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Editorial Results (free)

1. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

2. Supreme Court Justice Takes Ceremonial Oath of Office -

An investiture ceremony has been held for Tennessee’s newest Supreme Court Justice Roger Page.

3. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

4. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

5. Last Word: Grizz Aftermath, Mayor-A-Rama and Prince Saves Hendrix -

116-95, Spurs over the Grizzlies is how the NBA second season ends in Memphis. A four-game sweep of a team that now heals and perhaps changes on its way to the fall.

6. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

7. Tenn. Lottery Sets Record For Education Funding -

The Tennessee Lottery says it returned a record $119 million for education funding during the first quarter of the year, a 27 percent increase over the previous quarterly record.

Lottery-funded programs include 12 different scholarships and grants, multiple after-school programs, an energy-efficient schools program and Tennessee Promise, which offers eligible high school seniors the chance to go to community or technical college without paying tuition.

8. Major Violent Crime Rate Up 18.3 Percent From 2015 -

The major violent crime rate was up 18.3 percent countywide for the first three months of 2016 compared to the first quarter of 2015, according to crime statistics released Thursday, April 21, by the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission.

9. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

10. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

11. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

12. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

13. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

14. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

15. Major Violent Crime Countywide Up 18.3 Percent From 2015 -

The major violent crime rate was up 18.3 percent countywide for the first three months of 2016 compared to the first quarter of 2015, according to crime statistics released Thursday, April 21, by the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission.

16. EDGE Considering Fast-Track Incentive Program, Diversity Spend Changes -

The Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has started work on a new tax incentive program that would help Memphis compete with North Mississippi for industrial projects.

At its April 20 meeting, EDGE board chairman Al Bright appointed a committee to evaluate a proposed Fast Track PILOT and hammer out its policies and procedures.

17. Memphis' Startup Accelerators Teaming Up This Summer -

For several years now, Memphis hasn’t been home to a unified hub of startup companies and activities so much as a collection of startup archipelagos, the disparate factions of activity sometimes duplicating the work of other groups.

18. FDA Campaign Takes Aim at Chewing Tobacco Use by Rural Teens -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government health officials will team up with minor league baseball as part of a new $36 million campaign to discourage rural teenagers from using chewing tobacco.

Baseball stadiums will feature the campaign's central message this summer – "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" – via advertising and promotions with players. Ads will also run on local television, radio and online in 35 markets across the U.S., including cities in Michigan, Montana, South Carolina and Tennessee.

19. The Opportunity of a Learning Lifetime -

The opportunity of a tuition-free community college education for every Tennessee high school graduate who wants it is one of our state’s boldest initiatives. That’s what the Tennessee Promise program represents.

20. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

21. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

22. Tenn. Lottery Sets Record For Education Funding -

The Tennessee Lottery says it returned a record $119 million for education funding during the first quarter of the year, a 27 percent increase over the previous quarterly record.

Lottery-funded programs include 12 different scholarships and grants, multiple after-school programs, an energy-efficient schools program and Tennessee Promise, which offers eligible high school seniors the chance to go to community or technical college without paying tuition.

23. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

24. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

25. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

26. Shadyac Takes Over Soulsville Project With ‘Different Type of Model’ -

Tom Shadyac wants to pump $10 million into the heart of Soulsville. That’s the initial ask for his community center concept, One Family Memphis.

In September, the Hollywood filmmaker-turned-University of Memphis professor purchased for $1.9 million the bankrupt New Towne Center, a 77,000-square-foot community anchor that a local community development corporation tried to develop during the economic downturn.

27. Beale Landing Architecture Wins International Honors -

Beale Street Landing has been named the best marina or port in the world for 2016 in the fourth annual Architizer A+Awards.

A jury of designers, urban planners and architects selected the landing, designed by RTN Architects of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as the most architecturally significant marina or port for 2016.

28. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

29. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

30. Beale Landing Architecture Wins International Honors -

Beale Street Landing has been named the best marina or port in the world for 2016 in the fourth annual Architizer A+Awards.

A jury of designers, urban planners and architects selected the landing, designed by RTN Architects of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as the most architecturally significant marina or port for 2016.

31. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

32. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

33. Memphis College of Art Making Moves to Consolidate Campuses -

Memphis College of Art has confirmed the consolidation of its Downtown campus with its Overton Park campus and will begin relevant construction over the summer.

That construction includes converting five MCA-owned apartment buildings around the Overton Park campus into studios for use in the graduate program.

34. FedEx Unveils Latest Global Citizenship Report -

FedEx Corp. has been busy with more than worldwide package delivery and the operation of its sprawling logistics empire over the past year.

35. Three Decades In, Africa in April Maintains Cultural Focus -

It was 30 years ago that David and Yvonne Acey answered a dilemma from an educators’ conference about levels of learning among African-American students compared to white students.

36. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

37. Events -

Memphis Child Advocacy Center will host its annual children’s memorial flag-raising on Wednesday, April 13, at noon on Civic Center Plaza outside Memphis City Hall, 125 N. Main St. The ceremony remembers Shelby County kids who have died as a result of abuse or neglect. Visit memphiscac.org.

38. Downtown Gets Creative With Office Users -

The Downtown Memphis Commission is rebranding Memphis’ urban core to attract millennials and fill in office space vacancies with the next creative firm or startup.

Announced in November, “My HQ is Downtown” is a comprehensive marketing strategy that sells Downtown as a creative hotspot.

39. UTHSC Center for Addictions Created to Save Lives -

Back when he was still jumping out of planes as an Army Green Beret, serving alongside some of the nation’s most elite fighters, Daniel Sumrok was also inflating lungs and patching bullet holes. The imperative to save lives was part of the job, and he checked that box repeatedly.

40. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

41. Events -

ArtsMemphis will hold a free workshop for organizations interested in Arts Build Communities grants on Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The grants are open to nonprofits and government entities seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community. Visit tn.gov for details.

42. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

43. Georgia Tech Hires Pastner From Memphis to Replace Gregory -

ATLANTA (AP) – Josh Pastner isn't promising a quick fix as Georgia Tech's basketball coach.

44. First Tennessee Launches $50M Community Fund -

First Tennessee has launched a $50 million Community Development Fund that the bank says will award up to $3 million annually in grants to community and nonprofit organizations serving low- to moderate-income people and neighborhoods.

45. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

46. Events -

ArtsMemphis will hold a free workshop for organizations interested in Arts Build Communities grants on Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The grants are open to nonprofits and government entities seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community. Visit tn.gov for details.

47. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

48. Zika Virus Confirmed in Shelby County -

The Shelby County Health Department has confirmed the first case of the Zika virus in Shelby County.

Elizabeth Hart, the department's public information officer, declined to provide any identifying details about the individual, except to say the disease is a result of the person returning from outside the U.S. after having visited one of the countries where Zika is currently prevalent.

49. United Housing Gets $1.1M Boost From Banks -

United Housing Inc. has gotten a boost from area financial institutions in recent days to the tune of $1.1 million.

50. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

51. Daughter of Duality, Gibbs is Building a Better Justice System -

Say you stole a television worth $300. How long should you be punished? A year? Five years? Whatever you answered, it probably wasn’t “for the rest of your life.” But that’s how the U.S. legal system currently treats many people who have been convicted of felonies.

52. Tennessee Bill Would Allow Counselors to Deny Services -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would allow mental health counselors to turn patients away based on the counselors' religious beliefs and personal principles has passed in the House in Tennessee, the latest state to introduce measures that opponents say legalize discrimination against gays, bisexuals and transgender people.

53. First Tennessee Launches $50M Community Development Fund -

First Tennessee has launched a $50 million Community Development Fund that the bank says will award up to $3 million annually in grants to community and nonprofit organizations serving low- to moderate-income people and neighborhoods.

54. Events -

Metal Museum will host Whet Thursday on April 7 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can participate in a foundry class, tour the galleries, and enjoy food trucks, cash bar and live music. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

55. Southland Mall Sells In Foreclosure -

1215 E. Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2016
Buyer: 1215 East Shelby Drive Holdings LLC
Seller: Southland Mall Shopping Center LLC
Details: Southland Mall, Memphis’ first enclosed mall when it opened 50 years ago, has sold for $4.3 million in foreclosure.

