» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Ever' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:2374
Shelby Public Records:10380
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:1479
Middle Tennessee:12980
East Tennessee:3543
Other:95

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. New Lynching Memorial Evokes Terror of Victims -

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

2. Conscious Capitalism: Conversation With Raj Sisoda, Part One -

Raj Sisoda is the professor of global business, Babson College, and co-founder and co-chairman, Conscious Capitalism Inc. Raj has written 10 books and more than 100 academic articles. He is the co-author (with John Mackey, co-founder and co-CEO of Whole Foods Market) of “Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business” (Harvard Business Review Publishing, 2013), a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller.

3. No Walkouts at Closed Columbine on Shooting Anniversary -

DENVER (AP) — Students at some Colorado schools are participating in the latest student wave of walkouts to protest gun violence on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting but not students at the suburban Denver school.

4. Wells Fargo Fined $1B for Mortgage, Auto Lending Abuses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo will pay $1 billion to federal regulators to settle charges tied to misconduct at its mortgage and auto lending business, the latest punishment levied against the banking giant for widespread customer abuses.

5. London Cathedral Choir To Perform at Calvary -

St. Paul’s Cathedral Choristers from London will perform for free at Calvary Episcopal Church in Memphis on April 23 as part of an eight-venue tour of the U.S.

The tour is part of the Cathedral’s 60th anniversary of the American Memorial Chapel – a tribute to U.S. servicemen who gave their lives in World War II. The chapel was created by Dwight Eisenhower and Winston Churchill, and opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1958.

6. April 20-26, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

2012: The American Queen, the world’s largest steamboat, arrived at Beale Street Landing, its homeport, for the first time in four years since it was refurbished and resumed overnight river cruises on the Mississippi River.

7. More Scrutiny for Employers Likely This Year From Immigration Services -

Local immigrant and businesswoman Alexandra Matlock knows how hard it can be navigating the U.S. customs process. Her journey coming from Colombia to eventually obtaining permanent work status in the U.S. took well over a decade.

8. London Cathedral Choristers To Perform at Calvary Church -

St. Paul’s Cathedral Choristers from London will perform for free at Calvary Episcopal Church in Memphis on April 23 as part of an eight-venue tour of the U.S.

The tour is part of the Cathedral’s 60th anniversary of the American Memorial Chapel – a tribute to U.S. servicemen who gave their lives in World War II. The chapel was created by Dwight Eisenhower and Winston Churchill, and opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1958.

9. When It Rains, It Pours -

Ray’s Take

I always have an umbrella in my car. Most of the time it just takes up space and I end up pushing it aimlessly around the car to make room for other things. And there are many months of the year when an umbrella seems utterly pointless. But in Memphis, when it rains, it pours, and when that day comes I’m happy to have it. 

10. Pruitt Pumped Up for ‘Exciting’ Spring Game -

Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt loosened up a bit as the Vols went through spring practices last week, talking at length about individual players for the first time.

Big deal? Yeah, probably for media and fans starved for information about Pruitt’s first team of Vols.

11. History Upgrade -

Mud Island’s Mississippi River Museum will have a shorter season than the rest of the river park.

The park on the southern half of Mud Island opened for the season April 14 during a changing of the guard at the Riverfront Development Corp., which runs the park for the city.

12. The Latest: Judge Defends Right to Oppose Death Penalty -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Latest on an Arkansas judge participating in an anti-death penalty demonstration outside the governor's mansion (all times local):

12:35 p.m.

An Arkansas judge prohibited from hearing execution cases said he remains as committed to the law and his First Amendment right to express his "moral and religious" opposition to the death penalty as he was a year ago when he was disqualified for participating in an anti-capital punishment demonstration.

13. Bill Prohibiting Sterilization Incentives Passes State House -

A proposal by State Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the state House of Representatives by a vote of 70-23 Tuesday, April 17. The legislation now awaits the signature of Gov. Bill Haslam.

