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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Fever Obscured, Beale Cover and Who Had The First Supermarket? -

For all of the talk about Memphis turning 200 next year and the ongoing discussion and examination following the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strike and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, the Yellow Fever epidemic has a way of being obscured.

2. U.S. Marks 9/11 with Somber Tributes; Trump Speaks at Pa. Site -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans looked back on 9/11 Tuesday with solemn ceremonies, volunteer service and a presidential tribute to "the moment when America fought back" on one of the hijacked planes used as weapons in the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil.

3. Last Word: Selling Local Soccer, Football's Arrival and Luttrell's Vetoes -

So the United Soccer League Memphis franchise is to be called Memphis FC 901. The branding was launched as the Labor Day weekend began with a video that is part Rogues nostalgia, soccer at school memories and a liberal dose of Grit ‘n’ Grind rhetoric from another sports franchise just down the street from AutoZone Park. The combination is another example of sports carrying the banner for the promotion of Memphis in general.

4. Texas Democrat Beto O'Rourke Shakes Up Senate Race With Cruz -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — If elections were decided by viral videos and fawning media profiles, Democrat Beto O'Rourke would win Texas' Senate race in a landslide.

Video of the candidate defending NFL players' right to protest during the national anthem had been viewed by millions even before NBA star LeBron James called it a "must-watch." Another of O'Rourke, a three-term congressman, cruising through a Whataburger parking lot on a skateboard is almost as popular, increasing the onetime punk rocker's already considerable street cred.

5. From Penny Press To Snapchat: Parents Fret Through The Ages -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Stephen Dennis was raising his two sons in the 1980s, he never heard the phrase "screen time," nor did he worry much about the hours his kids spent with technology. When he bought an Apple II Plus computer, he considered it an investment in their future and encouraged them to use it as much as possible.

6. Last Word: New Council Smell, Harris's First Pick and Detroit's Comeback -

After months of renovation work, the new Memphis City Council committee room was ready for the council Tuesday on the fifth floor of City Hall. The council had been meeting in its chambers on the ground floor for the seven hours of committee meetings that precede the council’s main voting meeting at 3:30 p.m. two Tuesdays a month. The council room has that new council smell -- kind of ironic for a body that is about to get three new members by the end of the year.

7. Satanic Temple Brings Baphomet Statue to Arkansas For Rally -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Satanic Temple temporarily placed a bronze statue of a goat-headed, winged creature called Baphomet at the Arkansas State Capitol during a rally to call for the removal of a Ten Commandments monument already mounted on Capitol grounds.

8. 2019 Memphis In May Festival to Honor City's Bicentennial -

For the first time in its 42-year history, the month-long Memphis in May International Festival will depart in 2019 from its tradition of honoring a country and promoting trade ties with that country.

9. Michigan Attorney to Become 1st Muslim Woman in Congress -

DETROIT (AP) — An attorney and former Michigan lawmaker is looking ahead to becoming the first Muslim woman elected to Congress.

Former state Rep. Rashida Tlaib won the Democratic nomination late Tuesday to run unopposed for the Detroit-area congressional seat long held by former U.S. Rep. John Conyers. No Republicans or third-party candidates were in the race, meaning the daughter of Palestinian immigrants is set to win the seat in November and begin serving a full two-year term in January.

10. Tony Pollard a Known Commodity Entering 2018 -

Took Tony Pollard all of 10 seconds in a 2016 win at Temple to establish himself as a generational talent for the University of Memphis football team. Did it by becoming the first Tiger in a generation to turn a kickoff return into a touchdown.

11. Twin Northern California Fires Force Thousands to Flee Homes -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twin wildfires fueled by dry vegetation and hot, windy weather continued to grow Saturday in Northern California, destroying 55 homes and forcing thousands of residents to flee their neighborhoods.

12. Commercial Appeal, Amazon Eying New Locations -

262 Danny Thomas Place
Memphis, TN 38105

Permit Amount: $412 million

Project Cost: $330 million

13. Trump Team Wants to Roll Back Obama-Era Mileage Standards -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed weakening Obama-era mileage standards designed to make cars more fuel efficient and less polluting, a major rollback already being challenged in the courts by California and other states.

