» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
TDN Services
Research millions of people and properties [+]
Monitor any person, property or company [+]

Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'First Citizens' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:222
Shelby Public Records:4656
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:24183
Middle Tennessee:3969
East Tennessee:5669
Other:5

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. A New Benchmark -

Shelby Farms Park is gearing up for the second annual Mempho Music Festival and another chance to showcase the country’s largest urban park to a diverse and wide-reaching audience.
Memphis’ newest music festival is expecting a crowd of 20,000 on Oct. 6 and 7, which is impressive for a park two years out from a $70 million renovation embarked upon in 2010 with a distant vision for such an event.
The master plan for the park was designed not only for people to recreate and relax, but as a place to build community, and a music festival can be a big part of that, said Jen Andrews, executive director of Shelby Farms Park. Andrews has always had a larger vision for the park as a place where the community could come together and take ownership and pride in the best that Memphis has to offer.
Enter another visionary, native Memphian Diego Winegardner, founder of Mempho Fest and CEO of Big River Presents, which is putting on the festival. Winegardner grew up in Memphis and now lives outside of New York City where his day job is in finance and investment management. A couple of years ago on a trip home to Memphis he met some old friends for a bike ride at Shelby Farms Park.
“I was completely blown away,” Winegardner said. “The sun was setting on Hyde Lake, and I had this lightning-bolt moment of how special it would be to bring a world-class music festival to this site.
I thought about Memphis’ place in the annals of American music as the birthplace of blues, soul and R&B and the hip hop scene that we have here.
“If you think about the labels … Sun, Stax, Royal…I was exposed to all of that growing up, and seeing B.B. King on Beale Street was just normal,” he said. “I didn’t appreciate it until I was gone. I started to get really nostalgic about my hometown.”
Winegardner is a music enthusiast who has been to most of the notable music festivals in the U.S. and many around the world. He had the resources and connections to realize his dream. Last year, the first Mempho Fest kicked off with great success with 10,000 in attendance for two days of concerts featuring a variety of bands from different music genres.
“I’ve always been a big fan of (Memphis) and its people and a big defender of the city and its history,” Winegardner said. “This music festival was born out of my passion for music and my passion for the city of Memphis.”
When Winegardner first met with Andrews two years ago to pitch his idea, she caught his vision right away.
He approached it cautiously and wanted to understand how to protect the park and still give people a good experience, she said. “We like working with Diego,” she said. “They care about the park, and like us, have a big, bold vision, and they hired a professional team who knew how to put on a safe and fun event.”
This year’s festival will feature two days of multi-genre music headlined by Grammy Award-winning artist and hip-hop superstar Post Malone as well as Beck, Phoenix, NAS and Janelle Monae. Local talent like Lucero and alternative Mac deMarco also will perform, and there will be a special tribute to Willie Mitchell’s Royal Studios featuring the label’s past and present stars.
Sunday will feature performances by crowd favorites like George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic and Stones Throw, Chuck Laevell’s Rolling Stones’ backer band.
The festival will not only expand in attendance, but will add a larger culinary and craft beer presence in addition to on-site camping and VIP and super-VIP experiences.
“We’re trying to create more than just music on a stage,” said Winegardner, who also created a nonprofit arm called Mempho Matters that will partner with organizations that line-up with the vision of the festival, such as Oceanic Global Foundation, #BringYourSoul, Learn to Rock and the Memphis Area Women’s Council’s “Memphis Says NO MORE” campaign.
As part of Mempho’s partnership with the Oceanic Global Foundation, the festival has a 100 percent waste-free goal, which will start with its no straw policy.
“A best practice environmental policy is important to help make sure the park is as pristine when we leave as when we showed up,” said Winegardner.
The partnership promoting the Memphis Area Women’s Council’s “NO MORE” campaign is to make sure that Mempho Fest’s female attendees feel safe. Winegardner, who has a teenage daughter, knows stories about the lack of safety for females at other events, prompting him to take up the cause.
“In this day and age, you really have to take a stand and make it an institutional part of our way of doing things,” he said.
Money raised through Mempho Matters will also benefit the Memphis community through contributions to musical education in the form of free tickets for students and teachers to attend the festival as well as instruments and money for music education in local schools.
Last year, Mempho Matters gave away 2,000 tickets to students and teachers.
“We want to build bridges into the community and be as inclusive as possible,” Winegardner said. “We want to educate the children and the youth of tomorrow about the history of Memphis musically and create a sense of pride for its citizens while also attracting new people and adding another chapter to Memphis’ long, rich history.”
Andrews is optimistic about the growth of Mempho Fest this year, projecting double the attendance in its second year as well as adding 400 weekend camping permits. Those include primitive camping, RV hookups and glamping.
“The camping option is an important part of festival culture, and one of the great benefits of the park is its tremendous scale, which can accommodate that,” Andrews said.
But the plan is to grow Mempho Fest slowly, she said.
“We learned a lot the first year, and we’re applying the learning to this year’s festival,” she said. “We have a strong plan for safely managing the crowd. We want this to be a world-class festival.”
Big River Productions and Winegardner have an undisclosed agreement with Shelby Farms Park, and both entities hope to continue the relationship.
“I’m hoping that Mempho Fest will become a long-term asset for the city of Memphis,” Winegardner said.
Music remains a big driver of visitors to Memphis — 56 percent of leisure visitors come to the city for something related to music, said Kevin Kane, president and CEO of Memphis Tourism, formerly called the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau. “We’re supporters of (Mempho Fest),” he said. “We believe in it and want to see it grow. Music festivals have a big impact on the economy. The more events we have based in music the better, and we think it’s great to utilize Shelby Farms in this way.”

