» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Ever' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:2173
Shelby Public Records:9836
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:1313
Middle Tennessee:12408
East Tennessee:3534
Other:95

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

2. Rep. Cohen to Introduce Impeachment Articles -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis said Thursday, Aug. 17, he intends to introduce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, based on Trump’s comments about recent violence and marches by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia.

3. U.S. Rep. Cohen to Introduce Impeachment Articles -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis said Thursday, Aug. 17, he intends to introduce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, based on Trump’s comments about recent violence and marches by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia.

4. Believe It: 61 and 755 Are Real Home Run Records -

A few weeks ago I was at the Atlanta Braves’ new home, SunTrust Park. Predictably, the Braves were not up to the task of competing with baseball’s best team, the Los Angeles Dodgers.

But give the Braves credit for the in-stadium exhibits on the concourse honoring their greatest players. Especially the one dedicated to the true all-time home run king, Hank Aaron.

5. Tech Companies Banishing Extremists After Charlottesville -

NEW YORK (AP) – It took bloodshed in Charlottesville to get tech companies to do what civil rights groups have been calling for for years: take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence.

6. Novel Evokes Memories of Davis-Kidd, With a Few Updates -

If you turn your head and squint your eyes just right, you can almost believe that Davis-Kidd Booksellers is back.

That beloved Memphis institution closed in 2011 after more than 25 years in operation. The store was soon renamed the Booksellers at Laurelwood, but while it had the same location and the same employees, it wasn’t quite the same as its predecessor. Then, after barely six years in business, that store also closed down in February, leaving a gaping hole in the city for readers who still liked to visit bookstores.

7. Elvis Vigil Features Changes, Including Admission Fee -

Elvis Week was already going to be different this year with Graceland’s recent $137 million expansion and a new landscape across the boulevard from the Whitehaven mansion.

The candlelight vigil Tuesday, Aug. 15 – the high point of Elvis Week – was much different, and not all of the thousands of Elvis fans thought it was for the better.

8. Elvis Vigil Features Changes Including Admission Fee -

Elvis Week was already going to be different this year with Graceland’s recent $137 million expansion and a new landscape across the boulevard from the Whitehaven mansion.

The candlelight vigil Tuesday, Aug. 15 – the high point of Elvis Week – was much different and not all of the thousands of Elvis fans thought that change was for the better.

9. Several FedEx Drivers Win Big at Competition -

Nine drivers affiliated with FedEx have taken home top honors at the 2017 National Truck Driving Championships in Orlando, Florida.

Six FedEx drivers from around the United States won the national championships in their respective classes. In addition to winning in his class, FedEx Express driver Roland Buldoc of Windsor, Massachusetts, was named the Bendix National Truck Driving Championships Grand Champion, the top award.

10. Evolving Customer Lifecycle -

Editor’s Note: Part one in a two-part series. The B2C (business-to-consumer) customer lifecycle is used to describe the phases a customer progresses through when making a purchasing decision and is generally broken down into these five phases: awareness, consideration, purchase, service and advocacy.

11. Allegiant Gives Away Vacation Packages, Free Barbecue in Memphis -

Since Allegiant Air first arrived at the Memphis International Airport in 2015, it has ferried almost a half million passengers to and from the Bluff City.

In order to show its appreciation, the Las Vegas-based airline threw a celebration Monday, Aug. 14, at Central BBQ’s Downtown location where they doled out free lunches and five vacation packages, which included airfare and lodging for two at the Golden Nugget Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas.

12. NAWBO Memphis: On The Offensive -

Frankly, Carolyn Michael-Banks isn’t sure her business would still be around if she hadn’t made a fateful decision about a year ago.

That’s when Michael-Banks, owner of A Tour of Possibilities, joined the Memphis chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners. While she was sure she had a good grasp on how to market her business, she knew she didn’t know nearly as much about the financial side.

13. Arrested in LA, Z-Bo Will Remain a Hero in Memphis -

Change the location. Change the month and the year, too.

Instead of Sacramento Kings free-agent signee Zach Randolph being arrested at the Nickerson Gardens housing project in Watts in August of 2017, our beloved Z-Bo is arrested here.

14. NAWBO Memphis Looking to Help More Women Succeed in Business -

Frankly, Carolyn Michael-Banks isn’t sure her business would still be around if she hadn’t made a fateful decision about a year ago.