14. Commercial Appeal Looking at New Spot Downtown -

The Commercial Appeal building was a nexus of local news coverage for Memphis and the Mid-South for nearly a half-century, but The CA won’t be operating out of its 495 Union Ave. location for the first time since the Ford Administration.

15. The CA Looking at New Spot Downtown -

The Commercial Appeal building was a nexus of local news coverage for Memphis and the Mid-South for nearly a half-century, but The CA won’t be operating out of its 495 Union Ave. location for the first time since the Ford Administration.

16. League of Change -

The South has its advantages. First-year Mississippi State coach Joe Moorhead, whose previous head coaching job was at Fordham University in the Bronx, knows this to be true. “Everything being wrapped in bacon, that’s pretty good,” said Moorhead, who had a successful two-year run as Penn State’s offensive coordinator before coming to the SEC, where it is not a stretch to say everything is wrapped in the legacy of Nick Saban.

17. NY Daily News Slashes Newsroom Staffing in Half -

NEW YORK (AP) – The New York tabloid Daily News cut half of its newsroom staff Monday including Jim Rich, the paper's editor in chief.

18. Comcast Drops Fox Bid, Paving Way for Sale to Disney -

NEW YORK (AP) – Comcast is dropping its bid for Fox's entertainment businesses, paving the way for Disney to boost its upcoming streaming service by buying the studios behind "The Simpsons" and X-Men.

19. A Cut Above -

Longtime Downtown Memphis barber Excell Blanchard has been cutting hair for nearly a quarter of a century, and in that time, he has built up a loyal clientele base who has moved with him from one venture to next.

20. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Smallpox, in Case of Terror Attack -

U.S. regulators Friday approved the first treatment for smallpox – a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago – in case the virus is used in a terror attack.

Smallpox, which is highly contagious, was eradicated worldwide by 1980 after a huge vaccination campaign.

21. US Expected to Become World's Top Oil Producer Next Year -

The U.S. has nosed ahead of Saudi Arabia and is on pace to surpass Russia to become the world's biggest oil producer for the first time in more than four decades.

The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day.

22. Serena Williams Nears 8th Wimbledon Title, 24th Slam Overall -

LONDON (AP) — Yes, this will be Serena Williams' 10th Wimbledon final. Yes, it's her 30th title match at any major. And, well, sure, she's widely regarded as not just the best of her era, but any era.

23. Supreme Court Could Return Abortion Debate to the States -

BOSTON (AP) — Anticipating renewed fights over abortion, some governors and state lawmakers already are searching for ways to enhance or dismantle the right in their constitutions and laws.

24. Technology Rebound Sets Nasdaq on Course for Record High -

NEW YORK (AP) — Technology companies are soaring Thursday as investors remain optimistic about the sector even though much of the market has been shaken by fears about the trade war with China. The Nasdaq composite is on track for an all-time high. Industrial companies are also bouncing back as the market recovers most of its losses from a day ago. Software maker CA is jumping after chipmaker Broadcom agreed to buy it for $18.9 billion.

25. Stocks Skid as Trade War Worsens With New Tariff Threats -

NEW YORK (AP) — Global stock indexes are sinking Wednesday after the Trump administration released a list of $200 billion in goods that could be hit with tariffs and China said it would retaliate. The dollar is climbing and oil prices are plunging. Industrial and materials companies are also falling.

26. US Soon to Leapfrog Saudis, Russia as Top Oil Producer -

The U.S. is on pace to leapfrog both Saudi Arabia and Russia and reclaim the title of the world's biggest oil producer for the first time since the 1970s.

The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day.

27. Trump's Attacks on NATO Raise Questions About its Future -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's repeated tongue lashings of NATO allies and his friendly overtures to Russian President Vladimir Putin are stirring questions at home and abroad about Trump's commitment to an Atlantic alliance that has been a pillar of U.S. security policy for more than half a century.

28. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Education in Tennessee? -

Gov. Bill Haslam and the General Assembly have invested in education during the last eight years. Has that been a good investment and should it continue? What do the candidates propose for the next four to eight years?

29. Methodist Shapes Healthcare For a Century -

It was billed as the party of the century. It was a party that was one hundred years in the making. It was a worthy celebration of past successes entwined with the vision for the future of Methodist Health Systems and its positive impact in Memphis, and beyond.

30. Disney's bid for Fox clears US antitrust hurdle -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday won U.S. antitrust approval for its $71.3 billion bid for Twenty-First Century Fox's entertainment assets.