14. Tigers’ Ferguson, Jacobs Recognized for Academics -

University of Memphis football player Riley Ferguson and Nick Jacobs were two of an all-time high 1,267 college football players named to the National Football Foundation’s Hampshire Honor Society. In order to be named to the honor society, football players must have maintained a 3.2 GPA or better throughout their college careers, have completed their final year of eligibility in 2017 and been a starter or significant contributor.

15. Hardaway and Tigers Get Two More Signees -

University of Memphis coach Penny Hardaway has added two more players to his roster. Shooting guard Antwann Jones signed with the Tigers after being released from his national letter of intent with Texas A&M. Isaiah Maurice signed after playing one season at Kansas State and one season at South Plains junior college.

16. Sheriff: 80 Rescued From Flood at Mississippi Campground -

PERKINSTON, Miss. (AP) — Authorities say heavy rainfall unleashed flooding in Mississippi that required emergency workers to rescue 80 festivalgoers by boat and air.

WLOX-TV cites the George County Sheriff's Office as saying that most of the campers who were evacuated from the Red Creek Off-Road park Sunday morning were attending the annual Mud Bug Bash, which featured a duck hunt, free crawfish and a concert.

17. Hiring Your New Leader -

It happens all the time. “I quit!” or “You’re fired!” are the extremes that can mark the beginning of a crucial organizational change process.

When you find yourself in the midst of a leadership transition it will be critical that your search team pays attention to each candidate’s experience with and knowledge of fundraising.

18. New Plans Would Change Memphis Medical District -

With 27,000 people who either work or attend classes in the Memphis Medical District, and about 375 acres of parking space, something has to give.

Following last week’s release of a reconfigured city bus system plan and a new shuttle system that the Memphis Medical District Collaborative is working on, officials hope to convince 2,500 people to leave their cars at home.

19. Supporting Musicians Focus of New Initiative -

Old Dominick Distillery is hosting a bash this week to raise money for a new program that supports Memphis musicians while also turning them into ambassadors for the city.

The Tambourine Bash kicks off at 7 p.m. on April 19 at Old Dominick, 305 S. Front St. It is a first-ever benefit event for the nonprofit Music Export Memphis, which plans to launch a pilot version of its ambassador program later this year.

20. Wunderlich Downtown HQ Opens Next Week -

This time next week, Memphis-based investment firm Wunderlich Securities Inc. will start to be settled into the company’s new Downtown Memphis headquarters, in One Commerce Square, suite 1800.

21. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

22. 150-Year-Old Marx-Bensdorf Cites Culture as Key to Firm's Longevity -

Memphis real estate firm Marx-Bensdorf Realtors is celebrating a storied 150 years of business this year and looking back at the core values that have contributed to their longevity in an ever-changing industry.

23. Residents React to Cooper-Young’s Tentative Historic Overlay Status -

Though the Memphis City Council on Tuesday, April 10, granted Cooper-Young the historic overlay district status it has been seeking since last year, there is still a sense of concern among many of the residents.

24. Doubleheader -

These days, Craig Unger calls himself the “corporate guy.” After all, he is now president of both the Memphis Redbirds and the United Soccer League (USL) team that will share AutoZone Park with the St. Louis Cardinals’ Triple-A club beginning in 2019.

25. After a Lost Season, Grizzlies Turn Toward NBA Draft -

For seven straight years, Exit Interview Day at FedExForum was a mixture of chronicling the season’s successes and speaking to the wish that the playoff run, whenever it ended, could have lasted longer.

26. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

27. For the Grizzlies, a Last Loss and a Lesson from Russell Westbrook -

The last game of a season is like the last chapter of a book. You need it, even if it’s not very good and you already know how things turn out.

So on Wednesday, April 11, with the Grizzlies playing their final game of this wretched season at Oklahoma City and Pete Pranica and Brevin Knight on the call via Fox Sports Southeast, I tuned in.

