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Editorial Results (free)

1. Graceland's Lawsuit Against Grizz Dismissed -

Graceland’s legal challenge of the noncompete agreement between the city and the Memphis Grizzlies organization was dismissed Thursday, Feb. 15, by Chancellor Jim Kyle.

2. More Companies Providing Some Parental Leave Pay -

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act ensures that employees with over a year of employment get 12 weeks unpaid time off from their jobs, and the Tennessee Maternity Leave Act allows certain female employees four months of unpaid leave for pregnancy, childbirth, care of a newborn and adoption.

3. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

4. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

5. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

6. Customer-Focused Government Not Always a Pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

7. Council Takes Up MLGW Rate Hikes Again, Votes On Third Ballot Question -

With the 1 percent hike in the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division water rates taking effect this month, the Memphis City Council again takes up proposed hikes in the gas and electric rates on Tuesday, Feb. 6.

8. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

9. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

10. Towns Sponsoring Gun Security Bills in a ‘Dangerous World’ -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Joe Towns was like a lot of other legislators when he arrived at the renovated Cordell Hull Building for the start of the 2018 legislative session.

11. Dunavant Set Gold Standard As Public Servant -

For the late Bobby Dunavant, who worked as Shelby County Probate Court Clerk for 40 years from 1954 to 1994, qualities like being honest, accessible, generous, empathetic and highly attentive to detail made him beloved by friends and colleagues throughout his life.

12. Events -

Novel will host Wintrell Pittman, author of the “Children of the World” book series, for a discussion and book signing Saturday, Jan. 27, at 2 p.m. at 387 Perkins Road Extended. The 12-book series uses crayon characters to teach children basic morals and values while enhancing reading and comprehension skills. Visit novelmemphis.com.

13. Newspapers Make Public Notice Work for Tennessee -

Each year a few elected officials will sponsor a law or an ordinance to change the way the voters who elected them are notified about actions government wishes to take. 2018 will be no exception.

Generally, our officials say, the proposed changes are to make government notices, and the legally required notices for property foreclosures, bankruptcies or unclaimed property, less expensive to publish. “Anybody can see them on our government website,” they proclaim, “and we will save taxpayers money.”

14. Newspapers Make Public Notice Work for Tennessee -

Each year a few elected officials will sponsor a law or an ordinance to change the way the voters who elected them are notified about actions government wishes to take. 2018 will be no exception.

Generally, our officials say, the proposed changes are to make government notices, and the legally required notices for property foreclosures, bankruptcies or unclaimed property, less expensive to publish. “Anybody can see them on our government website,” they proclaim, “and we will save taxpayers money.”

15. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago. But they put off any new votes on the matter until the first council meeting in February after what is expected to be a lengthy discussion in committee earlier that same day at City Hall.

16. Supreme Court to Rule on Trump Travel Ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide the legality of the latest version of President Donald Trump's ban on travel to the United States by residents of six majority-Muslim countries.

17. Governors to Trump, Congress: Do More to Solve Opioid Crisis -

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) – Less than three months after President Donald Trump declared the U.S. opioid crisis a public health emergency, the nation's governors are calling on his administration and Congress to provide more money and coordination for the fight against the drugs, which are killing more than 90 Americans a day.

18. Last Word: Rate Hike No Go, No Abortion Vote Recount and Infill -

A foggy night, rising temperatures and the prospect of snow by Friday evening. This sounds like a familiar setting for something unexpected in Memphis while the old year is still a recent memory and the new year is still new. Tigers on a tear Tuesday evening at FedExForum, beating Tulane 96 – 89.

19. CW/CA Adds Fenton As Marketing, Research Director -

Laura Fenton has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as director of marketing and research. CW/CA’s Marketing & Research department serves as the commercial real estate firm’s in-house agency for brokers and clients, and in her role, Fenton leads strategic communication, marketing and research for business development initiatives, marketing on behalf of clients, public relations, advertising, internal communications, social media and community involvement. 

20. Parks Closed By Police On Eve of Saturday Protest Plans -

Memphis Police shut down two Memphis parks Friday, Jan. 5, in advance of planned protests Saturday by groups opposed to the Dec. 20 removal of Confederate monuments from both parks.

More than a dozen police cars were around Health Sciences Park and a single police car was in Memphis Park before 9 p.m. Friday evening. Signs were posted in each park at different entry points reading "Park Closed Today" and "No Trespassing" and warnng against loitering and carrying firearms.