31. Sprint Triathlons Saturday At Shelby Farms Park -

The 3rd Annual Annie Oakley & Buffalo Bill Super Sprint and Sprint Triathlons will be Saturday, June 23, at Shelby Farms Park (south of the intersection of Farm Road and Walnut Grove Road). The event includes four races: an all-women super sprint triathlon, an all-women sprint triathlon, an all-men super sprint triathlon, and an all-men sprint triathlon.

32. Methodist Kicks Off Centennial Celebration -

This weekend Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare begins its next 100 years helping people in the Mid-South with their healthcare needs. The hospital is celebrating with events like a book launch on Friday and “The Party of the Century” with special guest Magic Johnson on Saturday.

33. US stocks rise as trade fears ebb and tech companies lead -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Wednesday, led by technology and media companies, as global markets let go of some of their fears about the growing trade dispute between the U.S. and China. Still, investors are favoring the companies they think are less vulnerable to tariffs. Twenty-First Century Fox is jumping after Disney agreed to buy Fox's entertainment businesses for more than $71.3 billion, topping an offer from Comcast. Investors are hoping that will be followed by other deals.

34. Experts Say Auto Tariffs Would Raise Prices, Cost Jobs -

DETROIT (AP) – Every workday, about 7,400 trucks mostly loaded with automotive parts rumble across the Ambassador Bridge connecting Detroit and Canada, at times snarling traffic along the busy corridor.

35. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Health Care in Tennessee? -

According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality, number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

36. Bird Scooter Deal on Cutting Edge of Memphis’ ‘Demand Economy’ -

Standing beside two electric scooters in Court Square last week, Memphis City Council member Kemp Conrad quoted Sun Tzu, author of the ancient Chinese military strategy tome “The Art of War.” “Opportunities are multiplied as they are seen,” he said in quoting the favorite military tactician of 21st-century American business leaders.

37. After AT&T-Time Warner Win, Is Comcast-Fox a Done Deal? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Comcast will likely bid for Fox's entertainment business as early as Wednesday now that a federal judge has cleared AT&T's $85 billion takeover of Time Warner.

If Comcast succeeds in outbidding Disney for Fox, a major cable distributor would control even more channels on its lineup and those of its rivals. There are fears that it could lead to higher cable bills or hinder online alternatives.

38. Bartlett High Joins Wave of School Construction -

Though summer break has started, some of the school-year buzz remained on the campus of Bartlett High School this week as a group of adults gathered with ceremonial shovels for a groundbreaking.

Student-athletes came and went from other parts of the sprawling 26-acre campus that has been home to Bartlett’s only high school for more than a century.

39. Last Word: One for Graceland, Randy Boyd in Millington and Green Eyeshades -

From the distance of 50 years – half a century – it’s hard to relate what it was like to grow up in the 1960s – in particular the year 1968 in a city that figured prominently in the year’s turbulent trajectory.

40. Memphis News, Daily News Win 9 Green Eyeshade Awards -

The Daily News and the Memphis News placed in nine categories in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Green Eyeshade Awards, including five first-place finishes. The regional awards cover an 11-state area.

41. Department Stores Making Themselves Over in Beauty Battle -

NEW YORK (AP) – It's the beauty aisles themselves getting makeovers now.

Department stores are being forced to rethink how they sell higher-end makeup and perfume as competition intensifies from discounters like Target, specialty chains like Sephora and Ulta and online brands. So stores like Saks and Macy's are promising workouts for your face, augmented reality and beauty treatment concierges as they try to attract millennial customers and make the cosmetics aisles more of a destination than a stopover.

42. Women Seek to Add to Senate Numbers, But Challenges Await -

PHOENIX (AP) – A record number of women are on track to run for the U.S. Senate, though it will be a challenge to capture those seats and help make the chamber more diverse.

Many face uphill campaigns and two Democratic incumbents in particular among the 23 women in the Senate are seen as politically vulnerable in the November election.

43. 'It's About Time': Trump Pardons Late Boxer Jack Johnson -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Thursday granted a rare posthumous pardon to boxing's first black heavyweight champion, clearing Jack Johnson's name more than 100 years after what many see as his racially-charged conviction.