56. Gaskins Leads Engineering Office -

Wain Gaskins has joined consulting engineering firm Cannon & Cannon Inc. as manager of the company’s new Memphis office as well as director of West Tennessee operations and business development. 

57. Move to OK Commercial Drone Flights Over People -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A government-sponsored committee is recommending standards that could clear the way for commercial drone flights over populated areas and help speed the introduction of package delivery drones and other uses not yet possible, The Associated Press has learned.

58. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

59. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

60. Settle? No. UT Needs to Defend Itself in Title IX Suit -

Lots of smoke. But is there a fire? That is the issue at the University of Tennessee, where a Title IX lawsuit alleges the university has a “hostile sexual environment” and violates federal laws dealing with student discipline hearings for sexual assault cases, especially those involving student-athletes.

61. Billingsley Calls for Release Of County Disparity Study -

Shelby County Commissioner Mark Billingsley says county government leaders should release to the public a disparity study the commission reviewed privately Monday, March 28.

The study by Mason Tillman Associates is an overview of contracts and specifically how much of the county’s business is with minority-owned businesses.

62. Campbell Clinic Surgeon Wins Neer Award -

Every year, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons medical group wades through submitted papers detailing clinical research projects that focus on the shoulder and elbows. The end result: identifying the best, and naming them the Charles S. Neer Award winners for the year.

63. Editorial: The Ponderosa Box -

Maybe we’ve got this all wrong. Some people have suggested bringing recalcitrant, Memphis-hating legislators from other parts of the state here to our city to show them what’s right about this place. Instead, maybe we should go to them.

64. Fertile Ground -

Residents of the Memphis Medical District have begun filing in to the Premier Palace ballroom on Madison Avenue, along with area stakeholders, planners and other attendees who have business interests in the area.

65. Billingsley Calls for Release of County Disparity Study -

Shelby County Commissioner Mark Billingsley says county government leaders should release to the public a disparity study the commission reviewed privately Monday, March 28.

66. MEMFix East Targets Concrete Jungle Around i-Bank, Clark Towers -

East Memphis’ most prominent office towers, Clark Tower and the iBank Tower, are anchors in a strategy to make the Poplar Avenue-facing corner more walkable and memorable.

Late last year, In-Rel Properties purchased the iBank Tower, bringing both towers under the same ownership for the first time. The Florida-based real estate group plans to unite the 16-acre office campus with increased connections to the surrounding East Memphis restaurants and retail.

67. Tony Allen Sees his Bleak Chicago Existence in JIFF Kids -

As Tony Allen tells it, “I grew up in some of the hardest parts of Chicago.” And when he says “grew up,” he means survived.

68. Last Word: Encore In D, A Bus Every 10 Minutes and Marc Cohn in Memphis -

Encore in Nashville.
The state Senate’s state and local government committee meets again Wednesday to vote on the de-annexation bill it completed amending Tuesday.

This begins at 2:30 p.m. and we will be providing live Tweets of the action @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols. So join us.
Because there was so much debate and parliamentary swordplay Tuesday, the Wednesday session will probably be pretty matter of fact by comparison.
Here’s our account of how it went down with the committee upping the percentage of voters signatures it takes to get a deannexation call on the ballot. And those who do vote to deannex can add payments for benefits liability to what they would also pay as their share of capital debt. There is also reaction from Greater Memphis Chamber president Phil Trenary.
Trenary had some choice words for Chattanooga state Senator Todd Gardenhire who called out Memphis specifically for what he viewed as trying to make the deannexed pay twice for benefits of city workers.
The looming question is what will the reaction to this be in the House which passed a very different version of this.
The proponents of the bill in the House and Senate have fundamentally different views that appear to be the kind of differences that would take some time to reconcile.

69. Amended De-Annexation Bill Up for Key State Senate Committee Vote -

A de-annexation bill that takes in the whole state has a key state Senate committee vote set for Wednesday, March 30, after senators made some significant changes to the proposal Tuesday in committee.

