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Editorial Results (free)

1. 5th Class of Soulsville Seniors All Accepted to College -

For a fifth consecutive year, all of Soulsville Charter School’s seniors have been accepted into colleges and universities.

The school – which started in 2005 with 60 sixth-graders and graduated its first seniors in 2012 – says this year’s graduating class is its largest ever. It’s also the earliest date for all students to be accepted.

2. McMullen Takes on Public Sector Challenges as City’s Legal Chief -

Bruce McMullen remembers his hometown of Sparta, Georgia, as small, about 3,000 people.

“Life was pretty simple,” he said. “A lot of family, a lot of friends.”

3. Yellen: Persistent Economic Weakness Could Slow Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen cautioned Wednesday that global weakness and falling financial markets could depress the U.S. economy's growth and slow the pace of Fed interest rate hikes.

4. Burger King's Next Conquest: Hot Dog King -

NEW YORK (AP) — Burger King is looking for a new crown: Hot Dog King.

The Miami-based chain says it plans to put hot dogs on its menu nationally for the first time starting Feb. 23. It may seem like a jarring addition for those who know the chain for its Whoppers. But Burger King says its ability to flame-grill meat makes hot dogs a natural fit on its menu.

5. Crises Happen; Defend Your Company -

You likely haven’t gotten to where you are today with a “head in the sand” approach to managing your business. When it comes to crisis communications, busy executives sometimes neglect to plan against all that could go wrong.

6. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

7. Philanthropy is Alive and Well In The African-American Community -

Here’s a stereotype to bust: Philanthropy is about large gifts from the rich and the powerful who give to organizations and institutions that serve those in need. Here’s an expanded definition: Philanthropy includes everyday African-Americans who give freely of their treasure.

8. Glazed With Tradition, Gibson’s Keeps Customers Coming Back -

While word-of-mouth and nostalgia might get customers in the door of Gibson’s Donuts, great donuts and a commitment to customer service are what keep them coming back.

Gibson’s has been a Memphis icon since Lowell Gibson and his brother opened it in 1967 at 760 Mount Moriah Road, the East Memphis locale where it’s still going strong nearly 50 years later.

9. Tigers Win Game, Larger Story Remains the Same -

After a much-needed victory, the embattled Tigers head coach opened the door and walked into the media room for his post-game press conference. Seated in the first row and sporting a blue University of Memphis cap was U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, who offered up a grin and polite applause.

10. Glazed with Tradition, Gibson’s Donuts Keeps Customers Coming Back -

While word-of-mouth and nostalgia might get customers in the door of Gibson’s Donuts, great donuts and a commitment to customer service are what keep them coming back.

Gibson’s has been a Memphis icon since Lowell Gibson and his brother opened it in 1967 at 760 Mount Moriah Road, the East Memphis locale where it’s still going strong nearly 50 years later.

11. Confident Serrano Playing for Future at UT -

Tennessee baseball coach Dave Serrano wasn’t setting the bar too high when he met with the media for his 2016 preseason press conference.

Serrano made that mistake before the 2015 season with talk of reaching an NCAA regional and perhaps Omaha, Nebraska, site of the College World Series.

12. Growing Freelance Economy Creates Financial, Tax Implications -

Gone are the days of the traditional 9-to-5 office setting dominating the white-collar landscape.

In fact, it’s estimated that a third of the U.S. workforce now freelances in some form. In a 2015 report from nonprofit organization Freelancers Union and Elance-oDesk Inc., a company that provides platforms for freelancers to find work, it was revealed that 53 million Americans qualify as freelancers.

13. Editorial | Help Wanted: Top Cop With View Beyond the Ranks -

Finding the city’s next top cop is the most important police director selection in a generation.

And we believe the next Memphis Police Department director must be more than a leader of the ranks.