28. One City, One Team: When a Memphis sports entity succeeds, everyone wins -

On the occasion of the home opener for the reigning Pacific Coast League champion Memphis Redbirds at AutoZone Park, new Memphis basketball coach Penny Hardaway was given the honor of throwing out the first pitch. Predictably, he received a standing ovation just for walking out to the pitching mound.

29. Zuckerberg: Regulation of Social Media Firms is 'Inevitable' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told a House oversight panel Wednesday that he believes it is "inevitable" there will be regulation of the social media industry and also disclosed to lawmakers that his own data was included in the personal information sold to malicious third parties.

30. Wunderlich Downtown HQ Opens Next Week -

This time next week, Memphis-based investment firm Wunderlich Securities Inc. will start to be settled into the company’s new Downtown Memphis headquarters, in One Commerce Square, suite 1800.

31. SXSW 2018: My First-Year Experience -

I recently had the opportunity to attend South by Southwest (sxsw.com) in Austin, Texas, for the first time. If you’ve never been, SXSW is a giant festival in downtown Austin that draws in thousands of people. Founded in 1987, SXSW has boasted an economic impact to Austin of over $300 million in past years.

32. Wunderlich Downtown HQ Opens Next Week -

This time next week, Memphis-based investment firm Wunderlich Securities Inc. will start to be settled into the company’s new Downtown Memphis headquarters, in suite 1800 at One Commerce Square.

33. Poo as Good Business -

Talk about nothing wasted. Behold the founding story, which reads more like a creation myth, of Poo-Pourri.

Suzy Batiz, a 40-year-old woman from Jonesboro, Arkansas, declares her second bankruptcy conventional “rules” of success did not work for her life. To heal, she renounces the world of commerce and takes a two-year spiritual quest, experimenting with alternative healing methods that included the lost art of tapping and shamanic training in Peru.

34. EDGE Advances Both of EPE’s Graceland Expansion Requests -

After multiple delays, lawsuits and revamped plans, the next phase of Elvis Presley Enterprises’ Graceland expansion have been approved by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County.

35. Statewide Clinical Trials Effort Launches Out of UTHSC -

When Dr. Steven Goodman, vice chancellor for research at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, arrived at the college more than two years ago, his ambition was to launch a statewide clinical trials network.

36. Medical Pot Bill Dies in Committee, But Senate Sponsor Promises Return -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee is effectively dead for the year after its Senate sponsor, Nashville Republican Sen. Steve Dickerson, withdrew the bill from a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, April 3.

37. ER Visits Show Methodist South Filling Primary Care Gap in Whitehaven -

Methodist South Hospital in Whitehaven has for more than a year been the site of a flurry of construction projects, including an $8.7 million expansion of the emergency department that wrapped up last year, while an upgrade of the intensive care unit is underway now.

38. EDGE Advances Both of EPE’s Graceland Expansion Requests -

After multiple delays, lawsuits, and revamped plans, the next phase Elvis Presley Enterprises’ expansion plans have been approved by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County.

39. Under Hardaway, Memphis Again Can Have Hometown Heroes -

Headline from the future: “Alex Lomax Leads Memphis Tigers into the Sweet 16.”

A certainty? Of course not. But it’s a possibility because Lomax has committed to Penny Hardaway and the University of Memphis. You know, as opposed to staying with his earlier choice of Gregg Marshall and Wichita State.

40. Redbirds Redux? -

So what do the Memphis Redbirds do for an encore after an historic 2017 season? “For an encore, hopefully do it again,” said infielder Patrick Wisdom. “That’s what encore means. Get to 100 wins. That’d be nice.”

41. Outside the Box -

The Memphis Symphony Orchestra wants audiences to be “challenged” and introduced to new people and ideas via its programming choices and performance series, a philosophy that informed how the symphony’s upcoming season, which kicks off in September, was put together.

42. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

43. Medical Marijuana Bill Dies in Tenn. Legislature -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee is effectively dead for the year after its Senate sponsor, Nashville Republican Sen. Steve Dickerson, withdrew the bill from a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, April 3.

44. Study: Flood Control Engineering Likely Has Worsened Floods -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Flood control work in the Mississippi River and its tributaries has likely made floods worse in Mississippi and Louisiana, researchers say.

Using 500 years of data from tree rings and from sediment in oxbow lakes – bends that once were part of the Mississippi River but became lakes when the river changed its path slightly – they say the river has flooded more often and poured more water into those states over the past 150 years than any previous period.

45. A Place to be Heard -

On a recent weekday afternoon at AngelStreet in North Memphis, dozens of girls age 8-18 are practicing a song, “We Are the World.” Their voices seem to blend together naturally. It takes but a few seconds to hear the talent that’s in the room.

46. Redbirds Again Will Have Multiple Top Prospects -

Tuesday was Media Day at AutoZone Park for the reigning Pacific Coast League champion Memphis Redbirds. And some of the players who helped win that title were back; others likely will be.

The only constant in minor league baseball, after all, is the ever-changing roster. Pitcher Jack Flaherty, 22, was ticketed to begin the season with the Triple-A Redbirds. But when the Cardinals placed veteran Adam Wainwright on the disabled list with a hamstring injury, that opened a starting role for Flaherty; he was slated to get the ball Tuesday night, April 3, at Milwaukee.

47. Cellphones Gaining Acceptance Inside US Schools -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) – Cellphones are still absent from most U.S. schools but new data shows them steadily gaining acceptance as administrators bow to parents' wishes to keep tabs on their kids and teachers find ways to work them into lessons.

48. Every Arkansas County Part of Lawsuit Against Opioid Makers -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Pulaski County has agreed to join a lawsuit seeking relief from dozens of opioid manufacturers, and the addition of the lone holdout means every Arkansas county is now involved in the legal fight.

49. Commitment to King's Unfinished Work Remains 50 Years Later -

ATLANTA (AP) – Tyrone Brooks was 22 years old and 400 miles away, seeking clues to an unsolved lynching as old as he was, when he got the news that Martin Luther King Jr. was dead. Stunned, Brooks dropped everything and drove to Memphis, crying all the way.

50. Rebranded Shoemaker Insurance Expands -

Shoemaker Financial president and CEO Jim Shoemaker isn’t sure there is ever a perfect time for expansion and rebranding, but with the economy strong and his company well positioned for a transition of leadership, he could not hold off growing Shoemaker’s insurance line any longer.

51. Don't Like Medical Marijuana Bill? Just Wait for Next Version -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee could return to its original form, setting up a state commission to oversee use of the drug to treat debilitating illnesses. Any such move also could bring lobbyists back into the fold after they dropped support of the bill when its sponsor, Rep. Jeremy Faison, abruptly changed the bill and left onlookers flabbergasted.

52. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

53. Tigers' Softball Freshman AAC Player of the Week -

University of Memphis freshman designated player Kendall Lee has been named the American Athletic Conference Player of the Week after helping lead Memphis to a 4-1 week, including a 2-1 mark to open AAC play against Wichita State. This is the first-ever conference honor for Lee and the third time this season Memphis has had a player earn the title of Player of the Week.

54. Farm-to-Table Dinner To Benefit Farmers Market -

Oxford Community Market, a nonprofit weekly farmers market in Oxford, Mississippi, will host a community fundraiser after it kicks off its 2018 season Tuesday, April 17, from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Old Armory Pavilion, 1801 University Ave.

55. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

56. Farm-to-Table Dinner April 17 To Benefit Farmers Market -

Oxford Community Market, a nonprofit weekly farmers market in Oxford, Mississippi, will host a community fundraiser after it kicks off its 2018 season Tuesday, April 17, from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Old Armory Pavilion, 1801 University Ave.