21. Last Word: Saturday In The Parks, The Citizen and Kroger Backlash -

No protest or march permits applied for at City Hall as of Thursday morning in anticipation of a Saturday Confederate monuments protest, according to city chief legal officer Bruce McMullen at Thursday’s taping of “Behind The Headlines.” Our discussion included lots about the city’s move toward taking down the monuments Dec. 20 and what could happen next. Also, McMullen tells us there were some other nonprofits that talked with the city about Health Sciences and Memphis Parks before Memphis Greenspace. The show airs Friday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 8:30 a.m. on WKNO TV.

22. EDITORIAL: Take Current Council Members Out of Three-Term-Limit Question -

For all of the names currently circulating for this or that office on one of the three election days we’ll have in Shelby County this year, it might help somewhere near the outset to remember who and what this is about.

23. Battling Opioids -

Later this month, Shelby County government will roll out a public health effort led by the Shelby County Health Department to battle opioid addiction. “We’re taking a very long view of this. It’s not going to be a quick fix,” Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell told Shelby County Commission members Wednesday, Jan. 3, during committee sessions.

24. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

25. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

26. Tenn. Unemployment Rate Below National Average -

The unemployment rate in the state of Tennessee was “significantly” lower throughout the month of November, according to the latest data released by the U.S. Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

27. Forrest Down -

It’s hard to know where the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is when there aren’t lights on it.

That was the case Wednesday, Dec. 20, as the spotlights normally illuminating the likeness of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard were doused.

28. Council Delays MLGW Rate Hike Vote to Wednesday -

Memphis City Council members meet again Wednesday, Dec. 20, to vote on Memphis Light Gas and Water Divisions proposals to raise water, gas and electricity rates starting next month.

The council was debating the 1.05 percent water rate hike proposal at its regularly scheduled Tuesday session when chairman Berlin Boyd announced the meeting would recess until 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall. It came as council members had a lot of questions about possible alternatives to the rate hikes across all three sectors of the publicly-owned utility.

29. Party Leaders: Voter Turnout Trumps Trump -

The chairmen of the local Democratic and Republican parties are leading very different game plans into the 2018 elections.

While the focus may be local politics and voter turnout, Shelby County Democratic Party chairman Corey Strong and Shelby County Republican Party chairman Lee Mills are not blind to what is happening nationally.

30. Houston Levee Center Sells for $2.3 Million -

A 16,320-square-foot retail center in northeast Shelby County has sold for $2.3 million.

Mahmoud Faedah Jaber of Eads bought the Class B power strip at 2821 Houston Levee Road from Houston Levee Investments LLC, according to a Dec. 1 warranty deed.

31. Last Word: Grizz Speculation, SCS Grade Floors and Cedar Heights -

Grizz lose to the Wizards 93-87 in Washington. And ESPN columnist Zach Lowe says the team has lost its identity as well as a lot of games. CBSSports reports Marc Gasol is open to a trade but will not request one. And if you are looking to go far afield with the theories, here’s one from a Dallas Mavericks fansight, mavsmoneyball, that includes a really good graphic on the salaries of Grizz players.

32. Last Word: Grizz Troubles Deepen, Germantown Kroger Enigma and The Strikers -

Tigers over Great Danes Tuesday at the Forum 67 – 58. The Grizz are in Washington Wednesday to play the Wizards and some of the attention around the Grizz is shifting away from what happens on the court. What would you call the place that the Grizz are at this mile marker past Grit & Grind? It is more than a losing streak, says Don Wade in his Press Box column.

33. Election Commission Goes to Court in RCV Controversy -

Shelby County Election Commissioners are going to court to settle a conflict over ranked-choice voting.

The five-member commission voted unanimously Tuesday, Dec. 12, to file suit against the state election coordinator and the city of Memphis in Davidson County Chancery Court.

34. Houston Levee Retail Center Sells for $2.3 Million -

A 16,320-square-foot retail center in northeast Shelby County has sold for $2.3 million.

Mahmoud Faedah Jaber of Eads bought the Class B power strip at 2821 Houston Levee Road from Houston Levee Investments LLC, according to a Dec. 1 warranty deed.

35. RCV Goes To Ballot, Term-Limit Change May Join It -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting (RCV) in some city council races starting with 2019 city elections.

