» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Even Gap' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. County Commission Leaves Only Tax Rate Undone In Budget Season -

Shelby County commissioners took final action Monday, June 18, on every item in its budget season except a final approval of a $4.05 county property tax rate.

The approval of a $1.3 billion county consolidated operating budget and a $90.2 million capital budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1 came with unanimous votes by the 13-member body.

2. County Commission Leaves Only Tax Rate Undone in Budget Season -

Shelby County commissioners took final action Monday, June 18, on every item in its budget season except a final approval of a $4.05 county property tax rate.

The approval of a $1.3 billion county consolidated operating budget and a $90.2 million capital

3. Raised in the projects: San Fran elects black woman mayor -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco's incoming mayor knows the yawning gap between rich and poor firsthand, having been raised by her grandmother in the city's drug- and violence-riddled projects.

4. Standing in the Gap -

There are statistics that tell a story. Always, there are statistics that tell a story. The city of Memphis’ story cannot be told without mentioning a poverty rate of 26.9 percent (Tennessee’s is 15.8 percent). The child poverty rate in Memphis is even more staggering, at 44.7 percent.

5. Luttrell, Jones: County Budget Talks Center on Property Tax Allocation -

Shelby County government’s budget season turns on the county’s property tax rate. It’s not about decreasing the current $4.11 rate to $4.05, as proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell. It’s about how the $4.05 rate would be allocated among various county uses.

6. Going Global -

Over the past two years, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has extended its global reach in a variety of ways, forging new partnerships and alliances to further research efforts for pediatric cancer and blood disorders while investing more than $1 billion to substantially grow its Memphis headquarters.

7. Editorial: 100 North Main’s Better Days Come With Lessons -

No matter what spot is chosen for Memphis’ second convention center hotel, what comes with it is certain to change the gap between Civic Center Plaza and a thriving residential and retail area on the Main Street Mall.

8. Need an Entry-Level Job at a Store? It Can Be Harder Now -

NEW YORK (AP) – Asia Thomas knew she was at a disadvantage. It had been 16 years since she quit a job at McDonald's to raise her kids. When she left, restaurants didn't have kiosks to take orders, people didn't use smartphones to pay, and job seekers did applications on paper.

9. UT/West Institute’s Hayes Plays Critical Role in The Cancer Genome Atlas -

The Cancer Genome Atlas, a comprehensive map of the key genomic changes in 33 types of cancer, wrapped up a decade-long, $300 million national science project in April, with Dr. D. Neil Hayes, scientific director of the University of Tennessee/West Institute for Cancer Research, playing one of only a handful of leadership roles. 

10. East Meets West as 2 Legislators Run Out of Time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

11. Griffin Moves to Helm of Changing ASD -

Sharon Griffin wasn’t having any of the idea that she will be in competition with Shelby County Schools when she becomes the new leader of the state-run Achievement School District.

12. US Brands Suffer Collateral Damage in Chinese Corporate War -

SHANGHAI (AP) – The rivalry is so notorious it's been called the "great cat-and-dog war." On one side towers Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., China's e-commerce market leader, embodied by the black cat mascot of its Tmall platform. On the other is JD.com Inc., a fast-growing upstart represented by its white dog logo.

13. Report: Many State Pension Systems Have Huge Funding Gaps -

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) – A public employee pension crisis for state governments has deepened to a record level even after nearly nine years of economic recovery for the nation, according to a study released Thursday, leaving many states vulnerable if the economy hits a downturn.

14. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

15. China Targets $3 Billion of US Goods in Tariff Spat -

BEIJING (AP) — China announced a $3 billion list of U.S. goods for possible retaliation in a tariff dispute with President Donald Trump and girded Friday for a bigger battle over technology policy as financial markets sank on fears of global disruption.

16. Why So Few Female Fund Managers? It's Not Their Performance -

NEW YORK (AP) – Why is just one of every 10 managers at the helm of U.S. mutual funds a woman?

Many reasons may be behind the disparity, but researchers at Morningstar say they have disqualified one as a possibility: performance. After measuring how 11,272 funds have fared since 2003, the researchers found no big, statistically significant difference in performance between those led by men, women or teams of mixed genders.