That’s when Michael-Banks, owner of A Tour of Possibilities, joined the Memphis chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners. While she was sure she had a good grasp on how to market her business, she knew she didn’t know nearly as much about the financial side.

15. Editorial: Back-to-School Stability Includes Unresolved Issues -

Another school year is underway in Memphis, and it’s arguably the most stable for the Shelby County Schools system in the last seven years – maybe longer. Yet, there is much about education in our community that remains unresolved.

16. Krispy Kreme Marks Eclipse With Chocolate Glazed Doughnuts -

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) – Krispy Kreme is going dark ahead of the solar eclipse set to cast a shadow across part of the U.S. this month.

The doughnut chain is giving its signature glazed treats a chocolate sheen for the first time ever in honor of the Aug. 21 eclipse, where the moon will pass in front of the sun.

17. Renee White Adds Purpose to Numbers -

At the end of her third-grade year, Renee White’s elementary school switched math books. Why does White – now chief financial officer of Oak Hall – remember a textbook being retired 20 years ago?

18. Postal Service May Get More Freedom To Raise Stamp Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may be time to stock up on Forever stamps.

Regulators appear likely to accept the financially beleaguered Postal Service's request for more freedom to raise the price of mailing letters. It would be the biggest change in the Postal Service's pricing system in nearly a half-century, allowing stamp prices to rise beyond the rate of inflation.

19. Train Employees For Excellence -

Billions of dollars are spent on marketing every year by businesses and institutions trying to convince potential customers that they are the preferred choice. However, after decades as an observant consumer, I have concluded that most businesses would have much more success if they invested a portion of that marketing budget and a little time into professional development for their employees.

20. Memphis Runners Grind at Boston Marathon and Beyond -

For runners, the Boston Marathon is about as sacred as a pilgrimage to Mecca for Muslims, or a trip to the Vatican for Catholics. Participants are venerated as somewhat divine among their comrades, and qualifying assuages any doubts about their right to claim the title “runner” when describing themselves to outsiders.

21. Casinos Embrace Esports Even as They Work to Understand It -

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) – Casinos are slowly embracing competitive video game tournaments as a way to help their bottom lines, but the money is coming from renting hotel rooms to the young players and selling them food and drinks, not from turning them into gamblers.

22. What is MROI? -

Have you ever looked at your organization’s marketing spend and wondered, “What do I have to show for this?” Or maybe you spent the six-figure marketing budget and have to justify the same spend for the upcoming budget year. Either way, you need to calculate marketing return on investment (MROI).

23. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

24. U of M Receives Grant for Career Prep Academy -

The University of Memphis and three community colleges are set to get $773,447 from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to increase student success and outcomes.

The grants, through the Institutional Outcome Improvement Fund Grant, will allow institutions to focus on student outcomes in areas such as credit-hour progression and degree completion.

25. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

26. After Many Decades of Change, Why Haven’t Our Methods? -

Cities have to be in a constant state of problem solving in today’s world, especially when you consider that the shelf life of leading industries is shortening in dramatic fashion. Consider that it took 55 years for the automobile to spread to a quarter of the country, 35 years for the telephone, 22 years for the radio, 16 years for the personal computer, 13 years for the cellphone, and only seven years for the internet.

27. TCAT Students See the Future, Get Prepared -

Bryan Rippy, 38, chuckles when he says he’s in the prime of his life. But sharpening his skills is no laughing matter, and he understands the importance of raising his value in the job market.

28. Using Jargon Not Always a Crime -

We tell ourselves that the use of clever, intentional phrasing designed to encapsulate thoughts as succinctly as possible is the perfect method for communicating with our audience. But are we telling ourselves the truth?

29. Advice to My Younger Self -

In the past week, two interesting things have happened. First, I was asked the question, “What advice would you give your younger self?” Then, I attended my high school reunion. Walking through the old halls of my high school brought back memories of where it all started. Needless to say, both moments made me think about the past and what advice I would give a young person today.

30. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

31. Scaramucci Out of White House Job as John Kelly Takes Charge -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Anthony Scaramucci is out as White House communications director after just 11 days on the job – and just hours after President Donald Trump's new chief of staff, John Kelly, was sworn into office.

