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Editorial Results (free)

1. Lynching Centennial Observance Nears in May -

Leaders of an effort to mark the sites of 32 lynchings in Shelby County have hired a project director for the upcoming centennial of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons.

John Ashworth recently led efforts in Brownsville, Tennessee, to remember Elbert Williams, the organizer of an NAACP chapter in Haywood County. Williams was murdered in 1940 and his body found in the Hatchie River. He was ordered buried the same day his body was found.

2. January 6-12, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1978: The Sex Pistols play Taliesyn Ballroom in Midtown – the second of seven stops on the original band’s one and only U.S. tour – with Memphis punk trip Quo Jr. opening. The British band’s reputation prompts Memphis authorities to look over the setting for the show as well as go see the performance for themselves.
The ballroom, an annex to the Nineteenth Century Club on Union Avenue, is a short-lived live music venue that already has hosted REO Speedwagon’s first Memphis show.
Mid-South Concerts founder Bob Kelley originally plans a show with no seats until police and fire officials insist there must be seats. The late change means more tickets have been sold for the show then there are seats and some ticketholders are locked out initially.
The Sex Pistols play a full set with police officials watching, ultimately concluding there isn’t anything particularly inflammatory or illegal about the band, whose best known song is “God Save The Queen.” Eight days after the Memphis show, the band plays its final date in San Francisco – and the Sex Pistols break up.

3. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

4. Crosstown Concourse Sees First Residents -

Less than a week into 2017 and something is going on that hasn’t happened in nearly a quarter of a century. “We had our first apartment residents move in,” Crosstown Concourse co-founder Todd Richardson said. “After 24 years of being empty, we’ve got our first occupants.”

5. Tennessee Lawmakers Could Raise, Lower Taxes This Session -

The 110th General Assembly is set to convene on Jan. 10 with unfinished business from previous sessions likely to dominate debate.

Here’s a look at some of the hottest topics expected to arise.

6. The Week Ahead: January 3-9 -

Good morning, Memphis – and happy 2017! If you’ve made a new year’s resolution, chances are there’s an event this week to help you along the way. Want to get fit? Check out the Memphis Bike Swap. Vowing to read more? Try the BookTini Book Club launch. And that’s just a taste of what’s happening in The Week Ahead…

7. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

8. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

9. Dobbs’ Change of Heart a Great Gift to Vol Fans -

In the spirit of the holiday season, Joshua Dobbs is the gift that keeps on giving. Despite all the disappointments of 2016 for Tennessee football, it would be a mistake not to appreciate Dobbs for what he is: a scholar, an athlete, a leader, a role model and a winner.

10. Growing Pains -

In many ways, Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe in 1971 shaped the way Midtown Memphis looks today, so it’s only fitting that the park continues to inspire citizens to fight for what they feel is right.

11. Last Word: Boca, Poe Killed by Politics and Embedding In The Real Memphis -

BOCA BOWL – As expected, the University of Memphis Tigers football team is going south for the post season. They got and accepted Sunday the formal invitation to play in the Boca Raton Bowl on Dec. 20 against Western Kentucky. Ticket information should be forthcoming Monday for those of you who didn’t get enough during the Emerald Coast Classic with the basketball Tigers not too long ago.

12. The Week Ahead: November 28-December 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Now that Thanksgiving is behind us, the holiday shopping rush is in full swing. Amid the hustle and bustle, there are plenty of opportunities to give back to the community – including an entire day set aside to do just that. Check out details on that and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead…

13. Orange Mound Designated By Michelle Obama -

Orange Mound, the nation’s first subdivision designed specifically for African-Americans, has been designated by First Lady Michelle Obama as a Preserve America Community.

Orange Mound in Memphis becomes the 905th such community nationwide. The program recognizes a select group of communities that use their heritage resources in sustainable ways and share the myriad benefits of historic preservation with residents and visitors.

14. Transcript: CBU to Transform Campus, Transition to Project-Based Learning -

Christian Brothers University is not only changing the look of its campus at Central Avenue and East Parkway. Leaders of the institution are embarking on the second phase of a $70 million capital campaign that includes plans to “blow up” the university’s department of education to include Crosstown High School and the neighboring Middle College High School, extend internships to all students and to create a new library that is more than “air conditioning for books.”

