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Editorial Results (free)

1. NCAA Opens Door to Championships in States With Sports Bets -

The NCAA is opening a door for states with legalized sports gambling to host NCAA championship events and officials in Nevada are already set to get in the game as soon as they can.

The governing body for college sports on Thursday announced a "temporary" lifting of a ban that prevented events like college basketball's NCAA Tournament from being hosted in states that accept wagers on single games. The move comes three days after the Supreme Court overturned a federal law that barred most states from allowing gambling on professional and college sporting events.

2. Emergency 911 Technology Struggles to Keep Up With the Times -

ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) – High school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone.

3. Two Shots Didn’t Phase Lawmakers in Jack Daniel’s Case -

When Van Halen front man David Lee Roth opened a bottle of Jack Daniel’s on stage back in the ’80s, the last thing he thought about was taxes and court appeals when he took a big swig of whiskey.

4. Grant Awarded For Auto Museum -

A facade improvement grant for a new automotive museum near Sun Studio was approved by the Downtown Memphis Commission’s Center City Development Corp. on Wednesday, May 16, clearing the way for Richard Vining’s $1.4 million renovation project at 645 Marshall Ave. to begin.

5. Last Word: The Bus to Shelby Farms, Sports Gaming In Tunica and Tom Lee's Story -

It hasn’t been this hot in 30 years … to the day. The high Monday of 93 degrees eclipsed the old record for the day of 91 degree in 1988. I’m not much of a thermometer watcher. But this did get my attention because I was imagining all of the big hair emergencies 30 years ago. Guys going to their closets to break out the Miami Vice pastel t-shirts and linen blazers. And of course California Raisins hysteria. And I do find it not entirely coincidental that we break a record from 1988 as there is talk of a remake of the movie “Willow.” We could break another record for all of this Tuesday and we’ll see what my mind does with the year of the old record if that’s the case.

6. County About $1M Short on Pre-K Funding -

Advocates of expanding prekindergarten services countywide to 8,500 students over several years got a surprise last week when Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell outlined the administration’s funding for its share of the funding.

7. Mississippi Casinos Could Take Bets Soon as Court Clears Way -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi could, at least temporarily, be the only place within the Southeastern Conference where football fans can put bets down when games begin at summer's end.

8. Few Teeth in Trump's Prescription to Reduce Drug Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's long-promised plan to bring down drug prices, unveiled Friday, would mostly spare the pharmaceutical industry he previously accused of "getting away with murder." Instead he focuses on private competition and more openness to reduce America's prescription pain.

9. Second Convention Center Hotel Has Footprint Beyond City’s Tallest Building -

After four years as an emptied out eyesore and lots of promises with very little follow up, the city’s tallest building is at the center of a tentative deal to make it the second convention center hotel.

10. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

11. Tech Leaders Seek More Focus on AI at White House Summit -

Top U.S. tech executives and researchers want the Trump administration to invest more in artificial intelligence and craft policies they hope will strengthen the economy without displacing jobs.

The administration said Thursday it is doing just that. President Donald Trump's technology adviser Michael Kratsios pledged to a gathering of corporate leaders that "the Trump administration will ensure our great nation remains the global leader in AI."

12. Last Word: New Football League, Drone Testing and New Chandler Numbers -

The Alliance of American Football announces its presence in Memphis Thursday afternoon at the Liberty Bowl. And so begins another chapter in the city’s colorful history of start-up leagues. It is a long history dominated by football with a good stretch of the timeline taking in the city’s pursuit of an NFL franchise. Sometimes the rules are a bit different and the leagues have a history of not lasting very long. But they are fondly remembered.

13. Last Word: Veto Override Drama, Iran Reaction & Rise of the Rest Meets Soundways -

Shelby County Commissioners have a busy committee day Wednesday with a budget presentation – county mayor Mark Luttrell’s final one as the county’s chief executive, more discussions about the Graceland plan and a veto override.