2. Return of Beale Street Cover Charge Adds Fuel to Debate -

There are still some details left to work out about the return of the Beale Street cover charge.

The Downtown Memphis Commission and Memphis police have to set criteria for when to use the cover charge. There is also the question of whether it is a $10 cover with coupons from merchants or the $5 cover with no rebates that was in place before the council abolished the cover altogether.

3. Last Word: Jagger, Jerry Lee, Whalum & More and Harris' Plans on BTH -

Sir Mick Jagger and Jerry Lee Lewis walk into Sun Studio Wednesday. That’s not the start of a joke. Variety has reported that Jagger’s film company has signed on to the Elvis biopic being made from Peter Guralnick’s definitive two volume biography of the king. You connect the dots or don’t – who knows if there is a connection? Yes, but they aren’t talking.

4. FHN Names Dawn Morris to Chief Digital Banking/Marketing Post -

First Horizon National Corp. has named Dawn Morris executive vice president, chief digital banking and marketing officer.

5. Gun Sense Ratings for Republicans Raise Questions for Challengers -

Two Republican Shelby County legislators seeking re-election received “gun sense candidate” ratings this year from the weapons safety group Moms Demand Action while also netting good marks from the National Rifle Association, a distinction their Democratic opponents are questioning.

6. Gun Sense Ratings for Republicans Raise Questions for Challengers -

Gun Sense Ratings for Republicans Raise Questions for Challengers

Tennessee Legislature

By Sam Stockard

Special to The Daily News

Two Republican Shelby County legislators seeking re-election received “gun sense candidate” ratings this year from the weapons safety group Moms Demand Action while also netting good marks from the National Rifle Association, a distinction their Democratic opponents are questioning.

7. Gun Sense Ratings for Republicans Raise Questions for Challengers -

Two Republican Shelby County legislators seeking re-election received “gun sense candidate” ratings this year from the weapons safety group Moms Demand Action while also netting good marks from the National Rifle Association, a distinction their Democratic opponents are questioning.

8. Last Word: Selling Local Soccer, Football's Arrival and Luttrell's Vetoes -

So the United Soccer League Memphis franchise is to be called Memphis FC 901. The branding was launched as the Labor Day weekend began with a video that is part Rogues nostalgia, soccer at school memories and a liberal dose of Grit ‘n’ Grind rhetoric from another sports franchise just down the street from AutoZone Park. The combination is another example of sports carrying the banner for the promotion of Memphis in general.

9. Report: Nearly 3,000 Deaths in Puerto Rico Linked to Hurricane Maria -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Hurricane Maria killed nearly 3,000 people in Puerto Rico in the desperate, sweltering months after the storm — almost double the previous government estimate — with the elderly and impoverished most affected, according to an independent study ordered by the U.S. territory.