15. Orange Mound Gets Rare Designation From First Lady -

Orange Mound, the nation’s first subdivision designed specifically for African-Americans, has been designated by First Lady Michelle Obama as a Preserve America Community.

Orange Mound in Memphis becomes the 905th such community nationwide. The program recognizes a select group of communities that use their heritage resources in sustainable ways and share the myriad benefits of historic preservation with residents and visitors.

16. St. Jude Planning Renovation Of Tri Delta Place -

350 N. Third St.

Memphis, TN 38105

Permit Amount: $3.5 million

Application Date: November 2016

17. York Avenue Residents to Protest IC Expansion -

Residents who live along a scenic, tree-lined stretch of York Avenue in Midtown are planning a protest outside neighboring Immaculate Conception Cathedral Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 4:45 p.m. in opposition to a possible parish expansion.

18. Downtown May Get New 12-Story Boutique Hotel -

A plan to redevelop the former Tenoke Building into a hotel may be revived several years after a similar idea for the vacant Downtown office high-rise fell through.

Vibrant Hotels Inc., an affiliate of Batesville, Mississippi-based development company JVD Enterprises, is seeking a special use permit that would allow the conversion of the century-old Tenoke, located at 161 Jefferson Ave., and the adjacent one-story office at 191 Jefferson Ave. into an “upper-brand franchised full-service hotel,” according to an application filed with the city-county Office of Planning and Development in August.

19. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Nov. 9, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the University of Phoenix’s Memphis campus, 65 Germantown Court, first floor. Erich Eurich of FocalPoint Business Coaching will present “2017 Starts Now: Hit the ground running through effective goal setting.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

20. Events -

Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County will host a volunteer orientation on Monday, Nov. 7, at 6 p.m. at HSMSC, 935 Farm Road. The orientation is the first step to becoming a volunteer for the organization. Visit memphishumane.org or call 901-937-3900 for details.

21. Reconfirming -

Things I already knew, but have recently reconfirmed: That, at any given time, my clothing (including the contents of my pockets) weighs about six pounds.

That the words eerie and Erie appear in more crossword puzzles than any other two homophones.

22. Reconfirming -

Things I already knew, but have recently reconfirmed:

That, at any given time, my clothing (including the contents of my pockets) weighs about six pounds.

That the words eerie and Erie appear in more crossword puzzles than any other two homophones.

23. Clayborn Restoration Momentum Builds -

For the first time in 18 years, the 19th-century chandelier in the Clayborn Temple sanctuary was in working order, shedding light Tuesday, Oct. 25, on several hundred people gathered along with leaders of eight different denominations and faiths.

24. Last Word: MAA and TraVure, JT Votes Early and Minority Biz Momentum -

Big news overnight for one of several corporate headquarters moves we’ve been watching in the last year. Mid-America Apartments LP is poised to become the anchor of the TraVure mixed-use development on the western side of Germantown.

25. Last Word: The Day After Big River, Freedom Awards Shift and Tubby & Fiz -

Once the ribbons were cut, the speeches made and all of the players on both sides of the river were thanked, Sunday was the day those who put the Big River Crossing project in motion waited for to see what the public’s verdict would be on the boardwalk crossing the Mississippi River.

26. Clayborn Reborn Effort Charts Different Pre-vitalization Path -

The hope has been that the redevelopment of Central Station in the South Main area would cause a ripple in development to the east and link up with the sprawling South City development that encompasses the Foote Homes public housing development, the area south of FedExForum, and go south of Crump Boulevard.

27. The Week Ahead: October 24-30 -

The real fall may finally have arrived in Memphis, but we’ll see. What we do know will arrive this week is the Memphis Grizzlies’ first real game of the 2016-2017 season at FedExForum. And the first public look inside a very historic Memphis church near FedExForum the day before that season opener. The Wolf River also is in the news this week and toward week’s end, Halloween will be lurking around the corner.     

28. Owners Seek Uses for Historic Clayborn Temple -

Owners of the historic Clayborn Temple church at Hernando and Pontotoc are just about ready for visitors to the Presbyterian turned AME church that has been boarded up and fenced off for the last 18 years.

29. Last Word: Stop & Frisk, Council Day and The Big 12 Holds What It's Got -

We had quite the conversation with the two leaders of the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission about “stop and frisk” and what will be in the upcoming draft of a new Operation: Safe Community plan for Memphis.