17. Blackmon Takes City to Task, Says Too Much Focus on MLK Mountaintop Imagery -

A United Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area who is active in protests and other social justice causes told an interfaith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago.

18. Blackmon Critical of City Grants and Mountaintop Imagery at MLK50 Gathering -

A Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area and active in protest and other social justice causes in the area, told an inter-faith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago next month.

19. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

20. Last Word: Forrest and Slavery, The Tariff Blitz and Angus McEachran -

The report on poverty in Memphis over the last 50 years is on its way to a Greater Memphis Chamber breakfast meeting Thursday. And Terri Lee Freeman, the president of the National Civil Rights Museum and Elena Delavega, the University of Memphis lead researcher of the report, say their message is that as goes Memphis in this regard so goes the nation. And if employers start with lower pay at hiring with percentage raises across the board they feed the racial income gap and bonuses do as well.

21. What’s a Volanthropist? A Dolunteer? -

More and more of us live a “mobile” lifestyle, using our devices for everything from grocery shopping to bill paying. Yet there is often a disconnect between mobile life and nonprofit life.

22. Freeman: Wide Income, Poverty Gaps Persist in Shelby County -

The president of the National Civil Rights Museum says the national attention that comes with the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers strike and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination can be a guide for the nation as well as Memphis.

23. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

24. Walmart's Bruising Battle With Amazon Saps Its Q4 Results -

NEW YORK (AP) – Walmart is getting bruised in its battle with online leader Amazon.

The world's largest retailer on Tuesday reported a smaller-than-expected fourth-quarter profit as it wrestled with slower e-commerce sales during the busiest time of the year. The results underscore the company's challenges in a fiercely competitive retail landscape.

25. Slip Sliding Away … Tubby’s Tigers And Season On Downward Plane -

After his Tigers had suffered the ignominy of losing a college basketball game to East Carolina, Tubby Smith questioned his players’ sanity.

“We probably need some psychological help,” Smith had said after the 88-85 overtime loss at ECU on Saturday, Feb. 3. “Really, I’m serious. There’s some strange things.”

26. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

27. University of Memphis Baseball Team To Count More on Pitching in 2018 -

On April 5 last season, the University of Memphis baseball team owned a 20-9 record and twice had beaten Ole Miss – once when the Rebels were ranked eighth nationally and once when they were ranked 11th.

28. State Voters Have More to Fear Than Russian Meddling -

About 30 years ago, my wife and I were hanging out with another couple and decided to make a big night of it. We’d go out for Mexican food and then rent a movie.

After we had some Mexican grub, we went to Kroger to find a flick. As we perused the selections, my friend said, “What about a Russian spy movie?” To which his girlfriend (future wife, now ex-wife) whined, “John, you know I don’t speak Russian.” (His name is changed to protect the innocent.)

29. Facebook to Emphasize 'Trustworthy' News Via User Surveys -

Facebook is taking another step to try to make itself more socially beneficial, saying it will boost news sources that its users rate as trustworthy in surveys.

In a blog post and a Facebook post from CEO Mark Zuckerberg Friday, the company said it is surveying users about their familiarity with and trust in news sources. That data will influence what others see in their news feeds.

30. Editorial: Kroger’s Bottom Line Isn’t Ours -

The decision by Kroger’s Delta Division to close stores in Southgate shopping center and on Lamar Avenue west of Airways next month is probably based on dollars and cents – millions of dollars in losses at each store.

31. What a Kick -

Peter Freund is a baseball guy. Grew up on the New York Yankees. Today, not only is he principal owner of the Memphis Redbirds, he owns stakes in other minor league teams through his Trinity Baseball Holdings and even has a small slice of the Yankees. But make no mistake, he is a businessman. And it was the businessman in him that was convinced to bring a United Soccer League (USL) team to Memphis and AutoZone Park for the 2019 season.

32. Using Kids as Chips -

THIS ISN’T A GAME, KIDS AREN’T CHIPS. As I write this, 9 million low-income kids in America are at risk of losing their insurance, primarily because they aren’t the kids of Congress.

33. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

34. New Small Cars Unveiled at Auto Show, But Will Anyone Buy? -

DETROIT (AP) – Among the many shiny models vying for attention at Detroit's North American International Auto Show are the revamped Volkswagen Jetta, Hyundai Veloster and Kia Forte.