14. Groups Sue Ben Carson Over Delay of Anti-Segregation Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A group of advocacy organizations filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the Department of Housing and Urban Development and its secretary, Ben Carson, over his decision to delay an Obama-era rule intended to ensure that communities confront and address racial segregation.

15. US Job Openings Equal Unemployed for 1st Time in 2 Decades -

WASHINGTON (AP) – If you're looking for a job right now, this may be about as good as it gets: There are roughly as many open jobs in the United States as there are unemployed people.

In March, employers advertised 6.55 million open jobs, the most on records dating to December 2000, the Labor Department said Tuesday . At the same time, there were 6.59 million unemployed people.

16. Stengel Elected President Of Construction Counsel Association -

Evans Petree PC shareholder Elizabeth B. Stengel has been elected the first female president of the Tennessee Association of Construction Counsel, a not-for-profit professional association of Tennessee attorneys with practices related to the construction industry.

17. Amtrak Adds Stop in Mississippi Delta at New $1.2M Station -

MARKS, Miss. (AP) – Amtrak is making another stop in Mississippi.

The national passenger rail service's City of New Orleans train made its first stop Friday in the Mississippi Delta town of Marks.

18. Pro- and Anti-Gun Bills Fail in Tennessee Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – An election-year Tennessee legislative session tinged by national attention on a deadly school shooting in Florida saw many high-profile gun bills fail – both Republican efforts to ease gun laws and Democratic pushes to put more restrictions in place.

19. Verdict Still Out on Tale of Increased Voter Turnout In Primaries -

Voting in the May election that included primaries for most Shelby County government nonjudicial offices was up from the 2010 and 2014 primaries for both parties. But what that says about new political blood and energy in both of the local parties is still an open question.

20. Drug Epidemic Ensnares 25-Year-Old Pill for Nerve Pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The story line sounds familiar: a popular pain drug becomes a new way to get high as prescribing by doctors soars.

But the latest drug raising red flags is not part of the opioid family at the center of the nation's drug epidemic. It's a 25-year-old generic pill long seen as a low risk way to treat seizures, nerve pain and other ailments.

21. 2nd-Longest US Expansion on Record Keeps Churning Out Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy has delivered steady if only modest gains for most Americans since the Great Recession ended in 2009. It's been a frustration for many.

Yet the very sluggishness of the economic expansion helps explain why it's now the second-longest on record and why more of the country might soon benefit from higher pay.

22. Editorial: TNReady Problem Reopens Debate on Testing Culture -

If there’s a better way to measure academic achievement and growth than testing, we wish someone would name it. Until then, we need a reliable way to objectively determine where students are and what they need to go further. And we can’t change that test so drastically on a regular basis that teachers and school leaders must start over from square one.

23. Inner Fortitude -

Amid a teacher shortage attributed partly to economic opportunities luring away candidates, local educators are creating urban teaching programs and adopting new recruitment strategies.

Rhodes College is launching a master’s program in urban education in June and is offering a $10,000 scholarship to each student. If the student receives a Stafford federal loan of $15,000 and commits to teaching at a “high-need” school, the degree essentially will be free.

24. Last Word: BSMF Opens, Germantown's New Elementary and Links at St. Jude -

The Beale Street Music Festival opens Friday and the clouds appear right on cue. But that, in and of itself, doesn’t stop the proceedings in Tom Lee Park. Lightning is another matter, of course. Poncho and boots are a part of the Memphis In May identity. And one day there will be a digital map of the park’s terrain that shows the areas that are the mud pits and those that are largely mud proof. That’s for some of you to avoid them and others among you to find them and “celebrate” them.

25. More Businesses are Mellowing Out Over Hiring Pot Smokers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – FPI Management, a property company in California, wants to hire dozens of people. Factories from New Hampshire to Michigan need workers. Hotels in Las Vegas are desperate to fill jobs.

26. 2 Top Aides Leave EPA Amid Ethics Investigations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The top security official for embattled Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt abruptly left office ahead of his scheduled questioning before a congressional panel, one of two top aides whose departures were announced Tuesday amid a series of federal ethics investigations of the agency.