32. Son of Nashville Mayor Dies of Apparent Drug Overdose -

The only son of Nashville Mayor Megan Barry – whom her office described as "a kind soul full of life" – has died of an apparent drug overdose, and she asked for privacy as she and her husband face life "without his laughter and love."

33. Should Children Play Football? -

It was the second concussion that made the decision an easy one for Brentwood parent Chris Hulshof. His son, Alex, had suffered his first concussion playing football as an 11-year-old, but Hulshof had been willing to give things a second chance, reasoning that the concussion had been a fluke play that wasn’t likely to occur again.

34. Fully Loaded -

It’s almost like the first half of 2017 was a decade in the making, at least when it comes to commercial real estate. Throughout all four major sectors of the Memphis-area commercial real estate market – industrial, office, retail and multifamily – figures are consistently reaching or exceeding pre-recession marks.

35. Kim Cherry Invests in Culture and Community -

What do you want to be when you grow up? It’s a question commonly asked of children, with a slate of common answers: doctor, teacher, astronaut.

Ask Kim Cherry, executive vice president of corporate communications at First Tennessee Bank, what she wanted to be when she grew up, and the answer is a bit less standard.

36. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

37. NCAA Rule Ending Two-a-Days Forcing Teams to Adjust -

The two-a-day football practices that coaches once used to toughen up their teams and cram for the start of the season are going the way of tear-away jerseys and the wishbone formation.

As part of its efforts to increase safety, the NCAA approved a plan this year that prevents teams from holding multiple practices with contact in a single day.

38. Bad Leadership or Politics? Motlow President’s Fall -

One day he was the golden boy, touting Motlow State’s success and posing with the governor for the signing of the Reconnect Act. The next, seemingly, he was gone with the wind.

At least publicly, everything was grand as Anthony “Tony” Kinkel helped Gov. Bill Haslam meet his Drive to 55 effort to put certificates or degrees in the hands of half of Tennessee adults by 2025. With limited space and resources, Kinkel pushed the Tennessee Promise scholarship at Motlow, the state’s fastest-growing community college, bolstering student retention, graduation and fundraising.

39. Are ‘Snaplications’ The Next Trend In Recruiting? -

When most job seekers think of using social media to apply for a new job, they think of networking website LinkedIn. But McDonald’s pushed the boundaries of recruiting by partnering with Snapchat to hire new employees this summer. Previously rolled out in Australia earlier this year, they’re calling the recruiting effort “Snaplications.”

40. City Master Plan Development Aims To Reverse Random Development -

Not too far past a new generation of civic plans is the filter of reality – what is possible by a business bottom line.

At the outset of the still-forming Memphis 3.0 master development plan, the reality without a plan is striking.

41. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

42. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

43. Publicly Skewered by His Boss, Sessions Says He's Staying On -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions, publicly skewered by his boss for stepping aside from the Russia-Trump investigations, declared Thursday he still loves his job and plans to stay on. Yet Donald Trump's airing of his long-simmering frustrations with Sessions raised significant new questions about the future of the nation's top prosecutor.

44. Alexa, Turn Up My Kenmore AC; Sears Cuts a Deal with Amazon -

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. (AP) — Sears will begin selling its appliances on Amazon.com, including smart appliances that can be synced with Amazon's voice assistant, Alexa.

45. Vols Roster Gets Little Respect from SEC Media -

It was no surprise last week when Tennessee’s football team was picked to finish third by the media in the East Division at 2017 SEC Media Days.

Almost every national publication is picking the Vols third in the East behind Georgia and Florida, although not necessarily in that order.

46. Jeremiah Martin: No Rest for The Memphis Tigers’ Weary Point Guard -

Forget the ugly recent past. Forget the final 19-13 record and surely forget those last two games of the season – the 103-62 humiliation at SMU and the 84-54 beat down from UCF at the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

47. MRG, Thomas & Betts Receive Tax Incentives -

Makowsky Ringel Greenberg and Thomas & Betts were both awarded tax incentives to advance their respective projects by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County on Wednesday, July 19.

48. Madison @ McLean Project Awarded 14-Year Tax Abatement -

Local multifamily development group Makowsky Ringel Greenberg has been awarded a 14-year tax abatement to construct a 132,477-square-foot, 108-unit apartment complex in Midtown Memphis.