57. Football Can’t Arrive Soon Enough for Vols Fans -

Thank goodness Tennessee spring football is here. Vol Nation needs a diversion with all that’s happened the past couple of weeks, like the men’s basketball team losing to Loyola-Chicago in the NCAA Tournament’s second round, and Loyola advancing to the Final Four.

58. Daimler, BMW to Merge Car-Sharing, Other Digital Services -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) – Automakers Daimler and BMW have agreed to merge their transportation services businesses so they can expand offerings in ride-hailing apps, car-sharing, parking, and charging electric cars.

59. Strickland Talks of Work To Be Done 50 Years After Strike -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the hardest part of growing black-owned business, and thereby black wealth in the city, is increasing the number of minority-owned firms in certain sectors.

60. Tigers Softball Player Named AAC Player of the Week -

University of Memphis freshman designated player Kendall Lee has been named the American Athletic Conference Player of the Week after helping lead Memphis to a 4-1 week, including a 2-1 mark to open AAC play against Wichita State. This is the first-ever conference honor for Lee and the third time this season Memphis has had a player earn the title of Player of the Week.

61. Gun Violence March About More Than School Safety -

The Memphis “March For Our Lives” that drew several thousand people Downtown Saturday, March 24, focused on gun violence beyond the Parkland, Florida, school massacre that prompted the national movement about a month ago.

62. Pinnacle Continues to Ramp up Memphis Presence -

Pinnacle Bank is continuing to accelerate its growth in the Memphis banking market, with the opening in recent days of two new loan production offices, a new mortgage office, plus another mortgage office on the way soon in Southaven.

63. Thousands March In Local Version of 'March For Our Lives' -

Several thousand people marched Saturday, March 24, from Clayborn Temple to the National Civil Rights Museum in the Memphis version of the national March For Our Lives.

The group, led by students from Memphis schools, called for the passage of federal gun control measures as well as more mental health counseling at schools with chants of “The NRA has got to go” and “Vote them out.”

64. Mississippi Names First Black Higher Education Commissioner -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The first-ever African American has been named to oversee Mississippi's eight public universities.

The state College Board announced Friday that Alfred Rankins Jr. will become higher education commissioner July 1 when Glenn Boyce retires. Rankins is the current president of Alcorn State University.

65. This Week In Memphis History: March 23-29 -

2010: Groundbreaking for the Salvation Army Kroc Center at the Mid-South Fairgrounds after a five-year effort that included the local Salvation Army chapter raising $25 million to trigger $60 million in matching funds from the estate of Joan Kroc.

66. Editorial: Opioids Pose New Danger, Require New Strategy to Combat -

So you’ve seen drug problems come and go – numerous declarations of war on pot, crack, meth and other street drugs sold illegally.

The concept of people dying from legally prescribed drugs isn’t new either. But powerful, synthetic opioids, which can cause rapid addiction even when taken properly, are a new public health crisis.

67. Can Zuckerberg's Media Blitz Take the Pressure Off Facebook? -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embarked on a rare media mini-blitz in an attempt to take some of the public and political pressure off the social network.

68. Plan to Expand Pre-K Would Leverage Private Funds -

After voters defeated two ballot questions in two years for sales tax increases – city and county – to fund an expansion of prekindergarten classrooms primarily in Memphis, the effort is back with a momentum that seemed unlikely five years ago.

69. Mississippi Agriculture Official Appointed to US Senate Seat -

BROOKHAVEN, Miss. (AP) – The governor of Mississippi appointed state Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith on Wednesday to succeed fellow Republican Thad Cochran in the U.S. Senate.

70. In Tennessee, Music is Being Made Deep Below Earth's Surface -

MCMINNVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – By the time Nashville songwriter Travis Meadows took the stage on a recent Sunday afternoon, more than 500 music fans had found their way 333 feet (100 meters) below the ground, some taller guests ducking their heads just a bit.