14. Last Word: EW&F, Midtown Rent Rise and A Closer Look At The Pyramid Deal -

One seemingly ordinary winter’s night in Downtown Memphis, I was going from event to event focused on work – specifically trying to stay on a schedule in which several things I wanted to cover were happening at the same time.
That is usually when you miss the experience that is Memphis on an everyday but definitely not ordinary basis.
So I get in a parking garage elevator and on the next floor David Porter – of Stax Records fame – gets on and he introduces me to his friend, Maurice White – the founder of Earth Wind and Fire. They too are trying to be in several places at the same time.
As they went their way and I went mine, I remember thinking this is quite a special place.
The encounter slowed my stride a bit and took some of the edge off the schedule – noticing for the first time how many people were out on a winter’s night in our city having nothing but a good time made better by all of us going our different ways.
White, who was from Memphis, died Thursday with his band’s music stronger and more relevant than ever.
If you grew up listening to EWF when the songs were new, you know that the bright and funky sound and the positive, affirming, and diverse identity of this music was quite intentional at a time when there was plenty going on that could have pushed it the other way.
If your parents or grandparents grew up listening to EWF, this music is a part of your family’s tradition that calls to mind special occasions and even your own mild surprise the first time you found yourself dancing to it with your children.
And if your folks’ vinyl record collection from back in the day included Earth Wind and Fire, that was one of the ones you listened to when they weren’t around and one of the ones you took with you when you got a place of your own.

15. A Bit More Super -

CARE ABOUT THE GAME. I’m a homer. I can’t watch a sporting event for the beauty of the game, the spirit of the competition, the skill displayed on both sides. I want somebody’s butt kicked and for good reason.

16. Ariel Hearn Goes Where No Tiger Has Gone Before -

Keith Lee owns the University of Memphis records for career points and rebounds. Yet he didn’t do this.

Andre Turner is the Tigers’ career assists leader. But he couldn’t pull this off.

17. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

18. Tenn. Approves Incentives for TV Series Production in Memphis -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $4.3 million to support production of a TV series that will be shot in Memphis this spring.

The series will be an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama that Viacom’s CMT network is adapting from the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet.”

19. Casting Set to Begin for Memphis-based "Million Dollar Quartet" TV Series -

Viacom’s CMT network will announce Wednesday that it's begun casting for an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama it’s bringing to the small screen later this year.

The project is an adaption of the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet,” and the production will be based in Memphis, according to CMT.

20. Last Word: Groundhog Day's Long Shadow, Minority Percentage & The Value of Sports -

After the January into February weekend we had with its outbreak of spring fever, you might wonder if groundhogs are allowed to change their minds or if shadows that are the result of television lights count as a prediction on the winter’s length.
Or maybe it would be appropriate to have a weather map that includes the Groundhog Day immunity zones – areas where the long shadow of the groundhog does not venture.
Note to television meteorologists: This would in no way interfere with your right to declare large parts of your viewing areas as places of "potentially severe weather" far into the future. But you will need a different color for the Groundhog Immunity Zones.

21. Sports Community to Memphis: Acknowledge Our Value -

In sports, it is natural for some – maybe even many – to say what a player, coach, team or even a city can’t do. Memphis knows this well.

There were doubts about the viability of a Downtown minor-league baseball park. But 16 years after AutoZone Park opened at Third Street and Union Avenue, the ballpark is as beautiful as ever – thanks in part to some $6.5 million in upgrades following the team’s purchase by the parent St. Louis Cardinals.

22. Q&A: U of M’s Dan Pallme Points to Shipping Changes, Challenges in 2016 -

Dan Pallme is heavily involved in the University of Memphis’ logistics industry departments. He runs the Freight Transportation Leadership Academy, a program that consists of technical tours, sessions with industry experts, and overviews of historic and current trends to encourage leadership in Memphis’ primary modes: rail, river, road and runway.
He is also the senior associate director and freight industry liaison for the U of M’s Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute and the private-sector coordinator for the Southeast Transportation Workforce Center. He has worked with air, rail and trucking companies over the past 25 years.

23. Memphis Grizzlies Off The Grid As Record Rises -

When the Memphis Grizzlies rolled out to that hot start last season and carried a 39-14 record into the All-Star break, they had created legitimate national buzz – perhaps for the first time ever during the course of an NBA regular season.

24. Ford's 2015 Pretax Profit Jumps on Stronger sales -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Higher sales in most of the world helped Ford Motor Co. achieve a record pretax profit in 2015, but investors remain skittish that the good news won't keep coming.

25. Memphis CFO Brian Collins 'Constantly at 50,000 Feet' -

If you think about the city’s chief financial officer at all, you might imagine a robotic figure forever tethered to numbers and a desk, taking a microscopic view of life in search of where to squeeze out a few more dollars here, a few more dollars there.

26. Memphis Sports Leaders to Speak on Local Impact -

You will find Memphis sports fans everywhere – including in the Redbirds dugout at AutoZone Park.

“Our players like having the NBA here and FedExForum nearby,” said Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger.

27. U of M Notebook: ‘Bad Loss,’ Says Josh Pastner -

A two-game losing streak in a college basketball season isn’t that unusual. But for the University of Memphis, the current two-game skid has set off alarms.

The Tigers’ strength this season has been their defense. But at Cincinnati last Thursday the Bearcats shot 50 percent in beating Memphis 76-72. A dreadful East Carolina team scored its first American Athletic Conference victory on Sunday, Jan. 23, in an 84-83 win over Memphis at FedExForum and shot 61.5 percent in the first half. Guard B.J. Tyson hit 6 of 10 shots from long range and finished with 26 points.

28. HUD Funds Mid-South Greenprint With $60 Million Grant -

One of the largest federal grants ever awarded to Shelby County government will fund efforts to avoid some of the flooding the Memphis area saw in 2011.

The federal department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced Thursday, Jan. 21, the $60 million grant to fund the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan.

29. Flying Saucer Hosts Event At Cordova Location -

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium in Cordova is blowing out ten years’ worth of birthday candles by hosting a “Decade of Decadence” event Saturday, Jan. 23 at the restaurant, at 1400 N. Germantown Parkway.

30. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

31. Last Word: Winter Pre-Game Show, The Zoo Goes To Court And Hotel Fever -

You wouldn’t call this the eye of the storm, would you? We’ll go with calling this the pre-game show for the winter storm that is supposed to show up in Memphis at around 7 a.m. Friday morning. Think Super Bowl pre-game.
There is so much that’s been said in advance of this that whatever happens, it might be hard to live up to the preparation.
Much of the rest of this is like an arms race of sorts.
Consider the equipment list from Memphis International Airport.
10 snow brooms, 12 plow trucks, four de-icing trucks each with 40,000 gallons of deicer, four 2-ton salt spreaders and four tractors to keep the runways clear.
The city of Memphis Public Works division has eight snow plows ready to roll on major thoroughfares if the snow gets within the three-inch mark. A set of 16 salt trucks were to load up at 11 p.m. Thursday evening to begin applying salt and sand when needed, with continual inspections of road conditions. And that includes some pre-treated priority areas.
And then there was this truly unusual announcement from Shelby County Schools: the optional school parent camp-out was suspended Thursday evening because of the weather.
This is the camp out the school system tries its best to discourage each and every year at this time. That includes bar-coded applications and repeatedly emphasizing that 99.9 percent of those with the bar-coded applications get their first choice of optional schools, making the camp-out unnecessary. The applications are handed out over several days and are then time-stamped when they are turned in for consideration.
Nevertheless, the tents go up each year and voices are raised in the debate about whether this is parents who care more or parents who are carried away.
This year, the school system, while emphasizing that it “does not authorize or direct” the camp-out, says the line will resume Sunday at 7 a.m.
The school system also adds: “The current process being managed by parents will be recognized due to potential health and safety risks related to forecasted inclement weather.”
But is there a line to get back in line? And when does that start?

32. Butch Jones Builds for Championship Run With Staff Tweaks -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones got serious about taking the next step with his football program not long after his team’s 45-6 victory over Northwestern in the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl.

Jones fired defensive coordinator John Jancek on Jan. 6, and three days later hired his top candidate for the opening, Bob Shoop of Penn State.