10. How Memphis Can Learn from Detroit: Creating an Inclusive Comeback Story -

The City of Detroit intends to create the most inclusive comeback story America has ever told.

Detroit is the largest African-American majority city in the country with a population over 400,000. Memphis is the second largest.

11. Testimony Ends in Federal Case Questioning Memphis Police Surveillance Tactics -

After four days, the federal trial where the ACLU sued the city of Memphis over political surveillance of activists, ended Thursday, leaving the decision in the hands of U.S. District Judge Jon McCalla.

12. Melania Trump Addresses Federal Conference on Cyberbullying -

ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) — Melania Trump is encouraging technology and social media companies to provide more opportunities for children to share ideas on how to be good citizens online.

Opening a federal conference on cyberbullying, the first lady says most children are more aware than some adults of the "benefits and pitfalls" of social media. Even so, she says adults still must do "all we can" to provide them with information and tools for safe online habits.

13. McCalla Says City Violated Consent Decree on Political Surveillance of Protesters -

U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla ruled Friday, Aug. 10, that Memphis Police gathered political intelligence on protesters over the last two years in violation of a 1978 federal court consent decree. And if the plaintiffs in the 2017 lawsuit against the city can establish their standing in court next week, McCalla said he is prepared to declare the city in contempt of the consent decree and impose sanctions.

14. The Week Ahead: Aug. 13-19 -

Good morning, Memphis! A host a government meetings and late summer movie offerings mark this week in mid-August. The Labor Day holiday weekend and start of football season isn’t too far off.

15. Melania Trump's Parents Sworn In As U.S. Citizens -

NEW YORK (AP) — First lady Melania Trump's parents were sworn in as U.S. citizens Thursday.

Viktor and Amalija Knavs, both in their 70s, took the citizenship oath at a special, private ceremony in New York City. The Slovenian immigrants, a former car dealer and textile factory worker, had been living in the U.S. as permanent residents.

16. 1940 Civil Rights Worker Slaying Case Reopened -

MEMPHIS — More than 78 years after civil rights worker Elbert Williams' body was found in a Tennessee river, a district attorney announced Wednesday that he is reopening the investigation into the slaying.

17. Police Documents Show Protest Spreadsheet and Fear of 'Radicals' -

Memphis Police brass kept a spread sheet over the past two years on whether a protest received a city permit – was “lawful” or “unlawful” – while continuing to collect information on some of the protesters from public social media.

18. In His Final Months as Tennessee Governor, Haslam Reflects on His Education Legacy -

While Gov. Bill Haslam entered office as an education-minded leader intent on reforms, much of his administration’s K–12 public school work has focused on holding the line on sweeping policies launched under his predecessor.

19. Council Chairman Pushes Back Against Criticism -

The end of Memphis City Council sessions has long been the place for issues and complaints not on the council agenda. The time reserved for citizens to speak their mind is where some of the broadest criticism is leveled at city leaders. There is also no level of detail that is considered too great for some of the speakers.

20. Glasgow Finds All the Answers in Her Second Home -

Born in Shanghai, China, Wang-Ying Glasgow always knew she wanted to come to the United States. Whether it was to advance her degrees, which she says is a must to be successful in China, or as an interpreter, it was only a matter of when.

21. Turnout Growing With 2 Days to Vote Before Aug. 2 -

With two days left in the early voting period, 63,244 citizens had cast ballots in Shelby County in advance of the Aug. 2 election day. The last day of the early voting period is Saturday, July 28.

22. Last Word: Sunflowers, Poplar-Ridgeway TIF and Meet The Developer of The Bucc -

You wait for it all year but it always comes as a surprise when you see them by the side of the road beckoning with their bright colors and their solid stance on the horizon as early voters head for Agricenter in search of a bit of scenery before making their choices. The sunflowers – What did you think I was talking about? -- began blooming on Walnut Grove Tuesday, the first of two phases from more than 78,000 sunflower seeds planted at Agricenter. They last a few weeks and with the staggered plantings, the new crop should be in its full glory about a month from now. Please don’t pick the sunflowers. Agricenter has designated parking areas after you enter on Timber Creek Drive. Just follow the signs.

23. Chamber PAC Backs Both County Mayor Candidates -

The Jobs Political Action Committee of the Greater Memphis Chamber is backing both candidates in the race for Shelby County mayor on the Aug. 2 ballot and skipped the race for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Commission – arguably the most competitive of the 13 commission races.