30. The Week Ahead: October 17-23 -

This will be a historic week for Memphis, so mark your calendar for Saturday, Oct. 22, when a boardwalk across the Harahan Bridge opens to the public that will give Memphians and visitors alike an intimate experience with the Mighty Mississippi. The Big River Crossing also will link Memphis to West Memphis, Arkansas, and provide bicycle enthusiasts miles of trails along the river levee that will be unique in the world. There’s only one Mississippi River, the world’s second-largest inland waterway, and there’s only one Memphis! This crossing will be an unmatched amenity for the city for years to come.   

31. Big River -

Jim Jackson had it planned. At the third annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander bicycle ride, the 100-kilometer bike ride would become what it was intended to be – a ride across the Mississippi River from West Memphis to Memphis across the northern side of the Harahan Bridge.

32. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

33. Fourth Bluff Momentum Grows With $5 Million Grant -

They’ve been called the “things between things” in Downtown Memphis.

In the earliest plans for the city of Memphis, they were part of the Promenade – a section of public land that includes the city’s first public library, the river view behind what is now the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, and Memphis Park and Mississippi River Park below it on the other side of Riverside Drive.

34. Last Word: Z Bo and the Second Unit, Gannettized and the Electoral College -

Zach Randolph will not be starting for the Grizz this season as the post-Grit & Grind era enters the “Second Unit” chapter.

It will be interesting to see fan reaction Thursday at the Forum when the Grizz play Atlanta in another pre-season game. Randolph did not start Monday night’s pre-season opener against Orlando either.

35. Holiday Sales Expected to Be Up 3.6 Percent -

NEW YORK (AP) – Americans are expected to spend at a faster clip than last year for the critical holiday season, helped by an economy that should only continue to pick up, according to the nation's largest retail industry trade group.

36. Men Broke Key Race Barrier, Now Back on Vanderbilt Campus -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Two men who helped integrate college basketball came back to Vanderbilt University last week to share provocative views on the pace of change, take up matters they rarely dared to address as students, and describe the racism they encountered on their journey – indignities they once endured in silence on the Southern campus.

37. AMUM Celebrates 35 Years With Special Birthday Surprise -

The Art Museum of the University of Memphis is turning 35 this year and in celebration will present “This May Surprise You,” an exhibition featuring hidden gems in its collections. The exhibition will open Friday, Oct. 14, with a reception from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and run through Dec. 17.

38. Last Word: Pot Action In Memphis and Nashville, Izakaya and Wake Up Man -

A big night in Nashville and Memphis for the issue of marijuana decriminalization. An ordinance to allow cops to write a ticket with a $50 fine for possession of less than half an ounce of pot won final approval by the Metro Nashville Council hours after the Memphis City Council approved second of three readings of a similar ordinance. The Memphis action sets the stage for a final vote at City Hall on this come October 4.

39. OB-GYN Shweta Patel Joins Adams Patterson Gynecology -

Dr. Shweta Patel has joined Adams Patterson Gynecology & Obstetrics as a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist. Patel, who’s a lieutenant commander of the Medical Corps of the United States Navy, comes to Adams Patterson after serving as a naval medical officer and sexual assault response liaison at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

40. Like a Troll Under Poplar and Union, Flicker Street Flourishing as Arts District -

The Poplar/Union viaduct passes over a collection of half-moon shaped Quonset huts that look unlike any other building type in Memphis.

These mid-century warehouses on Flicker Street make up a modern-day artist enclave tucked between Chickasaw Gardens and Central Gardens.

41. Bursting the Bubble -

Graceland is in Memphis. But the two have tended to coexist, rather than being part of each other, since Elvis Presley’s home opened as a commercial enterprise in 1982.

That is starting to change as a $137 million expansion of Graceland – a $92 million hotel resort opening in October and a $45 million, 200,000-square-foot entertainment complex west of the mansion to open in the spring of 2017 – begins to overlap with a renewed emphasis on Whitehaven as the home of many of the city’s middle class.

42. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

43. Cossitt Series Kicks Off With 1980s Games, Films -

The city’s first public library is not closed. It’s something Memphis Public Library director Keenon McCloy has to keep telling people. And she’s taking steps to do more than just show the Cossitt Library is open, including fielding and testing out ideas for the second floor of the library.