33. On Deadline -

What do the following phrases have in common: Due date, Editor’s concern, End point, Freelancer’s problem, Time limit, and Zero hour?

Answer: They have all been used as clues in crossword puzzles for the answer DEADLINE.

34. Father Don’s Legacy: Planting Seeds of Hope -

It is said that the future belongs to those who give the next generation reason to hope. This saying rings true in the life of Rev. Donald Mowery, and is lived out through his decades of commitment to youth in Memphis and across the country.

35. Mounting Consumer Expectations -

This column is the 10th in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Check back for the remainder of the series and a deep dive into each of these trends.

Over the last couple of decades, consumers have flipped the buying process on its ear. Long gone are the days when your sales team was the sole source of research for prospective customers prior to making a purchase.

36. NCRM Forum on Sports and Race Features Lively Dialogue -

Professional athletes pay a price when they speak out on issues outside of or larger than the games they play.

And ESPN commentator and retired NBA player Jalen Rose draws a distinction between the way players in Major League Baseball and players in “black sports” are treated by their teams.

37. Insider Q&A: Allianz Strategist Hooper on Market Turmoil -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last year was the stock market's first down year since 2008, and this year has opened with a thud. The market is down 8 percent in the first two weeks of trading, the worst start to a year ever.

38. Flying Saucer Hosts Decade Celebration Event at Cordova Location -

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium in Cordova is blowing out ten years’ worth of birthday candles by hosting a “Decade of Decadence” event Saturday, Jan. 23 at the restaurant, at 1400 N. Germantown Parkway.

39. It’s Time for Manning to Call it a Career -

No amount of film study has prepared Peyton Manning for this. He enters the NFL postseason uncertain about his football future. After 18 years as a pro and at the age of 39, his body is breaking down and his skills are slipping. Passes he once made with ease now wobble and sail off target.

40. Daush Eyes Next Career Chapter -

On one hand, a long journey in the education profession will come to an end this spring for Barbara Daush.

Daush is president of St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School, a role she has served since 1994. She’ll retire at the end of this school year but it’s a short retirement; Daush begins work in fundraising at the University of Mississippi July 5.

41. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

42. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

43. Volkswagen CEO Understands 'Impatience' On Emissions Fix -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller told workers at the German automaker's lone U.S. plant in Tennessee that recovering from a diesel emissions cheating scandal "won't be a walk in the park," but that the company is committed to turning around its prospects in what he called a core market.

44. Are You Part of a Sandwich? -

Ray’s Take Being a member of the sandwich generation – adults who simultaneously care for children and aging parents – is becoming an increasingly familiar challenge.

It’s tough trying to make financial decisions to take care of loved ones today that may have a negative impact on your own future.

45. Stubby and Bo Know First Big-League Hit Is Forever -

They will always remember the first one because in baseball, there is no charity.

June 22, 2001, the St. Louis Cardinals are losing 10-5 to the San Francisco Giants when Stubby Clapp, back-flipping hero to Memphis Redbirds fans, leads off the bottom of the ninth inning as a pinch-hitter.

46. 8 Games Behind Where They Were Last Year, Grizz Need Z-Bo More Than Ever -

You can’t say the sports gods don’t have a sense of humor. On Jan. 12, 2015, the Grizzlies made a three-way trade with Boston and New Orleans that sent away the team’s designated whipping boy with fans (Tayshaun Prince) and the pouty Quincy Pondexter and brought in the athletic, the dynamic, the difference-making, Jeff Green.

47. Chancellor Steps Aside, Avoids Fight -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education didn’t take long to shake up the hierarchy.

It led to the early retirement of Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan, who blasted the proposal in a letter to the governor, before legislation even hit the printing press. The longtime state official said he would rather step down than support a plan he feels will be detrimental to colleges and universities.

48. Laminack Takes Winding Journey To Creating Pyramid Stone -

Chuck Laminack was exhausted. He faced a long flight from China back to the U.S. and all he could think about was sleep.