24. Chamber PAC Backs Both County Mayor Candidates -

The Jobs Political Action Committee of the Greater Memphis Chamber is backing both candidates in the race for Shelby County mayor on the Aug. 2 ballot and skipped the race for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Commission – arguably the most competitive of the 13 commission races.

25. Last Word: T.O. Jones, One Beale's Launch and De-Annexation in Trouble -

You might call it the final act of the MLK 50 observances around our city this year. With very little fanfare at the start of Tuesday’s city council session, the council honored T.O. Jones, the leader of the union representing city sanitation workers and the leader of the 1968 strike by those workers. Jones was a pivotal figure in the strike who soon after lost his position with the local union in the internal politics of AFSCME as the local became a powerful political symbol.

26. Early Voting Turnout Slants to Decisively Democratic Or Republican Precincts -

As the second full week of early voting got underway Monday, 6,660 citizens cast early ballots at the 27 sites across Shelby County bringing the early voting total to 39,135.

In the same election cycle four years ago at this point, 43,724 had voted early. And in the 2010 elections, 48,873 early voters had cast ballots. In those two past elections – the same election cycle as 2018 – the Downtown location was the only site open for the first two days followed by 20 other sites across the county. This year five sites were open for the first three days followed by another 22.

27. Last Word: Polls & Precinct Splits, Behind The Roundhouse Revival and The Bubba -

With a week left in early voting we have reached that part in the campaign where candidates and campaigns have one last chance to read the signs, interpret them on how this is going and act. They will still be doing the first two things up until the polls close on Aug. 2. But very shortly there won’t be time to do the third and have it make a difference in the outcome.

28. Early Voting Tops 32,000 Through Saturday -

More than 32,000 Shelby County citizens had cast an early vote through Saturday, July 21, in advance of the Aug. 2 election day.

The 32,472 early voters compares to 37,168 early voters through the first eight days in 2014 for this same election cycle and 41,310 at the same point in 2010. In 2010 and 2014, there were 21 early voting sites compared with today’s 27.

29. Last Word: MemFix 4's Big Weekend, Early Voting Six Days In and Grizz Moves -

A big weekend to avoid the interstate with a rare closing of I-240 between the 385 split and the I-40 split and Poplar over I-240 also closed in both directions. This kicks in Friday evening and runs up to Monday morning’s rush hour as TDOT crews work to replace four bridges in East Memphis using a relatively new process in which parts of the bridges are assembled in advance and then moved into place. The bridges are both Poplar bridges, the Park Avenue bridge and the Norfolk Southern rail bridge. And this will happen all over again in about a week’s time using the same schedule, weather permitting. Weekenders on the interstate already have some experience with a milder version of this with the interstate projects on the south leg

30. The Fuse -

Where and when to hold early voting has been such a low-grade political tug of war in the scheme of low-turnout Memphis elections that it hasn’t caused much of a ripple in the city’s deep political waters.

31. Early Voting Nears 23,000 Six Days In -

Early voting turnout totals with all sites open across Shelby County jumped to around 6,000 a day on the first three days all 27 sites were open to citizens in advance of the Aug. 2 election day.

The Tuesday turnout was 6,464. Wednesday’s was 5,863 and Thursday's 6,348, according to figures from the Shelby County Election Commission.

32. Lenoir, Harris Clash at Rotary Debate -

Republican contender for Shelby County mayor David Lenoir accused Democratic rival Lee Harris of being radical and for “wealth transfer.” Harris, a state senator, said Lenoir, as county trustee, has “almost no experience” with “tough issues” and accused Lenoir of resorting to name-calling.

33. Shelby County Early Voting Tops 4,300 -

A total of 4,324 citizens had voted early through Monday, July 16, the last day of the 14-day voting period confined to five sites. Early voting expanded Tuesday to 22 additional sites across Shelby County.

34. Last Word: Early Voting Goes Bigger, Worst Kept Secret and Christmas on Carr -

By 9:30 p.m. Monday, 599 people were still without power from weekend storms, according to MLGW with crews working into Tuesday. Meanwhile, 4,324 citizens had voted early through Monday at five sites with early voting expanded to all 27 sites Tuesday. There has to be some kind of connection there but at the moment it eludes me. Meanwhile, here is the grid of early voting sites and their hours from the Shelby County Election Commission… grid, get it?