27. Pfizer's Q1 Profit Up 14 Pct., Sales Just Miss Expectations -

Pfizer posted slightly higher sales and a 14 percent jump in profit in the first quarter, thanks to lower restructuring costs and a much-lower tax rate, but its revenue still missed Wall Street expectations.

28. County Commission Urges Haslam to Veto Immigration Bill -

Shelby County commissioners approved a resolution Monday, April 30, urging Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to veto a bill that would require local and state law enforcement agencies to work with federal immigration and customs enforcement agents on immigration matters.

29. Last Word: Trolleys Roll, Primary Election Day and The Rise of South City -

MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld likes to joke that the new trolleys are quieter since the transit authority decided to change from using square wheels. Transit humor. They really are quieter. And that may be because MATA wasn’t doing much of anything in the way of maintenance on them four years ago and even less in the way of record keeping when a second trolley car burst into flames causing MATA to shut down everything it ran on rails. So the trolley that rolled out of the MATA barn on North Main Street Monday morning and into service was symbolic of more than getting a trolley or three ready for service. It was about building a new system around the operation of the trolleys.

30. County Commission Urges Haslam Veto of Immigration Bill -

Shelby County commissioners approved a resolution Monday, April 30, urging Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to veto a bill that would require local and state law enforcement agencies to work with federal immigration agents on immigration matters.

31. Drugmakers Push Back Against Lawmakers' Calls to Tax Opioids -

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) – Facing a rising death toll from drug overdoses, state lawmakers across the country are testing a strategy to boost treatment for opioid addicts: Force drug manufacturers and their distributors to pay for it.

32. Sprint, T-Mobile Have to Sell $26.5B Deal to Antitrust Cops -

NEW YORK (AP) – To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T.

33. Gov’t Argues AT&T-Time Warner Deal Would Hurt Consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government pleaded its case Monday for blocking AT&T from absorbing Time Warner, saying it would hurt consumers as a big antitrust trial crept toward its end and a decision by a federal judge.

34. Young Says Construction About to Begin on South City Residential -

South City is about to begin construction east of Danny Thomas Boulevard and the road to construction has had some unexpected turns. “There’s a certain amount of anxiety when you talk about these big projects because people don’t know whether it’s actually going to happen or not,” Memphis Housing and Community Development Division director Paul Young said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

35. First Primaries Kick Off Busy Election Year -

Shelby County voters go to the polls Tuesday, May 1, in the first of three elections this year that will take in county, state and federal offices by the time the last vote is counted in November.

The primary elections Tuesday for 23 Shelby County government offices are being watched closely by local Republican and Democratic leaders. They are watching the turnout and what the results say about the political temperament and activism of a county Hillary Clinton carried with 60 percent of the vote in the November 2016 presidential general election won by Republican Donald Trump.

36. Trolleys Return to Main Street -

Almost four years after the trolley system was shut down and 25 years and a day since the service began, the Memphis Area Transit Authority resumed running the trolleys on the Main Street line.

The Monday, April 30, ceremonial first ride from the MATA trolley barn on North Main Street ended a multi-year process of restoring vintage cars and rebuilding the maintenance and record-keeping system for trolley service. MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld said the effort’s priority was making the trolleys a “safe and reliable mode of transportation.”

37. Last Word: Graceland Offensive, Mural Lawsuit, and a TNReady Encore -

It’s on in The Haven. Graceland’s managing partner, Joel Weinshanker, is looking to turn out Whitehaven residents in support of Graceland’s plans for a 5,000 to 6,000 seat arena and in the process a showdown over just what the city and county noncompete for FedExForum means. During a townhall meeting at Guest House Thursday evening, Weinshanker made his case to about 150 Whitehaven residents and around eight or nine candidates in this election year. And he said the chief problem is Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland won’t talk to him about projects he says will open up Whitehaven for future economic development and prosperity.

38. Building Heritage -

The basement of the Universal Life Insurance building, a Memphis landmark at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, is still defined by the intersection of overhead ventilation shafts and pipes.