But cars – particularly small ones – are having a tough time getting buyers to look their way as SUVs grow in popularity.

35. Global Reach -

Jasbir Dhaliwal wears many titles – and carries many responsibilities – at the University of Memphis. He is vice provost of academic affairs and dean of the graduate school. He is chief innovation officer and the executive director of the FedEx Institute of Technology.

36. Retail Workers Feel Disruption From Shifting Shopper Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – With new options and conveniences, there's never been a better time for shoppers. As for workers ... well, not always.

The retail industry is being radically reshaped by technology, and nobody feels that disruption more starkly than 16 million American shelf stockers, salespeople, cashiers and others. The shifts are driven, like much in retail, by the Amazon effect – the explosion of online shopping and the related changes in consumer behavior and preferences.

37. Mississippi Seeks Parity, But Academic Achievement Gaps Grow -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi has an ambitious plan to close academic achievement gaps among student groups by 2025, but last year's results won't help – most gaps grew wider.

38. Decade Since Recession: Thriving Cities Leave Others Behind -

As the nation's economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle's was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union district – and then expanded eight-fold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

39. Memphis Players See Football Program Continuing to Excel -

(Editor’s note: This story was published before the AutoZone Liberty Bowl on Dec. 30).

It was three days before the University of Memphis was to play Iowa State in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl. Much of the talk was about going for what would be a program-record 11th win, and finishing with an undefeated record on the home turf this season.

40. Exes and Taxes: How the Tax Overhaul Will Alter Alimony -

NEW YORK (AP) – Congress' giant tax overhaul is poised to reach virtually every corner of American life – even Splitsville.

Republicans delivered their sweeping plan to an exultant President Donald Trump, who signed it into law Friday. One provision scraps a 75-year-old tax deduction for alimony payments. The new rules won't affect anyone who divorces or signs a separation agreement before 2019.

41. Poll: Tennessee Voters More Moderate Than Some Think -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans are more moderate than their neighbors think they are, and their views of Congress and President Donald Trump have soured some in the past few months, according to a Vanderbilt University poll released Thursday.

42. Bredesen Joins Race for Corker's Senate Seat -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Gov. Phil Bredesen, the last Democrat to win a statewide election in Tennessee, touted his problem-fixing credentials on Thursday, Dec. 7, in announcing his bid to succeed Republican Bob Corker in the U.S. Senate.

43. Bredesen Joins Race to Succeed Sen. Corker in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Gov. Phil Bredesen, the last Democrat to win a statewide election in Tennessee, touted his problem-fixing credentials on Thursday, Dec. 7, in announcing his bid to succeed Republican Bob Corker in the U.S. Senate.

44. Will Pre-K Put the City of Memphis Back in the Education Business? -

For the first time since the city of Memphis ceased funding schools after the historic merger of city and county districts, it’s looking to get back into education – by putting dollars into pre-K classrooms.

45. Collins Leaving as City's Chief Financial Officer -

City of Memphis chief financial officer Brian Collins is leaving the post he’s held for the last five years across two mayoral administrations to become executive director of the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, Collins announced Friday, Nov. 17. He is leaving City Hall in January and starts his new job Jan. 8.

46. The Next Four Years -

A week before candidates for the 2018 Shelby County elections could pull qualifying petitions to run, Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves was thinking out loud on Facebook.

“Next four years,” was how it began.

47. Graceland Sues Over Concert Venue Scrapped By Grizz Noncompete -

Graceland is challenging the noncompete agreement the city and county governments have with the Memphis Grizzlies in a lawsuit filed Wednesday, Nov. 15, in Shelby County Chancery Court.

The lawsuit by Elvis Presley Enterprises Inc. and Guesthouse at Graceland LLC seeks a declaratory judgment against the city of Memphis, Shelby County and Memphis Basketball LLC.

48. Tigers Easily Tamed by No. 25 Alabama in Opener -

They weren’t very good from the free-throw line (22 of 36 for 61.1 percent) and they were abysmal from 3-point range (2 of 17 for 11.8 percent). None of the players, with the exception of guard Kareem Brewton (13 points), could consistently create his own shot and they collectively finished with seven assists and 17 turnovers.

