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Editorial Results (free)

1. Opioid Lawsuit Filed as County Dispute on Legal Action Goes to Court -

UPDATE: Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled Tuesday, Nov. 14, that the Shelby County Commission overstepped its role and powers within county government when the commission hired a law firm and had its own attorney file a lawsuit in Circuit Court against pharmaceutical companies over opioid abuse.

2. Boyd Re-Elected As City Council Chairman -

The Memphis City Council re-elected Berlin Boyd as chairman of the body for 2018. He was elected to another one-year term Tuesday, Nov. 7, without opposition. Council member Frank Colvett was elected vice chairman over council member Janis Fullilove, who is currently vice chairman.

3. November 10-16, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1927: Watkins Overton upsets incumbent Mayor Rowlett Paine in city runoff elections. Overton is backed by former Memphis Mayor E.H. Crump, who had backed Paine’s 1923 re-election bid at the last minute. But Crump and Paine parted company after Paine endorsed Austin Peay for governor. Meanwhile, City Court Judge Cliff Davis is elected city police and fire commissioner. Davis had been a Crump foe four years earlier, running on a ticket of Ku Klux Klan candidates. “Supporters and followers of the ticket put on a wild celebration, parading Watkins Overton, Cliff Davis and E.H. Crump down Main Street on the shoulders of enthusiastic supporters,” The Daily News reported.

4. Boyd Re-Elected As City Council Chairman -

The Memphis City Council re-elected Berlin Boyd as chairman of the body for 2018. He was elected to another one-year term Tuesday, Nov. 7, without opposition. Council member Frank Colvett was elected vice chairman over council member Janis Fullilove, who is currently vice chairman.

5. Council Funds Beale Crowd Consultant, Abolishes $5 Cover -

Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Nov. 7, to approve $50,000 in funding for a crowd control consultant for the Beale Street entertainment district and to end the $5 cover charge for entry into the district on spring and summer Saturday nights after 10 p.m.

6. County Commission OKs Emissions Fee Hike -

Shelby County commissioners advanced on the first of three readings Monday, Oct. 30, an ordinance that would increase the county’s air pollution emission fee and the major and minimum source permit fees for non-automobile emissions.

7. County Commission OKs Emissions Fee Hike -

Shelby County commissioners advanced on the first of three readings Monday, Oct. 30, an ordinance that would increase the county’s air pollution emission fee and the major and minimum source permit fees for non-automobile emissions.

8. County Pay Raises Short of Votes, In Search of Compromise -

Proposed pay raises for 19 of Shelby County government’s top elected positions don’t appear to have the nine votes necessary to pass on third and final reading in two weeks.

So Shelby County commissioner Van Turner is looking for a compromise that might put the double-digit percentage pay raises to voters in a 2018 referendum or tie future pay raises to any raises that county government rank and file employees get.

9. New Screenings to Start for All US-Bound Airline Passengers -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — All incoming flights to the United States will be subject to new security screening procedures before takeoff, including both American citizens and foreigners possibly facing security interviews from airline employees, the U.S. government said Wednesday.

10. Process vs. Protest: Opinions Differ On How to Remove Monuments -

Protest and the legal process live in the same neighborhood. Sometimes they are next-door neighbors with borders that may be in dispute. At others times they are allies. But there is almost always a tension between the two.

11. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

12. AP-NORC Poll: Most Don't Want Young Immigrants Deported -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

13. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

14. Vegas Shooting Renews Debate on High-Capacity Ammo Magazines -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – The rapid-fire shooting that killed or injured hundreds of concertgoers in Las Vegas has highlighted the easy availability of ammunition magazines that allow shooters to fire dozens of shots without having to reload.

15. Beale Street Task Force Outlines Two Cover Charge Options -

A Beale Street Task Force assembled this summer to consider the future of a spring and summer cover charge Saturday nights after 10 p.m. in the district is recommending the cover charge stay.

The task force, in its last meeting Monday, Oct. 2, also recommended the return of Beale Street Bucks in some form – coupons given to those paying the cover charge that can be redeemed in most Beale businesses Saturdays and Sundays.

16. Last Word: Las Vegas React, Moral Monday, Who Pays For Beale Security? -

We open with reaction Monday to the mass shooting in Las Vegas:

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland:

17. Paying Beale Street Security Costs Raises Lease Questions -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, on whether the city should start using some of the $378,000 in Beale Street cover charge funds the Downtown Memphis Commission has been holding in two bank accounts since June.

18. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

19. Last Word: Corker's Decision, Buses & Bikes and Tenoke Comeback -

And with a brief, carefully-worded written statement Tuesday afternoon, U.S. Senator Bob Corker has blown up the forming-2018 race for the Senate seat he will give up at the end of 2018 and that probably applies to the 2018 race for Tennessee Governor. That’s even if Corker doesn’t follow Tuesday’s announcement by getting into the race for Governor at some point. Corker said nothing about what is next beyond his remaining time in office.

20. Bus System Gets Review as Part of Memphis 3.0 -

On the way to a comprehensive city development and land use plan by 2019, those putting together the plan have heard one priority from citizens over and over: better public transportation.

The topic came up so much the Memphis 3.0 planning process is creating a more detailed transit strategy within the larger plan. The transit plan should be in a draft form by late 2018.

21. The Week Ahead: Sept. 18-24 -

Hello, Memphis! Autumn officially arrives this Friday, and it’s bringing along a spate of happenings this week – from the Metal Museum’s Repair Days to the Memphis Japan Festival and the Mid-South Fair. Check out our top event picks and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

22. Equifax Victims May Face Another Hassle in Buying an iPhone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple fans who froze their credit after the Equifax data breach may end up with another hassle on their hands if they try to get one of the new iPhones that can cost more than $1,000. People who did so and want to make any big purchase may find the same.

23. Activist Announces Bid for Corker's Tennessee Senate Seat -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Conservative activist Andy Ogles announced Thursday he will run for the U.S. Senate seat held by Tennessee Republican Bob Corker, who has so far refused to divulge whether he will seek a third term.

24. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

25. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

26. MMDC Hires Mitchell to Lead Community Development -

Memphis native Vonesha Mitchell has joined the Memphis Medical District Collaborative as program manager, community development. Mitchell’s new position rolls together several functions, including recruiting retail for vacant and underutilized storefronts, working with U3 Advisors to launch and administer the Hire Local program, developing assistance package and incentive programs, and engaging current and potential businesses in the district to understand opportunities and concerns.

27. Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Over Treatment of Tennessee Disabled -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A judge on Friday dismissed a long-standing lawsuit over Tennessee's treatment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, ending federal oversight of state programs.

28. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

29. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

30. House Passes Bill to Speed Deployment of Self-Driving Cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House voted Wednesday to speed the introduction of self-driving cars by giving the federal government authority to exempt automakers from safety standards not applicable to the technology, and to permit deployment of up to 100,000 of the vehicles annually over the next several years.

31. Memphis Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares Confederate statues on city-owned property public nuisances and sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

32. City Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares “all Confederate statues and artifacts … on City-owned property public nuisances” and also sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

33. Arlington Early Vote Hits 100 in First 2 Days -

A total of 100 citizens cast early ballots in the first two days of the early voting period in Arlington municipal elections, according to Shelby County Election Commission turnout numbers.

The early voting period in advance of the Sept. 21 election day runs through Sept. 16.

34. Corker Draws Distinction Between Tax Cuts, Reform -

Republican U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee says he wants to see tax reform that might mean a reduction in some taxes but very specific cuts aimed at a larger goal of promoting economic growth that makes up the revenue lost.

35. Corker Distinguishes Between Tax Reform and Tax Cut -

U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee says he wants to see tax reform that might mean a reduction in some taxes but very specific cuts aimed at a larger goal of promoting economic growth that makes up the revenue lost.

36. Officials Say Trump's Afghan Plan Involves 3,900 More Troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to end America's longest war and eliminate Afghanistan's rising extremist threat involves sending up to 3,900 additional U.S. troops, senior officials said Tuesday. The first deployments could take place within days.

37. Early Childhood Literacy Efforts Push ‘Knowledge-Based Competency’ -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen and other educators say early childhood educators across the state don’t spend enough time with children on reading, vocabulary building, word comprehension and other basic literacy skills.