39. Opioid Treatment Gap in Medicare: Methadone Clinics -

One in three older Americans with Medicare drug coverage is prescribed opioid painkillers, but for those who develop a dangerous addiction there is one treatment Medicare won't cover: methadone.

Methadone is the oldest, and experts say, the most effective of the three approved medications used to treat opioid addiction. It eases cravings without an intense high, allowing patients to work with counselors to rebuild their lives.

40. Bill Cosby Convicted of Drugging and Molesting a Woman -

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) – Bill Cosby was convicted Thursday of drugging and molesting a woman in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era, completing the spectacular late-life downfall of a comedian who broke racial barriers in Hollywood on his way to TV superstardom as America's Dad.

41. Tenn. Legislature Breaks TNReady Gridlock, Adjourns Session -

NASHVILLE – The House and Senate broke gridlock Wednesday night on problems stemming from the results of troubled TNReady testing by passing legislation saying no “adverse action” would be taken against teachers, students or schools for poor test scores.

42. Southwest Has Been Faced With Fines, Union Safety Complaints -

DALLAS (AP) – Southwest Airlines runs its planes hard. They make many short hops and more trips per day than other U.S. airliners, which adds to wear and tear on parts, including the engines.

43. Last Word: Graceland's New Map, Weighted Caseloads and Rallings on Duran -

I’ve been thinking a lot about the term budget season and what that means in our political culture. My thought is we need to make this more season than process in the same way that we have made May more than just the last full month of spring. We should celebrate reprogramming and enterprise funds. Why hasn't someone written an ode to OPEB or at least done an OPEB mural? -- unless that was one of the ones on Willet that got painted over by mistake.

44. Supreme Court Wrestles With Administrative Law Judge Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court wrestled Monday with a case brought by a former financial adviser known for his "Buckets of Money" strategy who is challenging the appointment of the administrative law judge who ruled against him.

45. Last Word: Reading Early Voting Tea Leaves, Corker Qualifies and New Carrot -

This should be the week that the Tennessee Legislature adjourns and state Senators and state Representatives return to their districts to begin campaigning in earnest for the August primaries and the November general election beyond that. The only hold-up to adjournment this week would be any more tremors surrounding education policy, specifically the TNReady test debacle of last week.

46. Wells Fargo Fined $1B for Mortgage, Auto Lending Abuses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo will pay $1 billion to federal regulators to settle charges tied to misconduct at its mortgage and auto lending business, the latest punishment levied against the banking giant for widespread customer abuses.

47. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

48. Excavator Blamed for Island-Wide Blackout in Puerto Rico -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — An island-wide blackout hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday as the U.S. territory struggles to repair an increasingly unstable power grid nearly seven months after Hurricane Maria. Officials said an excavator accidentally downed a transmission line.

49. GOP's Regulatory Fight Goes to Another Level Over Car Loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The GOP-led Senate voted Wednesday to block Obama-era guidance a consumer protection agency issued five years ago to help ensure lenders don't charge blacks and Hispanics higher interest rates on car loans.

50. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

51. One Dead After Jetliner Apparently Blows an Engine in Flight -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Southwest Airlines jet apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window and damaged the fuselage Tuesday, killing a passenger and injuring seven others, authorities said.

52. Amanda Dunham Talks Changes At East Memphis’ Grove Grill -

Twenty years after The Grove Grill opened in Laurelwood Shopping Center, the restaurant is reinventing itself with modernized decor and the recently launched Third Thursday monthly tasting series. Helping drive the changes are chef Chip Dunham – the son of Grove Grill owners Jeff and Tracey Dunham – and his wife, beverage director Amanda Dunham, who both joined the restaurant after moving to Memphis last July.

53. Last Word: The Wheels on the Bus, HelloHome and Cooper-Young's Debate -

It’s been so long that when someone talks about trolleys in this town of ours, you might think of the ones with rubber tires that have been running for the last four years. You might be part of the discussion about larger changes to the city public transportation system and some wondering about where trolleys should be in the way of priorities. Or you may have been someone caught by surprise during the recent trolley tests by how quiet the new ones are.