71. Officials: Woman to Fill Senate Vacancy in Mississippi -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The state's governor will appoint Mississippi's first female member of Congress to fill the Senate vacancy that will soon be created when veteran Sen. Thad Cochran retires, three state Republicans told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

72. 2018 E-commerce Trends -

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that e-commerce is much more than transactions made from a desktop computer or mobile device. Whether you’re in a B2B or B2C market, e-commerce remains a critical sales tool with a wide influential reach – estimated to impact over 50 percent of in-store purchases, while online sales are thought to see an annual increase of 15 percent for each of the next four years.

73. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

74. New Memphis Coach Penny Hardaway Vows Return to Glory Days -

They came in large numbers and they came early. The University of Memphis opened Tuesday’s press conference to the public and the basketball program’s staunchest supporters showed up at the gleaming new Laurie-Walton practice facility for the tip-off of the Penny Hardaway Era.

75. HBO Documentary Probes Real Life of Elvis Presley -

A Memphis screening of the three-hour, two-part HBO documentary on Elvis Presley over the weekend elicited cheers and applause with some somber moments .

“Elvis Presley: The Searcher” was shown at South by Southwest (SXSW) Conference & Festivals in Austin, Texas, and Saturday, March 17, at Guest House at Graceland – both in advance of its debut April 14 on HBO.

76. For Some Defrauded Students, Only Partial Loan Forgiveness -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Department of Education has begun notifying some former Corinthian Colleges students that it will forgive only one-half or less of their federal student loans, even though the students were defrauded by the now-defunct schools, The Associated Press has learned.

77. Small Cell Legislation Advancing, But Rural Options More Limited -

NASHVILLE – Unable to get cell-phone service at a football game in Nashville or Knoxville? Can’t send a text from a Broadway honky tonk or Beale Street blues bar? Wondering how autonomous cars will ever work?

78. Making Art Work -

After he’d finished his part in a Memphis Symphony Orchestra performance a few weeks ago that included Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade for Violin, guest violinist Charles Yang came out on stage and did something unexpected.

79. FDA Begins Push to Cut Addictive Nicotine in Cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal health officials took the first step Thursday to slash levels of addictive nicotine in cigarettes, an unprecedented move designed to help smokers quit and prevent future generations from getting hooked.

80. Tourism Backlash Creates Dilemma For Travelers -

In early February, CNN.com published “12 destinations travelers might want to avoid in 2018,” a list of destinations dealing with tourism backlash because of overcrowding and other issues. In my March 1 column, “Coming Around to Cruises,” I mentioned the mode of tourism as a reason many European destinations are overcrowded.

81. Florida’s Epiphany On Guns Means Little in Tennessee -

Memphis resident Stevie Moore has been waging a war to take illegal guns off the streets since someone shot his son in the head with an AK-47 15 years ago.

“It’s my mission to fight these guns whatever way I can,” says Moore, who founded the organization Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives in an effort to steer youth away from violence.

82. Stephen Hawking: 'His Laboratory Was the Universe' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Everyone knew of Stephen Hawking's cosmic brilliance, but few could comprehend it. Not even top-notch astronomers.

Hawking, who died at his home in Cambridge, England, on Wednesday at age 76, became the public face of science genius. He appeared on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" and "The Big Bang Theory," voiced himself in "The Simpsons" cartoon series and wrote the best-seller "A Brief History of Time." He sold 9 million copies of that book, though many readers didn't finish it. It's been called "the least-read best-seller ever." Hollywood celebrated his life in the 2014 Oscar-winning biopic "The Theory of Everything."

83. Trump's CIA Pick is Career Spymaster, Oversaw Secret Prison -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gina Haspel's colleagues describe her as a seasoned veteran who would lead the CIA with integrity. Human rights advocates see her as someone who supervised torture at a secret prison.

