's policy initiatives despite his still-hazy plan for cutting taxes and recent actions by Trump that have intensified attention on federal investigations of his campaign.

46. Justices Side With Religious Hospitals in Pension Dispute -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Religious hospitals don't have to comply with federal laws protecting pension plans, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Monday in a case that affects retirement benefits for roughly a million workers nationwide.

47. Trump to Push for $1 Trillion for Roads, Bridges -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is launching a major push for a $1 trillion overhaul of the nation's roads and bridges, a key item on his domestic agenda that's gained little traction amid a slew of controversies that have engulfed the White House.

48. US Employers Add Modest 138K Jobs; Rate Dips to 4.3 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers pulled back on hiring in May by adding only 138,000 jobs, though the gains were enough to help nudge the unemployment rate down to a 16 year-low.

The Labor Department said Friday that the jobless rate fell to 4.3 percent the lowest level since 2001, from 4.4 percent. Still, the rate declined mainly for a less-than-encouraging reason: People stopped looking for work in May and so were no longer counted as unemployed.

49. Fred’s Reports May Sales Slipped By 3.1 Percent -

Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. reported lower monthly sales for May compared to a year ago, citing the closing of 39 underperforming stores in the first quarter for the results.

50. Amid Trump Orders, Nashville Mulls Sanctuary City-Like Rules -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville officials are pushing to adopt sanctuary city-like standards in response to President Donald Trump's policies on immigration.

Metro Councilmen Bob Mendes and Colby Sledge were surrounded by immigrants, some of whom are in the country illegally, as they made a case for their legislation Wednesday during a news conference in the liberal-leaning capital of Tennessee, a red Southern state.

51. Fred’s Reports May Sales Slipped By 3.1 Percent -

Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. reported lower monthly sales for May compared to a year ago, citing the closing of 39 underperforming stores in the first quarter for the results.

52. Fed Survey Finds Tight Labor Markets, Rising Wages -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy kept growing in April through late May, with more regions citing worker shortages across a widening range of occupations, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday.

53. View From the Hill: GOP Points True North on State’s Moral Compass -

It was billed as the start of the 2018 governor’s race, but the GOP’s Reagan Day Dinner in Murfreesboro last week often sounded more like a tent revival.

Vote for one of these candidates and you’re guaranteed a place in heaven, ran the subtext of the evening, because, after all, everyone knows only Republicans know the road to salvation.

54. Long-Awaited Demolition at Foote Homes Begins -

Foote Homes, the last large public housing project in Memphis, began coming down Tuesday, May 30, with a formal ceremony marking the start of demolition toward the broader South City redevelopment.

55. Crews Move To Smaller Areas, Storm Damage Estimates Grow -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division’s response to the Saturday storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses will cost the utility at least $7 million.

“We will spend in excess of $7 million and it could be well in excess of $7 million,” said MLGW president Jerry Collins.

56. Last Word: Your Neighbor Has Power, City Budget Wrap Take One and BBQ -

We are at the point in our storm recovery where the novelty and sense of adventure have reached the end of their very short lives in areas where the power is still out. And the restoration of that service is at a point where you now have people on one side of a street with power and those on the other side may still be in the dark and the heat.

57. Strickland Taps City Reserves For $6 Million In Storm Debris Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking the Memphis City Council for up to $6 million from the city’s reserve fund for cleanup from the May 27 storm.

58. Strickland Taps City Reserves For $6 Million In Storm Debris Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking the Memphis City Council for up to $6 million from the city’s reserve fund for cleanup from the May 27 storm.

59. New 'Blue Lives Matter' Laws Raise Concerns Among Activists -

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – Following a spike in deadly attacks on police, more than a dozen states have responded this year with "Blue Lives Matter" laws that come down even harder on crimes against law enforcement officers, raising concern among some civil rights activists of a potential setback in police-community relations.

60. US Durable Goods Orders Fell for First Time in 5 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. orders for long-lasting manufactured goods dropped in April for the first time in five months, and a key category that tracks business investment went nowhere for the second straight month.

61. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

62. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

63. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

64. Appeals Court Deals Blow to Trump Administration Travel Ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's revised travel ban "speaks with vague words of national security, but in context drips with religious intolerance, animus and discrimination," a federal appeals court said Thursday in ruling against the ban that targets six Muslim-majority countries.

65. As FESJC Turns 60, There's No Taking PGA Tour Event for Granted -

This year marks the FedEx St. Jude Classic’s 60th year in Memphis. For decades the annual PGA Tour stop has signaled the start of summer and the arrival of stars ranging from Lee Trevino and Jack Nicklaus to Greg Norman and Phil Mickelson.

66. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

67. Fed Minutes: Officials Back Reducing Bond Holdings This Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials signaled in discussions early this month that they would likely start reducing the Fed's huge portfolio of bond holdings later this year, a step that could cause borrowing rates to rise.

68. Beale Street Cover Charge Cut, Larger Debate Remains -

The Saturday night summer cover charge on Beale Street is going from $10 to $5 next month. But the discussion about the Beale Street Bucks program is hardly over. And the crowd control measure is certain to raise longer-term questions about who controls the city-owned district.

69. Medical District Apartments Sell for $5.2 Million -

A medical district apartment switches hands in a multimillion-dollar deal, a Downtown developer plans an apartment complex near FedExForum, and a California investor buys a local industrial portfolio. Details in this week’s Real Estate Recap...

70. Council Sets Stage for Raise, Keeps Railgarten and Cuts Beale Cover -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 23, a 1 percent across the board pay raise for all city employees setting the stage for a final vote on budget matters at the June 6 council session.

71. Advocates Slam Trump Plan to Reduce Aid for College Students -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Education advocates say President Donald Trump's budget contradicts his campaign pledge to make college more affordable with its proposed elimination of subsidized student loans and cuts in other programs that help students pay tuition.

72. Mississippi Accused of Unequal Schooling for Black Students -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi is denying good schools to African American students in violation of the federal law that enabled the state to rejoin the union after the Civil War, a legal group alleged Tuesday.

73. Huge Cuts to Food Stamps Part of Trump's Budget Proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's budget would drive millions of people off of food stamps, part of a new wave of spending cut proposals that already are getting panned by lawmakers in both parties on Capitol Hill.

74. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

75. Prospect of NAFTA Rewrite Gives US Farmers a Case of Jitters -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sizable majority of rural Americans backed Donald Trump's presidential bid, drawn to his calls to slash environmental rules, strengthen law enforcement and replace the federal health care law.

76. FCC Vote Kicks Off a Battle Over Regulation of the Internet -

NEW YORK (AP) – A federal agency voted to kick off the repeal of "net neutrality" rules designed to keep broadband providers like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast from interfering with the internet.

77. US Households Owe Record Amount, Topping Pre-Recession Peak -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. household debt reached a record high in the first three months of this year, topping the previous peak reached in 2008, when the financial crisis plunged the economy into a deep recession.

78. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

79. Progress Reducing US Uninsured Rate Comes to a Halt -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Five years of progress reducing the number of Americans without health insurance has come to a halt, according to a government report out Tuesday. More than a factoid, it shows the stakes in the Republican drive to roll back the Affordable Care Act.

80. Winning and Losing Legislation in Tennessee in 2017 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Here is a look and some of the winning and losing bills of the 2017 session of the Tennessee General Assembly:

WINNERS

ABORTION BAN-20 WEEKS: Enforces a 20-week abortion ban if the fetus is deemed viable. HB1189

81. Local Democratic Party Organizers Grapple With Activism -

Once the new bylaws and a new executive committee is in place for the reconstituted Shelby County Democratic Party this summer, there will still be a fundamental question about the political strength of the new organization.

82. Cai to Lead Memphis Chamber’s International Business Efforts -

Jinliang (Jin) Cai has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as vice president of international business development. In that role, Cai will be directing efforts both to grow foreign direct investment in Memphis and Shelby County and to increase the volume of local exports to foreign markets. 

83. Who are the Lawyers and Judges Debating Trump Travel Ban? -

SEATTLE (AP) – Two lawyers with broad experience before the U.S. Supreme Court argued for and against President Donald Trump's travel ban Monday before a panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Three judges appointed by President Bill Clinton heard the case over the executive order that targets six predominantly Muslim countries.