35. Early Voting So Far Tops 2010 and 2014 Levels -

The first two days of early voting in advance of the Aug. 2 election talliede more than 2,700 early and absentee ballots cast.

The two-day total of 2,766 topped the first two days of early voting in 2010 and 2014 in the same election cycle of county general elections and state and federal primaries.

36. Last Word: Opening Day at the Polls, Court Square Sighting and Different Moonlight -

For some candidates summer heat is a campaign tradition that they thrive on. Governor Ned McWherter was one of those candidates. But for most of those running for political office in an election year, it amps up the grueling pace immeasurably, especially the pace of a statewide campaign in a state whose northeastern most point is closer to Canada than it is to Memphis. That is the atmospheric setting for Friday’s first day of the early voting period. And a look at the past turnout for this election cycle shows the statewide primaries on the ballot will likely tell a good part of the story.

37. Early Voting Schedule Changes Again as Court Order Signed -

UPDATE: The court order governing early voting in advance of the Aug. 2 election day changed again Tuesday, July 10, as Chancellor JoeDae Jenkins amended his Monday order to permit all 27 early voting sites to open Tuesday -- keeping the previous plan to open five of those sites Friday when the 14-day early voting period begins this Friday.

38. Last Word: The Jenkins Ruling, No More City Court Clerk and Harwell's Quest -

Making your early voting plan for Friday’s debut of the voting period in advance of the Aug. 2 election day? Well, you might want to hold off until after Tuesday morning. That’s when the latest changes could get set in stone … or not.

39. Jenkins Orders Changes to Early Voting Roll Out -

The day after Chancellor JoeDae Jenkins ordered a rearrangement of early voting scheduled to begin Friday, the attorney for the Shelby County Election Commission was contemplating an appeal of the ruling.

40. Editorial: Early Voting Review Should Be Bipartisan -

From the outset of early voting in Shelby County 24 years ago, there was never an expectation that going to the polls for two weeks before Election Day would increase the overall turnout.

If that happened it was considered to be an added benefit. But the goal of early voting was convenience and maybe a step or two down the road to a time when we would vote at fewer polling places once this became a habit.

41. Last Word: River Museum Review, Tigers' Blended Family and Oxford Crackdown -

It’s not the Gulf. It’s Lake Pontchartrain that draws the crowds on Mud Island. The Riverwalk replica of the Gulf of Mexico’s neighbor that is. A few adjustments is all it took to return authorized wading to the area at the end of the scale model of the Mississippi River. The river park is changing as it continues to make its way through the annual season from the summer and into the fall.

42. Election Commission Reviews Democrats’ Complaints About Early-Voting Sites -

The Shelby County Election Commission meets Friday, June 29, to hear complaints from local Democrats about the locations and hours of early-voting sites in advance of the Aug. 2 Election Day.

Corey Strong, chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party, said Wednesday the election commission should apologize for having Agricenter International as the only site for early voting the first four days of the early-voting period.

43. Democrats Cry Foul on Early Voting Sites -

The chairman of the Shelby County Democratic party says the Shelby County Election Commission should apologize for having Agricenter International as the only site for early voting the first four days of the early voting period in advance of the Aug. 2 election day.

44. Memphis Fire Suspends Trial Program After Invoice Error -

The Memphis Fire Department has suspended a pilot program for non-emergency medical calls after the city paid $50,000 to a healthcare provider when the physician services involved were supposed to be provided at no cost to the city.

45. Fire Department Suspends Trial Program After Invoice Error -

The Memphis Fire Department has suspended a pilot program for non-emergency medical calls after the city paid $50,000 to a healthcare provider when the physician services involved were supposed to be provided at no cost to the city.

46. Fire Department Suspends Trial Program After Invoice Error -

The Memphis Fire Department has suspended a pilot program for non-emergency medical calls after the city paid $50,000 to a healthcare provider when the physician services involved were supposed to be provided at no cost to the city.

47. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Health Care in Tennessee? -

According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality, number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

48. MIFA Marks 50 Years of Interfaith Activism -

When a group of Memphis religious leaders marched from St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral to City Hall the day after Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968, they were in the middle of a pivotal year for an ecumenical movement whose impact is still being felt.