54. Trump Convenes Task Force to Study US Postal Service -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After weeks of railing against online shopping giant Amazon, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday creating a task force to study the United States Postal Service.

55. 3 US Banks Post Higher Profits With Huge Assist From Tax Law -

NEW YORK (AP) – Three of America's biggest banks reported higher profits Friday, with a huge assist from the tax law passed late last year.

JPMorgan reported a record quarterly profit, while Citigroup and Wells Fargo topped analyst expectations.

56. Immigration Raid at Tennessee Plant Inspires March -

MORRISTOWN, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans took to the streets a week after 97 people were detained in an immigration raid at a meat packing plant.

WBIR-TV reports more than 100 people marched Thursday in Morristown, holding pictures of those detained in the raid at the Southeastern Provision plant in Grainger County.

57. Raymond James Sues Landlord Over Elevators -

Raymond James & Associates Inc., the name tenant of the Raymond James building at 50 North Front St., is suing its landlord at the building over elevator problems in a lawsuit first filed in Chancery Court in February that has since been transferred to Memphis federal court.

58. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

59. Opioid Trials to Begin in 2019 as Settlement is Also Pushed -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – A federal judge with an audacious plan to settle hundreds of lawsuits filed by local governments against the drug industry over the destruction wrought by prescription opioid painkillers has altered his course.

60. Uber to Up its Background Checks for Drivers -

DETROIT (AP) – Uber will start doing annual criminal background checks on U.S. drivers and hire a company that constantly monitors criminal arrests as it tries to do a better job of keeping riders safe.

61. Last Word: Bakery Rising, Legislative Notes From Nashville and Jazz Messiah -

Some call it the Bakery Project – others Wonder Bread. Whatever you call it the redevelopment project that is centered on the old Wonder Bread bakery on Monroe between Downtown and the Medical District is moving with a building permit this week for what developer Gary Prosterman and his team call the Cadillac Building … because it was once a Cadillac dealership. That’s part of the code being used for places that have been out of action or barely functioning for decades and are now under development.... very post-apocalyptic. 

62. Mulvaney Insists Consumer Watchdog is Still Doing its Job -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Mick Mulvaney tried Wednesday to reassure Democrats on a House finance panel that he's committed to punishing unscrupulous financial companies, while agreeing with Republicans that the watchdog agency he runs needs to be reined in and refocused.

63. Fed in March Discussed 'Slightly Steeper' Future Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials signaled rising confidence last month that a strong economy will lift inflation closer to its 2 percent target and that they may accelerate the Fed's pace of interest rate hikes as a result.

64. Lots of Noise, But Few Results in Legislature -

Just when you think the Tennessee Legislature is going off the deep end, someone will throw them a bungee cord. Maybe a rope made out of hemp would work better because a bungee cord leaves people bouncing, never quite reeling them in.

65. Prosterman Talks Trends for Wonder Bread Project and Phase Two ‘Jewel’ -

As a fourth-generation Memphian, Gary Prosterman is familiar with the drive to and from work on Union, Monroe or Madison avenues.

He called for an informal show of hands at the Memphis Rotary Club luncheon Tuesday, April 10, of how many also drive the streets daily and a lot of hands went up.

66. ‘I'm Sorry’: Zuckerberg Opens Senate Hearing With an Apology -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg began a two-day congressional inquisition Tuesday with a public apology for a privacy scandal that has roiled the social media giant he founded more than a decade ago.

67. Early Voting Opens for May County Primaries -

Early voting in the first of three 2018 elections in Shelby County opens Wednesday at 21 sites across the county and runs through April 26.

The primaries are led by contests for county mayor, all 13 seats on the county commission and most of the county’s elected offices. The remainder are in the other even-year election cycle or have an eight-year term of office that comes around next in 2022.