Named Madison @ McLean after the eponymous Midtown intersection it will reside on, the $14 million project is the first ever recipient of a Residential PILOT (payment-in-lieu-of-taxes), incentive, which was created earlier this year by the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County.

49. Justices Uphold Refugee Ban But Say Grandparents Still OK -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court says the Trump administration can strictly enforce its ban on refugees, but is leaving in place a weakened travel ban that includes grandparents among relatives who can help visitors from six mostly Muslim countries get into the U.S.

50. Last Duet: Kenny, Dolly Announce Final Performance Together -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Two of country music's biggest stars, Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton, whose onstage chemistry spawned hit duets like "Islands in the Stream" and "Real Love," will be making their final performance together this year.

51. Wall Street's Goldman Sachs Moves Quietly Into Main Street -

NEW YORK (AP) – More homeowner, less hedge fund titan. Goldman Sachs, long known for its super-rich clients and well-connected executives, is starting to act a lot more like a neighborhood bank.

52. After-School Job Not For Everyone -

A reader recently wrote to me with an interesting question. He was seeking advice on how his teenage daughter might find an after-school job for her high school years. His logic makes sense. He wants her to learn discipline and to gain a work ethic. These are great qualities for a young student to develop. Although I respect this method of getting there, I also suggested an alternative path.

53. US to Create Independent Military Cyber Command -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

54. Honor Your Muse, Part 2 -

Editor’s note: This is the second in a three-part series. Full of fear my friend stares into the unknown, wondering whether or not to launch her own business. Only dark silence answers her unvoiced pleas. Like so many professionals in a monolithic system, she yearns for meaning and purpose in her daily work, which is lacking for her in health care social work.

55. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

56. NSA Mid-South to Get New Commanding Officer -

The Naval Support Activity Mid-South base in Millington is getting a new commanding officer.

Capt. Michael Wathen will relieve Capt. David Bryson as commanding officer of the installation in a change-of-command ceremony Friday, July 14, at the NSA Mid-South Conference Center.

57. Butch Pierre Joins U of M Men’s Basketball Staff -

Longtime college assistant coach Butch Pierre has been hired as director of player personnel at the University of Memphis.

“He is someone that I have known of for many years, having coached against him at almost every one of his stops,” said Tigers head coach Tubby Smith. “He has a deep knowledge of how major basketball programs are run, and will be able to add a lot to our program.”

58. ‘Cheeseburger Buddies’ Make Nice for TV -

Tennessee coach Butch Jones passed his first test of the 2017 football season Monday. He made it through SEC Media Days.

There were no new catch phrases, although Jones did allude to the team’s “D.A.T.” (Details, Accountability, Toughness) motto. But nothing close to “champions of life” or “five-star hearts.”

59. Last Word: Overton Gateway Talks, Norris of the Governor's Race and Coach O -

Shelby County Commissioners have quite the disagreement going in several ways as they try to put another budget season in the books and let the ink dry. As we’ve reported, the commission approved a $1.2 billion county government budget Monday and there is no taking that back – at least as a budget. That now becomes an important detail because in committee sessions Wednesday in advance of next week’s meeting of the full commission, there were five votes to change the proposed county property tax rate from $4.10 to $4.13.

60. Butch Pierre Joins U of M Men’s Basketball Staff -

Longtime college assistant coach Butch Pierre has been hired as director of player personnel at the University of Memphis.

“He is someone that I have known of for many years, having coached against him at almost every one of his stops,” said Tigers head coach Tubby Smith. “He has a deep knowledge of how major basketball programs are run, and will be able to add a lot to our program.”

61. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

62. Crust Named MSO Assistant, Youth Symphony Conductor -

Andrew Crust, who recently was named assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Memphis Youth Symphony, shares why young musicians inspire him and how orchestras can reach a younger audience in this week's Newsmakers Q&A.

63. Stern Working to Expand UTHSC’s Community Reach -

When the University of Tennessee Health Science Center launched its Center for Addiction Science in the College of Medicine last year, it represented an ambitious bid by the school to help people beat a variety of addictions and to research the causes of substance abuse.

64. SEC Commissioner Confident in Future of League and its Network -

HOOVER, Ala. – Before SEC commissioner Greg Sankey kicked off SEC Media Days Monday morning, a league official reminded everyone there wasn’t enough bandwidth to support live streaming.