84. Haslam: Achievement School District Still Needed, But Changes Near -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says there is a continuing need for the state-run Achievement School District. But the school district for the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state, in terms of academic achievement, is being “streamlined,” Haslam said last week during a visit to the Aspire Coleman Elementary School in Raleigh.

85. Patton & Taylor to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award -

In 1967, the Vietnam War was in full effect, the Green Bay Packers won the first ever Super Bowl and two employees of Joyner, Heard & Jones Realtors in Memphis had the idea to start their own company.

86. Lawyers: Wells Fargo Created About 3.5 Million Fake Accounts -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Lawyers representing aggrieved customers suing Wells Fargo have said the bank may have opened about 3.5 million unauthorized accounts, far more than bank and regulators disclosed last year.

87. Unfair Labor Practices Charged at Volkswagen's US Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The National Labor Relations Board has filed another unfair labor practices complaint against Volkswagen for hiking health insurance premiums and changing working hours of employees who voted for union representation at the German automaker's only U.S. plant.

88. CLERB Prepares Response to Rallings’ Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’ dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. Even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

89. Memphis Retail Market ‘Cautiously Optimistic’ Through First Quarter -

Despite some notable big-box bankruptcies, positive growth is still in the forecast for the rest of 2017, according to Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors’ first quarter Retail Marketbeat Report.

90. Haslam Credits Republican Leadership for Budget, Economic Accomplishments -

With the legislative session finished, Gov. Bill Haslam is touting budget accomplishments and a strong economy as the result of Republican leadership.

In a Capitol Hill press conference shortly after the General Assembly adjourned for the year, the governor called passage of a $37 billion budget, the second consecutive one with no new debt, as the Legislature’s most important act.

91. Postal Service Seeking Higher Stamp Prices -

The U.S. Postal Service is hoping it can soon raise stamp prices by a penny or more. The postal service on Wednesday, May 10, reported a quarterly loss of $562 million, despite growth in package delivery, due to continued erosion in the use of first-class mail as well as expensive mandates for its retiree health care obligations. It also attributed losses to a forced reduction in stamp prices last year.

92. CLERB Prepares Response To Rallings Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’s dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. That’s even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

93. CLERB Prepares Response To Rallings Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’s dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. That’s even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

94. May 12-18, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: On the front page of The Daily News, a receiver is appointed by U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla for the Tulane and Warren apartments. The two apartment complexes owned by Global Ministries Foundation of Memphis are to be sold by the receiver, with proceeds going to bond holders represented by the Bank of New York, which has filed suit against GMF.
The bank’s lawsuit follows federal officials’ decision to cut off rent subsidies to the two complexes after they fail a second inspection of conditions ranging from bed bug infestations to broken plumbing

95. Last Word: Deeper on Beale, End of Session and Johnny Mathis -

Beale Street keeps its cover charge on Saturday nights during its Memphis In May peak. But the district has some complex questions to resolve about its future and who controls that future. If that wasn’t evident before, it became apparent at City Hall Tuesday. It wasn’t the council action on the Beale Street Bucks program that was significant as much as it was the council’s discussion.

96. Federal Government Records $182.4 Billion Budget Surplus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government ran the second highest monthly surplus on record this April as tax revenues were pushed higher by a change in the deadline for corporate tax payments.

97. Postal Service, Citing Losses, Seeks Higher Stamp Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service is hoping it can soon raise stamp prices by a penny or more.

The postal service on Wednesday reported a quarterly loss of $562 million, despite growth in package delivery, due to continued erosion in the use of first-class mail as well as expensive mandates for its retiree health care obligations. It also attributed losses to a forced reduction in stamp prices last year.

98. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

99. Council Hears Railgarten Dispute in 2 Weeks, Appoints Impasse Panels -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of the approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

100. Bates Gold-and-Silver Fraud Case Includes Big Numbers -

At the end of a five-week trial in Memphis federal court this month, a jury convicted a former Tennessee state representative turned religious prophet and gold-and-silver broker on 46 counts of fraud.