44. Last Word: The Wiseacre Deal, City Hall Goes To Pot and TEDx Memphis -

That was quick. Less than a week to come up with lease terms between the city and Wiseacre Brewing for the Mid-South Coliseum including a due diligence period that is the first order of business.

45. Memphians Invited to Tour Victorian Village Homes This Weekend -

Scott Blake lives in the kind of Memphis neighborhood where he can go three, sometimes four days without ever starting his car. Everything he needs, everywhere he has to go, is that close by.

46. Last Word: The Evolution of Michael Rallings, Mediation Confidential and Council Day -

The appointment of Michael Rallings as the permanent Memphis Police Director goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

Rallings and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland talked about the appointment – the only major appointment in Strickland’s inner circle left seven months into his term as mayor – during a press conference Monday morning in the Hall of Mayors.

47. Last Word: Election Wrap Up, Crosstown's Momentum and GMF's Court Report -

For an election that only 14 percent of us turned out for, the Thursday elections in Shelby County delivered in terms of political drama.

David Kustoff, whose bid for Congress in the old 7th Congressional District 14 years ago ended in frustration amidst too many primary candidates from Shelby County, claimed the Republican primary in the 8th amidst an even larger field with even more Shelby County rivals.

48. Threlkeld Says Metropolitan Bank Going Back In Time With New Advisory Service -

A conversation with Metropolitan Bank executives about a new business advisory platform the 9-year-old bank has just launched quickly turned into a talk about how much of a commodity business banking has become.

49. To Zoo. Zooed. Zooing. -

YOU’VE BEEN ZOOED. That headline is indicative of the last few months. In fact, it’s the indicative present perfect usage of the new verb this city has created.

50. Storied University of Memphis Railroad Right Of Way To Become Safer, Greener -

When classes resume at the University of Memphis in August, the unofficial campus tradition of crossing the railroad tracks along Southern Avenue will change.

Students on foot will no longer be able to cross just anywhere along the 2,000 feet of track between Patterson and Zach Curlin.

51. Frank Stokes, Epitome of the ‘Memphis Sound,’ Given Just Memorial -

Nathaniel Kent remembers his grandfather as an older man in his 70s by the mid-1950s who came over with his guitar – ill and near the end of his life.

52. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

53. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 4 -

In the past three columns, I’ve told how, in February 2002, I had a major reminiscence of my role in saving the life of a heart attack victim-in-denial 20 years earlier. In March I received annoying emails about how to survive a heart attack while alone. In early April I dreamed of my heartland being under attack.

54. Jury Finds Led Zeppelin Did Not Steal Riff for 'Stairway' -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Led Zeppelin did not steal a riff from an obscure 1960s instrumental tune to use for the introduction of its classic rock anthem "Stairway to Heaven," a federal court jury decided Thursday.

55. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

56. The Horse Race That (Thankfully) Never Happened -

There I was, cranking out another story, minding my own business, of course, when the phone rang.

“Newsroom, Sam Stockard,” I said. It was sometime in 1987, long before newsrooms became information centers.

57. Crosstown High Organizers Prepare Charter Application as One Option -

The organizers of a Crosstown High School expect to take their application for a charter school to the Shelby County Schools board at the end of June.

Christian Brothers University president John Smarrelli said the still evolving purpose and structure of the school is as a “contract school” in the Shelby County Schools system.

58. Leaving Footsteps For Others -

There is a passage from Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” that reads, “A child goes forth each day, and the first object that the child sees, that object he becomes, for a day, or part of a day, or for days stretching into years.” For me, that “object” was my parents. What I saw in them, I have become. The older I get, the more it surprises me how of much of me is them.

59. Cloverleaf Shopping CentercUnveils New Look -

The owners of the Cloverleaf Shopping Center at Summer Avenue and White Station Road have recently wrapped a major renovation and rebranding of the center.

The new signage and retro logo is meant to be a throwback to the center’s mid-century roots.

60. Last Word: ServiceMaster's Choice, Democrats Regroup, Oprah Goes To Church -

The ServiceMaster headquarters search is over and the pick is a real surprise as office spaces goes – Peabody Place – not the office building but the shuttered mall south of the Peabody hotel.