44. Crazy Good -

STILL CRAZY. STILL RIGHT. Lauren Crews and I sipped coffee and talked about his crazy idea. Again. I’m writing about it. Again. Maybe we’re both crazy.

We first talked about it sipping whiskey years ago at sunset on the bluff behind the Metal Museum, gazing out on the river’s big, bold bend south of the Harahan, the most dramatic river view in Memphis, dramatic enough to accommodate big, bold vision.

45. Comcast v. Disney: A Fight for Twenty-First Century Fox -

NEW YORK (AP) – Comcast and Disney are on the verge of a head-to-head bidding war for Fox's entertainment properties.

The potential battle for Twenty-First Century Fox comes as traditional entertainment companies try to amass more properties to compete better with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers' attention – and dollars.

46. Emergency 911 Technology Struggles to Keep Up With the Times -

ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) – High school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone.

47. Tom Wolfe, Pioneering 'New Journalist,' Dead At 88 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Tom Wolfe, the white-suited wizard of "New Journalism" who exuberantly chronicled American culture from the Merry Pranksters through the space race before turning his satiric wit to such novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full," has died. He was 88.

48. Opening the Book -

A new Learning and Innovation Fund for Educators grant from Lausanne Learning Institutes (LLI) is now available to a team of teachers looking for funding to do creative things in their classrooms.

And the upcoming annual LLI Memphis teacher conference in July will give them the chance to share those ideas with their peers.

49. Postal Service: More Financial Loss as Mail Delivery Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service reported another quarterly loss on Friday after an unrelenting drop in mail volume and costs of its health care and pension obligations outweighed strong gains in package deliveries.

50. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

51. Local Entrepreneur Bringing Old Properties Back To Life One Building at a Time -

Being a developer is something that local entrepreneur Eduardo Sanchez Borja has always been interested in, but has never really had the time to do.

But with his two staffing companies, Inspire Hotel Staffing and Supreme Staffing, doing well, he figured the time was right to take a leap of faith.

52. Sinclair to Sell 7 TV Stations to Fox to Win Regulatory OK -

NEW YORK (AP) – Media company Twenty-First Century Fox has agreed to buy seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million.

The move comes as Sinclair is selling some stations to meet regulatory approval for its pending $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media. Meanwhile, Disney is pursuing a $52 billion takeover of much of Fox, though TV stations will stay with Rupert Murdoch's family under a new Fox company.

53. Robot Fast-Food Chefs: Hype or a Sign of Industry Change? -

BOSTON (AP) – Robots can't yet bake a souffle or fold a burrito, but they can cook up vegetables and grains and spout them into a bowl – and are doing just that at a new fast casual restaurant in Boston.

54. Germantown To Fund School Deferred Maintenance -

Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo will propose more city capital funding in his upcoming budget proposal for renovation and maintenance of schools in the Germantown Municipal School District.

Palazzolo announced the move this week at the groundbreaking for construction of the new $27 million, 110,000-square-foot Germantown Elementary School on Forest Hill-Irene Road south of Poplar Pike.

55. More Businesses are Mellowing Out Over Hiring Pot Smokers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – FPI Management, a property company in California, wants to hire dozens of people. Factories from New Hampshire to Michigan need workers. Hotels in Las Vegas are desperate to fill jobs.

56. A First View -

Whenever the leadership at Opera Memphis maps out the lineup for a new season of music, general director Ned Canty has a specific audience member in mind. He’s thinking about that concertgoer who’s attending their very first opera, who’s never been roused by Carmen or had their passion stirred by La Traviata, The Magic Flute, Rigoletto and so many other classics of the genre.

57. Building Heritage -

The basement of the Universal Life Insurance building, a Memphis landmark at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, is still defined by the intersection of overhead ventilation shafts and pipes.

58. Opioid Treatment Gap in Medicare: Methadone Clinics -

One in three older Americans with Medicare drug coverage is prescribed opioid painkillers, but for those who develop a dangerous addiction there is one treatment Medicare won't cover: methadone.

Methadone is the oldest, and experts say, the most effective of the three approved medications used to treat opioid addiction. It eases cravings without an intense high, allowing patients to work with counselors to rebuild their lives.

59. Comcast Challenges Murdoch With Rival Bid for UK-Based Sky -

LONDON (AP) – U.S. media giant Comcast on Wednesday offered 22 billion pounds ($30.7 billion) for Sky PLC, topping a bid from Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox and setting up a bidding war for Britain's biggest satellite television company.