So he approached the boarding agent in an attempt to upgrade his seat to first class and one that would allow him to really get comfortable on the flight. But his credit card was declined for the $3,600 charge, which was odd considering he always made sure the balance remained at zero.

49. Last Word: SOTU React, OPEB Comeback and NFL Nostalgia -

The day after the last State of the Union address by President Barack Obama here's a breakdown of the reaction from our delegation to Washington.
Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen emphasized Obama's references to criminal justice reform.
"I know he is also committed to criminal justice reform and I hope my colleagues will work together to put meaningful reform on his desk," Cohen said.
Republican U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher tweeted, "We need a plan to keep America safe and make America strong. I did not hear that from the President tonight."
Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander: "If Pres. Obama focuses on what he agrees on with Congress instead of what we disagree on, there's quite a bit we could get done in 2016."
Republican U.S. Senator Bob Corker urged the "swift release" of U.S sailors being held overnight by Iran in a border dispute just before the speech.

50. Mobile Is Everything -

Editor’s Note: This column is the ninth in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Check back for the remainder of the series and a deep dive into each of these trends.

51. 8 Career Trends For 2016 -

With the New Year here in full force, employees are setting their sights on new goals, new jobs and new careers. One question I keep hearing is “What’s new in 2016?” Here’s the rundown.

52. Hughes Promoted at Harris Shelton -

Brett Hughes has been promoted to managing member at Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC law firm. In his new role, Hughes will provide managerial support to the firm’s three offices. His primary responsibility will be to manage the firm’s administration and committees, particularly on issues that impact client service, as well as the morale, compensation, growth and development of the firm.

53. Book Looks at Sam Phillips' Career, Early Days in Alabama -

FLORENCE, Ala. (AP) — The legacy of Sam Phillips is inextricably tied to Memphis, Tennessee, and his Sun Records and studio. But Phillips' Alabama hometown holds the key to understanding the man who gave the world rock 'n' roll.

54. US Stocks Veer Lower Following Another Drop in Price of Oil -

A slump in crude oil prices and other commodities weighed on stocks in afternoon trading Monday. Energy companies were among the biggest decliners as the price of crude oil sank to the lowest level in more than a decade. Investors also weighed the implications of another drop in China's stock market.

55. With SUV Look, Tech Touches, Chrysler Aims to Revive Minivan -

DETROIT (AP) — Thirty-three years ago, Chrysler invented the minivan. Now, it's reinventing it — with styling reminiscent of an SUV, high-tech features and a first-ever hybrid version that Chrysler hopes will make minivans popular again.

56. Former Governor, Senator Bumpers Remembered at Service -

Former U.S. Senator and Arkansas governor Dale Bumpers was remembered Sunday by former President Bill Clinton and others for his public service, his wit and his role in ending the segregation of the school in his small western Arkansas hometown.

57. Grizzlies Notebook: Zach Randolph Still Mr. Double-Double, Even Off the Bench -

Ever since Memphis coach Dave Joerger decided to have power forward Zach Randolph play off the bench, he has been Mr. Team First and Mr. Positive Attitude.

He also is still capable of being Mr. Double-Double.

58. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

59. Does Your Battery Life Stink? Try Some High-Tech Workarounds -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – It's enough to make you want to drop everything and race for the nearest power outlet: Your workday isn't even done, and your smartphone or laptop battery is already in the red zone.

60. From the High-Flying to the Practical: CES 2016 in Brief -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – This year's CES gadget show, like ones before it, showed off a mix of the dreamy and the practical in technology. Gadget prototypes promised us fully autonomous vehicles carrying commuters on the streets and in the sky, while gizmos went on sale that aimed to solve daily problems like restocking your fridge.

61. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

62. Mediocre Grizz, McGwire Gets It, NCAA Madness -

Wednesday night, Jan. 6, Grizzlies at Oklahoma City on ESPN. It was, well, must-grimace TV.

With Mike Conley in street clothes because of a sore left Achilles, hopes were not particularly high from tip-off. But the Thunder closed the first quarter on an 11-1 run and the Grizzlies never mustered a threat, losing 112-94.

