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Editorial Results (free)

1. Commission OKs Contract For Greenline Extension -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $163,400 contract Monday, Feb. 8, for the design of a part of the Shelby Farms Greenline extension.

2. Events -

Memphis Jewish Community Center will kick off the third annual Morris and Mollye Fogelman International Jewish Film Festival with a screening of “Dough” Tuesday, Feb. 16, at 7:30 p.m. at Malco Paradiso, 584 S. Mendenhall Road. Tickets are $7 for the community; $5 for MJCC and Indie Memphis members. Other screenings continue through Feb. 28. Visit jccmemphis.org/film for a schedule.

3. Editorial: A Call for More Conservancies -

When you look at the physical changes currently underway at Shelby Farms Park, it can be easy to miss the rise of conservancies as forces that are changing the landscape of our city.

4. Focus On Qualities When Hiring Leaders -

If you know what you’re searching for, then look where you’re most likely to find it. That sounds too simple to be good advice, but it is.

When something is that simple, instead of just doing it, sometimes we want to complicate it, make it more difficult, or just plain mess it up by looking everywhere. I see it all the time when it comes to executive searches, especially those “national” ones.

5. Commission OKs Contract For Greenline Extension Design -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $163,400 contract Monday, Feb. 8, for the design of a part of the Shelby Farms Greenline extension.

6. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

7. Roland Passes on 8th Congressional District Run, Sticks With Mayor in 2018 -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

8. Events -

Central Defense Staffing will host a recruitment event Wednesday, Feb. 10, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 6084 Apple Tree Drive, suite 10. CDS is seeking to fill positions for all shifts at various accounts in Memphis and North Mississippi. Applicants must bring two forms of ID and be able to pass drug screening and background checks. Visit centraldefensestaffing.com or call 901-473-6385, ext. 400.

9. Innovation: A Journey Of Discovery -

Innovation gets defined so many ways that it can be confusing. While there is a repeatable framework for creating new value, the iterative nature of front end discovery work can perplex those who believe that work should be linear.

10. Workforce Effort Leaders Talk About Skills Gap -

Before Olympus Corp. announced last month its plan to locate a service and distribution center in Bartlett, a bigger medical device manufacturing company was on the hook for the town.

11. Hattiloo Theatre to Expand With Development Center -

Hattiloo Theatre is expanding with a $750,000 addition 18 months after the black repertory theater company opened in Overton Square.

Hattiloo founder Ekundayo Bandele said Monday, Feb. 8, that the theater currently is designing and will break ground in March on the Hattiloo Theatre Development Center – a 3,200-square-foot two-story building. It will be built on what is now the northwest grassy slope of the parcel next to the theater.

12. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

13. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present 2014 Tony Award winner “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder” Tuesday, Feb. 9, through Feb. 14 at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

14. Memphis Gets Federal Recognition for Local Food Infrastructure -

Memphis has received national recognition as a site of entrepreneurship and innovation in the agriculture sector. Through the federal 2016 Local Foods, Local Places Initiative, Memphis will receive technical support to integrate local food into community development efforts, increase access to healthy goods and create economic opportunities for local farmers and food entrepreneurs.

15. Events -

University of Memphis Hooks Institute will host “Stokely: A Life” author Peniel E. Joseph for a lecture, lunch and book signing Thursday, Feb. 11, at 11 a.m. in the University Center River Room, 499 University St. Joseph’s biography of Stokely Carmichael won the 2014 Benjamin L. Hooks Institute National Book Award. Visit memphis.edu/benhooks for details.

16. Confident Serrano Playing for Future at UT -

Tennessee baseball coach Dave Serrano wasn’t setting the bar too high when he met with the media for his 2016 preseason press conference.

Serrano made that mistake before the 2015 season with talk of reaching an NCAA regional and perhaps Omaha, Nebraska, site of the College World Series.

17. EDGE Grants Development Loans to 4 Inner-City Businesses -

Memphis’ inner-city neighborhoods garnered $79,000 in business development loans at the Feb. 3 meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine’s finance committee.

18. Midtown Memphis Ready for Apartment Building Boom -

It’s been more than a decade since new apartments were built in Midtown, and that’s poised to change in a big way with a wave of new multifamily construction stretching from Binghampton to Crosstown.

19. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

20. Harwell: Durham Scandal Won't Affect Gubernatorial Decision -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — House Speaker Beth Harwell said Tuesday that the scandal surrounding a Republican lawmaker who has gone on hiatus amid sexual harassment allegations shouldn't damage her prospects as a serious gubernatorial candidate in Tennessee.

21. Boyd: Tennessee Shifting to ‘Product Development’ Site Selection -

Elected officials are going to say it if they talk long enough about economic development.

They will talk about how quality of life plays a role in business growth, specifically the move or expansion of corporations into a city or region they weren’t in previously.

22. Collaborative Aims to Enhance Memphis Medical District -

In 2016, the Memphis Medical Center will see $1.8 million in upgrades and enhancements aimed at creating a unified, livable district. That’s the annual budget for the newly established Medical District Collaborative, a nonprofit entity made up of the area’s stakeholders and executives.

23. Tenn. Approves Incentives for TV Series Production in Memphis -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $4.3 million to support production of a TV series that will be shot in Memphis this spring.

The series will be an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama that Viacom’s CMT network is adapting from the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet.”

24. First Tennessee Reaches $1.9M Settlement With HUD -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — First Tennessee Bank has reached a $1.9 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, resolving allegations that the bank discriminated against African-Americans and Hispanics.

25. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, Feb. 3, from noon to 1 p.m. at The University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Mike Fleming, president of the Memphis Railroad and Trolley Museum, will speak. Lunch fee is $20. RSVP to bethhaag@comcast.net.

26. Last Word: Post Caucus, Fincher's Exit, 1919 Handwriting and Your Rolodex -

That close (very little light between index finger and thumb) between Clinton and Sanders in Iowa Monday evening.
Both live to fight another day in another state—New Hampshire.
And because it is Iowa – they each get to declare victory as long as they don’t go into a lot of detail about the totals.
This is one of those cases where it is like horsehoes and hand grenades – close does count.

27. Events -

Rotary Club of Memphis will meet Tuesday, