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Editorial Results (free)

1. Kellogg Foundation Grant Targets Healthier Babies -

Right! From The Start will continue work in the Delta through a new $1.9 million W.K. Kellogg Foundation grant to the Community Foundation of Northwest Mississippi. The initiative will work to increase the breastfeeding rates of extremely low birth-weight babies utilizing a multi-agency approach to ensure better outcomes and effect systemic change. The funding continues through March 2019.

2. First Tennessee Tweaks West Tennessee Leadership -

First Tennessee Bank has announced some Memphis-area executive changes.

Louis F. “Bo” Allen Jr., executive vice president and manager of commercial banking for First Tennessee’s West Tennessee region, will be promoted to West Tennessee president on June 30.

3. Last Word: Graduation Day and Our Outrage, An ASD Offer In Raleigh and Fashion -

According to Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson, 15,000 people have watched the several dozen high school graduation ceremonies the school system has streamed live on its website including the 14 graduations held Saturday.

4. Balink Chosen to Lead The Exchange Club Family Center -

Jennifer Balink has been named executive director of The Exchange Club Family Center, where she’ll begin her duties July 1. In her new role, Balink aims to secure and direct every available resource toward breaking the cycle of child abuse and family violence in the Memphis community. 

5. Pugh Takes Politically Volatile Shelter Position -

The new director of the Memphis Animal Shelter says a shelter that doesn’t euthanize animals because of time or space is a goal.

But Alexis Pugh, who starts the job next month, is quick to add that public safety is the immediate priority.

6. Small Neighborhood Improvements Can Add Up Big -

Memphians have raised half a million dollars and counting for neighborhood improvements through a Livable Memphis and ioby strategic partnership.

“A lot of times you’re waiting for that check, that one big investment,” said John Paul Shaffer, program director for Livable Memphis. “And that can create a stasis in a neighborhood.”

7. Baptist Adding ICU at Children’s Hospital -

The Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital has hit its ceiling and is now expanding to meet increased demand. When the 19,000-square-foot pediatric emergency department opened last year, Baptist Memorial Health Care expected to treat 35 children a day. That figure is more like 65 to 70 children, with the hospital expecting to exceed 20,000 patients in its first year.

8. Last Word: Graduation Day, St. Jude's New Office Tower and Another Bike Map -

The chances are pretty good that you encountered someone in a cap and gown this weekend.

It is graduation season and Shelby County Schools kicked it off Saturday with 14 high school graduations – that’s in one day.

9. 2 Memphis Nonprofits Get $100K From First Tennessee -

A pair of Memphis nonprofits has received $100,000 each in community grant funds from First Tennessee Bank.

10. Crosstown High Organizers Say It Will Be Innovative, Whether Charter or Optional -

Crosstown High School could be a charter school after all.

That was the original plan when charter operator Gestalt Community Schools signed on as one of the early tenants of Crosstown Concourse, the transformation of the old Sears Tower on Cleveland Avenue. When Gestalt pulled out of the project in late 2015, a group of philanthropists and community leaders rallied to recruit another school for the mixed-use high-rise.

11. Editorial: Look at the ‘Grand Plan,’ Then Look Beyond It -

From a supermarket to a community center. From a produce section to a climbing wall. That is now the plan for a major part of the Soulsville redevelopment.

It’s easy to be skeptical at moments like this. Part of the skepticism comes from a long civic experience of well-meaning people who have come to our city with the goal of doing something for us that they believed we should do but imagined we couldn’t or wouldn’t do.

12. One Family -

An unprecedented private investment aims to restore a commercial heart to the Soulsville USA neighborhood, where a pair of sprawling buildings take up nearly a full block across from the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. It isn’t an eyesore, but inactivity within those walls has been a drag on the community.

13. BRIDGES Celebrates Retirement of CFO Bob Rogalski -

The BRIDGES mission is as clear as it is bold: “To unite and inspire diverse young people to become confident and courageous leaders committed to community transformation.”

