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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

2. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

3. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

4. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

5. Legislature Passes Online Voter Registration Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The General Assembly passed legislation Tuesday that would allow Tennesseans to register to vote online.

The House unanimously passed a bill that the Senate had earlier approved. The measure allows Tennesseans to go online to register to vote or update their registration records. Applicants would be directed to apply on paper if their name, date of birth or other identifying information could not be confirmed with the Department of Safety.

6. Dyer Confirmed to State Court of Criminal Appeals -

Shelby County Attorney Ross Dyer became a state appellate court judge Monday, April 18, as members of both chambers of the Tennessee Legislature met in a joint session to confirm Dyer’s appointment as a judge on the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals.

7. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

8. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

9. FedEx Unveils Latest Global Citizenship Report -

FedEx Corp. has been busy with more than worldwide package delivery and the operation of its sprawling logistics empire over the past year.

10. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

11. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

12. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

13. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

14. Events -

Metal Museum will host Whet Thursday on April 7 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can participate in a foundry class, tour the galleries, and enjoy food trucks, cash bar and live music. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

15. Travel in a World of Warnings -

In the pre-dawn hours of March 22 I found myself awake and decided to check Facebook on my phone before attempting to go back to sleep.

The first update was from a friend who lives in Paris. Just four months prior, that friend declared herself safe on Facebook following the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks there.

16. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

17. Last Word: Greensward Truce, Connor Schilling Retires and MEMFix Goes East -

You’ve heard of the mediation process surrounding the long-term use of the Overton Park Greensward by the Memphis Zoo for its overflow parking.
It appears there is now a less formal mediation process underway when it comes to the use of the greensward during the park’s spring peak season which is now underway.

18. New Haslam Spending Proposed for Roads, TennCare, Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Monday proposed new spending on Tennessee roads, TennCare and schools.

The annual budget amendment reflects the governor's priorities for spending about $65 million in savings beyond what was originally projected for the budget year beginning July 1.

19. Amended De-Annexation Bill Up for Key State Senate Committee Vote -

A de-annexation bill that takes in the whole state has a key state Senate committee vote set for Wednesday, March 30, after senators made some significant changes to the proposal Tuesday in committee.

20. Tenn. Legislature Passes Public Records Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Legislature has passed a bill that will require nearly every government office across Tennessee to tell citizens how they can get public records.

The measure first directs the open records counsel in the state comptroller's office to come up with a model public records policy that local government agencies could adapt. The legislation would then require government offices to have a written public records policy by July 17, 2017. The policy can't be less open than state law allows, and it should explain to citizens how to make a request to either inspect or copy public records and any fees charged for obtaining copies.

21. US Government Sets Record for Failures to Find Files When Asked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration set a record for the number of times its federal employees told disappointed citizens, journalists and others that despite searching they couldn't find a single page requested under the Freedom of Information Act, according to a new Associated Press analysis of government data.

22. ‘Spotlight’ Defends Open Access to Public Records -

There’s a great scene about public records in the movie “Spotlight,” which is based on the true story of The Boston Globe’s investigative reporting of child sex abuse by Catholic priests.

23. Sparks Fly In Nashville Over Deannexation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s debate about a proposed deannexation law isn’t a case of Memphis against the rest of the state.

It’s a debate within the Shelby County legislative delegation and with a few exceptions, most of the critics of the measure that would allow referendums to undo annexations that are in some cases 18 years old are Memphis legislators.

24. Tennessee House Approves Deannexation Bill -

The Tennessee House approved a deannexation bill Monday, March 14, in a 68-25 vote after an emotional debate and a tide of amendments that were all voted down on the floor.

Republican state Representative Mike Carter of Hamilton County also disputed Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s claim that the city of Memphis stands to lose approximately $80 million in sales and property tax revenues.

25. Tri-Star Chronicles Captures Tennessee’s Lesser-Known Stories -

J.R. “Pitt” Hyde III is not Memphis’ most famous name across the state of Tennessee. But he is an important name, has a deep and rich story worth telling, and that is exactly the point.

26. Ole Miss Adding Plaque With Context for Confederate Statue -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Confederate soldier statue that has stood for generations in a prominent spot on the University of Mississippi's Oxford campus will soon be accompanied by a plaque giving it historical context.

