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Editorial Results (free)

1. FDA Reconsiders Training Requirements for Painkillers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration is reconsidering whether doctors who prescribe painkillers like OxyContin should be required to take safety training courses, according to federal documents.

2. Federal Regulators Close Memphis-Based Bank -

Trust Co. Bank of Memphis has failed, with state and federal regulators announcing Friday, April 29, they had closed all four branches of the West Tennessee financial institution and arranged a purchase agreement to protect depositors.

3. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

4. US Economy Struggles at Start of Election Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It was not a great start for the U.S. economy.

With consumers and businesses turning cautious, the U.S. struggled to grow in the first three months of a presidential election year that is shining the spotlight on the economy's fitful recovery.

5. Last Word: TNReady Termination, NFL Draft Day and What Drove The Bible Bill -

When students in public schools take tests these days, it is about more than how they are doing and whether they know what is being taught them.

The scores play a significant role in how teachers are evaluated and rated. And both play a role in their careers and how much they will be paid. They play a role in whether the state decides to take over a school or the school system they remain in decides to essentially start over with an Innovation School model.

6. Fed Keeps Key Rate Unchanged; No Hint on Timing of Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve kept a key interest rate unchanged Wednesday against the backdrop of a slowdown in U.S. and global growth and provided no hint of when its next rate hike may occur.

7. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

8. Last Word: Grizz Aftermath, Mayor-A-Rama and Prince Saves Hendrix -

116-95, Spurs over the Grizzlies is how the NBA second season ends in Memphis. A four-game sweep of a team that now heals and perhaps changes on its way to the fall.

9. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

10. Insure Tennessee: In Like A Lion, Out With A Committee -

What started with a roar is ending with a whimper.

On the first day of the 2016 legislative session, dozens of Insure Tennessee supporters rallied, shouted and sang songs outside the House chamber.

11. City Budget Season Begins With the Basics -

The Memphis City Council Budget Committee begins its work next week with afternoon sessions that lead to a goal of a June 7 council vote on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s first budget proposal.

12. Strickland Defines 'Brilliant at the Basics' $667M Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took a $667 million operating budget proposal to Memphis City Council members Tuesday, April 19, that keeps the property rate stable at $3.40.

13. Dyer Confirmed to State Court of Criminal Appeals -

Shelby County Attorney Ross Dyer became a state appellate court judge Monday, April 18, as members of both chambers of the Tennessee Legislature met in a joint session to confirm Dyer’s appointment as a judge on the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals.

14. Last Word: When To Heal, Budget Day at City Hall and Cheese Steak Pondering -

After Sunday’s thrashing of the Grizzlies by the Spurs in their 2016 NBA playoff debut, there is a school of thought among Grizz watchers that the sooner this is over the better.
But there are others who would have a more content off season if the Grizz could win just one game in the series as they go down and then proceed back to the cave for some summer healing.
Either way, Game 2 is Tuesday in San Antonio and then FedExForum Friday for Game 3.

15. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

16. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

17. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

18. First Horizon Reverses Loss in First Quarter -

With its first quarter results, First Tennessee Bank’s parent company is off to the kind of start to the year any large banking organization would love to report – a reversal of losses, abundant capital to deploy and metrics like loans and deposits trending in the right direction.

19. Election Commission Hires New Elections Coordinator -

Shelby County Election Commissioners voted Friday, April 8, to hire Linda Phillips, a former county clerk in Tippecanoe County, Ind., to be the next Shelby County elections coordinator.

20. Mortgage Market Up 3 Percent In March -

Shelby County’s mortgage market closed out the first quarter by posting March numbers that headed in the direction bankers and real estate professionals like to see.

Last month’s total purchase mortgage volume was a little more than $131 million, up by $3.4 million over March 2015’s total of almost $128 million, for a gain of about 3 percent. That’s according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

21. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

22. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

23. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

24. Phillips New County Elections Administrator -

Shelby County Election Commissioners voted Friday, April 8, to hire Linda Phillips, a former county clerk in Tippecanoe County, Indiana to be the next Shelby County Elections Coordinator.

25. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

26. Canadian Pacific Ends Bid to Buy Norfolk Southern -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Canadian Pacific said Monday that it is ending its nearly $30 billion takeover bid for Norfolk Southern, less than six months after it offered to buy the rival railroad.

27. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

28. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from New Memphis Institute's popular “Memphis 101” crash course to the music- and culture-filled Africa in April festival.

29. Shelby County Election Commission Hires New Coordinator -

Shelby County Election Commissioners voted Friday, April 8, to hire Linda Phillips, a former county clerk in Tippecanoe County, Ind., to be the next Shelby County elections coordinator.

30. Experts Caution Self-Driving Cars Aren't Ready for Roads -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Self-driving cars are more likely to hurt than help public safety because of unsolved technical issues, engineers and safety advocates told the government Friday, countering a push by innovators to speed government approval.

31. 4 Fed Leaders Face Questions About Their Powerful Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Janet Yellen was put on the spot about whether she made a mistake in raising interest rates in December. Ben Bernanke was quizzed about what it felt like to be called a traitor by the governor of Texas.

32. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

33. This Week in Memphis History: April 8-14 -

1976: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division board takes the first step toward pursuing federal funding for a coal gasification plant in Memphis. Federal funding totaling $2.8 billion is available to build eight of the plants, each using a different method for coal to liquid or gas fuel starting in the 1980s.

34. Shelby County Election Commission Hires New Coordinator -

The Shelby County Election Commission voted Friday, April 8, to hire Linda Phillips, a former county clerk in Tippecanoe County, Ind., to be the next Shelby County elections coordinator.

35. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

36. US Consumer Borrowing Rises at Weak Pace Again -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers borrowed at a modest pace in February for the second month in a row, evidence of ongoing caution that has kept a lid on spending this year.

Borrowing rose at a 5.8 percent annual rate, the Federal Reserve said Thursday, just above January's 5 percent pace. January's climb was the smallest in more than two years. The use of revolving credit – mostly credit cards – rose just 3.7 percent after slipping in January. Total outstanding credit increased $17.2 billion to $3.57 trillion.

37. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

38. Stricter Rules Unveiled for Brokers Giving Retirement Advice -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration acted Wednesday to require that brokers who recommend investments for retirement savers meet a stricter standard that now applies to registered advisers: They must act as "fiduciaries" – trustees who are obligated to put their clients' best interests above all.

39. Fed Minutes Show Officials Wary of April Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers were split at their last meeting over how to respond to a slowing global economy, with two officials supporting a rate hike in March even as an opposing group felt that even raising rates in April would be too soon.

40. US Hiring Reaches 9-Year High; Job Openings Slip -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. hiring jumped to a nine-year high in February, a sign of robust business demand for new workers, while the number of open positions slipped.

The Labor Department reported Tuesday that 5.4 million people found jobs, a 5.8 percent jump from January and the most since November 2006. More Americans also quit their jobs. Both figures point to a healthier, more dynamic labor market.

41. Move to OK Commercial Drone Flights Over People -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A government-sponsored committee is recommending standards that could clear the way for commercial drone flights over populated areas and help speed the introduction of package delivery drones and other uses not yet possible, The Associated Press has learned.

42. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

43. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

44. Job-Seekers Return at Fastest Pace Since Before Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are flooding back into the job market at the fastest pace since before the Great Recession, encouraged by steady hiring and some signs of higher pay.

The flow has halted, at least temporarily, one of the economy's more discouraging trends: the sharp decline in the percentage of people either working or looking for work. That figure fell last year to a four-decade low.

45. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

46. Moore Tech Expands With Welding School, Looks Toward Next Goal -

For the first time in its 80-year history, the William R. Moore School of Technology has expanded beyond its Poplar Avenue campus.

The trade school, now known as Moore Tech, opened its new School of Welding at 475 N. Bellevue Blvd. Thursday, March 31, in a renovated building that was once a furniture store.

47. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

48. Settle? No. UT Needs to Defend Itself in Title IX Suit -

Lots of smoke. But is there a fire? That is the issue at the University of Tennessee, where a Title IX lawsuit alleges the university has a “hostile sexual environment” and violates federal laws dealing with student discipline hearings for sexual assault cases, especially those involving student-athletes.

49. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

50. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

51. US Consumer Spending Posts Scant February Increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers barely increased their spending in February and spent less in January than the government had earlier estimated. The pullback led some analysts to downgrade their expectations for the economy's growth during the January-March quarter.

52. Feds: Risk of 2016 Quake Increases, Including on New Madrid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal scientists say the chance of damaging earthquakes hitting east of the Rockies has increased significantly, much of it a man-made byproduct of drilling for energy. Oklahoma now has a 1 in 8 chance of damaging quakes in 2016, surpassing California as the state with the highest probability.

53. Household Spending, Home Building Fuel Modest US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumer spending and home construction are helping sustain modest U.S. economic growth despite problems caused by a strong dollar, low oil prices and an excess of business stockpiles.

54. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

55. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

56. FDA Adds Boldest Warning to Most Widely Used Painkillers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal health regulators will add their strongest warning labels to the most widely used prescription painkillers, part of a multi-pronged government campaign to reverse an epidemic of abuse and death tied to drugs like Vicodin and Percocet.

57. US Government Sets Record for Failures to Find Files When Asked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration set a record for the number of times its federal employees told disappointed citizens, journalists and others that despite searching they couldn't find a single page requested under the Freedom of Information Act, according to a new Associated Press analysis of government data.

58. US Job Market's January Stumble Likely to Prove Temporary -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. job market stumbled a bit in January, yet data released Thursday suggests the slowdown was likely temporary.

Total hiring fell sharply that month, the Labor Department said, and the number of people quitting their jobs also dropped.

59. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

60. Fed Keeps Key Rates Unchanged; Foresees Fewer Hikes In 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is keeping a key interest rate unchanged in light of global pressures that risk slowing the U.S. economy.

As a result, Fed officials are forecasting that they will raise rates more gradually this year than they had envisioned in December. The officials now foresee two, rather than four, modest increases in their benchmark short-term rate during 2016.

61. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

62. CDC Guidelines Aim to Curb Painkiller Prescribing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin.

63. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

64. Tri-Star Chronicles Captures Tennessee’s Lesser-Known Stories -

J.R. “Pitt” Hyde III is not Memphis’ most famous name across the state of Tennessee. But he is an important name, has a deep and rich story worth telling, and that is exactly the point.

65. Finances Will Be in Focus at City Council -

The list of financial surprises that Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presented to Memphis City Council members two weeks ago tops council discussions Tuesday, March 15.

66. With No Rate Hike Seen, Fed's Outlook on Economy is Awaited -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The financial world is awaiting the Federal Reserve's response to a critical question: How stable are the world's economies and financial markets?

Whatever picture the Fed sketches will help shape expectations of when it will resume the interest rate increases it began in December. That's when the Fed raised its key rate from record lows to reflect an economy finally strong enough 6½ years after the Great Recession ended to withstand higher loan rates.

67. Sticky Lawsuit: $400M Dispute Lingers Over Post-It Inventor -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) – Alan Amron has invented a battery-powered squirt gun, a digital photo frame, even a laser system that may someday provide a visible first-down line for fans inside NFL stadiums. He holds 40 U.S. patents, but he's most interested in an invention for which he gets no credit: the Post-it Note, that ubiquitous sticky-back product made into a worldwide success by the 3M Company.

68. Up, Up and Away -

The modern-day drone is both a high-tech military tool and a safer way to play humanitarian and deliver medicine and supplies to the suffering people of war-torn Syria.

The drone is everything from a stalking device to track poachers creeping through the South African bush hunting rhinos to the impetus for a potential commercial growth industry right here in Memphis.

69. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

70. Snapchat, Seagate Among Companies Duped in Tax-Fraud Scam -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Tax-filing season is turning into a nightmare for thousands of employees whose companies have been duped by email fraudsters. A major phishing scheme has tricked several major companies – among them, the messaging service Snapchat and disk-drive maker Seagate Technology – into relinquishing tax documents that exposed their workers' incomes, addresses and Social Security numbers.

71. Health Law Fines Double for Many Uninsured at Tax Time -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people who went without health insurance last year are now seeing fines more than double under President Barack Obama's health care law, tax preparation company H&R Block said Tuesday.

72. Commission Votes Down Term Limits Referendum -

Shelby County commissioners voted down a referendum ordinance Monday, March 7, to eliminate term limits in county government.