38. City Council To Take Up Monument Removal Resolution -

Memphis City Council members will discuss and possibly vote Tuesday, Aug. 22, on a resolution that directs the city to act on the “immediate removal and/or sale of Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from Health Sciences Park and statue of Jefferson Davis and related artifacts from Memphis Park.”

39. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

40. County Mulls Garage For Long-Term Parking Fix -

Shelby County Jury Commission officials have points they always make with citizens on jury duty in Downtown Memphis. And it includes an apology for the parking situation around the Criminal Justice Center and the Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse, where those called to be on juries will work for a week at a time.

41. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

42. Firehouse Subs Holding ‘H2O for Heroes’ Drive -

Firehouse Subs hopes guests will help local first responders beat the heat when it hosts its annual H2O for Heroes bottled water collection drive Saturday, Aug. 5, at all Memphis Firehouse Subs locations.

43. Firehouse Subs Holding ‘H2O for Heroes’ Drive -

Firehouse Subs is hoping guests will help local first responders beat the heat when it hosts its annual H2O for Heroes bottled water collection drive on Saturday, Aug. 5, at all Firehouse Subs locations in Memphis.

44. Tennessee's Abortion Laws at Risk in Quirky Vote Count Case -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The future of abortion access in Tennessee hinges on a quirky court case that's about vote counting, not women's reproductive health rights.

A 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hearing Wednesday in Cincinnati will mark the first major action in more than a year in the case of Amendment 1, an anti-abortion measure passed by voters in 2014. The amendment says that nothing in the state constitution "secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of an abortion" and empowers state lawmakers to "enact, amend, or repeal statutes regarding abortion."

45. Fully Loaded -

It’s almost like the first half of 2017 was a decade in the making, at least when it comes to commercial real estate. Throughout all four major sectors of the Memphis-area commercial real estate market – industrial, office, retail and multifamily – figures are consistently reaching or exceeding pre-recession marks.

46. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

47. New Local Democratic Party Council Features Lots of New Faces -

Shelby County Democrats selected 102 citizens Saturday, July 22, to the local party’s new Democratic Grass Roots Council and 26 of those 102 to the local party’s executive committee in a local party convention at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church.

48. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

49. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

50. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

51. Peaceful Bridge Anniversary Protests Draw Moving Police Presence -

A heavy but moving and shifting Memphis Police presence responded Sunday, July 9, to a set of peaceful protests and gatherings on the first anniversary of the protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the Mississippi River.

52. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

53. Last Word: A Second Juvenile Court Letter, Fred Smith's Tax Plan and Memphis Hops -

A group of 19 organizations including the Memphis Branch NAACP and 28 citizens sent a letter Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urging him to keep in place Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. The 12-page letter is a point-by-point detailed response to the June 9 letter from County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham asking Sessions to end the memorandum of agreement between county government and the Justice Department.

54. Theresa May Details Post-Brexit Plans for EU Citizens in UK -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May tried Monday to reassure European Union citizens living in Britain that their lives and those of their family will not be disrupted when Britain leaves the EU in 2019.

55. Tourism Leaders Focus on City’s Complexity, Struggle -

Stax Records turns 60 years old this year, going back to its origins as a country music label called Satellite at a tiny studio in Brunswick. Next year marks 50 years since the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In August, it will be 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. And in 2019, the city of Memphis will mark 200 years since its founding.

56. After Warmbier's Death, US Weighs Travel Ban on North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is considering banning travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea, officials said Tuesday, as outrage grew over the death of American student Otto Warmbier and President Donald Trump declared it a "total disgrace."

57. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

58. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

59. 2,700 Vote Early, 3 Election Day Polls Move in House District 95 -

A total of 2,700 citizens cast early votes ahead Thursday’s special state House District 95 election in eastern Shelby County. And on election day, three of the 14 polling places – two in Collierville and one in Germantown – will move from their regular locations.

60. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

61. A New Life Made Possible by a $170 Discount -

A harassment conviction lingered on the record of Memphis resident Brenda A. for 10 years, the high cost of expungement making it difficult to erase the past.

Like many people convicted of misdemeanors and felonies, she paid her court fees and fines, along with probation costs, years ago, but had trouble cobbling together the money to expunge her record, making it hard to land a good job and make a fresh start.