68. Mortgage Market Up 2 Percent in March -

When Financial Federal executive vice president John Loebel looks at the local mortgage market, he has a straightforward assessment: If you want to buy a home, buy it now.

“The mortgage rate trend is up, period,” he said. “With the Federal Reserve’s consistent raising of rates to control inflation, we foresee this will only continue. We wouldn’t be surprised if rates hit 5 percent next quarter. Due to these variables, we’re experiencing such a seller’s market. Countless buyers are bidding on every single home, decreasing the timeframe for negotiations and even appraisals.”

69. At the EEOC, Harassment Cases Can Languish for Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal agency handling workplace harassment complaints has become a crowded waystation in an overwhelmed bureaucracy, with wait times often stretching years. And as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission takes on renewed significance in light of the growing #MeToo movement, lawyers worry the increased caseload will lead to even longer delays.

70. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

71. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

72. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

73. Powell Says Fed Expects to Stick With Gradual Rate Hikes -

CHICAGO (AP) – Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Friday painted a mostly sunny view of the U.S. economy and said the Fed remains committed to raising its key interest rate gradually unless events change. He said it was too soon to determine how a trade fight with China could affect the U.S. economy.

74. Workers Benefit as US Businesses Struggle to Fill Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. workers are increasingly benefiting as employers struggle to fill millions of open jobs.

More people who had given up looking for work are renewing their job hunts, more employees are confident enough to quit to look for other jobs and pay is gradually picking up.

75. South City Redevelopment Prepares to Break Ground -

Capstone Building Corp. is preparing to break ground on the first phase of the South City Choice Neighborhood Improvement project on the site of the former Foote Homes public housing development.

76. Memphis Lawmakers Helped Advance Medical Marijuana Bill in House -

NASHVILLE – Three Shelby County lawmakers played key roles in helping a medical marijuana bill move through the Legislature, supporting its passage in the House Criminal Justice Committee before the bill was pulled Tuesday, April 3, by its Senate sponsor, Democratic state Sen. Steve Dickerson of Nashville.

77. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

78. Opioid Crisis: Top Doctor Urges Access to Overdose Antidote -

ATLANTA (AP) – The nation's chief doctor wants more Americans to start carrying the overdose antidote naloxone to help combat the nation's opioid crisis and save lives.

Speaking at the National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta on Thursday morning, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams issued his office's first national public health advisory in 13 years.

79. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

80. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

81. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

82. Local Experts To Tackle Health Care Changes -

Eight years after the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, health care can still spark contentious debates around the country, though there are nevertheless a few things people can agree on.

Costs keep going up. Insurers have continued to pull out of the individual ACA marketplace, leaving that market segment volatile and uncertain. And there’s still no widespread consensus on how to plug the gaps that still exist in the country’s health care system.

83. Anniversary of King's Assassination Marked With Marches, Rallies -

Several thousand people marching under the banners of unions and civil rights organizations marched peacefully Wednesday, April 4, from the headquarters of the American Federal of State County and Municipal Employees at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard to Mason Temple Church of God in Christ.

84. States, Cities Sue US Over Census Citizenship Question -

NEW YORK (AP) – Seventeen states, the District of Columbia and six cities sued the U.S. government Tuesday, saying the addition of a citizenship question to the census form is unconstitutional.

85. Tesla Raises Production but Falls Short of Model 3 Goals -

DETROIT (AP) – Electric car maker Tesla Inc. increased production of its Model 3 mass-market car in the first quarter but still fell far short of the numbers it promised last summer.

86. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

87. South City Redevelopment Prepares to Break Ground -

Capstone Building Corp. is preparing to break ground on the first phase of the South City Choice Neighborhood Improvement project on the site of the former Foote Homes public housing development.

88. Baseball's Back and NCAA Not Ready to Pay Players -

Babe Ruth and Shohei Ohtani. In the same sentence. In baseball’s record book.

On Sunday, April 1, Ohtani became the first Major League player to start as a position player on opening day (albeit, as a designated hitter) and then start as a pitcher within his team’s first 10 games since Ruth with the Boston Red Sox in 1919.