But the ordinance moves on to second and third readings under the commission’s rules of procedure despite the first vote.

73. Commission Votes Down Term Limits Referendum On First Reading -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a referendum ordinance Monday, March 7, to eliminate term limits in county government.

But the ordinance moves on to second and third readings despite the vote on first reading under the commission’s rules of procedure.

74. US Consumer Borrowing Growth Slows in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers bumped up their borrowing in January at the slowest rate pace in nearly three years, as outstanding revolving debt – such as credit cards – slipped from December.

75. Fed Vice Chair Sees Hints of Too-Low Inflation Moving Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said Monday that inflation in the U.S. may be starting to tick up from too-low levels, a key condition for further interest rate hikes.

76. County Commission Weighs Referendum Lifting Term Limits -

At the first Shelby County Commission meeting since the March primary elections, commissioners will consider a move to eliminate all term limits for elected county officials.

The issue could be put to county voters on the August ballot.

77. March 4-10, 2016: This Week in Memphis History -

1966: On the front page of The Daily News, Memphis State University begins season ticket sales for the Tigers’ 1966 season with 5,000 more prime seats available.
The student section at Memphis Memorial Stadium is moved to the east side of the stadium from its former location on the same side as the season ticket holders.
Season tickets at a rate of $20 per ticket – $3 less than buying individual tickets to the five home games – can also be bought for the first time through Dixiemart and Corondolet stores, along with 200 other retailers, by using the charge accounts for those stores.
And there is the “Tiger Note” method through the big three local banks – First National, National Bank of Commerce and Union Planters – as well as Murdock Insurance Corp. Tickets can be ordered on credit through the four institutions and paid later with no interest or carrying charges.

78. Pentagon Seeks a Few Good Computer Hackers to Test Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Pentagon is looking for a few good computer hackers.

Screened high-tech specialists will be brought in to try to breach the Defense Department's public Internet pages in a pilot program aimed at finding and fixing cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

79. Fed Survey Finds Weaker Exports Hurting Manufacturers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy was expanding in most of the country in January and February, helped by gains in consumer spending and home sales. But there were also rising headwinds from falling oil prices and a strong dollar that held back some sectors, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

80. Council Rejects Hotel at Jackson and Front -

Memphis City Council members rejected a hotel with retail Tuesday, March 1, on the northeast corner of Jackson Avenue and Front Street, across from The Pyramid in the Pinch District, that was first proposed last year.

81. Lynch at NFL Combine, UT Troubles, Memphis Carries Senior Day -

Paxton Lynch went through all the drills – physical and mental – at the NFL Combine in Indianapolis and, brace yourself for this deep insight, but the “experts” feel confident that his pro career will land somewhere between Tom Brady and Tim Tebow.

82. Clinton Visits Churches, Trump Rallies In Millington -

Democratic presidential front runner Hillary Clinton made surprise appearances at two Memphis churches Sunday, Feb. 28, the day after Republican presidential front runner Donald Trump drew a crowd of 10,000 less than 12 hours earlier in Millington.

83. US Economy Ends 2015 on Better Note, Starts 2016 With a Bang -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy got a double dose of good news Friday. Economic growth in the final three months of 2015 didn't slow as much as previously estimated, and consumers roared back to life in January, spending at the fastest clip in eight months.

84. Editorial: Your Anger And The Political Process -

The moving national elections that are our presidential primaries have never generated a 40 percent or higher voter turnout in Shelby County.

That goes back to 1972 when the primaries were redesigned to temper a convention process in both parties that had lost touch with voters.

85. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

86. Last Word: Carson Cancels, Haslam Endorses, Bank Numbers and Kobe's Exit -

Presidential campaigns and the security concerns that come with them aren’t something that comes up a lot in terms of press coverage in this election cycle.
But it has come up leading into what will be a busy weekend locally and in the region among the presidential contenders.
Republican candidate Ben Carson was scheduled to attend both Sunday services at Highpoint Church in East Memphis.
Leaders of the church emphasized it was a non-political event in which Carson would talk about his personal story and his faith but would not make a political pitch.
This is not unprecedented.
In 2008, Republican contender Mike Huckabee attended an ordination ceremony for two ministers at Bellevue Baptist Church in Cordova – an event that was billed also as a nonpolitical event.
And so the reporters who came to cover the candidate who would win the Tennessee Republican primary days later watched not from the sanctuary but from the room where Bellevue’s video and audio feeds are coordinated. Huckabee talked politics with reporters after the service as he made a run for some barbecue to-go from Corky’s on his way to another city on the campaign trail.