65. Honor Your Muse, Part 1 -

Editor’s note: Part one in a three-part series. Recently, more and more people ask me about launching their own business. They see something liberating about leaping into the unknown, owning their own destiny and not having to make compromises they are forced to make in their current situation.

66. NSA Mid-South to Get New Commanding Officer -

The Naval Support Activity Mid-South base in Millington is getting a new commanding officer.

Capt. Michael Wathen will relieve Capt. David Bryson as commanding officer of the installation in a change-of-command ceremony Friday, July 14, at the NSA Mid-South Conference Center.

67. Mississippi Demands $6.4M Back From Electric Car Maker, CEO -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's state auditor on Wednesday demanded that a troubled electric car maker or its leader repay $4.9 million in state and local aid the company received, plus $1.5 million of interest.

68. Boomerang – When Adult Children Come Home -

Ray’s Take: A changing economy, a sluggish job market and student loan debt have created a perfect storm for delaying the empty nest parents have expected, and had, in the past. According to a recent Census Bureau report, 30 percent of young adults ages 18 to 34 live with their parents. That’s a big number, and the trend is driven in part by unemployment or underemployment of millennials.

69. Memphis Coaches Employ Advanced Metrics to Help Tomorrow’s Cardinals -

Almost an hour after a Sunday afternoon game at AutoZone Park, Memphis Redbirds hitting coach Mark Budaska and pitching coach Bryan Eversgerd are sitting at a small table doing their homework. There are pieces of paper on the table and some visible charts.

70. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

71. Friendliness Drives Barcelona’s Attraction -

Friendly. That’s my lasting impression of Barcelona. This northeastern Spain city, perched between the foothills of the Pyrenees and Mediterranean Sea a couple hours south of the French border, goes to the beat of its own Catalan drum. But every beat I encountered was a friendly one, and only cemented my love of this city.

72. Facebook Drone Could One Day Provide Global Internet Access -

YUMA, Ariz. (AP) – A solar-powered drone backed by Facebook that could one day provide worldwide internet access has quietly completed a test flight in Arizona after an earlier attempt ended with a crash landing.

73. Warren Buffett to Buy 700 Million Shares in Bank of America -

NEW YORK (AP) – Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway said Friday it will amass a 700-million-share stake in Bank of America, making Buffett the largest shareholder in two of the nation's largest banks.

74. Biggest Fireworks Display In AZP History on July 3 -

The Memphis Redbirds’ Independence Day celebration on Monday, July 3, presented by AutoZone, will include the biggest postgame fireworks display in AutoZone Park history and a specialty ticket option that features an All-American baseball picnic.

75. Germantown Approves 21-Cent Property Tax Hike -

The Germantown Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a 21-cent property tax hike Monday, June 26, on third and final reading.

Passage of the tax hike seems to end discussions with Shelby County Schools about the Germantown Municipal School District buying Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools from SCS.

76. Analyst: Fred’s Not Seen as Viable Buyer of Rite Aid Stores -

Nick Mitchell, managing director and research analyst with Northcoast Research, didn’t have to do much work or analysis in the wake of news that Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has been cut out of a deal between Walgreens and Rite Aid.

77. Editorial: Memphis Tourism Has Its Own Unique Ride -

Memphis is never, ever going to be a theme park built for the delight of visitors from around the world.

Memphis tourism is increasingly about exploration and personal experiences that tell someone on a journey a few things about themselves as well as this city by the river.

78. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

79. Fred’s Cut Out of New Walgreens, Rite Aid Deal -

Walgreens Boots Alliance has struck a new deal with Rite Aid to buy 2,186 of the chain’s stores for $5.18 billion, an agreement that replaces the two rivals’ planned merger. It also nixes the component of the merger involving Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. buying hundreds of Rite Aid stores to help the now-defunct merger pass regulatory muster.

80. Debt Deadline Now October, CBO Says As Deficit Spikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The drop-dead deadline for Congress to increase the government's borrowing authority and avoid a devastating economic default is early to mid-October, says a government estimate released Thursday that delivered another challenge to Republican leaders.

81. Paying Fulmer $100K A Deal for UT Athletics -

What does Phillip Fulmer’s hiring as special adviser to University of Tennessee president Joe DiPietro have to do with Vols football coach Butch Jones?

82. Grizz Front Office Has Tough Decisions to Make -

To be an NBA general manager on the eve of free agency is to be asked a lot of questions you really can’t answer.