63. Armstrong Leaves MPD After Five Years of Change -

In five years as Memphis Police Department director, Toney Armstrong has seen more changes in law enforcement culture and how officers are perceived than most of his predecessors in the position ever saw.

64. Last Word: The River, Miss Cordelia's, OPEB and the Kumbaya Council -

Here comes the river. Not quite at 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge at Memphis overnight but getting there
For those who weren’t around in 2011 when the river crested at 48.3 feet, the second highest level ever recorded at Memphis, this is the part of the program where lots of people begin to gather at the river.
For some it will be to compare what they've seen before. For others it will be their first look and experience with the concept that nature is bigger than we are.
The smaller those first-time river visitors are, the easier it is for them to accept that. After all, when you are always looking up at the world everything is bigger than you are.
In Tom Lee Park you see them step onto the park's grass, their eyes riveted on the west, perhaps not seeing much beyond the grass at first, a small hand poking out of a coat sleeve shielding their eyes from the sun. And then their first glimpse of the running brown water. And the walk inevitably becomes a run and then a quick halt as the immensity of the river kicks in. Always the two together even when the river is just being eternal.

65. Meteoric Rise of Digital Leaves TV in Dust -

Editor’s Note: This column is the eighth in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Check back for the remainder of the series and a deep dive into each of these trends.

66. Strickland Wades Into River Concerns -

The local agencies that respond to natural disasters learned a lot four years ago when the Mississippi River was rising in Downtown Memphis.

And many of those lessons are being used as the river approaches a crest on Friday, Jan. 8, estimated to be 40.5 feet on the river gauge.

67. Dividends On the Chopping Block as Profit Growth Peters Out -

NEW YORK (AP) — The dividend gravy train is slowing down, threatening an important source of income for investors at a time when stocks are going nowhere.

About 500 companies cut or halted their dividends last year, the highest tally since the economy was crawling out of the Great Recession in 2009. Not only that, other companies got more reluctant to raise their payouts to shareholders, according to numbers released Tuesday by S&P Dow Jones Indices. The number of dividend increases was the lowest in four years.

68. US Auto Sales Expected to Hit an All-Time High in 2015 -

DETROIT (AP) — Americans are buying more new cars than ever before.

U.S. auto sales were expected to reach a record high of 17.5 million in 2015, topping the old record of 17.35 million set in 2000. Analysts expect sales could go even higher this year as unemployment continues to decline and more young buyers enter the market.

69. Last Word: The River, The New Mayor and Explaining Boll Weevils -

Hello, 2016. What’s your hurry?

First things first – the Mississippi River at our doorstep is above flood stage. But the crest is now predicted to come Friday and will be just over 40 feet – lower than predicted last week.
We will be posting web stories on the forecasts and other announcement from the county’s Office of Preparedness each evening to work with their schedule for summarizing where we are.
Floods are a slower moving cause for concern because we know what is happening upriver from us where the river is narrower. But this is also the Mississippi River, which is the definition of unpredictable.

70. Mississippi River At Memphis Above Flood Stage, Projected Crest Lowered -

The Mississippi River at Memphis was a foot and a half above flood stage Sunday, Jan. 3, with the muddy waters of the Mississippi just a few feet away from Tom Lee Park and Greenbelt Park on Mud Island.

71. 19 Tornadoes Touch Down in Tennessee in 2015 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Weather officials say 19 tornadoes touched down in Tennessee last year, marking the state's lowest total since 2007.

The National Weather Service said Saturday that one tornado struck the state in April and two touched down in May of 2015.

72. Strickland Pushes Change Theme Beyond Campaign Borders -

Change as a political force is usually defined by the length of a campaign season.

Once the votes are counted, it’s taken as a verdict on how much or how little voters wanted change in a short span of time.

73. Last Word: Out With the Old, In With The River -

We end 2015 with an eye on the Mississippi River as the city marks the New Year with three major New Year’s Eve outdoor celebrations – one on Beale Street, another in the newly-awakened Overton Square and yet another in the Broad Avenue Arts District.
Two come with lots of memories of past New Year’s eves – with soon-to-be memories.
Overton Square’s comeback as a theater district has been a big story of the last two years.
But Beale Street at the end of 2015 is an institution that has also seen a lot of change in the last year with the move to a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority at year’s end.
Broad is a different story with a different context. The context is a diversified Memphis whose crowd is likely to be at least slightly more local than the mix in Overton Square and on Beale Street.
It's example could very well show us the path to a New Year's eve with public celebrations from Whitehaven to Frayser.

74. AP Explains: How Much Money You Just Saved on Gas in 2015 -

NEW YORK (AP) – U.S. drivers saved a bunch of money on gasoline this past year, as Saudi Arabia and other OPEC members kept the pumps going in the face of low oil prices. Massive stockpiles of crude globally turned 2015 into the year of the pain-free fill up. More of the same is expected for 2016 as oil prices remain low. Here's a quick breakdown of the numbers, courtesy of the AAA.

75. Sports Legacy Award Winners to Be Honored at MLK Game -

Jalen Rose, Spencer Haywood and Tamika Catchings are the recipients of the 11th annual National Civil Rights Museum Sports Legacy Award and will be honored on Martin Luther King Jr. Day – Monday, Jan. 18 – when the Grizzlies play the New Orleans Pelicans at FedExForum.

76. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

77. Thrive in The Expectation Economy -

Maxwell Luthy’s keynote begins with a warm-up. Luthy, director of Trends and Insight, showed two innovations and asked if they were good or bad. The first has a real-time countdown of your life expectancy. The second innovation is an emoji-based room service.

78. DuPont Moves Ahead on Job Cuts Ahead of Dow Merger -

DuPont says it will cut 1,700 jobs in its home state of Delaware and thousands more globally as it prepares for its merger with Dow Chemical.

The companies announced earlier this month that they would join to create a giant chemical producer that will eventually be split into three independent companies.

79. Family Safety Center Awarded Grant for Shelter Services -

For women escaping domestic violence, overcrowded shelters only aggravate a fragile transition. To ensure safety, the Family Safety Center of Memphis and Shelby County is adding temporary hotel and apartment housing to its list of domestic violence services.

80. The Week Ahead: Dec. 28, 2015 -

How was your (hopefully long) weekend, Memphis? This week, more than most, is a time of change – of renewal, of turning the page, starting over. And of course, a time to ask the annual question: What are we going to do on New Year’s Eve?

81. Opera Memphis General Director Reflects on Challenges, Storytelling -

Even though he’ll have reached the five-year mark as general director at Opera Memphis in January, Ned Canty says there are some days when it feels like he’s still just getting started.

In a recent conversation with The Daily News, he was by turns philosophical and as optimistic as ever about the nature of his work and about the task of making one of the oldest musical forms relevant in the city where rock ’n’ roll was born.

82. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

83. Harmjoy? -

Writing in the November issue of The American Lawyer, a quartet of byline authors put forth: “Among big-firm lawyers, the Dewey & LeBoeuf trial [which, after four months of testimony and 21-days of jury deliberation, ended in a mistrial] has produced reactions ranging from introspection to schadenfreude.” Of German descent, the latter word – combining schaden and freude – is, literally, harmjoy. And, apparently, this 13-letter word has an 11-letter synonym.

84. The Pressure of Parity: There’s Golden State … And Everybody Else -

San Antonio had just handed the Grizzlies a 20-point home loss. Someone asked Spurs coach Gregg Popovich what his team could take from the game.

His answer: Even the Spurs were a work in progress, continuing to chase the shadows of perfection. Which, on Dec. 3, was personified in the still-undefeated Golden State Warriors.

85. Tiger Bookstore Adapts To Changing Landscape -

Business at Tiger Bookstore can’t always be like the 2008 run to the Final Four.

That magical basketball season saw University of Memphis fans gather at the store on Walker Avenue adjacent to the campus to buy memorabilia marking the occasion.