But every bridge needs support. For 11 years, Bob Rogalski has served as the nonprofit’s vice president of finance and CFO. He is retiring on June 30, the end of BRIDGES’ 2016 fiscal year. Endowment earnings for this fiscal year were $720,000 and next year’s endowment should be around $765,000, Rogalski said.

14. Hardy Makes Art Accessible for Millennials -

Whitney Hardy is a woman on the move. The day we meet, she’s supervising 200 tons of soybeans as they make their way from hopper trucks onto train cars. Then she’s off to the premier of “Genesis,” a collection of new works presented by Collage Dance Collective.

15. New FESJC Director Hoping for Clear Skies, Big-Name Leaders -

Sometimes, the moments that determine your future are seemingly small. Only later can you put everything together and realize that’s when you really made your choice.

This is Darrell Smith’s first year as tournament director of the FedEx St. Jude Classic. Because he is only 33 years old, one could argue he got to this position quickly. But that’s not entirely true and does not take into account the fateful moment when he was 14 years old.

16. Baptist Executive Vaughn Receives U of M’s Highest Alumni Award -

Anita Vaughn’s notable 43-year career with Baptist Memorial Hospital started on a whim.

“I went to University of Memphis for a year thinking I was going to be a commercial artist,” Vaughn said. “Then a friend just happened to say, ‘You know what? I’m going down to Baptist School of Nursing,’ and I said, ‘Well, OK. Me too!’

17. EDGE OKs Fast Track PILOT Program -

The board of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has approved a new tax incentive package designed to give Memphis a more competitive edge against North Mississippi.

The EDGE board green-lighted the Fast Track PILOT program at its Wednesday, May 18, meeting, making it EDGE’s fifth payment-in-lieu-of-taxes program.

18. 2 Memphis Nonprofits Get $100K From First Tennessee -

A pair of Memphis nonprofits has received $100,000 each in community grant funds from First Tennessee Bank.

19. Time Running Out to Vote for Conley in NBA Cares Contest -

The NBA recently announced Mike Conley as a finalist for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award presented by Kaiser Permanente. Fan voting continues through Wednesday, May 18, for the league-wide award.

20. Check This Out: Memphis Library Visitors Can Now Access Seeds -

Thanks to its many books available for perusal, a library can be thought of as a veritable garden of wisdom, scholarship and literature for visitors to sample and enjoy.

At one Memphis library, though, the metaphor is much more literal.

21. The Week Ahead: May 16-22 -

With a barbecue-filled weekend behind us, it’s time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the Memphis in May Triathlon (where you can work off that pork belly) to the city’s first Palestine Festival (where, yes, there will be even more food).

22. Planned Parenthood Launches Speaker Series -

Planned Parenthood of Greater Memphis Region will kick off a new series of events next week. Each event in the Beers with Pioneers series will feature an icon of the reproductive justice and women rights movement in conversation with one of her current contemporaries.

23. Mike Conley Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

24. Opera Memphis: If You Sing – Anywhere – They Will Listen -

For everything else opera might be, Ned Canty has made it his business to see opera as opportunity.

The general director for Opera Memphis, when Canty came to town five years ago the company was in decline.

25. Events -

Tennessee Small Business Development Center will host a workshop on government contracting Thursday, May 19, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. The University of Tennessee’s Procurement Technical Assistance Center will teach small-business owners how to successfully compete for government contracts. Cost is free; registration required. Visit tsbdc.org/training for details.

26. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

27. Memphis Planned Parenthood Launches Speaker Series -

Planned Parenthood of Greater Memphis Region will kick off a new series of events next week. Each event in the Beers with Pioneers series will feature an icon of the reproductive justice and women rights movement in conversation with one of her current contemporaries.

28. Food Tour Event Launches This Weekend -

When you’re a foodie like Cristina McCarter who proudly flies the flag of her favorite local restaurants, you attract certain reactions from friends.

One, in particular, is a frequent occurrence – the phone call McCarter gets often from a friend asking the same question. “Where should I eat this weekend?”

29. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

30. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

31. More Student Housing For University District -

3557 Mynders Ave. 
Memphis, TN 38111
Permit Amount: $15.5 million

Completion: Fall 2017
Owner: 908 Group
Tenant: The Nine
Architect: BDG Architects
Details: A student housing tower near the University of Memphis has taken a step forward nearly two years after a development on that site was first announced.

32. Last Word: Humdingers, Gangster Disciples Paper Work and Underground Day -

Sometimes you think you know what is going on and then something happens like Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies, grabbing a bite to eat Monday at Humdingers out east with former Grizz coach Lionel Hollins. Next thing you know there’s another possibility for the next Grizz coach – a return engagement that would be exceedingly rare.

33. Student Housing Tower Near U of M Moves Forward -

A student housing tower near the University of Memphis has taken a step forward nearly two years after a development on that site was first announced.

Montgomery Martin Contractors recently applied for a $15.5 million building permit for 3557 Mynders Ave. at the southwest corner of Brister Street.

34. Events -

Central Defense Staffing will host a job fair Wednesday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at The Landers Center, 4560 Venture Drive in Southaven. CDS is seeking to fill hundreds of positions for all shifts at accounts in North Mississippi. Applicants should come prepared for an interview. For more information and details on available positions, call 901-473-6385.

35. Dave Thomas Named CEO Of Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as chief executive officer. In this role, he’s responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations and also is tasked with growing the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance company. Thomas has 40 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently serving as CEO of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

36. Rallings May Seek Permanent Director Post -

When law enforcement brass talk about putting “drugs and guns on the table” – it’s a literal expression of a police department touting its ability.

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings did just that last week with the results of a 2 1/2 month operation by the police Organized Crime Unit that began Feb. 1, his first day on the job as police director.

37. Resurrection Health Merges With Larger System -

Resurrection Health, a faith-based, evangelical health service organization that’s opened a handful of Memphis-area clinics since launching in December 2014, has merged with a larger health system.

38. Mike Conley a Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

39. Memphis Musician Loan Program Awards First Loan -

Memphis musician and Beale Street fixture Eric Hughes is finishing his latest album with help from a non-traditional source.

40. Raleigh Mall Demolition Signals Change After Delays -

The crowd of several hundred people on the south end of the Raleigh Springs Mall Saturday, May 7, was larger than the crowd inside the mall to shop.

They came to watch the beginning of the end.

41. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

42. Retail, Amenities Embellish Highland Row Development -

Highland Row, a mixed-use development sprawling across an entire block in the University of Memphis area, will see its first residents this summer.

Construction began in February on the three-building project located along Highland Street between Midland and Eastland avenues.

43. EdR Reports Net Income Of $16.7M in First Quarter -

Memphis-based EdR earned $16.7 million in net income, or 26 cents per diluted share, in the first quarter, the company announced Monday, May 2.

That compares with net income of $6.9 million, or 14 cents per diluted share, during first quarter 2015.

44. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

45. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

46. Herenton Pitches Two New Schools For Juvenile Offenders -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton began Wednesday, May 4, with an appeal that got the attention of Shelby County Commissioners. “We don’t want your money,” he told 11 of the 13 commissioners in committee sessions as he pitched two new residential campuses for children in juvenile detention.

47. French Fort Motel Compromise Hard-Fought -

The developer of the old Marine Hospital south of E.H. Crump Avenue at the Memphis-Arkansas Bridge across the Mississippi River and the leader of the French Fort neighborhood association never actually talked to each other Wednesday, May 4.

48. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

49. South Front Hits its Stride as Standalone Corridor -

South Front Street, which stretches Downtown from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Central Station, is emerging as its own standalone residential and commercial corridor. What was once a heavy industrial area and warehousing district for South Main’s department stores is undergoing a transformation into Downtown’s most residentially dense neighborhood.

50. Bikesmith Evolving Into Community Hangout -

The Bikesmith’s grand opening next week for a patio expansion and a pump track at the 509 N. Hollywood bicycle shop is the latest reflection of Jim Steffen’s longstanding intent to make his business bigger than a place where goods are bought and sold.