62. First Tennessee Bank Complaint vs. Pinnacle Financial to Go to Trial -

A legal fight brought in the wake of Pinnacle Financial Partners’ arrival into the Memphis market appears set for a jury trial.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle on Tuesday, June 6, denied a motion for partial summary judgment made by Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank, which filed its complaint against Pinnacle in February 2016.  First Tennessee originally brought the action in 2015 only against Damon Bell, a First Tennessee executive vice president recruited to be Pinnacle’s Memphis president.

63. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.

64. Amid Trump Orders, Nashville Mulls Sanctuary City-Like Rules -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville officials are pushing to adopt sanctuary city-like standards in response to President Donald Trump's policies on immigration.

Metro Councilmen Bob Mendes and Colby Sledge were surrounded by immigrants, some of whom are in the country illegally, as they made a case for their legislation Wednesday during a news conference in the liberal-leaning capital of Tennessee, a red Southern state.

65. Crews Move To Smaller Areas, Storm Damage Estimates Grow -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division’s response to the Saturday storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses will cost the utility at least $7 million.

“We will spend in excess of $7 million and it could be well in excess of $7 million,” said MLGW president Jerry Collins.

66. Strickland Taps City Reserves For $6 Million In Storm Debris Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking the Memphis City Council for up to $6 million from the city’s reserve fund for cleanup from the May 27 storm.

67. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

68. Strickland Taps City Reserves For $6 Million In Storm Debris Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking the Memphis City Council for up to $6 million from the city’s reserve fund for cleanup from the May 27 storm.

69. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

70. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

71. Beale Street Cover Charge Cut, Larger Debate Remains -

The Saturday night summer cover charge on Beale Street is going from $10 to $5 next month. But the discussion about the Beale Street Bucks program is hardly over. And the crowd control measure is certain to raise longer-term questions about who controls the city-owned district.

72. Unwilling Private Sector Gives Park Workers a Victory -

Two state parks are celebrating victories in an atmosphere of uncertainty created by the governor’s penchant for privatizing state functions.

Fall Creek Falls drew no bidders for a $20 million plan to hire a vendor who would tear down its inn, construct a new one and take over operations for 10 years. Henry Horton State Park, meanwhile, is set for $10 million in improvements this coming fiscal year, including upgrades to its hospitality facilities, plus a new visitors center, rather than a proposal to raze its inn and not rebuild.

73. Trucking Companies Say Additional Fuel Costs Worth It for Improved Infrastructure -

Donnie Caldwell figures that the increase in the state gas tax that will begin this summer will cost his company more than $315,000 a year.

74. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

75. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

76. Hackett Retires From CMOM to Devote Effort to Grand Carousel Fundraising -

Former Memphis Mayor Richard C. Hackett is retiring as CEO of the Children’s Museum of Memphis in June to devote his attention to fundraising for the institution he helped create 30 years ago. Hackett became leader of the museum in 2006.

77. Local Democratic Party Organizers Grapple With Activism -

Once the new bylaws and a new executive committee is in place for the reconstituted Shelby County Democratic Party this summer, there will still be a fundamental question about the political strength of the new organization.

78. CLERB Prepares Response to Rallings’ Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’ dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. Even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

79. Former Banker Pleads Guilty to Felony Theft -

A former lead bank teller pleaded guilty Thursday, May 4, to systematically walking out of the bank with concealed cash that eventually totaled some $266,000 over a three-month period in 2009, according to Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich.

80. CLERB Prepares Response To Rallings Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’s dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. That’s even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

81. CLERB Prepares Response To Rallings Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’s dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. That’s even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

82. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

83. House Takes First Step on ‘Almighty God’ Amendment -

The House of Representatives took the first legislative step Monday toward rewriting the state Constitution with a measure recognizing liberties come from Almighty God rather than governments.

In a 69-17 vote, the House passed the resolution by Rep. Micah Van Huss, an East Tennessee Republican, to amend the Constitution, a move requiring votes by consecutive General Assemblies and passage by the state’s voters.

84. Bates Gold-and-Silver Fraud Case Includes Big Numbers -

At the end of a five-week trial in Memphis federal court this month, a jury convicted a former Tennessee state representative turned religious prophet and gold-and-silver broker on 46 counts of fraud.

