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Editorial Results (free)

1. CEO Pay Climbs Again, Even As Their Stock Prices Don't -

NEW YORK (AP) – CEOs at the biggest companies got a 4.5 percent pay raise last year. That's almost double the typical American worker's, and a lot more than investors earned from owning their stocks – a big fat zero.

2. Lendermon Sports Medicine Explores Non-Surgical Healing Methods -

Laura Lendermon is amazed at how the body works. As a former college athlete and lifelong runner, she’s familiar with the aches and pains athletes experience. As a doctor, she’s knowledgeable on a much deeper level of the magic of the human body.

3. SCS Budget Plan Goes To School Board For Vote Monday -

Shelby County Schools board members meet Monday, May 16, to vote on a budget proposal that goes to the Shelby County Commission for funding.

The budget proposal up for a vote Monday has $27 million in red ink – the gap between revenues and expenses.

4. Editorial: The New Map of Memphis -

It’s time for a map of Memphis that includes more than highways and vehicular roads.

The Memphis area has reached enough critical mass with bike lanes, greenways, greenlines and similar features that it is time to put that network on a map and put the streets in the background.

5. Middle Class Shrinks in 9 of 10 US Cities as Incomes Fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In cities across America, the middle class is hollowing out.

A widening wealth gap is moving more households into either higher- or lower-income groups in major metro areas, with fewer remaining in the middle, according to a report released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center.

6. Shelby County Schools Board Eyes Wheel Tax to Bridge Budget Gap -

Shelby County Schools board members are looking at the county wheel tax to bridge some, but not all of the $27 million gap in their still tentative budget for the new fiscal year.

The specific solution they are looking at is the half of the $32 million in annual revenue from the wheel tax that Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has proposed go instead to capital projects across all seven public school systems in Shelby County. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

7. Hopson Whittles Schools Budget Gap To $27 Million -

After an estimate of as much as $86 million in red ink, Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson has presented the Shelby County Schools board with a budget that is $27 million in the red.

8. Last Word: Humdingers, Gangster Disciples Paper Work and Underground Day -

Sometimes you think you know what is going on and then something happens like Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies, grabbing a bite to eat Monday at Humdingers out east with former Grizz coach Lionel Hollins. Next thing you know there’s another possibility for the next Grizz coach – a return engagement that would be exceedingly rare.

9. Poll: Age, Income Factors in Staying With Single Employer -

CHICAGO (AP) – A new poll says more than 40 percent of America's baby boomers stayed with their employer for more than 20 years. But it's unlikely that their children or grandchildren will experience the same job tenure.

10. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

11. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

12. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

13. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

14. Missing Ingredient for Millennials: Down-Payment Savings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Short of savings and burdened by debt, America's millennials are struggling to afford their first homes in the face of sharply higher prices in many of the most desirable cities.

15. Insure Tennessee: In Like A Lion, Out With A Committee -

What started with a roar is ending with a whimper.

On the first day of the 2016 legislative session, dozens of Insure Tennessee supporters rallied, shouted and sang songs outside the House chamber.

16. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

17. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

18. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

19. Editorial: Time for Blight Talk to Become Action -

It’s time for the city’s battle against blight to move beyond the byzantine path of legal barriers, grant programs and other hurdles that have defined a slow-moving process so far.

The process is slow-moving even by the standards of local government, where time is often the last consideration.

20. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

21. Pastner Hopes ‘Right Memphis Team' Shows Up at AAC Tourney -

Remember El Paso in 2011? Remember how the Tigers were down to about six minutes in their season, playing in the Conference USA championship game on UTEP’s home floor, and trailing by 12 points?

22. Hopson: Help ASD Improve, At Least for Now -

The state-run Achievement School District has a problem in how it engages with the public, especially in areas where it is about to take over a school.

But Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson isn’t ready to say it is time for the state to pick a winner and a loser and fund either the ASD or Innovation Zone schools run by SCS.

23. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

24. Senators Say Court Vacancy Is Next President’s Job -

U.S. Sens. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker told Shelby County Republicans over the weekend that they favor the next president appointing the successor to the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

25. UT President Says School Thriving Despite Legal Troubles -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro pushed back against recent criticisms of the school, telling UT supporters that "the long arm of the government" is reaching further and further into university matters.

26. Last Word: TN(not)Ready, Hatiloo Expands and Tax Season Advice -

So what do you do when the test-makers fail the test?

You go back to the old test in the case of the Tennessee Education Department and the TNReady tests.
These were the new tests for the new statewide student achievement standards that replaced Common Core standards.
They can only be taken online.
But the system crashed Monday, which was the day that all of the preparation in the last year was geared toward. That included two tests locally of the on-line capacity and other technical standards necessary to make this go smoothly.
Here is a good account of what happened statewide and locally with a few other stops across the state to take in the scope of how big a failure this was and what failed.

27. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

28. Midtown Memphis Ready for Apartment Building Boom -

It’s been more than a decade since new apartments were built in Midtown, and that’s poised to change in a big way with a wave of new multifamily construction stretching from Binghampton to Crosstown.

29. New Mental Health Court Aims for Intervention -

At any given time, around 525 of the people jailed at 201 Poplar have a persistent mental illness. That’s means 25 percent of the jail’s capacity, and exponential care and liability, are directed to people who commit crimes as a byproduct of illness.

30. RDC Leader: Pyramid Isn’t Translating to Tourism Elsewhere -

Toward the back of its proposal for Mud Island River Park, executives with The Mansion Entertainment and Media LLC included a few caveats for those judging the five redevelopment applications.

31. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

32. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

33. SEC Still Overrated? Wrap Your Head Around SEC West, Says Bielema -

That an Arkansas team played its best football at season’s end, coming into Memphis and defeating Kansas State 45-23 in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, hardly qualifies as a surprise.

But the Southeastern Conference’s eight bowl wins – the most by a conference in a season – did seem to shake up some folks.

34. The Latest in Gadgets: Even Footballs Are Getting Smarter -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The latest developments surrounding the consumer-electronics show in Las Vegas known as CES (all times PST):

12:15 p.m.

Kids tossing around a football probably hope to throw a perfect spiral in a big game one day. Technology is about to help them out.

35. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

36. Opera Memphis General Director Reflects on Challenges, Storytelling -

Even though he’ll have reached the five-year mark as general director at Opera Memphis in January, Ned Canty says there are some days when it feels like he’s still just getting started.

In a recent conversation with The Daily News, he was by turns philosophical and as optimistic as ever about the nature of his work and about the task of making one of the oldest musical forms relevant in the city where rock ’n’ roll was born.

37. Legislature Not Playing Santa With Insure Tennessee -

It’s going to take a Christmas miracle for Insure Tennessee to make it into anyone’s stocking this year.

As the 2016 session of the General Assembly approaches in early January, Republicans are showing no support for the plan Gov. Bill Haslam offered for a special session in early 2015.

38. From Beginning to End, Tigers Not Good Enough to Handle Ole Miss -

Even John Calipari lost to Ole Miss at FedExForum. It was Dec. 11, 2004, and the Tigers were on the short end of a 65-53 score.

That season ended with the Tigers in the Final Four – of the NIT.

39. Sister Pact Aims to Raise Breast Cancer Awareness for Black Women -

Debra Melton did just about the best thing a young African-American woman in Memphis – or anywhere – can do in the fight against breast cancer.

40. So Far, Grizzlies Fail the Eye Test -

In this day and time we hear a lot about statistics and analytics vs. the eye test.

It’s a discussion we have throughout the season when debating the College Football Playoff rankings, and when arguing about the seeding that sets our brackets for March Madness.

41. Others might join Whisenhunt before it’s over -

The clock is ticking for Mike Mularkey, just as it is for most of the organization’s management team.

As the Tennessee Titans new interim coach, Mularkey has nine games now to prove himself worthy of being the team’s head coach beyond just the remainder of the team’s wrecked 2015 season.

42. US Housing Recovery Divided on Age, Race and Place -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the most profitable time to sell a house since the Great Recession started in late 2007. But first-time buyers are increasingly scarce.

More Americans are qualifying for mortgages, yet minorities still get disproportionately rejected.

43. Conference Aims to Spark Positive Change, One ZIP Code at a Time -

The world can be a big place, even within one city or a single ZIP code. But the world also can be made smaller when the right kinds of lines are crossed.

Steve Nash founded nonprofit Advance Memphis in 1999, beginning an ambitious project without end. His goal: bring economic sustainability to the people living in and around the Cleaborn/Foote Homes public housing developments in South Memphis’ 38126 ZIP code, the poorest urban ZIP in Tennessee.

44. LendMed Wants to Track Health Care Sharing -

Through conversations with health care industry professionals, Ryan Freiden saw a need he thought he could fill.

45. Students Find Options via Tennessee Promise -

Siegel High School graduate Davione Williamson wasn’t quite sure he was college material when he entered Motlow State Community College in Smyrna this August on a Tennessee Promise scholarship.

46. Posturing Against Supreme Court Is a Waste of Money -

Legislation rejecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling faces major constitutional questions and, if passed, could put a financial burden on Tennessee taxpayers.

When the high court declared gay and lesbian couples have the right to be married across the United States, overturning state laws to the contrary, Tennessee’s Republican legislators started brainstorming for methods to work around the decision or to defy it. The Republican Caucus still hasn’t announced the outcome.

47. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

48. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

49. Pastner, Always True to Self, Is Still Doing Things His Way -

Expectations. That’s the word that drives all sports narratives. Remember the record of Josh Pastner’s first University of Memphis team, the ragtag bunch that was left over after John Calipari exited for Kentucky?

50. Planning for Lifestyle Creep -

Ray’s take: Investopia defines lifestyle creep as a situation where people's lifestyle or standard of living improves as their discretionary income rises either through an increase in income or decrease in costs.

51. Roundhouse Revival 2 Takes Shape Outside Coliseum -

Four months after they drew thousands of people outside the Mid-South Coliseum, the group that organized the Roundhouse Revival, as it was called, is prepping for an even more ambitious show.

For the Oct. 4 event, the Coliseum Coalition has a six-hour lineup for two wrestling rings on the building’s west side. Posters for “round two” of the revival promise “roundball, rock and roll, rods, rhythm and blues, rasslin’, roller derby, rap and rally.”

52. Kosten Foundation Lifts Pancreatic Cancer Awareness -

When the Herb Kosten Foundation began in 2003, it was out of a desire to honor the man’s legacy.

Kosten passed away in June 2003, about a year after his diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A gifted athlete in his youth – the University of Alabama named him to its All-Century Team for his play on the baseball diamond – Kosten would be 79 today.

53. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

54. Tardy Tax Filers Risk Loss of Health Care Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sign-up season for President Barack Obama's health care law doesn't start for another couple of months, but the next few days are crucial for hundreds of thousands of customers at risk of losing financial aid when they renew coverage for 2016.

55. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

56. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

57. US Trade Gap Widens 7 Percent in June as Imports Jump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased in June as solid consumer spending pulled in more imports, while the strong dollar restrained exports.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday the trade gap jumped 7 percent to $43.8 billion in June, up from $40.9 billion in May. Imports increased 1.2 percent to $232.4 billion, while exports edged lower to $188.6 billion from $188.7 billion.

58. Wolf River Greenway Targets Raleigh Riverbend -

At the northernmost bend of the Wolf River in Shelby County, the Wolf River Conservancy has plans for a boat ramp onto the Wolf and a nature center that together promise to change the surrounding area of Raleigh where the river turns.

59. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

60. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

61. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

62. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

63. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

64. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

65. Projects, Issues Spill into Memphis' New Fiscal Year -

On Monday, June 29, two days before the new fiscal year, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was in the back of a house on Ridgewood Drive in Whitehaven.

Wharton was marking the start of a 90-day public works project spanning both fiscal years to build a retention pond for the Days Creek area. The $450,000 project includes removing trees and brush from the drainage area, in an effort to prevent flooding. In September 2014, some homes in the area were heavily damaged in a sudden and prolonged downpour.

66. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

67. HopeWorks Workshop Aims to Help Memphis Employers Reduce Entry-Level Job Turnover -

Different experiences, different vocabularies, and a different perspective on what it means to go to work each day. The difference, really, between a “job” and a “career.”

Making sense of these differences for the benefit of entry-level employees and their employers is the mission of the free workshop “Finding Talent. Growing Profits.”

68. The Invisible Safety Net -

This week, the Internet is buzzing about the struggles of Gap Inc. and Lucky Magazine. Gap announced it will lay off 250 workers and close 175 stores. From the outside, Lucky appears to be going out of business or reducing operations considerably. At Lucky, there are rumors claiming many people were laid off without any severance. I received an email from a reader about just this issue, and what workers can do to prepare.

69. AP Analysis: More 'Phony Numbers' in Reports as Stocks Rise -

NEW YORK (AP) – Those record profits that companies are reporting may not be all they're cracked up to be.

As the stock market climbs ever higher, professional investors are warning that companies are presenting misleading versions of their results that ignore a wide variety of normal costs of running a business to make it seem like they're doing better than they really are.

70. Why a Shrinking Economy Last Quarter Isn't Cause for Fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another first quarter of the year. Another reversal for the U.S. economy. Another expectation of a rebound to come.

On Friday, the government will likely estimate that the economy shrank in the January-March quarter for a second straight year, depressed by brutal weather, a reeling energy sector and an export slump caused by a higher-valued dollar.

71. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

72. Media Heads Rule Ranks of Best-Paid CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're not Hollywood stars, they're not TV personalities and they don't play in a rock band, but their pay packages are in the same league.

Six of the 10 highest-paid CEOs last year worked in the media industry, according to a study carried out by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press.

73. Daisy King Still Serving Tearoom Favorites -

Like a proper Southern hostess, Daisy King of Miss Daisy’s Tearoom had trouble turning on the “closed” sign. If guests wanted to snag a table after hours, she couldn’t help but oblige.

74. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

75. A Hazy View of US Economy Emerges Ahead of April Jobs Report -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government reports Friday on job growth during April, it could help clarify an increasingly nagging question:

Just how strong is the U.S. economy?