49. Rolling by the River -

After nearly two years of planning, preparation and hard work, Explore Bike Share in Memphis has finally rolled out. Despite the early morning heat and humidity, several hundred onlookers and volunteers assembled Downtown in Court Square Wednesday, May 23, to celebrate the official launch of the 600-bike fleet.

50. Canale is Newest City Council Member -

The newest Memphis City Council member is Joseph Ford Canale. The Christian Brothers High School golf coach and funeral director got the seven votes required to fill the vacant Super District 9 seat on the first and only ballot by the 12 council members.

51. Memphis City Council To Fill Vacancy Tuesday -

Memphis City Council members fill a vacancy on the 13-member body Tuesday, May 22.

The Super District 9 seat was vacated earlier this month by the resignation of first-term council member Philip Spinosa, who resigned to become senior vice president of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

52. Graceland Arena Controversy Shows Strings as it Broadens -

Elvis Presley Enterprises and City Hall got together last week in Whitehaven on neutral ground to talk about Graceland’s expansion plan, specifically a 6,200-seat arena. And from a distance you could barely see the strings from the arena attached to the 1,000-job manufacturing facility Graceland has also talked about starting on Brooks Road.

53. The Week Ahead: May 21-27 -

Good morning, Memphis! School ends this week and the long-awaited Explore Bike Share bicycle stations open across the city. The 600 bikes for rent will enable residents and visitors to explore the city, ride to work, visit local landmarks and get some exercise without polluting the air.

54. Last Word: Monuments Ruling, The Open Council Seat and Not So Great Streets -

It is likely just the first round. But the city of Memphis prevailed on every major point in the Wednesday ruling out of Nashville by Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle upholding the removal of Confederate monuments this past December from two city parks.

55. Last Word: The Bus to Shelby Farms, Sports Gaming In Tunica and Tom Lee's Story -

It hasn’t been this hot in 30 years … to the day. The high Monday of 93 degrees eclipsed the old record for the day of 91 degree in 1988. I’m not much of a thermometer watcher. But this did get my attention because I was imagining all of the big hair emergencies 30 years ago. Guys going to their closets to break out the Miami Vice pastel t-shirts and linen blazers. And of course California Raisins hysteria. And I do find it not entirely coincidental that we break a record from 1988 as there is talk of a remake of the movie “Willow.” We could break another record for all of this Tuesday and we’ll see what my mind does with the year of the old record if that’s the case.

56. Corporate Leaders Are True Partners -

“What can we do to help?” That was the question asked by a corporate representative at a conference we attended last week.

We were in Winston-Salem, participating in the State of Black North Carolina conference. We fell in love with the people, energy and positive, forward thinking. We were surrounded by people – including high school students and senior citizens – all of whom were asking questions, offering solutions, sharing history and strategizing.

57. Week Ahead: May 14-20 -

Go hog wild, Memphis! One of the most anticipated community events of the year kicks off this week when Tom Lee Park again becomes ground zero for the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. Teams from around the world will try to win over judges with their savory renditions of all things pig. It will be a lip-smackin’ good time win or lose, though. 

58. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

59. Report: Goldman Looks to Partner With Apple on Credit Card -

NEW YORK (AP) – Goldman Sachs and Apple are looking to partner together to create a new credit card, the first foray by Goldman Sachs into the $1 trillion credit card market, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday, citing unnamed sources.

60. Strickland: City Given Enough For Entertainment -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says he would support some kind of incentives for the manufacturing facility Graceland wants to open in Whitehaven. But not if it’s linked to a greater share of city and county property tax revenue for a 6,200-seat arena Graceland also wants to build.

61. Verdict Still Out on Tale of Increased Voter Turnout In Primaries -

Voting in the May election that included primaries for most Shelby County government nonjudicial offices was up from the 2010 and 2014 primaries for both parties. But what that says about new political blood and energy in both of the local parties is still an open question.

62. Spinosa Takes Job With Chamber, Resigns from Council -

Philip Spinosa, Jr. has resigned from the Memphis City Council and was named the new senior vice president of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

Spinosa will be taking over for Shea Flinn, who announced he would be vacating his position in March. Much like Spinosa, Flinn left his post on the council in 2015 to join the chamber.