51. Density is Destiny for Memphis’ Creative Economy -

The lack of density in creative workers has worked against the cultivation of a creative economy in Memphis. Density turns out to play an outsized role in the cultivation of collective knowledge and access to the resources necessary to build creative solutions to power the modern-day economy.

52. Startup Teams Announced for ‘Summer Of Acceleration’ -

Monday, May 2, marked Day One of Memphis’ first “summer of acceleration,” a joint program of seven startup accelerators running concurrently that have collectively drawn the participation of 18 startup teams and dozens of founders hailing from as far away as Slovenia and Israel.

53. 1866 Memphis Massacre Anniversary Draws Historians -

South Street is now named G.E Patterson Boulevard in one of two name changes since the thoroughfare was a dirt road trod by horses and the wagons they pulled.

The only reminder of the street’s status as an epicenter of the violence 150 years ago this month that killed 46 people and burned every black church and school in the city to the ground is a plaque unveiled Sunday, May 1, in Army Park.

54. EdR Reports Q1 Net Income of $16.7M -

Memphis-based EdR earned $16.7 million in net income, or 26 cents per diluted share, in the first quarter, the company announced Monday, May 2. That compares with net income of $6.9 million, or 14 cents per diluted share, during first quarter 2015.

55. Federal Regulators Close Memphis-Based Bank -

Trust Co. Bank of Memphis has failed, with state and federal regulators announcing Friday, April 29, they had closed all four branches of the West Tennessee financial institution and arranged a purchase agreement to protect depositors.

56. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

57. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

58. Women's Foundation Honors 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

The Women’s Foundation hosted its annual Legends Awards Tribute Luncheon on April 29 to honor women in Memphis leadership. Honey Scheidt received the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, received the Catalyst Award, and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, was recognized with the Innovation Award.

59. Last Word: TNReady Termination, NFL Draft Day and What Drove The Bible Bill -

When students in public schools take tests these days, it is about more than how they are doing and whether they know what is being taught them.

The scores play a significant role in how teachers are evaluated and rated. And both play a role in their careers and how much they will be paid. They play a role in whether the state decides to take over a school or the school system they remain in decides to essentially start over with an Innovation School model.

60. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

61. Supreme Court Justice Takes Ceremonial Oath of Office -

An investiture ceremony has been held for Tennessee’s newest Supreme Court Justice Roger Page.

62. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

63. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

64. Last Word: Grizz Aftermath, Mayor-A-Rama and Prince Saves Hendrix -

116-95, Spurs over the Grizzlies is how the NBA second season ends in Memphis. A four-game sweep of a team that now heals and perhaps changes on its way to the fall.

65. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

66. Tenn. Lottery Sets Record For Education Funding -

The Tennessee Lottery says it returned a record $119 million for education funding during the first quarter of the year, a 27 percent increase over the previous quarterly record.

Lottery-funded programs include 12 different scholarships and grants, multiple after-school programs, an energy-efficient schools program and Tennessee Promise, which offers eligible high school seniors the chance to go to community or technical college without paying tuition.

67. Major Violent Crime Rate Up 18.3 Percent From 2015 -

The major violent crime rate was up 18.3 percent countywide for the first three months of 2016 compared to the first quarter of 2015, according to crime statistics released Thursday, April 21, by the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission.

68. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

69. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

70. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

71. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

72. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

73. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

74. Major Violent Crime Countywide Up 18.3 Percent From 2015 -

The major violent crime rate was up 18.3 percent countywide for the first three months of 2016 compared to the first quarter of 2015, according to crime statistics released Thursday, April 21, by the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission.

75. EDGE Considering Fast-Track Incentive Program, Diversity Spend Changes -

The Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has started work on a new tax incentive program that would help Memphis compete with North Mississippi for industrial projects.

At its April 20 meeting, EDGE board chairman Al Bright appointed a committee to evaluate a proposed Fast Track PILOT and hammer out its policies and procedures.

76. Memphis' Startup Accelerators Teaming Up This Summer -

For several years now, Memphis hasn’t been home to a unified hub of startup companies and activities so much as a collection of startup archipelagos, the disparate factions of activity sometimes duplicating the work of other groups.