49. Sports Complex Remains Driver of Fairgrounds Redevelopment Plan -

Parts of the city’s tentative plan for redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds may still come and go and the cost estimates could vary. But Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration made it clear at a Monday, Nov. 6, public meeting to unveil the most specific plan yet that a youth sports tournament complex is the anchor and driver of the financing for a redevelopment covering 175 acres.

50. Last Word: Fairgrounds Surprises, Aquarium Reprise and Six Open Commission Seats -

There are lots of renderings and blueprints floating around this city of ours these days. Land opening up, locations changing, possibilities revealed, new uses for old places and old places giving way to new. So it’s not surprising to see some smaller changes that are nevertheless highly visible. Thus comes word with the new week that Spin City, the corner tenant at Poplar and Highland in Poplar Plaza, will close with the new year and Spaghetti Warehouse, on Huling Downtown, will close later this month in the week before Thanksgiving.

51. Harris Cites Effects of ‘Trump Approach’ on County Races -

Three weeks into his run for Shelby County mayor on the 2018 ballot, state Sen. Lee Harris told a group of 30 supporters in Victorian Village Wednesday, Nov. 1, that he is running as a response to the “Trump approach.”

52. Run Women Run -

In 2018, Shelby County voters will be presented with a long ballot as candidates compete for most county offices, many school board and suburban government positions and congressional and legislative seats.

53. Memphis College of Art Closing Doors -

Memphis College of Art, the 81-year-old Overton Park institution, will close by May of 2020 after years of financial struggles.

The college’s board described the pending process as an “orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA.”

54. Memphis College of Art Closing Its Doors -

The Memphis College of Art will close by May of 2020 in what the board of the 81-year old Overton Park institution is describing as an "orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA."

55. The Ties That Bind -

When Big River Crossing was about to open a year ago, Doug Carpenter was asked often where the Tennessee-Arkansas state line is over the Mississippi River.

His marketing firm DCA has overseen publicity for the crossing from concept through construction, so he has learned much about the history of the Harahan Bridge and the mighty river below it. But the stateline wasn't marked

56. American Athletic Conference Making Noise -

At the 2015 American Athletic Conference’s football media days, commissioner Mike Aresco made the case for the league as a “challenger brand” to the established Power Five of the SEC, Big Ten, ACC, Big 12 and PAC-12.

57. Democrat Bredesen Confirms Interest in Tennessee Senate Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Gov. Phil Bredesen, the last Democrat to win a statewide race in Tennessee, is considering a bid to succeed retiring Republican Bob Corker in the U.S. Senate.

58. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

59. Connecting The Pieces -

The Pinch District – a Downtown mini-neighborhood of only a few blocks sandwiched between the Memphis Cook Convention Center, Uptown, The Pyramid and the campus of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – has been a neglected donut hole of development for years, as investments have poured into other areas of Downtown around it.

60. State Politicians in No Hurry to Fix Health Insurance -

We don’t need no stinkin’ special session on Medicaid expansion.

That’s pretty much the Republican response to House Democratic Leader Craig Fitzhugh’s call for Gov. Bill Haslam to bring lawmakers back to Nashville after the Graham-Cassidy bill failed in Congress.

61. Profound Effect -

The life of a college basketball walk-on tends to be an uneven equation. All those hours of practice, day after day after day. In return, precious minutes on game nights. Well, every few weeks.

In the case of Jonathan Wilfong, a Memphis University School grad who walked on at Southern Methodist University, he played 11 minutes his entire freshman season and 22 as a sophomore. He got a little more run the next two years, including a 16-minute stint when SMU smashed the University of Memphis 103-62 as Wilfong scored four points.

62. After 40-13 Loss at UCF, Memphis Tigers Embrace a Put-up or Shut-up Mentality -

Had the University of Memphis football team gone into Orlando last Saturday and defeated UCF, the Tigers would have been 4-0 and likely moved into the Top 25. In fact UCF (3-0) did slide into the 25th spot in the Associated Press poll after giving Memphis a 40-13 beatdown.

63. Editorial: The 5,000-Seat Noncompete In a Changing Memphis -

The mantra has been clear since Graceland dramatically changed the plans for its proposed Whitehaven concert venue: Almost nobody in officialdom wants to touch the Memphis Grizzlies’ noncompete clause for FedExForum.