36. City Council Gives Final Approval to RCV Repeal Referendum in November -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting in some city council races starting with the 2019 city elections.

37. Trump Signs Proclamation to Scale Back 2 National Monuments -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – President Donald Trump signed a proclamation Monday to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, pledging to "reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens."

38. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

39. Last Word: Grizz Ownership Moves, Confederate Deadline and Medical Family Tree -

As many of us were focused on Tigers football and the journey to Orlando last week, there was word that either both or one of the two minority owners of the Grizz had exercised a buy-sell provision in the NBA team’s unique ownership agreement. And what could be a fight for control of the team’s ownership is underway. The sports website The Athletic broke the story last Thursday. Here it is. It also talks about the timing of this coming with the controversial sacking of David Fizdale, an interim coach at the helm of a changing team and lead owner Robert Pera’s lack of visibility in all things Grizz around the city.

40. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

41. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

42. Opioid Lawsuit Filed as County Dispute on Legal Action Goes to Court -

UPDATE: Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled Tuesday, Nov. 14, that the Shelby County Commission overstepped its role and powers within county government when the commission hired a law firm and had its own attorney file a lawsuit in Circuit Court against pharmaceutical companies over opioid abuse.

43. Boyd Re-Elected As City Council Chairman -

The Memphis City Council re-elected Berlin Boyd as chairman of the body for 2018. He was elected to another one-year term Tuesday, Nov. 7, without opposition. Council member Frank Colvett was elected vice chairman over council member Janis Fullilove, who is currently vice chairman.

44. November 10-16, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1927: Watkins Overton upsets incumbent Mayor Rowlett Paine in city runoff elections. Overton is backed by former Memphis Mayor E.H. Crump, who had backed Paine’s 1923 re-election bid at the last minute. But Crump and Paine parted company after Paine endorsed Austin Peay for governor. Meanwhile, City Court Judge Cliff Davis is elected city police and fire commissioner. Davis had been a Crump foe four years earlier, running on a ticket of Ku Klux Klan candidates. “Supporters and followers of the ticket put on a wild celebration, parading Watkins Overton, Cliff Davis and E.H. Crump down Main Street on the shoulders of enthusiastic supporters,” The Daily News reported.

45. Boyd Re-Elected As City Council Chairman -

The Memphis City Council re-elected Berlin Boyd as chairman of the body for 2018. He was elected to another one-year term Tuesday, Nov. 7, without opposition. Council member Frank Colvett was elected vice chairman over council member Janis Fullilove, who is currently vice chairman.

46. Council Funds Beale Crowd Consultant, Abolishes $5 Cover -

Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Nov. 7, to approve $50,000 in funding for a crowd control consultant for the Beale Street entertainment district and to end the $5 cover charge for entry into the district on spring and summer Saturday nights after 10 p.m.

47. County Commission OKs Emissions Fee Hike -

Shelby County commissioners advanced on the first of three readings Monday, Oct. 30, an ordinance that would increase the county’s air pollution emission fee and the major and minimum source permit fees for non-automobile emissions.

48. County Commission OKs Emissions Fee Hike -

Shelby County commissioners advanced on the first of three readings Monday, Oct. 30, an ordinance that would increase the county’s air pollution emission fee and the major and minimum source permit fees for non-automobile emissions.

49. County Pay Raises Short of Votes, In Search of Compromise -

Proposed pay raises for 19 of Shelby County government’s top elected positions don’t appear to have the nine votes necessary to pass on third and final reading in two weeks.

So Shelby County commissioner Van Turner is looking for a compromise that might put the double-digit percentage pay raises to voters in a 2018 referendum or tie future pay raises to any raises that county government rank and file employees get.

50. New Screenings to Start for All US-Bound Airline Passengers -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — All incoming flights to the United States will be subject to new security screening procedures before takeoff, including both American citizens and foreigners possibly facing security interviews from airline employees, the U.S. government said Wednesday.

51. Process vs. Protest: Opinions Differ On How to Remove Monuments -

Protest and the legal process live in the same neighborhood. Sometimes they are next-door neighbors with borders that may be in dispute. At others times they are allies. But there is almost always a tension between the two.

52. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

53. AP-NORC Poll: Most Don't Want Young Immigrants Deported -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

54. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

55. Vegas Shooting Renews Debate on High-Capacity Ammo Magazines -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – The rapid-fire shooting that killed or injured hundreds of concertgoers in Las Vegas has highlighted the easy availability of ammunition magazines that allow shooters to fire dozens of shots without having to reload.

