» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'First Federal' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:338
Shelby Public Records:133
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:301
Middle Tennessee:29609
East Tennessee:264
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Crosstown Concourse Debuts: Aug. 19 Opening Day Begins Test of Larger Goals -

A relatively recent urban legend, as urban legends go, is that the large elevated tract of land along Bellevue Boulevard by the interstate wall is some kind of Indian mound.

It’s not. It is an area elevated in anticipation of the route federal officials in the 1960s had planned for Interstate 40 to take through Crosstown and then through Midtown. Those plans were stopped in a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case.

2. SBA Head Sees Businesses Held Back by Lack of Loans, Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Six months into her tenure as head of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon sees a split among small business owners – they are increasingly optimistic, she says, but many are held back by their inability to get loans or find the right workers for jobs that are staying open.

3. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

4. Pressured by Government, Uber Agrees to Protect Rider Data -

DETROIT (AP) – Ride-hailing service Uber has agreed to protect data and audit use of rider information to settle a complaint from the federal government that it deceived customers.

The Federal Trade Commission, in a complaint settled on Tuesday, alleged that Uber failed to secure data about rider trips and neglected to monitor employee access to the information. It's another in a long string of missteps for the San Francisco-based company, which faces a separate federal investigation for allegedly using a phony app to block city inspectors from monitoring its service.

5. Biz Leaders Quit Trump Panel After Charlottesville Comments -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A fourth business leader resigned Tuesday from President Donald Trump's White House jobs panel – the latest sign that corporate America's romance with Trump is faltering after his initial half-hearted response to violence by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia.

6. Shelby County Schools, Charters Clash Over Student Data -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A new Tennessee law requiring public school districts to provide student data to charter schools faces its first tests with pushback from districts.

The Tennessean reports Shelby County Schools said in a letter Thursday that the district has denied charter operator Green Dot Public Schools' request for contact information, citing federal student privacy laws. The letter says board policy limits the release of information for the purpose of marketing under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

7. Events -

The annual Elvis Presley candlelight vigil starts Tuesday, Aug. 15, at 8:30 p.m. at the gates of Graceland. After an opening ceremony, fans may walk up the driveway to Elvis’ gravesite and back down, carrying a candle in quiet remembrance. Gates remain open until all who wish to participate in the procession have done so, which usually stretches into the early hours of the next morning. Cost is free. Visit graceland.com/elvisweek/schedule for details and other Elvis Week events.

8. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Aug. 16, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in NovaCopy’s conference room, 7251 Appling Farms Parkway. Representatives from the University of Tennessee Extension’s Shelby County office will present “Shelby County Extension – Focusing on Families, Fitness, Food & Finances.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

9. Postal Service: More Red Ink, Missed Payments as Mail Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service warned Thursday that it will likely default on up to $6.9 billion in payments for future retiree health benefits for the fifth straight year, citing a coming cash crunch that could disrupt day-to-day mail delivery.

10. Last Word: Megasite Prospect, Crosstown Opening Plans and New Chandler Numbers -

Tennessee is pursuing the new $1.6 billion assembly plant Toyota and Mazda announced just last week to turn out 300,000 vehicles a year and there is that regional megasite in nearby Haywood County that isn’t being used. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he wants to add the joint facility to the state’s auto industry.

11. Ten AGs Threaten Trump on Immigration -

The attorneys general of 10 states, led by Texas’ Ken Paxton with strong support from Tennessee AG Herbert Slatery III, are threatening to sue the federal government.

12. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

13. Federal Lawsuit Seeks to Overturn Arkansas Panhandling Law -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – The American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal judge Monday to halt a new Arkansas anti-loitering law that it says unconstitutionally targets panhandlers and that the restrictions pose the same problems as a ban on begging that was struck down last year.

14. First Day of School Begins With Greetings, Hopes -

The school year began Monday, Aug. 7, with some parents registering children on the first day, other children finding their way back into academic routines on their own and Shelby County Schools leaders awaiting the release of achievement test scores from the state that will set a new baseline for where students are academically.

15. Hacker Who Helped Stop Global Cyberattack Arrested in US -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Marcus Hutchins, a young British researcher credited with derailing a global cyberattack in May, was arrested for allegedly creating and distributing malicious software designed to collect bank-account passwords, U.S. authorities said Thursday.

16. Jobless Rate Raises Question: How Much Better Can It Get? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A drop in the unemployment rate to a 16-year low raises a tantalizing question about the job market: How much better can it get?

Earlier this year, economists worried that the low unemployment rate meant businesses would struggle to find workers and that would drag down the pace of hiring. Those fears were heightened by a tiny job gain in March and modest hiring in May.

17. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

18. GOP Plan to Slash Legal Immigration Wins Trump's Support -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has embraced legislation that would dramatically reduce legal immigration and shift the nation toward a system that prioritizes merit and skills over family ties.

19. With 401(k) Accounts Booming, What Should Investors Do? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Did you notice that your toe doesn't hurt because you didn't stub it today?

We tend to pay the closest attention to things when they're going badly, and the same is true of the stock market. When stocks crashed during the financial crisis in 2008, phone lines for financial advisers and 401(k) providers were jammed with panicky investors. Now stocks are at record highs, and the market is tranquil. It's easy to feel comfortable leaving your account on autopilot.

20. Fannie Mae Posts $3.2B Profit in Q2; To Pay $3.1B Dividend -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fannie Mae reported net income of $3.2 billion from April through June, up from a year earlier as the mortgage giant marked gains on its investments.

The government-controlled company released its second-quarter results Thursday. Washington-based Fannie Mae will pay a dividend of $3.1 billion to the U.S. Treasury next month if the company's federal regulator agrees. That payment would bring the total dividends paid by Fannie to $165.8 billion.

21. Cordova Apartment Community Sells for $27.9M -

The Charleston, a 284-unit apartment community on the east side of Houston Levee Road just south of U.S. 64, has sold for $27.9 million, marking a new chapter for a property that was built just last year.

22. New Academic Year Brings Changes, Familiar Issues -

The school year for most students in Shelby County begins Monday, Aug. 7. But teachers and school administrators mentally remain at least a few weeks ahead, if not more – a permanent condition for educators.

23. Last Word: Kustoff at Rotary, Royal's Vibe and The Terms of MEMPOWER -

The investment group that renovated the Chisca resurfaced Tuesday evening with a plan for the Wonder Bread factory, vacant for the last four years. But don’t look for a return of the bread smell to the Edge area. And if you look at what has started to happen in that particular corridor since Wonder Bread shut down, the mixed-use plan has some precedent. Throw in the move to sell The Commercial Appeal property just a few blocks away and if the economy remains this good, the transformation in this area could be radical in another four years.

24. Flying Ace Sully Makes Case Against Privatization -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Who are you going to trust when it comes to what's best for the flying public? Members of Congress or the hero of the Miracle on the Hudson, retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger?

25. Last Word: 'Secular Stagnationists', CRE's Big Year in Memphis and Lakeland Prep -

Protests over the weekend in Martyr’s Park and at the federal prison facility in Mason, Tennessee for those rounded up in the ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement -- raids here in Memphis that began a week ago. Latino Memphis is also offering legal advice to those who believe they may be caught up in the new push. There are also several efforts to support families that find mothers and/or fathers in federal custody in the sweeps. And over the weekend, Memphis Police issued an arrest warrant for a bounty hunter who turned up on YouTube video in an apartment complex with a large Latino tenant base wearing some kind of badge and vest.

26. The Week Ahead: July 31-August 6 -

Hello, Memphis! It's time to wave goodbye to July and hello to August, and there's plenty to keep you busy this week. Check out our top picks, plus more you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

27. City Council Members Express Uncertainty, Doubt Over Instant Runoff Voting -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd questions why there should be runoff elections for the seven single-member district seats of the council.

Boyd made the comment as he and other council members continued to react to plans by the Shelby County Election Commission to implement Instant Runoff Voting, or Ranked Choice Voting (RCV), starting with the 2019 city elections.

28. FDA to Target Addictive Levels of Nicotine in Cigarettes -

For the first time, the federal government is proposing cutting the nicotine level in cigarettes so they aren't so addictive.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb on Friday directed the agency's staff to develop new regulations on nicotine. The FDA has had the power since 2009 to regulate nicotine levels but hasn't done so. Stocks of cigarette makers plunged after the announcement.

29. US Employment Costs Grew Slower in Second Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wages and benefits paid to U.S. civilian workers grew more slowly in the second quarter.

The Labor Department said Friday total compensation was up 0.5 percent in the April-June period, compared to 0.8 percent growth in the first quarter.

30. US Economy Expanded at Stronger 2.6 Percent Rate in Q2 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy revved up this spring after a weak start to the year, fueled by a surge in consumer spending. But the growth spurt still fell short of the optimistic goals President Donald Trump hopes to achieve through tax cuts and regulatory relief.

31. Tennessee's Abortion Laws at Risk in Quirky Vote Count Case -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The future of abortion access in Tennessee hinges on a quirky court case that's about vote counting, not women's reproductive health rights.