64. Full Steam Ahead: Funds of All Types Rose Again Last Quarter -

NEW YORK (AP) – Utopia is still in effect for fund investors. Funds of all types again powered higher in the third quarter, as stocks and bonds around the world rose in unison. Not only did investors get strong returns from their funds, they also got them with remarkably few headaches along the way.

65. Shafer: Graceland, FedExForum Should Compromise on Whitehaven Arena -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says there may be some kind of compromise still to be made when it comes to a performance venue at Graceland in Whitehaven.

66. Editorial: Beale Street and The Line for City Leaders -

When he was mayor, Willie Herenton had a saying that was his answer to speculation about whether he had crossed a legal line. Like the time when he bought an option on land fronting Union Avenue near AutoZone Park that was being considered as a possible site for a new convention center or hotel.

67. Widening The Path -

He asked to only be a small part of this story. But when you come up with an idea so good, so powerful, that it’s named as one of the top 20 ideas in the Forbes Change the World Competition, you are the story’s foundation.

68. Flee Joins Youth Villages To Lead Digital, Creative Strategy -

Travis Flee has been named a director of Youth Villages’ marketing and communications department, where he serves as director of digital strategy and creative services. Flee comes to Youth Villages with nearly 20 years of marketing experience, serving most recently as the director of digital brand marketing for Hilton Worldwide.

69. American Household Income Finally Topped 1999 Peak Last Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a stark reminder of the damage done by the Great Recession and of the modest recovery that followed, the median American household only last year finally earned more than it did in 1999.

70. Apple May Test the Bounds of iPhone Love With a $1,000 Model -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple is expected to sell its fanciest iPhone yet for $1,000, crossing into a new financial frontier that will test how much consumers are willing to pay for a device that's become an indispensable part of modern life.

71. Is Business Killing Our Creative Sprits? -

This week there was an article in Inc. magazine that was wildly popular on social media. Elon Musk named his favorite books and there was only one business book out of 10. The rest were science fiction, classics, great books. Many were surprised to learn that Musk finds inspiration in the arts and other fields and finds the canon of management literate uninspired, clichéd, even boring.

72. Pamela Urquieta Paves Innovative Pathways -

Pamela Urquieta has worked closely with about 100 student innovators, and led workshops for another 1,000, during her two-year tenure as program coordinator at LITE Memphis. LITE, which stands for Let’s Innovate Through Education, is a Memphis-based nonprofit that focuses on connecting students with internship and entrepreneurship opportunities.

73. Education Expert Cites Need for Preschool Access, Higher Teacher Pay -

Education research continues to show that early intervention sets the foundation for students’ future academic success. On Friday, Memphis’ Hutchison School hosted nationally acclaimed education researcher Dr. Amanda VanDerHeyden for a talk titled "How Critical Is a Strong Early Childhood Education.”

74. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

75. Commission Locks In $4.11 Tax Rate With 10-0 Vote -

Shelby County Commissioners closed the books Wednesday, July 19, on another budget season with approval on third and final reading of a county property tax rate of $4.11.

The fourth commission meeting in a week and a half ran about 20 minutes, ending with the 10-0 vote. Several commissioners were absent from the special meeting.

76. Made-In-USA Goods Can Be Pricey and Elusive. Just Ask Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's push this week to get Americans to buy goods "made in America" is harder than it might seem.

Even for Trump.

The gold-plated pens the president uses to sign laws are assembled in Rhode Island but lacquered and engraved in China. The Boeing jet he posed with to showcase America's industrial might is 30 percent foreign-made. The firetruck the administration parked at the White House this week to promote U.S.-made goods gets about 10 percent of its parts from abroad.

77. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

78. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

79. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

80. Hiring Surged Last Month in a Sign of US Economic Vitality -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hiring surged in June in a surprising show of U.S. economic vitality eight years into the recovery from the Great Recession. Pay gains remain weak, though, a stark reminder of one of the economy's key shortcomings.

81. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

82. McConnell Delays Health Care Vote; Trump Engaged -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Republican legislation overhauling the Obama health care law (all times EDT):

2:40 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he is delaying a vote on a Senate health care bill while GOP leadership works toward getting enough votes.