87. Debt After Death -

Ray’s Take You can’t take it with you. Debt, that is. And most debt does not get passed to a spouse or other heirs. But debt collectors may try to get the money from family members anyway. For this reason, it’s good to know what happens to various forms of debt that may be left behind when a loved one dies.

88. Fed Numbers Show Improving Banking Market -

The five largest Memphis-based banks all got bigger over the past year. That’s according to new figures from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis covering the fourth quarter, which show continued improvement among local banks in a variety of key metrics like loans and loan-loss reserves.

89. Apple: Feds Want to Circumvent Security on Other Phones, Too -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple is challenging government efforts to overcome encryption on at least 14 electronic devices nationwide in addition to the phone of a San Bernardino, California, shooter, its lawyers say.

90. US Bank Earnings Jump 11.9 Percent In 4Q; Loan Losses Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The impact of plummeting oil prices has shown up in the financial picture of U.S. banks, whose losses from loans increased for the first time in five and half years, according to new government data.

91. New Year, New Financial You -

With the new year now well underway, you might have spent January tackling fitness or organizational goals, but many experts believe the most powerful resolution that you can adopt is to focus on your financial well-being.
With most of 2016 ahead of us, and tax season right around the corner, there’s no better time to take a look at your finances and make a plan to increase your financial stability for this year and beyond. 

92. Experts: The FBI's iPhone-Unlocking Plan for Apple is Risky -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – In its battle with Apple over an extremist's iPhone, the FBI says neither the company nor anyone else has anything to fear. Although they want to compel assistance from Apple to unlock a phone used by San Bernardino mass shooter Syed Farook, officials say the techniques they propose are limited in scope and pose no risk to the privacy of other iPhone users.

93. Big Tech Companies Join Apple in Its Encryption Fight -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry is starting to line up with Apple in its fight against the federal government over the encryption it uses to keep iPhones secure.

Earlier this week, a U.S. magistrate ordered Apple to help investigators break into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino mass shooters. Apple was given until Tuesday to challenge that ruling, but a person familiar with the case says Apple has been granted an extension until next Friday.

94. Last Word: 901Fest, First Tennessee Sues Pinnacle and EDGE Responds -

U of M Tigers 73 – UCF Knights 56 at FedExForum and on ESPN Wednesday evening.

As that was underway, Vice President Joe Biden was on his way out of the Memphis area after a visit to the Norfolk Southern intermodal facility in Rossville.
Here’s the basic web story account from Wednesday evening of Biden’s visit which comes on the seventh anniversary of the enactment of the federal stimulus act.
More on the larger themes in the visit and three-city tour by Biden in the print version that hits online Thursday afternoon.

95. Minutes Show Fed Worried By Global Turmoil -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers expressed growing concerns at their meeting last month about potential threats to the U.S. economy, including turbulence in financial markets, plunging oil prices and slowing growth in China and other emerging markets.

96. UT President Says School Thriving Despite Legal Troubles -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro pushed back against recent criticisms of the school, telling UT supporters that "the long arm of the government" is reaching further and further into university matters.

97. The Big Uh-Oh: Global Economy Shaky and Cavalry May Not Come -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Eight years after the financial crisis, the world is coming to grips with an unpleasant realization: serious weaknesses still plague the global economy, and emergency help may not be on the way.

98. More Police Body Camera Details, Still No Start Date -

The city plans to hire 10 part-time video analysts to start work on April 5 in the move to police body cameras as well as in-car cameras.

But there is still no roll-out date for the body cameras, Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration said Tuesday, Feb. 16, in a meeting with Memphis City Council members.

99. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

100. Memphis City Council to Get Police Body Camera Update -

Memphis City Council members are to get a timeline Tuesday, Feb. 16, on the roll out of police body cameras from Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland as well as some idea of the additional cost.