85. Former Banker Pleads Guilty to Felony Theft -

A former lead bank teller pleaded guilty Thursday, May 4, to systematically walking out of the bank with concealed cash that eventually totaled some $266,000 over a three-month period in 2009, according to Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich.

86. Last Word: Budget Books and Line Items, Top of the Road List and Silencers -

The comforting thud of reams of bound printed paper hitting a wooden table top. The sound of pages turning as Power Points are read aloud. Yes, fellow citizens of the republic, it is budget season in Shelby County. The gavel fell on Memphis City Council budget hearings Tuesday at City Hall. And Wednesday morning Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes his budget proposal to the County Commission. A note about the city budget deliberations. Tuesday’s opening session saw the return of council member Janis Fullilove to City Hall after being out for a while due to an extended illness.

87. Memphis May Day March Points To Deeper, Sustained Involvement -

Three months after a Downtown march protesting the first of President Donald Trump’s two immigration travel ban orders, the turnout was smaller Monday, May 1, along the same route between Clayborn Temple and the National Civil Rights Museum.

88. It’s Not Hogwash, State Approves Silencer Bill -

Tennesseans who want to shoot feral hogs won’t have to worry about scaring the critters now that they have permission to put a silencer on their rifle.

The House of Representatives passed legislation 74-18 Monday, May 1, ending the state’s prohibition on possessing, manufacturing, transporting, repairing or selling silencers. The Senate previously passed the measure 28-1.

89. Groups Prepare for Persons’ Lynching Centennial -

When a pair of new historical markers on Summer Avenue are unveiled later this month, it will be the latest milestone in current discussions about what happened long ago in Memphis.

The markers will be unveiled at and near the site where Ell Persons was burned by a lynch mob 100 years ago this month.

90. Last Word: End of The Season, Honoring Forrest and MATA's Coming Campaign -

It’s over. No Game 7 for the Grizz and the off-season begins. Spurs advance after beating the Grizz at the Forum Thursday 103 – 96. But in the process, the Grizz created a chapter in Memphis basketball lore where it is about more than winning on the court.

91. Crosby Plants a Park in the Shadow of Skyscrapers -

How do you repurpose a blighted old Burger King? That’s the question Scott Crosby was facing. “Initially we thought we’d make it a bar, or maybe a restaurant,” he says. “But the building was too dilapidated. Then we thought, maybe a parking lot, but the space was too small.”

92. Strickland: City Already Funds Schools Many Ways -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says a coalition calling for city government to provide $10 million for local education through nonprofit groups has to take into account “a $50 million challenge” the city faces in its finances over the coming years.

93. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

94. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

95. Strickland Willing To Talk About Schools Funding, But Budget Set -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says his budget proposal to the Memphis City Council is set and ready to deliver next week. But he added Tuesday, April 18, that he is willing to talk with the citizens who drafted a letter to him last week calling on the city to put up $10 million in funding for schools in his proposal.

96. Coalition Urges City Funding For Schools -

A coalition of 13 organizations and 17 citizens, including Shelby County Schools board chairman Chris Caldwell and state Reps. Raumesh Akbari and G.A. Hardaway, are calling on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to include at least $10 million in funding for schools in the budget he takes to the Memphis City Council next week.

97. Coalition Urges City Funding For Memphis Schools -

A group of 13 organization and 17 citizens including Shelby County Schools board chairman Chris Caldwell and state Representatives Raumesh Akbari and G.A. Hardaway are calling on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to include at least $10 million in funding for schools in the budget he takes to the Memphis City Council next week.

98. Defining the Basics: Bike Lane Expansion -

Our current administration’s platform desires to be brilliant at the basics, but what is the definition of basic?

“Basic” is not merely the ability to reduce crime, provide sanitation services or put out fires; in today’s world, it means more than that. The basics are the acceptable standard of living in a large metropolitan city.

99. Guest Column: Defining the Basics – Bike Lane Expansion -

Editor’s note: Voice your opinion on Memphis’ proposed repaving and bike lane by taking the city’s online survey by 11:59 p.m. Monday, April 17.

100. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.