27. Numerous Benefits to Cleaning Up Blight -

I grew up in Memphis, but like so many young people, moved away for college and lived in a few other cities before returning in 2012. I always missed my hometown and when I had the opportunity to choose where I wanted to build my career, Memphis was the only choice in my heart.

28. County Commission Weighs Referendum Lifting Term Limits -

At the first Shelby County Commission meeting since the March primary elections, commissioners will consider a move to eliminate all term limits for elected county officials.

The issue could be put to county voters on the August ballot.

29. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

30. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

31. Council Approves Zoo Control of Overton Greensward Section -

Memphis City Council members voted 11-1 Tuesday, March 1, to grant the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Overton Park Greensward.

The control comes in a resolution that surfaced earlier in the day Tuesday after a weekend of rumors about such a move by some on the council.

32. Last Word: The Moving Election Comes to Town and Missing Early Voters Are Found -

We probably haven’t had this much action with so many presidential candidates in the Memphis area since the 1984 Democratic presidential primary campaign.

Four of the contenders – three Republicans and one Democrat – in Memphis over the weekend looking for votes in advance of Tuesday’s Tennessee primary elections.

33. Early Voting Numbers Set Record -

More than 43,000 Shelby County voters cast early ballots in advance of the March 1 presidential primaries election day statewide, a record for the state, according to the Tennessee Secretary of State’s office

34. Tennessee Designates Barrett As Official State Rifle -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – While Tennessee lawmakers balked last year at making the Holy Bible the official state book, they showed little hesitance Wednesday in designating an official state rifle.

35. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

36. Big Tech Companies Join Apple in Its Encryption Fight -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry is starting to line up with Apple in its fight against the federal government over the encryption it uses to keep iPhones secure.

Earlier this week, a U.S. magistrate ordered Apple to help investigators break into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino mass shooters. Apple was given until Tuesday to challenge that ruling, but a person familiar with the case says Apple has been granted an extension until next Friday.

37. Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan To Get Outside Review -

Gov. Bill Haslam's administration announced Wednesday, Feb. 17, that it has agreed with higher education leaders to have an outside group review the Republican's privatization plan for building maintenance at Tennessee's public colleges and universities.

38. Haslam, Colleges Agree to Outside Review of Outsourcing Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's administration announced Wednesday that it has agreed with higher education leaders to have an outside group review the Republican's privatization plan for building maintenance at Tennessee's public colleges and universities.

39. I-Team Veteran Takes Reins Of Innovate Memphis -

Two years ago, when Justin Entzminger found a job that combined his background in entrepreneurship with his dedication to the public realm, he jumped at the chance to join the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team.

40. MATA Chief: System ‘On Verge Of Collapse’ -

The president and CEO of the Memphis Area Transit Authority said Tuesday, Feb. 16, that the city’s bus system will “collapse” without additional operating funds and city capital funding to buy new buses.

41. Presidential Primaries Early Voting Tops 2,600 -

Shelby County early voting in advance of Tennessee’s March 1 presidential primaries topped 2,600 through Monday, Feb. 15, the first day of balloting at 21 sites countywide.

The balloting opened Feb. 10 at one location, the Downtown Election Commission office, before spreading to other locations.

42. Meeting the Demands of a Rapidly Aging Population -

When Gov. Bill Haslam gave his annual State of the State address on February 1, he proposed a $34.8 billion plan providing new spending on colleges and universities, road projects and a large deposit into Tennessee’s emergency budget reserves.

43. Memphis Still Has ‘Real Shot’ At Being a OneJet Focus City -

On Feb. 11, OneJet announced Pittsburgh as its second focus city – its term for a hub or main connection point – and while Memphis didn’t make the cut this time around, it’s still in the running to be a focus city.

44. Early Voting Opens With More Than 800 Ballots -

Absentee and early voting in Shelby County in advance of the March 1 presidential primary election day topped 800 ballots by the end of the first day of the period.

Most of the early votes – 645 of 822 – were absentee ballots at area nursing homes cast before the Wednesday, Feb. 10, first day of the voting period.

45. Early Voting Opens With More Than 800 Ballots -

Absentee and early voting in Shelby County in advance of the March 1 presidential primary election day topped 800 ballots by the end of the first day of the period.

Most of the early votes – 645 of 822 – were absentee ballots at area nursing homes cast before the Wednesday, Feb. 10, first day of the voting period.