77. FDA Campaign Takes Aim at Chewing Tobacco Use by Rural Teens -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government health officials will team up with minor league baseball as part of a new $36 million campaign to discourage rural teenagers from using chewing tobacco.

Baseball stadiums will feature the campaign's central message this summer – "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" – via advertising and promotions with players. Ads will also run on local television, radio and online in 35 markets across the U.S., including cities in Michigan, Montana, South Carolina and Tennessee.

78. The Opportunity of a Learning Lifetime -

The opportunity of a tuition-free community college education for every Tennessee high school graduate who wants it is one of our state’s boldest initiatives. That’s what the Tennessee Promise program represents.

79. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

80. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

81. Tenn. Lottery Sets Record For Education Funding -

The Tennessee Lottery says it returned a record $119 million for education funding during the first quarter of the year, a 27 percent increase over the previous quarterly record.

Lottery-funded programs include 12 different scholarships and grants, multiple after-school programs, an energy-efficient schools program and Tennessee Promise, which offers eligible high school seniors the chance to go to community or technical college without paying tuition.

82. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

83. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

84. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

85. Shadyac Takes Over Soulsville Project With ‘Different Type of Model’ -

Tom Shadyac wants to pump $10 million into the heart of Soulsville. That’s the initial ask for his community center concept, One Family Memphis.

In September, the Hollywood filmmaker-turned-University of Memphis professor purchased for $1.9 million the bankrupt New Towne Center, a 77,000-square-foot community anchor that a local community development corporation tried to develop during the economic downturn.

86. Beale Landing Architecture Wins International Honors -

Beale Street Landing has been named the best marina or port in the world for 2016 in the fourth annual Architizer A+Awards.

A jury of designers, urban planners and architects selected the landing, designed by RTN Architects of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as the most architecturally significant marina or port for 2016.

87. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

88. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

89. Beale Landing Architecture Wins International Honors -

Beale Street Landing has been named the best marina or port in the world for 2016 in the fourth annual Architizer A+Awards.

A jury of designers, urban planners and architects selected the landing, designed by RTN Architects of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as the most architecturally significant marina or port for 2016.

90. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

91. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

92. Memphis College of Art Making Moves to Consolidate Campuses -

Memphis College of Art has confirmed the consolidation of its Downtown campus with its Overton Park campus and will begin relevant construction over the summer.

That construction includes converting five MCA-owned apartment buildings around the Overton Park campus into studios for use in the graduate program.

93. FedEx Unveils Latest Global Citizenship Report -

FedEx Corp. has been busy with more than worldwide package delivery and the operation of its sprawling logistics empire over the past year.

94. Three Decades In, Africa in April Maintains Cultural Focus -

It was 30 years ago that David and Yvonne Acey answered a dilemma from an educators’ conference about levels of learning among African-American students compared to white students.

95. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

96. Events -

Memphis Child Advocacy Center will host its annual children’s memorial flag-raising on Wednesday, April 13, at noon on Civic Center Plaza outside Memphis City Hall, 125 N. Main St. The ceremony remembers Shelby County kids who have died as a result of abuse or neglect. Visit memphiscac.org.

97. Downtown Gets Creative With Office Users -

The Downtown Memphis Commission is rebranding Memphis’ urban core to attract millennials and fill in office space vacancies with the next creative firm or startup.

Announced in November, “My HQ is Downtown” is a comprehensive marketing strategy that sells Downtown as a creative hotspot.

98. UTHSC Center for Addictions Created to Save Lives -

Back when he was still jumping out of planes as an Army Green Beret, serving alongside some of the nation’s most elite fighters, Daniel Sumrok was also inflating lungs and patching bullet holes. The imperative to save lives was part of the job, and he checked that box repeatedly.

99. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

100. Events -

ArtsMemphis will hold a free workshop for organizations interested in Arts Build Communities grants on Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The grants are open to nonprofits and government entities seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community. Visit tn.gov for details.