60. New Lynching Memorial Evokes Terror of Victims -

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

61. History Upgrade -

Mud Island’s Mississippi River Museum will have a shorter season than the rest of the river park.

The park on the southern half of Mud Island opened for the season April 14 during a changing of the guard at the Riverfront Development Corp., which runs the park for the city.

62. Excavator Blamed for Island-Wide Blackout in Puerto Rico -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — An island-wide blackout hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday as the U.S. territory struggles to repair an increasingly unstable power grid nearly seven months after Hurricane Maria. Officials said an excavator accidentally downed a transmission line.

63. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

64. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

65. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

66. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

67. Analysis: Blacks Largely Left Out of High-Paying Jobs -

BOSTON (AP) – Jonathan Garland's fascination with architecture started early: He spent much of his childhood designing Lego houses and gazing at Boston buildings on rides with his father away from their largely minority neighborhood.

68. Last Word: MLK 50 Arrives, Heritage Trail and Medical Marijuana's Comeback -

This will be a big week in the national spotlight for the city. But whenever someone with a megaphone like a newspaper or a television station says that in Memphis there is something that happens that gives me pause and I think gives a lot of other Memphians pause. Some of us start to open the floodgates of our long-held need to please at all costs.

69. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

70. Visiting Memphis 50 Years After King's Assassination -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Fifty years ago, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader's shocking murder on April 4, 1968, marked one of the most significant moments in U.S. history.

71. Massive Mixed-Use Project Slated for Broad Avenue -

In many ways the Broad Avenue water tower has become the defining emblem of the iconic arts district, but the empty warehouse it sits on stands in stark contrast from the vibrant shops, restaurants and art galleries that line the more developed south side of the street.

72. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Infrastructure Investment? -

Is investment in public infrastructure important? And should Tennessee have more dedicated revenue sources to pay for construction and maintenance of infrastructure across the state, or is the existing tax structure – primarily the state tax on fuel, and wheel taxes – sufficient to pay for what Tennessee needs to sustain and grow its economy?

73. Fed Raises Key Rate, Foresees 2 More Hikes This Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is raising its key interest rate and signaling confidence in the U.S. economy's durability but plans to continue a gradual approach to rate hikes for 2018 under its new chairman, Jerome Powell.

74. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

75. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

76. Trump to Impose Tariffs on Imports of Steel and Aluminum -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Determined to protect vital American industries, President Donald Trump declared Thursday that he will impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, dramatically raising the possibility of a trade showdown with China and other key trading partners.

77. State Archivists Seek WWI Artifacts from West Tenn. Residents -

The Tennessee State Library and Archives has launched “Over Here, Over There: Tennesseans in the First World War,” an effort to collect digital records of how World War I affected Tennesseans. Archivists will travel throughout the state to digitally scan and photograph documents, maps, photographs, uniforms and other artifacts related to World War I that are owned by private citizens.

78. Not Your Father’s Office Building -

2017 was a big year for Clark Tower, with more than $9 million in physical improvements. But perhaps one of the biggest changes to the 34-story East Memphis office tower, located at 5100 Poplar Ave., is a change in perception.

79. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

80. Friedman Talks of Tribalism in Global Digitization -

At the end of his talk this week to a group of 250 at a Greater Memphis Chamber gathering, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman said all he has written about the Middle East and had supported for the region didn’t happen.

81. Citing Fraud, LL Bean Imposes Limits on Its Return Policy -

FREEPORT, Maine (AP) – L.L. Bean's generous return policy is going to be a little less forgiving: The company, which has touted its 100 percent satisfaction guarantee for more than a century, is imposing a one-year limit on most returns to reduce growing abuse and fraud.

82. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

83. Building Memphis From the Core -

When I delivered this year’s State of the City speech to the Kiwanis Club of Memphis at its meeting at the University Club, long planted at the corner of Lamar and Central, it would’ve been easy to think that the ground on which we stood had been part of Memphis from its very start.

84. Distillers Struggle to Comply With Water Quality Regulations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As the whiskey industry continues to grow, Tennessee's two largest distilleries struggled to comply with water quality regulations last year.