84. AP: Pentagon Often Fails Young Sex Assault Victims on Bases -

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) – A decade after the Pentagon began confronting rape in the ranks, the U.S. military frequently fails to protect or provide justice to the children of service members when they are sexually assaulted by other children on base, an Associated Press investigation has found.

85. Blackmon Takes City to Task, Says Too Much Focus on MLK Mountaintop Imagery -

A United Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area who is active in protests and other social justice causes told an interfaith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago.

86. Blackmon Critical of City Grants and Mountaintop Imagery at MLK50 Gathering -

A Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area and active in protest and other social justice causes in the area, told an inter-faith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago next month.

87. US Sets New Record for Censoring, Withholding Gov't Files -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government censored, withheld or said it couldn't find records sought by citizens, journalists and others more often last year than at any point in the past decade, according to an Associated Press analysis of new data.

88. Last Word: River Crests, Tigers Post-Season and Library Shift -

The slow fall of the Mississippi River begins. The river at Memphis crested at 39.2 feet over the weekend. By Friday it should be below flood stage, which at Memphis is 34 feet. The high river season here was marked mostly by a lot of watching by Memphis public works and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as the river and its tributaries moved into the bottom land it usually occupies at this time of the year.

89. Bill Removing Sterilization From Sentencing Advances -

A proposal by state Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the Senate on Thursday, March 1.

90. Clark Tower, Primacy Parkway Ink New Tenants -

5100 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38137

Lease Amount: 1,830 square feet

Tenant: Accurate Communications Corp.

91. Dixon Loses Appeal Seeking to Restore Right to Vote -

The Tennessee Criminal Appeals Court calls it a “harsh” result, but ruled last week that former Democratic state Sen. Roscoe Dixon of Memphis cannot have his right to vote restored almost 12 years after he was convicted of corruption charges in the state’s most recent political corruption probe.

92. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

93. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

94. Tennessee Panel Won't Let Las Vegas Shooting Survivors Speak -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee legislative panel refused to let two Las Vegas concert shooting survivors testify Wednesday after Republicans delayed action on a Democratic bill to ban the device used by that gunman in October.

95. No Luck Investing -

Ray’s Take: A rabbit’s foot on a string. A silver dollar. A four-leaf clover. A lucky penny. These are all lyrics from a 1961 song by our very own Memphis legend, Elvis Presley, titled “Good Luck Charm.”

96. Russell Happy She Came Back, Even If . . . -

Mercedes Russell had a tough decision to make last March when the Tennessee Lady Vols ended a disappointing season in the second round of the NCAA women’s tournament.

Should the 6-foot-6 center enter the 2017 WNBA Draft or return as a fifth-year senior at Tennessee?

97. At ComCap Partners, Alex Willis Focuses on Improving Community -

Ever spot your name on a street sign? It’s a total coincidence – you know this to be true – and yet you may be tempted to stop and grab a selfie with the caption built right in. If you’re a Memphian descended from renowned civil rights leader A.W. Willis, Jr., though, the Willis in white letters on a green sign was your grandfather. And chances are, you share his first and middle initials, too.

98. Republican Mayoral Candidates Find Ways to Differentiate -

The three contenders in the May Republican primary for Shelby County mayor didn’t disagree on much when they met this week at the Southwind clubhouse. But David Lenoir, Joy Touliatos and Terry Roland did try to distinguish themselves from the other two in a relatively spark-free first encounter as a trio.

99. Wells at New TVA Plant to Stay Idle for Now -

The Tennessee Valley Authority has no plans to use the wells it drilled into the Memphis Aquifer earlier in the construction of the Allen Combined Cycle Plant, the $1 billion natural gas-fired power plant it is building in southwest Memphis.

100. Monuments Bill Would Establish Felony Charge for Some Votes -

NASHVILLE – A state legislator is set to seek the attorney general’s advice on legislation enabling the state to charge local elected officials with a felony for “knowingly” casting votes in conflict with state law.