61. Civil Rights Museum Highlights Lorraine Hotel’s Storied History -

The balcony is usually the part of the National Civil Rights Museum’s exterior that is the center of attention.

Visitors know the mid-20th century wrought iron railing and other features of the post-World War II Lorraine Motel’s motor court. It’s usually from pictures and videos of the April 4, 1968, assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on a second-story balcony outside room 306.

62. Cloverleaf Shopping Center Unveils New Look -

The owners of the Cloverleaf Shopping Center at Summer Avenue and White Station Road have recently wrapped a major renovation and rebranding of the center.

The new signage and retro logo are meant to be a throwback to the center’s mid-century roots.

63. Rose Guiding Memphis Symphony to Firm Financial Footing -

What is classical music good for? How can it remain relevant in the 21st century? For most people, these are abstract questions – but for Gayle Rose, they couldn’t be more pressing.

64. Ifs, Etc. -

A wordier version of this column ran in 2008. That would have been shortly after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette ran a certain editorial. In which it asserted that to say there are “no ifs, ands or buts” is wrong. The correct phrase, it averred, is “no ifs, ans or buts.”

65. New $60M Project to Fight for 1st Amendment in Digital Age -

NEW YORK (AP) – The First Amendment is getting a new champion, with some deep pockets.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Columbia University on Tuesday announced the launch of a $60 million project, the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, which would use litigation as well as research and education to fight for freedom of expression in an ever-evolving digital era.

66. The Week Ahead: May 16-22 -

With a barbecue-filled weekend behind us, it’s time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the Memphis in May Triathlon (where you can work off that pork belly) to the city’s first Palestine Festival (where, yes, there will be even more food).

67. Last Word: Behind Grit N Grind, Brooks at 100 and Massacre -

This is a 12-month-a-year basketball town. There’s the season, possibly a post season, which by NBA standards is a second season. (Yep, they are still playing.) And then there is the rest of the year when whatever has been about to boil over behind the façade of sports clichés finally begins to spill out into the open.

68. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

69. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

70. Mild Weather Cuts TVA’s Bottom Line by Half -

The Tennessee Valley Authority reported net income of $281 million between Oct. 1 and March 31, the first half of its fiscal year.

TVA, which reported earnings on Tuesday, May 3, said net income was $296 million less than the same period last year, primarily due to the extremely mild winter experienced in TVA’s service territory compared to record-setting cold temperatures in 2015.

71. Kyles Played Big Role in Civil Rights Movement -

The world knows him through his story of standing near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in 1968 just seconds before King was assassinated.

72. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

73. Treasury Official Says Harriet Tubman Will Go On $20 Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew has decided to put Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, making her the first woman on U.S. paper currency in 100 years, a Treasury official said Wednesday.

74. Southland Mall Sells In Foreclosure -

1215 E. Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2016
Buyer: 1215 East Shelby Drive Holdings LLC
Seller: Southland Mall Shopping Center LLC
Details: Southland Mall, Memphis’ first enclosed mall when it opened 50 years ago, has sold for $4.3 million in foreclosure.

75. Campbell Clinic Surgeon Wins Neer Award -

Every year, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons medical group wades through submitted papers detailing clinical research projects that focus on the shoulder and elbows. The end result: identifying the best, and naming them the Charles S. Neer Award winners for the year.

76. For Hobbled Grizzlies, Wins Now Precious As Gemstones -

Red diamonds, a 14th century Ming vase, William Shakespeare’s signature and, of course, the unfiltered Gregg Popovich compliment. Yes, these are among the rarest things on planet earth.

So it was notable when the San Antonio coach directed praise the Grizzlies’ way after the Spurs had defeated them by just six points within the shadow of The Alamo, and before a more thorough 101-87 beating at FedExForum a few nights later.

77. Rudd + Bowen + Pastner = PR Nightmare at Memphis -

You keep thinking the story can’t get worse, and then it does. What we have here is an ongoing public relations disaster that is the University of Memphis athletic department as it pertains to all matters regarding the men’s basketball program.

78. Council Working to Build Local Manufacturing for Device Industry -

The medical device industry fuels Memphis’ backbone. With a $2.6 billion local economic impact and nearly 17,000 direct and indirect jobs, original equipment manufacturers like Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Group, Medtronic Spinal & Biologistics and Microport Orthopedics have made the Memphis area their base for products and medical devices.

79. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

80. Leap Seconds Lost in Shuffle -

In late 2005, the world – including Tennessee and Arkansas – was told that Mother Earth had lost a moment or so, notwithstanding the hectic pace we’d been on for a decade. The solution was to add a “leap second” to the intangible timepiece maintained by cosmic forces.

81. Creating a Flexible Sales Pitch -

If you don’t bend, you’ll break. We’ve all heard that saying before, but it’s increasingly true for sales teams.

21st century prospects can research services, compare brands and read reviews online before they ever reach out to you directly – and they almost always do their homework. By the time you’re fielding a phone call, your prospect is almost always ready to make a quick purchasing decision. Your prospect knows what they want, and they believe you can deliver the goods.

82. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

83. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

84. Big Tech Companies Join Apple in Its Encryption Fight -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry is starting to line up with Apple in its fight against the federal government over the encryption it uses to keep iPhones secure.

Earlier this week, a U.S. magistrate ordered Apple to help investigators break into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino mass shooters. Apple was given until Tuesday to challenge that ruling, but a person familiar with the case says Apple has been granted an extension until next Friday.

85. Memphis Meats Startup Focused on Lab-Grown Food -

The purpose of new meat-production startup Memphis Meats Inc. is in the name, but what’s perhaps more important – the “how” of the company’s operation – is not as readily apparent.

86. The Week Ahead: Feb. 8, 2016 -

Guys, there’s an important holiday coming up that forgetting about would mean immense trouble for you. Luckily, City & State is coming to the rescue. Head over to the Broad Avenue retailer on Friday, two days before Valentine’s Day, for “BYOB” (Bring your own Bailey’s).
Bring something like Bailey’s, Irish cream, whisky, whatever, and City & State will add it to any item you order over on the coffee side of the shop. Meanwhile, the shop has also invited the makers behind Paper & Clay and Question the Answer to be on hand with their wares to take some of the pressure off trying to decide what to buy your significant other for Valentine’s Day.

87. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

88. Cost of Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor Rises to $4.7B -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — America's first new power plant to be built in the 21st century may end up costing $200 million more than what it was budgeted last year.

The Times Free Press reports Tennessee Valley Authority directors voted in January to add $200 million more to the budget to the Unit 2 reactor at the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, raising the completion budget to $4.7 billion since work was revived on the Westinghouse pressurized rector in 2007.

89. Matriculating Down the Field Of History to Super Bowl 50 -

For sports fans of my generation, there is something very personal about the Super Bowl. My earliest television sports memory is from Super Bowl I, which wasn’t even originally called the Super Bowl and retroactively introduced me to Roman numerals.

90. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

91. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

92. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

93. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

94. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

95. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

96. 75-Year Wordfest -

I’m a word fanatic. Always have been. And the first of the year is never a bad time to reflect on what’s going on in the world of dictionarization. To set the stage, let’s first look at a progression of new dictionary entries – decade by decade – over the past 75 years. 

97. Last Word: Council Round-Up, One Beale's Third Tower and the Battle Over the ASD -

On a clear day, the song goes, you can see forever.
In Memphis though, it seems that no two politicians will see exactly the same thing or have precisely the same opinion.
On a somewhat sunny but not necessarily clear Tuesday in our fair city there was a lot to see.

98. Sports Execs Tackle Teams’ Economic Impact -

Football fans in Charlotte, N.C., have had a fun season watching the NFL’s Carolina Panthers reel in 15 wins, a near perfect season, and secure the top playoff seed in their conference.

And it could turn out to be quite the edge for the Panthers in their quest to reach the Super Bowl.

99. Strickland Pushes Change Theme Beyond Campaign Borders -

Change as a political force is usually defined by the length of a campaign season.

Once the votes are counted, it’s taken as a verdict on how much or how little voters wanted change in a short span of time.

100. Last Word: Drones, Haslam's Year and Bygone Sports Logos -

Drones. Yes, drones -- which seem to be an odd match for a column called Last Word since there will be many more words written about them and their technological impact.

The FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis has funding for 11 research projects that will includes drones as well as robotics and autonomous vehicles.