46. MATA Changes Target Frayser and Southeast Memphis -

The public’s first chance to comment Tuesday, Feb. 9, on a set of 35 interim changes to Memphis’ bus schedule sounded like an auction.

There were questions that began with numbers – route numbers that would change directions and streets or the frequency of service. And there were a lot of numbers to consider.

47. The Week Ahead: Feb. 8, 2016 -

Guys, there’s an important holiday coming up that forgetting about would mean immense trouble for you. Luckily, City & State is coming to the rescue. Head over to the Broad Avenue retailer on Friday, two days before Valentine’s Day, for “BYOB” (Bring your own Bailey’s).
Bring something like Bailey’s, Irish cream, whisky, whatever, and City & State will add it to any item you order over on the coffee side of the shop. Meanwhile, the shop has also invited the makers behind Paper & Clay and Question the Answer to be on hand with their wares to take some of the pressure off trying to decide what to buy your significant other for Valentine’s Day.

48. Details of Bass Pro-St. Jude Pinch Plan Near -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Bass Pro Shops have agreed on a tentative and general plan for future development of the Pinch District, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

49. Collaborative Aims to Enhance Memphis Medical District -

In 2016, the Memphis Medical Center will see $1.8 million in upgrades and enhancements aimed at creating a unified, livable district. That’s the annual budget for the newly established Medical District Collaborative, a nonprofit entity made up of the area’s stakeholders and executives.

50. Tentative Pinch Development Plan About to Emerge -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Bass Pro Shops have agreed on a tentative and general plan for future development of the Pinch District, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

51. Strickland: Police Body Camera Rollout Requires More Personnel -

The rollout of police body cameras will mean hiring more people at the Memphis Police Department and the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office, according to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

52. Zoo Distances Self From Overton Park Traffic Study -

Unusually warm temperatures over the weekend brought out more visitors to Overton Park and the Memphis Zoo, offering a preview of what the spring could be like on the greensward.

Overflow zoo parking on the grass mixed with pedestrian park patrons beyond the border of orange cones the zoo uses to mark off the parking.

53. Bratcher Shooting First Test of Local Pact With TBI -

The first fatal police shooting since local law enforcement and prosecutors adopted a policy of sending such cases to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is being watched closely.

And a quick initial account by the TBI is a change from the agency’s normal posture of not making any comments and abiding strictly by a state law that seals all of its records from the public unless by court order or subpoena.

54. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

55. History Lesson -

A HISTORY LESSON TAUGHT, NOT LEARNED.

When I first wrote about attempts to steamroll Overton Park, a friend told me a great story. He was in his parents’ living room one afternoon in the late ’60s listening to his father go on and on about the battle to keep I-40 out of Overton Park ... too late to stop it, who are these silly protestors anyway, yadda yadda ... when they turned on the local news.

56. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

57. City Council Approves Colonial Conversion, Vintage Trolley Purchase -

One of two golf courses at Colonial Country Club would give way to houses under a planned development approved Tuesday, Jan. 19, by the Memphis City Council.

The council approved a development that would turn the north course at Colonial into either a mix of single-family homes, townhouses and cottages or a mix of housing for senior citizens.

58. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

59. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

60. Tennessee Lawmakers Return With Eye Toward Campaign Season -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for the second session of the 109th General Assembly with an eye toward quickly disposing of their business and heading home for election season.

61. An Emotional Obama Unveils His Plan to Cut Gun Violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama, at one point wiping tears from his cheek, unveiled his plan Tuesday to tighten control and enforcement of firearms in the U.S., using his presidential powers in the absence of legal changes he implored Congress to pass.

62. Tri-State Bank HQ Sale Heightens Speculation -

The northeast corner of Main and Beale streets is more than prime real estate; it’s historic ground with a direct connection to ongoing racial and economic issues.

Tri-State Bank, the city’s 70-year old black-owned bank, and Belz Investco announced Thursday, Dec. 31, that the bank was selling its headquarters, 180 S. Main St., to Belz Investco GP in a $3 million deal.

63. Harris Weighs Cohen Challenge -

Tennessee state Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris is considering a challenge of U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the August Democratic Congressional primary.

64. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

65. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

66. Bass Pro Shops Draws 2 Million Visitors Since April Opening -

Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid has had more than 2 million visitors since its April 29 opening, store executives announced Thursday, Dec. 17.