Jack Daniels and George Dickel exceeded their limits for chlorine and other pollutants that can harm aquatic wildlife. After investigating the violations, the distilleries traced the problems to broken or inadequate machinery and faulty testing. State officials say the companies have fixed the problems and are now back in compliance.

85. Trump's Move May Nudge Holdout GOP States to Expand Medicaid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In an ironic twist, the Trump administration's embrace of work requirements for low-income people on Medicaid is prompting lawmakers in some conservative states to resurrect plans to expand health care for the poor.

86. Last Word: Second Snow Day, The Post-King Generation and Cohen's Cadillac -

A second snow day awaits Wednesday on this short week for many but not all of us. And there is some grumbling about the approach to treating roads off the main thoroughfares that may, in this city where a cut-through detour is a real thing and the reason for speed humps, still see a lot of traffic.

87. McMullen: Legislative Session Influenced Timing in Monuments Removal -

Several nonprofits approached the city administration about buying Health Sciences and Memphis parks before the Memphis City Council approved the sale of each to Memphis Greenspace last month for $1,000 each. And some of them said no.

88. US Employers Add Modest 148,000 Jobs; Unemployment 4.1 Pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 148,000 jobs in December, a modest gain but still enough to suggest that the economy entered the new year with solid momentum.

The unemployment rate remained 4.1 percent for a third straight month, the lowest level since 2000, the Labor Department said Friday.

89. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

90. GOP's Senate Majority Shrinks With Jones Sworn Into Office -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Democrat Doug Jones of Alabama was sworn into office Wednesday, shrinking the Senate's Republican majority and leading lawmakers of both parties to plead for more bipartisanship as Congress tackles pressing issues in advance of the 2018 midterm elections.

91. Legislators Can’t Get Past Threat of Medical Weed -

Heading into the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Jeremy Faison is looking to send a message about his medical marijuana bill: Tennessee won’t open the door to recreational pot without General Assembly action.

92. The Week Ahead: January 1-7 -

Brrrrrrrr! It’s been a while since the wind chill was below zero degrees in the Bluff City. Some events to kick off the new year that fortunately, are all inside. Happy New Year, Memphis!

93. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

94. In Break With Tradition, Trump Doesn't Host a State Dinner -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump couldn't stop talking about the red carpets, military parades and fancy dinners that were lavished upon him during state visits on his recent tour of Asia. "Magnificent," he declared at one point on the trip.

95. Buoyed by Alabama Win, Democrats Eye Tennessee Senate Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democrats eager to take control of the Senate next year are turning to the state of Tennessee, where a popular Democratic former governor is running for the seat being vacated by the retirement of Republican Sen. Bob Corker.

96. Forrest Down -

It’s hard to know where the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is when there aren’t lights on it.

That was the case Wednesday, Dec. 20, as the spotlights normally illuminating the likeness of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard were doused.

97. Disney-Fox Deal May Create a New Nerdy Nirvana -

MENLO PARK, California (AP) – The coming union of the Disney and Fox media empires is set to create a new nirvana for fanboys and -girls, one that reunites superheroes and sci-fi characters long separated by an energy barrier of corporate legalism.

98. Merriam-Webster's Word of the Year for 2017: 'Feminism' -

NEW YORK (AP) – This may or may not come as a surprise: Merriam-Webster's word of the year for 2017 is "feminism."

Yes, it's been a big year or two or 100 for the word. In 2017, lookups for feminism increased 70 percent over 2016 on Merriam-Webster.com and spiked several times after key events, lexicographer Peter Sokolowski, the company's editor at large, told The Associated Press ahead of Tuesday's annual word reveal.

99. Trump Signs Proclamation to Scale Back 2 National Monuments -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – President Donald Trump signed a proclamation Monday to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, pledging to "reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens."

100. Last Word: Grizz Ownership Moves, Confederate Deadline and Medical Family Tree -

As many of us were focused on Tigers football and the journey to Orlando last week, there was word that either both or one of the two minority owners of the Grizz had exercised a buy-sell provision in the NBA team’s unique ownership agreement. And what could be a fight for control of the team’s ownership is underway. The sports website The Athletic broke the story last Thursday. Here it is. It also talks about the timing of this coming with the controversial sacking of David Fizdale, an interim coach at the helm of a changing team and lead owner Robert Pera’s lack of visibility in all things Grizz around the city.