63. Ladies of Charity: Serving Memphis for 80 Years -

There are hundreds of nonprofit organizations in Memphis founded to address a multitude of needs that plague our city, such as under-education, poverty, homelessness, crime, and societal ills and issues of all kinds. They range from grass roots organizations with a handful of volunteers who multitask to raise the needed funds, to large single-source private foundations with multimillion-dollar distributions.

64. Local, State and Federal Election Cycles Blend On Last Weekend of Early Voting -

Candidates in the August and November elections were out on the last weekend of early voting in Shelby County in advance of the May 1 election day for county primaries.

The events were a mix of candidates from all three elections on the calendar in 2018.

65. History Upgrade -

Mud Island’s Mississippi River Museum will have a shorter season than the rest of the river park.

The park on the southern half of Mud Island opened for the season April 14 during a changing of the guard at the Riverfront Development Corp., which runs the park for the city.

66. Early Voting Tops 7,000 in County Primaries Through Saturday -

More than 7,000 citizens voted early in Shelby County through the first weekend of the early voting period in the 2018 county government primaries.

The 7,255 early voters in advance of the May 1 election day through Saturday, April 14, are voting in a primary only election with 3,983 voting in the Democratic primaries and 3,272 voting in the Republican primaries.

67. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

68. Last Word: Bakery Rising, Legislative Notes From Nashville and Jazz Messiah -

Some call it the Bakery Project – others Wonder Bread. Whatever you call it the redevelopment project that is centered on the old Wonder Bread bakery on Monroe between Downtown and the Medical District is moving with a building permit this week for what developer Gary Prosterman and his team call the Cadillac Building … because it was once a Cadillac dealership. That’s part of the code being used for places that have been out of action or barely functioning for decades and are now under development.... very post-apocalyptic. 

69. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

70. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

71. Memphis Police: 9 Arrested Protesting Immigrant Detention -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Nine people were arrested Tuesday during a protest over the detention of immigrants in Memphis, Tennessee.

The Memphis Police Department said on its Facebook page that protesters blocked streets at two locations on Tuesday. The arrests took place at the Criminal Justice Center, which also contains the Shelby County jail.

72. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

73. States, Cities Sue US Over Census Citizenship Question -

NEW YORK (AP) – Seventeen states, the District of Columbia and six cities sued the U.S. government Tuesday, saying the addition of a citizenship question to the census form is unconstitutional.

74. Explore Bike Share Reveals Station Locations -

The launch of Explore Bike Share is getting closer with the nonprofit revealing Wednesday, March 28, the locations of the stations for the 600-bike system.

Explore Bike Share’s 60 stations span from Downtown, South Memphis and Cooper-Young to Orange Mound, Overton Square and Crosstown. The stations and bikes are being funded through a combination of donations from foundations and individuals, plus a $2.2 million federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality grant, said Explore Bike Share executive director Trey Moore.

75. Last Word: The RDC's New Leader, Potter on 100 North Main and FedEx Moves -

Is Memphis big enough for FedExForum and some kind of event space on the Graceland campus in Whitehaven? The city administration thinks that could be the case. But it requires an “honest broker” between Graceland and the Grizz – who run the forum for the city and county – to quote city chief legal officer Bruce McMullenif there is a deal to be had.

76. City Working to Settle EPE/Grizzlies Dispute as Litigation Mounts -

As the litigation piles up in a dispute between two of the most recognizable brands in Memphis, city officials say they are still hopeful a deal can be worked out between Elvis Presley Enterprises and the Memphis Grizzlies.

77. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Infrastructure Investment? -

Is investment in public infrastructure important? And should Tennessee have more dedicated revenue sources to pay for construction and maintenance of infrastructure across the state, or is the existing tax structure – primarily the state tax on fuel, and wheel taxes – sufficient to pay for what Tennessee needs to sustain and grow its economy?

78. Mississippi Agriculture Official Appointed to US Senate Seat -

BROOKHAVEN, Miss. (AP) – The governor of Mississippi appointed state Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith on Wednesday to succeed fellow Republican Thad Cochran in the U.S. Senate.

79. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

80. US Sets New Record for Censoring, Withholding Gov't Files -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government censored, withheld or said it couldn't find records sought by citizens, journalists and others more often last year than at any point in the past decade, according to an Associated Press analysis of new data.

81. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

82. Issues and Answers: Election 2018 -

In a survey of 19,000 adults in fall 2017, the Knight Foundation found that 84 percent of Americans think that the news media is very important, even critical, to our democracy. Eighty-eight percent said that news media must “make sure Americans have the knowledge they need to be informed about public affairs.”

83. Republican Mayoral Candidates Find Ways to Differentiate -

The three contenders in the May Republican primary for Shelby County mayor didn’t disagree on much when they met this week at the Southwind clubhouse. But David Lenoir, Joy Touliatos and Terry Roland did try to distinguish themselves from the other two in a relatively spark-free first encounter as a trio.

84. Council Still Battling With Public Art Issue -

Memphis City Council members were told Tuesday, March 6, that removing a mural from a private business front on Lamar Avenue will be difficult despite a council call to do so.

The zombie-like mural by the artist Dustin Spagnola has drawn most of the ire of council members for several months. Some have called it “satanic.” Others on the council argue the imagery isn’t respectful of the surrounding community.

85. Heir on the Side of Caution -

The closest and best parcel of land for a second convention center hotel in Downtown Memphis is the Mud Island parking garage. It’s a block away from the Memphis Cook Convention Center and is the first site that came up when a Denver developer approached the city last year about possibly building such a hotel.

86. Lawmakers Consider Armed Off-Duty Officers for Schools -

Saying “this is Tennessee, not Florida” and school officers here will face trouble head-on, state Rep. Antonio Parkinson is co-sponsoring legislation to arm off-duty police to patrol public schools.

87. Lake District Announces First Tenant -

It was a symbolic day for Lakeland. On the same day that the last piece of the old Lakeland Factory Outlet Mall was torn down, the city’s 160-plus-acre mixed-use Lake District project celebrated another milestone – its first tenant.

88. Defying the NRA, Dick's Takes a Harder Line Against Guns -

NEW YORK (AP) – Dick's Sporting Goods will immediately stop selling assault-style rifles and ban the sale of all guns to anyone under 21, the company said Wednesday, as its CEO took on the National Rifle Association by demanding tougher gun laws after the massacre in Florida.

89. FedEx Responds to Criticism Over Ties to National Rifle Association -

The day after FedEx Corp. released a statement saying that would continue to offer discounts to National Rifle Association members despite differing opinions on gun legislation, the Memphis-based company released a follow-up statement addressing the backlash.

90. FedEx Responds to Criticism over NRA Ties -

The day after FedEx Corp. released a statement saying that would continue to offer discounts to National Rifle Association members despite differing opinions on gun legislation, the Memphis-based company released a follow up statement addressing the backlash.

91. FedEx to Keep Discount Amid Calls for NRA Boycott -

The day after FedEx Corp. released a statement saying that would continue to offer discounts to National Rifle Association members despite differing opinions on gun legislation, the Memphis-based company released a follow-up statement addressing the backlash.

92. FedEx to Keep Discount amid Calls for NRA Boycott -

Despite a recent trend that has seen more than a dozen major corporate brands sever ties with the National Rifle Association in the wake of the latest school massacre in Parkland, Florida, local brand FedEx has announced that it will continue to offer discounts to NRA members.

93. State Archivists Seek WWI Artifacts from West Tenn. Residents -

The Tennessee State Library and Archives has launched “Over Here, Over There: Tennesseans in the First World War,” an effort to collect digital records of how World War I affected Tennesseans. Archivists will travel throughout the state to digitally scan and photograph documents, maps, photographs, uniforms and other artifacts related to World War I that are owned by private citizens.

94. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

95. Graceland's Lawsuit Against Grizz Dismissed -

Graceland’s legal challenge of the noncompete agreement between the city and the Memphis Grizzlies organization was dismissed Thursday, Feb. 15, by Chancellor Jim Kyle.

96. More Companies Providing Some Parental Leave Pay -

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act ensures that employees with over a year of employment get 12 weeks unpaid time off from their jobs, and the Tennessee Maternity Leave Act allows certain female employees four months of unpaid leave for pregnancy, childbirth, care of a newborn and adoption.

97. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

98. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

99. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

100. Customer-Focused Government Not Always a Pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.