A 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hearing Wednesday in Cincinnati will mark the first major action in more than a year in the case of Amendment 1, an anti-abortion measure passed by voters in 2014. The amendment says that nothing in the state constitution "secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of an abortion" and empowers state lawmakers to "enact, amend, or repeal statutes regarding abortion."

32. Man Sentenced to 25 Years in Memphis Officer Shooting -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A judge sentenced a Tennessee man to 25 years in federal prison Friday on charges connected to the fatal shooting of a police officer in 2015.

U.S. District Judge Sheryl Lipman sentenced Tremaine Wilbourn, 31, during a hearing in Memphis federal court.

33. Trump Choice for Fed Board Says He Likes Rule Change Ideas -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Randal Quarles, President Donald Trump's nominee for the Federal Reserve Board, says he likes a predecessor's ideas for where regulators should prune banking rules.

34. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

35. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

36. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

37. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

38. UAW, Nissan Pressing High-Stakes Campaign for Worker Votes -

CANTON, Miss. (AP) — The United Auto Workers faces a strong anti-union campaign from Nissan Motor Co. as it tries to gain a foothold in the union-averse South by organizing workers at the Japanese automaker's Mississippi plant.

39. Revival of Ranked Choice Voting Marks Phillips’ Attention to Detail -

The use of Ranked Choice Voting or instant-runoff voting in Memphis elections was a moot point even before Memphis voters approved it in 2008 in a city charter amendment.

The Shelby County Election Commission had concluded before the charter referendum that its voting systems couldn’t accommodate a method of voting that ranked candidates in a single race by a voter’s preference, instead of a voter picking one and only one candidate.

40. Former Deputy Indicted for Trying to Kill Witness -

Former Shelby County Sheriff’s Deputy Jeremy Drewery has been indicted by a federal grand jury for trying to hire someone to kill a witness in another federal court case. Before his termination, Drewery had been assigned to the Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Task Force.

41. State Setting Record Pace For Workforce Tax Credits -

The Workforce Services Division of the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development issued more than $215 million of Work Opportunity Tax Credits (WOTC) to employers across the state through June.

42. Publicly Skewered by His Boss, Sessions Says He's Staying On -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions, publicly skewered by his boss for stepping aside from the Russia-Trump investigations, declared Thursday he still loves his job and plans to stay on. Yet Donald Trump's airing of his long-simmering frustrations with Sessions raised significant new questions about the future of the nation's top prosecutor.

43. State Setting Record Pace For Workforce Tax Credits -

The Workforce Services Division of the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development issued more than $215 million of Work Opportunity Tax Credits (WOTC) to employers across the state through June.

44. Justices Uphold Refugee Ban But Say Grandparents Still OK -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court says the Trump administration can strictly enforce its ban on refugees, but is leaving in place a weakened travel ban that includes grandparents among relatives who can help visitors from six mostly Muslim countries get into the U.S.

45. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

46. Mock Election In ‘19 Could Test Ranked Choice Voting -

The Shelby County Election Commission could hold a public mock election of what is called Ranked Choice Voting in 2019, ahead of city of Memphis elections that year.

But the earliest the election commission could move to new machines that would provide such an option is the 2022 elections, says Shelby County Elections Administrator Linda Phillips. And that’s provided the state certifies the use of a voting system that includes the option, which it currently doesn’t.

47. Last Word: No Assumptions, Riverfront Concepts and A Tale of Two Teams -

The “Midtown is Memphis” arch in Overton Square is no more. Vanished this week as the former Chiwawa is being converted to Indian Pass Raw Bar – for those of you new to Memphis, these are both restaurants – one former and the other future.

48. Lawsuit: New TennCare Rates Endanger Hemophilia Patients -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee lawsuit claims the state is breaking federal law and endangering people with bleeding disorders like hemophilia by reimbursing less for prescription blood-clotting drugs through its Medicaid program.

49. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

50. Former Deputy Indicted for Trying to Kill Witness -

Former Shelby County Sheriff’s Deputy Jeremy Drewery has been indicted by a federal grand jury for trying to hire someone to kill a witness in another federal court case. Before his termination, Drewery had been assigned to the Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Task Force.

51. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

52. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

53. US Consumer Credit Up $18.4 Billion in May, Most in 6 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American consumers increased their borrowing in May at the fastest pace in six months, reflecting a sharp rebound in the category that includes credit cards.

The Federal Reserve reported Monday that total consumer borrowing rose by $18.4 billion in May, the strongest gain since a $25.1 billion increase in November. In addition, April's gain of $8.2 billion, the weakest increase in nearly six years, was revised up to a more respectable increase of $12.9 billion.