General manager David Hagel said the attendance count is “a lot of people in a short amount of time” and ahead of projections.

67. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

68. Oxford Feels Stress from Development Boom -

Kent Wunderlich travels to Oxford, Miss., often, in part because his grandson is the kicker on the University of Mississippi football team.

69. One Step Initiative Taking Education Beyond Memphis -

For some high school seniors, college is the first time they leave home. For others, college isn’t in the cards. A local nonprofit, One Step Initiative, is looking to make college a nearer possibility by sending high school seniors abroad and providing them with ongoing professional support.

70. Memphis to Host Back-to-Back Transportation Conferences -

On Thursday, Dec. 10, Memphis’ status as a logistics hub and its future in inner-city transportation will be debated.

The University of Memphis will be hosting two back-to-back free conferences at the FedEx Institute of Technology. The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute will host its ninth annual conference, dubbed The State of Freight, from 7:30 a.m. to noon, and the newly established University of Memphis Design Collaborative will host the Workforce to Work Transportation Summit from noon to 4:30 p.m.

71. TBI’s Report on Stewart Case Still Moving -

A Shelby County District Attorney General lawsuit seeking to make public the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation’s file on the police shooting of Darrius Stewart will continue with the police officer who fatally shot Stewart in July allowed to intervene in the case.

72. How to Fly Free Forever: Put $170 Million on Your AmEx -

NEW YORK (AP) — Chinese billionaire Liu Yiqian, who doesn't exactly struggle to afford a plane ticket, can now likely fly free, in first class, with his whole family, anywhere in the world, for the rest of his life.

73. THDA Makes $1 Million Habitat Challenge Grant -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will contribute $1 million in matching funds to Habitat for Humanity’s fundraising drive for the 2016 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis.

74. THDA Makes $1 Million Habitat Challenge Grant -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will contribute $1 million in matching funds to Habitat for Humanity’s fundraising drive for the 2016 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis.

75. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

76. EPA, Memphis Partner for Lead Paint Program -

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has formed a partnership with the city of Memphis and Shelby County governments for a pilot program to address lead-based paint issues in the community.

Memphis is the first community for the EPA to launch the initiative in its eight-state Southeastern Region 4. The year-long pilot program will address the EPA’s Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule. The rule requires that firms performing renovation, repair and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in homes, child care facilities and preschools built before 1978 become certified. In addition to EPA certification, those firms also must use certified renovators who have received EPA-approved training and follow lead-safe work practices.

77. Overton Park Moves Toward Traffic Plan -

All sides in the parking dispute at Overton Park have agreed to hire a planner to coordinate a traffic plan as well as mediate talks among them.

And for the first time there will be a set of public hearings on the matter.

78. 'Call of Duty' Creators Buy 'Candy Crush' Maker for $5.9B -

NEW YORK (AP) — The company behind the hugely successful "Call of Duty" has struck a $5.9 billion deal to buy the makers of the highly addictive "Candy Crush" and take advantage of the way video games are moving out of living rooms and onto smartphones and tablets.

79. Greenprint Summit Launches Nov. 16 -

The first biannual Greenprint Summit is set for Nov. 16 in the Germantown Great Hall in Germantown.

The public summit, happening from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., will feature a collection of local organizations whose current projects support the Greenprint’s objectives to accelerate the Mid-South’s transition into a more livable, sustainable and connected region.

80. Greenprint Summit Launches Nov. 16 -

The first biannual Greenprint Summit is set for Nov. 16 in the Germantown Great Hall in Germantown.

The public summit, happening from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., will feature a collection of local organizations whose current projects support the Greenprint’s objectives to accelerate the Mid-South’s transition into a more livable, sustainable and connected region.

81. Wharton’s Transition Reveals Lighter Mood -

The incumbent’s advantage in Memphis politics often keeps playing out after all of the votes are counted – even if the winner isn’t the incumbent.

A version of that is happening now as Memphis Mayor A C Wharton serves out the rest of his term after losing a re-election bid to challenger Jim Strickland in the Oct. 8 city elections.

82. Grammy Museum to Celebrate Mississippi's Musical Talent -

GREENVILLE, Miss. (AP) — With a history of producing music legends such as Elvis Presley and B.B. King, it's no surprise that Mississippi is the home of the first Grammy museum outside of California.