86. Airlines Prep for Holiday Crush: More Flights, Bigger Planes -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are shifting the timing of thousands of flights, even adding dozens of redeyes, as they try to avoid delays while hauling millions of passengers from now through the Christmas weekend.

87. Winter Heat Wave to Bring Threat of Tornadoes to Deep South -

ATLANTA (AP) — A heat wave that could deliver the warmest Christmas ever recorded to cities across the South may also fuel tornadoes and storms featuring golf ball-sized hail and damaging winds of up to 70 mph, forecasters say.

88. App Explosion Projected for 2016 -

This column is the sixth in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Check back for the remainder of the series and a deep dive into each of these trends.

With our sights set on 2016, it’s the perfect time for reflection on your growth strategy. What marketing successes will you carry over from 2015 into the New Year, and which will you abandon? What marketing trends, anticipated for 2016, are worthy of consideration in your 2016 plan?

89. All I Want For Christmas Is A New Job -

I hope this holiday season has been a great one. If you’re like many people, a new job may be on your Christmas list. Whether you’re looking for a better work environment, more money or something else, December brings up thoughts of something new.

90. Grizzlies Talk New Lineup, Easing Schedule and Christmas Presents -

Feel like Christmas is closing in on you? Feel like you’re being double-teamed – work and all the usual daily responsibilities, plus shopping for family and friends?

The Grizzlies are right there with you. Coach Dave Joerger admits his shopping is not done. Neither is Vince Carter’s, even though he’s been balancing the holidays and the grind of an NBA season for going on 20 years.

91. Redemption Unreachable as Pete Rose Keeps Screwing Up -

In the TV commercial, banished Hit King Pete Rose is walking down a hallway lined with trophies and baseball memorabilia. His stated purpose: to promote Skechers Relaxed Fit shoes.

Anything for a buck, right, Charlie Hustle?

92. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

93. Memphis Lessons That Follow You Home -

Every now and then events occur that seem small, routine, just part of the job until they collide with such force that they explode with meaning, renewing your work with a sense of purpose and change a job into a mission.

94. Office Gift Giving -

It’s that time of year again. The time of year that you’re required to attend an awkward holiday party with your co-workers during the day. I’ve gotten the sense that most people mainly are looking forward to receiving any sort of holiday bonus and leaving work early for the day.

95. Collison Joins Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Eric Collison has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as insurance sales manager. In his new role, Collison’s duties will include development and mentoring of the current and new sales force, marketing campaigns and initiatives, developing and fostering carrier relationships, and identifying new profitable areas for growth within the agency.

96. Planning the Perfect Wedding -

Weddings begin with the venue. “A venue holds everything,” says Kristin King, who is opening a new event facility, The Sloane, in Nashville’s Gulch area in 2016.

97. Struggling Titans Step Up Their Game for Mularkey -

The biggest positive for the 2015 Titans is that they continue to fight.

Their record – 3-9 – is terrible, not a marked improvement over last year’s 2-14 debacle. But the Titans have not folded on a regular basis, as they did a year ago when they lost nine games by two touchdowns or more.

98. Grizzlies’ Footprint Growing Across Region; Redbirds, RiverKings Try to Hit Their Niches -

Decades ago, the St. Louis Cardinals used their vast radio network to extend their brand across the middle of America. Even today, they have more than 130 affiliated stations in eight states.

“The Cardinals did a great job through their radio outreach,” said John Pugliese, Memphis Grizzlies vice president of marketing, communications and broadcast.

99. Tennessee Lawmakers Discuss Syrian Refugee Vetting Process -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers said Wednesday that they continue to get calls from constituents expressing concern about the vetting process for allowing Syrian refugees into the state and sought assurance from security officials that the program is safe.

100. So Far, Grizzlies Fail the Eye Test -

In this day and time we hear a lot about statistics and analytics vs. the eye test.

It’s a discussion we have throughout the season when debating the College Football Playoff rankings, and when arguing about the seeding that sets our brackets for March Madness.