54. Federal Reserve Tells Congress Further Rate Hikes on the Way -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve said Friday it expects the U.S. economy will strengthen and warrant further gradual increases in its key interest rate.

That rate forecast was included in the Fed's semi-annual monetary report to Congress, which Chair Janet Yellen will deliver to Congress next week. The Fed has raised interest rates three times since December, pushing its benchmark rate to a range of 1 percent to 1.25 percent. The Fed noted that policymakers still expect one more rate hike this year and another three hikes in 2018.

55. First Tennessee Scores High Marks for Reputation -

A new report from the industry publication American Banker ranks First Tennessee Bank at No. 5 on a list of U.S. banks sorted by reputation.

56. Health Insurance Carriers Seek Higher Rates in Tennessee -

The Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance has released the insurance rates requested by carriers offering coverage on the Federally Facilitated Marketplace ahead of open enrollment for 2018.

57. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

58. MATA Eyes Greener Future, Prepares For Upcoming Service Changes -

Despite being hampered by a tight budget, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is making strides to be more green and environmentally sensitive, including participating in National Dump the Pump Day in June and offering reduced fares on “Ozone Days” throughout the year, as well as recently collaborating with the EPA to install air pollution-monitoring stations.

59. Hobby Lobby Fined $3M for Smuggling Iraq Religious Artifacts -

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Hobby Lobby Stores has agreed to pay a $3 million federal fine and forfeit thousands of ancient Iraqi religious artifacts smuggled from the Middle East that the government alleges were intentionally mislabeled for import, federal prosecutors said.

60. Memphis Announces Grants for Remaining 1968 Sanitation Workers -

A group of 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 – four still working for the city and 10 who are retired – will be getting $50,000 grants from the city, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced Thursday, July 6.

61. Last Word: The List Lawsuit, Charlie Morris on 1939 and New Rules for Democrats -

This looks like the end of Grit ‘n’ Grind as we wait for the other shoe to drop following Zach Randolph’s exit from the Grizzlies to Sacramento. There were a lot of rumors Wednesday, the day after Randolph’s $24 million free agency deal, including some about Marc Gasol and the Celtics. And then Tony Allen dropped a Grizz reference from his Twitter account causing even more speculation.

62. Want Your Student Loans Forgiven? Avoid These 4 Mistakes -

Having college debt disappear is something many student loan holders can only dream of. But it's possible for some of the 44 million people in the U.S. with education loans.

Through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, people with federal student loans can get their loans erased tax-free if they first make loan payments for 10 years while working for the government or a nonprofit.

63. Fed Debating When to Unwind $4.5 Trillion in Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is figuring out when to start unloading much of its $4.5 trillion in bond holdings – a major turning point for an economy still healing from the 2008 financial crisis.

64. First Tennessee Scores High Marks for Reputation -

A new report from the industry publication American Banker ranks First Tennessee Bank at No. 5 on a list of U.S. banks sorted by reputation.

65. State Politely Refuses To Turn Over Voter Data -

The state of Tennessee will not be turning over voter rolls to a presidential commission on election integrity.

The panel, chaired by Vice President Mike Pence, was established in May by an executive order signed by President Donald Trump and meets in July for the first time. The stated goal of the group is to promote fair and honest federal elections.

66. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

67. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

68. Analyst: Fred’s Not Seen as Viable Buyer of Rite Aid Stores -

Nick Mitchell, managing director and research analyst with Northcoast Research, didn’t have to do much work or analysis in the wake of news that Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has been cut out of a deal between Walgreens and Rite Aid.

69. Last Word: No Deal, Ivan Rabb and Intermodals in Overton Park -

And the winner is … not Fred’s. After months of speculation about the Memphis-based discount retail store’s transformation into a pharmacy-based enterprise with the purchase of hundreds of Rite Aid stores in a third-party divestment move, Fred’s was nowhere to be found when Walgreens announced a deal Thursday to buy the Rite Aid stores. The corporation told investors it will still pursue its strategy but acknowledged its trajectory is “stunted” – that as Fred’s got hammered on Wall Street.

70. Debt Deadline Now October, CBO Says As Deficit Spikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The drop-dead deadline for Congress to increase the government's borrowing authority and avoid a devastating economic default is early to mid-October, says a government estimate released Thursday that delivered another challenge to Republican leaders.

71. US Economic Growth in Q1 Upgraded to 1.4 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy got off to a lackluster start during the first three months of 2017, though it enjoyed more momentum than earlier estimates indicated.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that gross domestic product, the broadest measure of economic health, grew at an annual rate of 1.4 percent in the first quarter – better than a previous estimate of 1.2 percent and double the initial estimate of 0.7 percent. The upgrade reflects new-found strength in consumer spending and exports.