89. Trump EPA Expected to Roll Back Auto Gas Mileage Standards -

DETROIT (AP) – The Trump administration is expected to announce that it will roll back automobile gas mileage and pollution standards that were a pillar in the Obama administration's plans to combat climate change.

90. Small Business Dilemma: Raise Prices or Absorb Inflation? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Higher energy prices and borrowing costs make it more expensive than last year for Bill Savickas to operate his wholesale produce business – especially since it's hard to pass the increases on to his customers.

91. Last Word: Opening Day, Slowing the Flow and 30 Years of Shangri-La -

There is something about opening day of the Major League Baseball season – especially when it is opening day for just about every team at the same time. Just seeing the green fields with a solitary outfielder, the low brick walls behind the symmetry of batter, catcher and umpire renews my love for the game. I don’t really pay attention to players – don’t know any of their names. And how and when did the Astros wind up in the American League and the Brewers in the National League? I just like watching the game in a sport where the team and the individual coexist as in no other sport.

92. Facebook Revamps Privacy Tools as Tighter EU Rules Draw Near -

NEW YORK (AP) – Facebook is giving its privacy tools a makeover as it reels from criticisms over its data practices and faces tighter European regulations in the coming months.

The changes won't affect Facebook's privacy policies or the types of data it gathers on users. But the company hopes its 2.2 billion users will have an easier time navigating its complex and often confusing privacy and security settings. Facebook says it also wants to give users a simpler way to access and download the data it collects on them.

93. US Economic Growth in Q4 Revised Up to 2.9 Percent Rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a solid 2.9 percent annual rate in the final three months of last year, a sharp upward revision that caps three quarters of the fastest growth in more than a decade. The Trump administration is hoping the economy will accelerate further this year, aided by sizable tax cuts and increased government spending.

94. Last Word: Graceland Responds, The Hustle's First Season and Memphis Rent -

Sun Studio getting a fresh coat of paint Tuesday as city road crews were redoing some lines on Downtown streets including turning arrows in the left curb lane that always need pointing out to visitors baffled by the Memphis enigma that is one-way streets.

95. Explore Bike Share Reveals Station Locations -

The launch of Explore Bike Share is getting closer with the nonprofit revealing Wednesday, March 28, the locations of the stations for the 600-bike system.

Explore Bike Share’s 60 stations span from Downtown, South Memphis and Cooper-Young to Orange Mound, Overton Square and Crosstown. The stations and bikes are being funded through a combination of donations from foundations and individuals, plus a $2.2 million federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality grant, said Explore Bike Share executive director Trey Moore.

96. August Ballot Starts to Fill Out Ahead of April 5 Filing Deadline -

With contenders in the May county primaries now appearing at various campaign forums, holding their own events and going door-to-door in search of votes, there are still a few gaps to be filled on the Aug. 2 state and federal primary ballot.

97. Last Word: The RDC's New Leader, Potter on 100 North Main and FedEx Moves -

Is Memphis big enough for FedExForum and some kind of event space on the Graceland campus in Whitehaven? The city administration thinks that could be the case. But it requires an “honest broker” between Graceland and the Grizz – who run the forum for the city and county – to quote city chief legal officer Bruce McMullenif there is a deal to be had.

98. Frontier Gun Maker Remington Seeks Bankruptcy Protection -

Remington, the storied gun maker that began turning out flintlock rifles when there were only 19 states in the Union, has filed for bankruptcy reorganization amid years of slumping sales and legal and financial pressure over the Sandy Hook school massacre.

99. Questions for Feds Delay TennCare Work Requirement Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers have temporarily hit pause on their push to make many able-bodied adults either work, volunteer, or take classes if they don't have children younger than 6, in order to keep their TennCare health coverage.

100. Pinnacle Continues to Ramp up Memphis Presence -

Pinnacle Bank is continuing to accelerate its growth in the Memphis banking market, with the opening in recent days of two new loan production offices, a new mortgage office, plus another mortgage office on the way soon in Southaven.