83. Opera Memphis Using Grant to Reach Mostly Absent Audience -

Innovation isn’t necessarily the first word that comes to mind to describe opera. That’s one reason Opera Memphis’ award of a $28,000 Innovation Grant – among the first to be handed out by OPERA America, funded by the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation – is interesting, to say the least.

84. GOP Leaders Add Penalty for Lapsed Coverage to Health Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders added a penalty for people who've let their insurance lapse Monday as party leaders prepared to begin pushing their health care measure through the Senate, despite a rebellion within GOP ranks.

85. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

86. Higher Prices Squeezing Both Renters and Would-Be Homeowners -

A diminished supply of available homes is swelling prices in large U.S. metro areas from New York to Miami to Los Angeles, squeezing out would-be buyers and pushing up rents as more people are forced to remain tenants.

87. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

88. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

89. Wal-Mart Works to Close Gap Between Itself and Amazon -

HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) – Even after an online spending spree, it may be hard for Wal-Mart to escape the Amazon in the room.

Wal-Mart's acquisition of Jet.com and brands that appeal to younger shoppers have given it an e-commerce boost as it works to close the gap between itself and the online leader. The world's largest retailer is betting on essentials like cereal and diapers, and has adjusted its shipping strategy to better compete with Amazon's Prime program.

90. States Struggle With Oversight of Online Charter Schools -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – As U.S. children flock to virtual charter schools, states are struggling to catch up and develop rules to make sure the students get a real education and schools get the right funding.

91. Hardy: EDGE’s MWBE Program Not Working -

The chairwoman of the Greater Memphis Chamber board said first indications are that minority business requirements in tax breaks awarded by the Economic Development Growth Engine – or EDGE – aren’t working.

92. Wal-Mart Sees Online Sales Surge, More Shoppers at Stores -

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Wal-Mart saw online sales surge as it changed up its shipping offers, and drew more shoppers to its stores as well in the most recent quarter even as retail overall is more competitive.

93. Burr is Building a Prison-to-Opportunity Pipeline -

The first time Mahal Burr walked into the Shelby County Jail, she was planning to meet with prison officials. Instead, to her surprise, she was shown into a room with 18 incarcerated kids.

“The sheriff’s office rep said, ‘This is Mahal and Evan from BRIDGES, and they’re going to do an activity with you around youth leadership,’” recalls Burr.

94. Yellen Says Women Still Face Challenges in Workplace -

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that women have made major strides in the workplace in the past 125 years, but she expressed concern about barriers that are still holding women back today.

95. Editorial: Optimism and Uncertainty Amid a ‘WWTD’ Mindset -

Since the presidential election in November, economists and investors have been judging the future by a standard dubbed WWTD: What would Trump do?

Much of the early speculation was based specifically on what Donald Trump said as a candidate. In the last four months, however, that standard has come to be judged increasingly on what is possible with the art of compromise.

96. The Optimal Retirement Age -

Ray’s Take Most of us say we want to do it – retire, that is. Given that, how do we find that perfect time to do it? Retirement at the optimal age isn’t something to be left to chance; it is something that needs to be a rational decision that takes into consideration a variety of variables. Financial variables include how much income you’ll be receiving from all sources and factoring in life expectancy and health issues. Emotional variables include considering that your spouse may have taken you for better or worse, but not for lunch.

97. GOP Happy to ‘Wait and See’ on Medicaid -

Republicans say ho, Democrats say go. In the wake of Trumpcare’s congressional crash, states such as Kansas and North Carolina are joining the majority of the nation in expanding Medicaid rolls.

98. Trump: Next Old Hickory or Carnival Barker -

For those who ignore the news – fake or otherwise – Donald Trump won the presidency last November.

While he didn’t capture a majority of the vote, he did win the electoral vote, causing many detractors to call for the elimination of this outdated voting method.

99. Greensward Compromise Text, Discussion Differ on Cost Split -

At the end of a surprising day at City Hall, Memphis City Council member Worth Morgan was anticipating what might happen in the three weeks until the next council session to the compromise for zoo parking in Overton Park.

100. Hopson, Caldwell Plan for SCS Long-Term -

Five years into historic changes in public education locally, the rapid pace of change is starting to give way to longer-term views and plans.

“This has been the first year since the merger that we actually are in a position to do some strategic investments in our schools,” Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”