70. Buckman Performing Arts Center Becomes Community Gem -

It was 25 years ago that singer-songwriter Marc Cohn released his debut album that included the song for which he’s most known, “Walking in Memphis.”

71. Last Word: Saturday In The Park, Lipscomb's Successor and Fred's Looks Up -

Quite the Easter weekend on the Overton Park Greensward.
Greensward partisans planned a Saturday Easter Egg hunt, Memphis Zoo parking crews found the eggs and a crowd of several hundred people blocked overflow parking briefly that afternoon.

72. Two City Entities Thriving in MWBE Participation -

Recently released disparity studies say that minority- and women-owned businesses are only getting a sliver of contracts in the local business world.

Of all $128.6 billion in revenue flowing through Memphis in 2012, black-owned firms garnered 0.83 percent of those receipts. In Shelby County, 88.3 percent, or $168.2 million, of county contracts went to white-owned businesses between 2012 and 2014.

73. Major Violent Crime Spikes 24.5 Percent Countywide -

Shelby County’s major violent crime rate over the first two months of 2016 was up 24.5 percent compared to the first two months of 2015, while Memphis’ rate rose 22.2 percent over the same period.

74. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

75. Angel Care Clinic Takes Holistic Approach to Treating Animals -

Dr. Kathy Mitchener’s philosophy on treating animals is pretty simple. More than just treating an illness or pain, she believes in a holistic approach to medical care.

In 2004, she opened Angel Care Cancer Clinic for Animals, and in 2014 she added Angel Care Natural Healing and Acupuncture for Pets.

76. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

77. Stephenson Leverages Capital for Community Change -

Why start a bank? It’s a question that would never occur to most people. But to Susan Stephenson, the answer is obvious: “It’s infinite variety. You get to participate in other people’s dreams. In the morning, I can be a first-time homeowner. In the afternoon, I’m a small business looking to open a new location.”

78. Crocker Repairing Urban Child Institute’s Reputation, Reviving Mission -

As a vice president for Bank of America, Jill Crocker has witnessed the upheaval that can occur when one financial institution takes over another.

79. Sugar Services, an Elephant in South End Room, Plans to Stay -

In operation since 1969, Sugar Services is one of the last vestiges of the South End’s legacy as a heavy industrial area. While the factory has continued to process bulk sugar into liquid sugar from its site at 15 W. G.E. Patterson, at the southeast corner of Tennessee Street, developers attracted to the South Main Arts District have built condos and apartments on either side.

80. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

81. Major Violent Crime Spikes 24.5 Percent in Shelby County -

Shelby County’s major violent crime rate over the first two months of 2016 was up 24.5 percent compared to the first two months of 2015, while Memphis’ rate rose 22.2 percent over the same period.

The Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission statistics for major violent crime released Tuesday, March 22, cover the categories of murder, rape, aggravated assault and robbery.

82. Mural Sets Scene for 107 S. Main Revelopment -

The long-blighted building at 107 S. Main St. is headed for active use and will see the addition of a mural by May 1.

At its March 16 meeting, the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. approved to put $10,000 toward a colorful mural designed by Chicago artist Damon Lamar Reed.

83. Up-Tempo Offense Will Need ‘Nasty’ O-Line -

If all goes well, the attention probably will be on the quarterback – an open competition at the moment – and the receivers and the running backs. That’s just how football works.

But ultimately the success of the University of Memphis offense next season will be about much more than the fast guys and the guy who gets the ball to them. First-year head coach Mike Norvell was offensive coordinator at Arizona State and he has brought with him Chip Long, who will serve as Norvell’s offensive coordinator, and who worked with Norvell from 2012 through 2015.

84. Major Violent Crime Rate Spikes 24.5 Percent Countywide -

The major violent crime rate in Shelby County over the first two months of 2016 was up 24.5 percent compared to the first two months of 2015 and up 22.2 percent over the same period in the city of Memphis.

85. Last Word: A Trip to Committee, Minority Business Moves and the Issue With Reissues -

So those who support the general concept of de-annexation in the Tennessee state Senate were the most vocal Monday in sending the proposal back to committee for a more intense examination.