56. Beale Street Task Force Outlines Two Cover Charge Options -

A Beale Street Task Force assembled this summer to consider the future of a spring and summer cover charge Saturday nights after 10 p.m. in the district is recommending the cover charge stay.

The task force, in its last meeting Monday, Oct. 2, also recommended the return of Beale Street Bucks in some form – coupons given to those paying the cover charge that can be redeemed in most Beale businesses Saturdays and Sundays.

57. Last Word: Las Vegas React, Moral Monday, Who Pays For Beale Security? -

We open with reaction Monday to the mass shooting in Las Vegas:

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland:

58. Paying Beale Street Security Costs Raises Lease Questions -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, on whether the city should start using some of the $378,000 in Beale Street cover charge funds the Downtown Memphis Commission has been holding in two bank accounts since June.

59. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

60. Last Word: Corker's Decision, Buses & Bikes and Tenoke Comeback -

And with a brief, carefully-worded written statement Tuesday afternoon, U.S. Senator Bob Corker has blown up the forming-2018 race for the Senate seat he will give up at the end of 2018 and that probably applies to the 2018 race for Tennessee Governor. That’s even if Corker doesn’t follow Tuesday’s announcement by getting into the race for Governor at some point. Corker said nothing about what is next beyond his remaining time in office.

61. Bus System Gets Review as Part of Memphis 3.0 -

On the way to a comprehensive city development and land use plan by 2019, those putting together the plan have heard one priority from citizens over and over: better public transportation.

The topic came up so much the Memphis 3.0 planning process is creating a more detailed transit strategy within the larger plan. The transit plan should be in a draft form by late 2018.

62. The Week Ahead: Sept. 18-24 -

Hello, Memphis! Autumn officially arrives this Friday, and it’s bringing along a spate of happenings this week – from the Metal Museum’s Repair Days to the Memphis Japan Festival and the Mid-South Fair. Check out our top event picks and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

63. Equifax Victims May Face Another Hassle in Buying an iPhone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple fans who froze their credit after the Equifax data breach may end up with another hassle on their hands if they try to get one of the new iPhones that can cost more than $1,000. People who did so and want to make any big purchase may find the same.

64. Activist Announces Bid for Corker's Tennessee Senate Seat -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Conservative activist Andy Ogles announced Thursday he will run for the U.S. Senate seat held by Tennessee Republican Bob Corker, who has so far refused to divulge whether he will seek a third term.

65. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

66. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

67. MMDC Hires Mitchell to Lead Community Development -

Memphis native Vonesha Mitchell has joined the Memphis Medical District Collaborative as program manager, community development. Mitchell’s new position rolls together several functions, including recruiting retail for vacant and underutilized storefronts, working with U3 Advisors to launch and administer the Hire Local program, developing assistance package and incentive programs, and engaging current and potential businesses in the district to understand opportunities and concerns.

68. Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Over Treatment of Tennessee Disabled -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A judge on Friday dismissed a long-standing lawsuit over Tennessee's treatment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, ending federal oversight of state programs.

69. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

70. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

71. House Passes Bill to Speed Deployment of Self-Driving Cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House voted Wednesday to speed the introduction of self-driving cars by giving the federal government authority to exempt automakers from safety standards not applicable to the technology, and to permit deployment of up to 100,000 of the vehicles annually over the next several years.

72. Memphis Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares Confederate statues on city-owned property public nuisances and sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

73. City Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares “all Confederate statues and artifacts … on City-owned property public nuisances” and also sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

74. Arlington Early Vote Hits 100 in First 2 Days -

A total of 100 citizens cast early ballots in the first two days of the early voting period in Arlington municipal elections, according to Shelby County Election Commission turnout numbers.

The early voting period in advance of the Sept. 21 election day runs through Sept. 16.

75. Corker Draws Distinction Between Tax Cuts, Reform -

Republican U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee says he wants to see tax reform that might mean a reduction in some taxes but very specific cuts aimed at a larger goal of promoting economic growth that makes up the revenue lost.

76. Corker Distinguishes Between Tax Reform and Tax Cut -

U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee says he wants to see tax reform that might mean a reduction in some taxes but very specific cuts aimed at a larger goal of promoting economic growth that makes up the revenue lost.