72. Alabama, Mississippi Drought-Free for First Time Since 2016 -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – Alabama and Mississippi are completely free from drought for the first time in more than a year.

A federal assessment released Thursday shows rains have eliminated a dry spell that began in April 2016, the last time Alabama was totally drought-free.

73. Man Destroys New Ten Commandments Statue at Arkansas Capitol -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A man yelled "Freedom!" as he crashed his vehicle into Arkansas' new Ten Commandments monument early Wednesday, nearly three years after he was arrested in the destruction of Oklahoma's monument at its state Capitol, authorities said.

74. County Budget Vote Delayed But Government Continues To Operate -

Shelby County government’s fiscal year begins Saturday, July 1, but the county won’t have a new operating budget at least until July 10.

That’s when the Shelby County Commission meets in special session to take up an estimated $13 million in amendments various commissioners are proposing to the budget proposal of county mayor Mark Luttrell.

75. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

76. County Commission Opposes End To Juvenile Court Oversight, Delays Budget Vote -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, June 26, opposing an end to the Justice Department memorandum governing conditions at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court. And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said he will veto it.

77. Last Word: Cooper-Young Complications, The Mackin Investigation and Tuition Hike -

Landmarks status for Cooper-Young is on hold because part of the process for the status isn’t an official part of the application process. That would be the part that requires a certain number of signatures to get the status. And it has put on hold a similar process in Vollintine-Evergreen.

78. Memphis Getting Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

79. Arkansas Panel Approves Temporary Ban on Herbicide -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas took the first steps Friday toward temporarily banning the sale and use of an herbicide that has prompted hundreds of complaints and a federal lawsuit from farmers who say it has caused widespread damage to crops.

80. Budget Amendments, Tax Rate and Juvenile Court Top County Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners will have lots of amendments to the county’s proposed operating budget Monday, June 26, and at least one bid to change the proposed county property tax rate of $4.10 approved on first reading earlier this month.

81. County Commission Reviews Juvenile Court Moves as Monitors Say Issues Remain -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

82. June 23-29, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2014: Formal opening of the $301 million expansion of the Frayser Nike plant. As he tours the plant expansion, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam learns the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of same-sex marriage in an appeal of Tennessee’s constitutional amendment that specifically banned gay marriages.

83. Community Rx -

As one of the city’s premier medical institutions, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital stays as busy as you might expect for an organization that tries to operate on the leading edge of pediatric care.

84. Shelby County Commissioners Question Ending DOJ Agreement -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, June 21, commissioners complained of not being consulted before county Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

85. Juvenile Court Settlement Meets Resistance on County Commission -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, commissioners complained of not being consulted before County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

86. Juvenile Court Settlement Meets Resistance on County Commission -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, commissioners complained of not being consulted before County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

87. Groups File Lawsuits Over New Arkansas Abortion Restrictions -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Abortion-rights groups asked a federal court Tuesday to block Arkansas from enforcing new restrictions lawmakers approved this year, including a ban on a commonly used second-trimester procedure that the groups say would make it nearly impossible for many women in the state to have an abortion.

88. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

89. Last Word: Cooper-Young's Controversy, Harris and Norris and Fulmer Returns -

Shelby County Commissioners have at least two hot topics to talk about Wednesday at committee sessions that could take up most if not all of the work day. By the agenda, these sessions go from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. But they have been known to stretch into the afternoon quite a bit.

90. Memphis Gets Federal Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

91. Harris: Norris Law On Immigration Status Sends Negative Signal -

NASHVILLE – State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing a new law sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris enabling state judges to consider a convict’s immigration status during sentencing.

92. Shelby County Commission to Probe Juvenile Court Moves -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

93. Supreme Court Pushes Redskins' Name Fight Back to Society -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Washington Redskins aren't in the clear with their team name just yet, even after the Supreme Court ruled Monday that the government can't block trademarks on the basis that they're offensive.

94. Justices Say Law on Offensive Trademarks is Unconstitutional -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday struck down part of a law that bans offensive trademarks in a ruling that is expected to help the Washington Redskins in their legal fight over the team name.

95. Boyd Talks Gaps In Higher Ed During Whitehaven Stop -

Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd says there is a gap in the state’s Tennessee Promise plan and its reality.

96. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

97. County Seeks End to DOJ Memorandum -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the move by him and Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael to end a 5-year-old memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Justice Department over conditions at Juvenile Court indicated “significant progress,” but not that all of the problems at Juvenile Court are resolved.

98. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

99. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

100. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.