83. Memphis City Council to Talk ‘Rooney Rule’ For Minority Contracts -

Memphis City Council member Edmund Ford Jr. wants to bring the NFL’s “Rooney Rule” to City Hall’s approach to minority business contracting.

The council discusses the proposed ordinance at a 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 20, committee session.

84. Design Thinking As Worldview -

Design thinking is considered a human-centered framework for problem solving, used in formal innovation work in many fields: health care, consumer products, software, medical devices, durable goods, services and city planning. Design thinking has been perhaps the most lauded innovation method. In brief, the phases include empathy, define, ideation, prototyping, testing and storytelling.

85. New Mayor in Town -

Jim Strickland has some big decisions to make.

At the top of the list: make sure the toilets are flushing, the lights are coming on at night and the stoplights are flashing red, yellow and green.

86. Hattiloo Forum Explores Black Generation Gap -

Always looking for a good topic of conversation, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele decided to put a group of millennials and active senior citizens together.

The Tuesday, Oct. 13, event was prompted by a dinner conversation Bandele had with his 21-year-old daughter.

87. ‘Blue Lives Matter’ Campaign Spreading Across the Country -

The person was not a politician, wasn’t famous and wasn’t in law enforcement. He – or she – just wanted to thank local enforcement people for the service they provide every day.

88. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

89. Groups Want More Memphians to Discover River’s Front Yard -

Once upon a time it was called the “promenade.” In 1828, two years after the city of Memphis was incorporated, the city’s founders and their successors put it in writing.

The statement – signed by the men who owned 5,000 acres where the Wolf and Mississippi rivers meet – read: “In relation to the piece of ground laid off and called the Promenade, said proprietors say that it was their original intention, is now and forever will be that the same should be public ground for use only as the word imports.”

90. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story in Memphis Election -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

91. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

92. Memphis Early Vote Turnout Higher Than 2011 and 2009 -

Nearly 15 percent of the voters in Memphis cast early ballots in advance of Thursday's election day in the races for Memphis Mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court Clerk.

Through the final day of the early voting period Saturday, Oct. 3, 51,848 citizens voted early, according to Shelby County Election Commission statistics.

93. Memphis Early Vote Turnout Higher Than 2011 and 2009 -

Nearly 15 percent of the voters in Memphis cast early ballots in advance of Thursday's election day in the races for Memphis Mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court Clerk.

Through the final day of the early voting period Saturday, Oct. 3, 51,848 citizens voted early, according to Shelby County Election Commission statistics.

94. Tenn. Leaders Try to Allay Fears About VW Scandal Impact -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — As an emissions cheating scandal engulfs the German automaker Volkswagen, Tennessee officials are trying to soothe fears about the potential impact on the company's Chattanooga factory, the crown jewel of the state's economic development efforts of the last decade.

95. Wharton Reintroduces Detroit Specter as Early Voting Begins -

When the city of Memphis got an unmistakable warning in May 2013 from Tennessee comptroller Justin Wilson to get its financial house in order, Memphis mayor A C Wharton was among those quick to caution against likening the city’s problems to those of Detroit.

96. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

97. Farmers First -

After all these years – 27 weeks of Saturdays for a decade – Jill Forrester calls it a “nice routine.” And by that she means she and husband Keith getting up at 3 a.m., loading their produce, herbs and flowers, and driving to the Memphis Farmers Market downtown.

98. Ed Wallin Spends Lifetime Helping Traumatized Vets -

Abraham Lincoln said, “Commitment is what transforms a promise into a reality.”

It’s the kind of commitment Ed Wallin has. He doesn’t count the days, months or years, the successes or failures, the efforts or rejections, but simply keeps going, to keep the promise.

99. Cohen’s Office Giving Away Tickets for Pope’s Speech -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is accepting entries from his Ninth District constituents into a lottery for tickets to watch Pope Francis’ upcoming address to Congress – the first such address by a pope in history – and for the chance to see him in person when he is in Washington Sept. 24.

100. Record-Setting Freshman Class Settles in at UT Knoxville -

Murfreesboro’s Madison Underwood, 18, admits the University of Tennessee-Knoxville was not her first choice after graduating Siegel High School this spring.

But it soon became a serious contender – and ultimate winner – thanks to a combination of value, community and programming.