77. Officials Say Trump's Afghan Plan Involves 3,900 More Troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to end America's longest war and eliminate Afghanistan's rising extremist threat involves sending up to 3,900 additional U.S. troops, senior officials said Tuesday. The first deployments could take place within days.

78. Early Childhood Literacy Efforts Push ‘Knowledge-Based Competency’ -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen and other educators say early childhood educators across the state don’t spend enough time with children on reading, vocabulary building, word comprehension and other basic literacy skills.

79. City Council To Take Up Monument Removal Resolution -

Memphis City Council members will discuss and possibly vote Tuesday, Aug. 22, on a resolution that directs the city to act on the “immediate removal and/or sale of Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from Health Sciences Park and statue of Jefferson Davis and related artifacts from Memphis Park.”

80. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

81. County Mulls Garage For Long-Term Parking Fix -

Shelby County Jury Commission officials have points they always make with citizens on jury duty in Downtown Memphis. And it includes an apology for the parking situation around the Criminal Justice Center and the Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse, where those called to be on juries will work for a week at a time.

82. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

83. Firehouse Subs Holding ‘H2O for Heroes’ Drive -

Firehouse Subs hopes guests will help local first responders beat the heat when it hosts its annual H2O for Heroes bottled water collection drive Saturday, Aug. 5, at all Memphis Firehouse Subs locations.

84. Firehouse Subs Holding ‘H2O for Heroes’ Drive -

Firehouse Subs is hoping guests will help local first responders beat the heat when it hosts its annual H2O for Heroes bottled water collection drive on Saturday, Aug. 5, at all Firehouse Subs locations in Memphis.

85. Tennessee's Abortion Laws at Risk in Quirky Vote Count Case -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The future of abortion access in Tennessee hinges on a quirky court case that's about vote counting, not women's reproductive health rights.

A 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hearing Wednesday in Cincinnati will mark the first major action in more than a year in the case of Amendment 1, an anti-abortion measure passed by voters in 2014. The amendment says that nothing in the state constitution "secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of an abortion" and empowers state lawmakers to "enact, amend, or repeal statutes regarding abortion."

86. Fully Loaded -

It’s almost like the first half of 2017 was a decade in the making, at least when it comes to commercial real estate. Throughout all four major sectors of the Memphis-area commercial real estate market – industrial, office, retail and multifamily – figures are consistently reaching or exceeding pre-recession marks.

87. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

88. New Local Democratic Party Council Features Lots of New Faces -

Shelby County Democrats selected 102 citizens Saturday, July 22, to the local party’s new Democratic Grass Roots Council and 26 of those 102 to the local party’s executive committee in a local party convention at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church.

89. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

90. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

91. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

92. Peaceful Bridge Anniversary Protests Draw Moving Police Presence -

A heavy but moving and shifting Memphis Police presence responded Sunday, July 9, to a set of peaceful protests and gatherings on the first anniversary of the protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the Mississippi River.

93. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

94. Last Word: A Second Juvenile Court Letter, Fred Smith's Tax Plan and Memphis Hops -

A group of 19 organizations including the Memphis Branch NAACP and 28 citizens sent a letter Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urging him to keep in place Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. The 12-page letter is a point-by-point detailed response to the June 9 letter from County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham asking Sessions to end the memorandum of agreement between county government and the Justice Department.

95. Theresa May Details Post-Brexit Plans for EU Citizens in UK -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May tried Monday to reassure European Union citizens living in Britain that their lives and those of their family will not be disrupted when Britain leaves the EU in 2019.

96. Tourism Leaders Focus on City’s Complexity, Struggle -

Stax Records turns 60 years old this year, going back to its origins as a country music label called Satellite at a tiny studio in Brunswick. Next year marks 50 years since the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In August, it will be 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. And in 2019, the city of Memphis will mark 200 years since its founding.

97. After Warmbier's Death, US Weighs Travel Ban on North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is considering banning travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea, officials said Tuesday, as outrage grew over the death of American student Otto Warmbier and President Donald Trump declared it a "total disgrace."

98. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

99. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

100. 2,700 Vote Early, 3 Election Day Polls Move in House District 95 -

A total of 2,700 citizens cast early votes ahead Thursday’s special state House District 95 election in eastern Shelby County. And on election day, three of the 14 polling places – two in Collierville and one in Germantown – will move from their regular locations.