The picture has grown hazier of late. Employers added only 126,000 jobs in March, ending a yearlong streak of monthly gains above 200,000. For April, economists predict a rebound to 222,500 added jobs.

76. US Trade Deficit Jumps to 6-Year High of $51.4 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit in March swelled to the highest level in more than six years, propelled by a flood of imports that may have sapped the U.S. economy of any growth in the first quarter.

77. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

78. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

79. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

80. Walgreens Aims to Close About 200 US Stores -

Walgreens will shutter about 200 U.S. stores as part of an expanded cost reduction push, but the nation's largest drugstore chain has no plans to shrink in the wake of its combination with European health and beauty retailer Alliance Boots.

81. Legislators Not Moved by Hymns, Reason -

The words of “We Shall Overcome” and “Wade in the Water” resonate through the halls as Insure Tennessee supporters descend on the Legislative Plaza for a key vote on the plan to provide coverage to 280,000 working Tennesseans.

82. End of Robust Hiring Streak Raises Doubts About Job Market -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For months, the U.S. economy's strength has been flagging.

Manufacturing slowed. Fewer homes were built. Cheaper gas failed to ignite consumer spending. Yet month after month, employers kept on hiring vigorously.

83. Holding On -

The national outlook for traditional enclosed malls is bleak. No new enclosed mall has been built in the U.S. since 2006. More than 24 have closed since 2010, and an additional 60 are teetering on the edge, according to data from Green Street Advisors. Around 15 percent of malls nationwide are expected to close in the next decade.

84. Hard to ‘Mansplain’ Workplace Gender Issues -

“Jane felt like screaming at Dick after he manterrupted her in the staff meeting, bropropriated her idea and then spent the afternoon mansplaining it back to her.’’

That’s an actual sentence – if people are willing to use gender-specific language that’s gaining popularity to describe unwanted workplace behavior.

85. US Economic Growth in Q4 Revised Down to 2.2 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy slowed more sharply in the final three months of the year than initial estimates, reflecting weaker business stockpiling and a bigger trade deficit.

The Commerce Department said Friday that the economy as measured by the gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 2.2 percent in the October-December quarter, weaker than the 2.6 percent first estimated last month. It marked a major slowdown from the third quarter, which had been the strongest growth in 11 years.

86. Applications for US Jobless Aid Rise to 313,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More Americans sought unemployment aid last week, though the number of applications was still consistent with steady hiring.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications rose 31,000 to a seasonally adjusted 313,000, the most in six weeks. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, increased 11,500 to 294,500.

87. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

88. Wal-Mart Raises Could Help Lift Pay in Lower-Wage Industries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The modest raises that Wal-Mart has said it will give its lowest-paid workers provide a glimmer of hope for lower-wage workers in other companies and industries.

Other retailers and some fast food restaurants may now feel compelled to follow suit to retain their workers and attract others to fill openings, economists said.

89. Luttrell Scolds State Legislators -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says the political forces that defeated the Insure Tennessee proposal of Gov. Bill Haslam this month in Nashville weren’t in a fight with Washington and President Barack Obama

90. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

91. Wharton Calls for Outside Fairgrounds Review -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, Feb. 10, that the ambitious recasting of the Mid-South Fairgrounds – a project that is solely a City Hall creation at this point -- is going to get a second look from outside consultants.

92. Critical Link -

If you’re a wine lover along the East Coast – everywhere from Florida to the Mid-Atlantic and New England - chances are a Memphis-based third-party logistics provider played a significant role in getting your vino into your glass.

93. Using Creativity in Your Job Search -

It goes without saying. Applying online can be a long, difficult process. You’re often left wondering if anyone has read your resume, or if they even know you exist at all.

Earlier this week, I read a story of a creative job seeker who found work passing out resumes at a train station. This inspirational tale reminded me of my own job search years ago.

94. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

95. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

96. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

97. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

98. Trucking Industry in ‘Desperate’ Need of Drivers -

With demand on the upswing thanks to improving economic growth and lower fuel prices, a scarcity of truck drivers could put the brakes on the trucking industry and cripple a critical piece of global supply chains.

99. Taxing Question -

With gas prices in a historic plunge, the idea of hiking state and federal gas taxes and fees to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements is gaining traction.

Democratic and Republican leaders in both chambers of Congress in recent weeks have signaled a willingness to approve an increase in the federal gas tax to help fund improvements to the nation’s crumbling roads and bridges. Meanwhile, a new statewide coalition has launched to support an increase and reform in Tennessee’s transportation fees.

100. Federal Deficit in October-December Up Slightly at $176.7 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal deficit for the first three months of the budget year is up slightly from the same period a year ago, reflecting the absence of a special payment from mortgage company Freddie Mac that helped narrow the gap in 2014.