There were plenty of Memphians in the Senate chambers Monday despite the rumors that this was on its way back to committee.
Staying put until the deal is done has been a lesson won through bitter experience for some Memphis leaders.
Despite hearing from legislators in other parts of the state who are uneasy about this, the opposition remains a Memphis thing in Nashville.
But the Senate sponsor, Bo Watson, stumped his toe badly on this when he shut down an amendment Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville wanted to allow the voluntarily de-annexation of an area Millington recently took into its city limits.
So when the state and local government committee meets at noon Wednesday, it will be round – frankly, I forget which round it is. Just ring the bell and let’s see what happens.

86. The Week Ahead: March 21-27 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first Great River Indoor Food Truck Festival to a celebration of late Memphis wrestler Sputnik Monroe.

87. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

88. Community Mortgage Corp. Opens New Oxford Branch -

Community Mortgage Corp. has opened a new branch location in Oxford, Miss.

The new branch is located just off the Oxford downtown square, at 400 S. Lamar Blvd.

89. Step Ahead Scholarship to Award $100,000 to Girls -

A pair of Memphis-area nonprofits and a local bank are preparing to award $100,000 in scholarships to girls and young women who plan to continue their studies beyond high school.

Applications for the Step Ahead Scholarship – a collaborative effort of A Step Ahead Foundation and Girls Inc. of Memphis – are being accepted through April 15.

90. Visible Music College Developing Whalum Center -

Visible Music College is developing a new academic center on the fifth floor of its Downtown Memphis campus named in honor of Grammy-winning saxophonist Kirk Whalum and his family.

The new Whalum Center for Music will include the college library and student center. Central to its literary and audio collection will be jazz and gospel influences and emerging genres curated and developed by the Whalum family and by Whalum himself. All music styles will be represented through themed rooms designed for instrument and voice practice, audio listening and media.

91. Oliver North to Speak at Salvation Army Dinner -

The Salvation Army’s 2016 Hardin Annual Dinner on May 17 will include a special guest appearance by Lt. Col. Oliver North as part of the program’s “An Evening with Heroes” theme.

92. Council Working to Build Local Manufacturing for Device Industry -

The medical device industry fuels Memphis’ backbone. With a $2.6 billion local economic impact and nearly 17,000 direct and indirect jobs, original equipment manufacturers like Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Group, Medtronic Spinal & Biologistics and Microport Orthopedics have made the Memphis area their base for products and medical devices.

93. Five to Watch -

“You can’t live in Memphis without some kind of side hustle, right?” That’s the way former WMC-TV reporter Lauren Squires Ready sees it. Her side hustle, the passion project she’s been pursuing in her free time separate from all the writing, reporting and live shots as an on-air news personality?

94. Memphis Habitat Receives Statewide Grant Funds -

Memphis Habitat has received a $13,500 grant from the Tennessee Housing Development Agency through Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to support the construction of a new home in Uptown.

The funds were part of a $500,000 grant Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee received from the THDA Housing Trust Fund to distribute among the 50 Habitat affiliates across Tennessee to aid in the construction of 20 homes statewide.

95. The $10.6 Million Question: Fire Josh Pastner or Keep Him? -

The Hall-of-Fame coach was speaking on ESPN Radio’s “Mike & Mike,” his team sitting on the outside looking in on this year’s NCAA Tournament because of his university’s own imposed ban:

96. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

97. Community Mortgage Corp. Opens New Oxford Branch -

Community Mortgage Corp. has opened a new branch location in Oxford, Miss.

The new branch is located just off the Oxford downtown square, at 400 S. Lamar Blvd.

98. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

99. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

100. Step Ahead Scholarship To Award $100,000 to Girls -

A pair of Memphis-area nonprofits and a local bank are preparing to award $100,000 in scholarships to girls and young women who plan to continue their studies beyond high school.

Applications for the Step Ahead Scholarship – a collaborative effort of A Step Ahead Foundation and Girls Inc. of Memphis – are being accepted through April 15.