Better the media should ask you to weigh in on Trump and Russia. Or Serena and McEnroe. Those answers – whatever they were – would be safer.

83. The Latest: Trump Promises 'Big Surprise' on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Republican legislation to repeal and replace the Obama health care law (all times EDT):

2:30 p.m.

President Donald Trump says the Republican health care effort is "working along very well" and suggested there could be a "big surprise coming." The White House did not elaborate on what Trump meant.

84. US to Syria: 'Heavy Price' Awaits Any Chemical Weapons Use -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration threatened Tuesday that Syria will pay "a heavy price" if it follows through on what the U.S. says are preparations for another chemical weapons attack — warning of action that could plunge America deeper into a civil war alongside the fight against Islamic State militants.

85. McConnell Delays Health Care Vote; Trump Engaged -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Republican legislation overhauling the Obama health care law (all times EDT):

2:40 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he is delaying a vote on a Senate health care bill while GOP leadership works toward getting enough votes.

86. Germantown Approves 21-Cent Property Tax Hike -

The Germantown Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a 21-cent property tax hike Monday, June 26, on third and final reading.

Passage of the tax hike seems to end discussions with Shelby County Schools about the Germantown Municipal School District buying Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools from SCS.

87. Is Your Company Protected from Ransomware? -

Think of it as a heist. Instead of force in exchange for your purse or wallet, it’s an attack on your confidential online files.

It’s called ransomware. Last month, a new form of ransomware called WannaCry interfered with Microsoft Windows-based systems to infect tens of thousands of computers in over 100 countries, including Memphis-based FedEx Corp. WannaCry has been called one of the worst and most widespread use of malware that security experts have ever seen.

88. Federal Judge Considers Fate of Texas 'Sanctuary Cities' Law -

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — A federal judge on Monday heard arguments before he decides whether a new Texas "sanctuary cities" crackdown backed by the Trump administration can take effect.

U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia appeared interested in how the law signed by Republican Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and scheduled to take effect in September would be enforced. The measure lets police ask people about immigration status during routine stops.

89. Tennessee Weighs Commission to Examine Jim Crow Brutality -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

90. Redbirds’ Biggest Fireworks Display in AZP History July 3 -

The Memphis Redbirds’ Independence Day celebration on Monday, July 3, presented by AutoZone, will include the biggest postgame fireworks display in AutoZone Park history and a specialty ticket option that features an All-American baseball picnic.

91. Budget Amendments, Tax Rate and Juvenile Court Top County Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners will have lots of amendments to the county’s proposed operating budget Monday, June 26, and at least one bid to change the proposed county property tax rate of $4.10 approved on first reading earlier this month.

92. Community Rx -

As one of the city’s premier medical institutions, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital stays as busy as you might expect for an organization that tries to operate on the leading edge of pediatric care.

93. For Memphis AD Bowen, Knowledge is Also Worry -

Among the items on Tom Bowen’s desk are a miniature University of Memphis football helmet and a Tubby Smith bobblehead that, I swear, gives off a “don’t worry, be happy” vibe.

94. Called To Faithfulness, Not Success -

If there was ever anyone who had a saintly solution to the ordinary trials of life, however grave, it was Mother Teresa.

“God has called us not to be successful, but to be faithful,” she said.

95. Ole Miss Buys Baptist Hospital in $22 Million Deal -

2301 S. Lamar Blvd.
Oxford, MS 38655

Sale Amount: $22 million

Sale Date: June 15, 2017

96. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

97. Haslam Scheduled to Sign Civil Rights Cold-Case Bill -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is scheduled to sign into law Wednesday, June 21, a bill to investigate unsolved murders from the civil rights era. The bill was sponsored by Rep. Johnnie Turner, a Memphis Democrat, and will create a special joint legislative committee specifically to look into unsolved civil rights crimes and cold cases.

98. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

99. Downtown Core Attracting More Corporate Tenants -

Hamida Mandani, who with her husband Sunny owns City Market at the corner of Main Street and Union Avenue, is anticipating lots of potential new customers soon for her small grocery and deli enterprise.

100. After Warmbier's Death, US Weighs Travel Ban on North Korea -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is considering banning travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea, officials said Tuesday, as outrage grew over the death of American student Otto Warmbier and President Donald Trump declared it a "total disgrace."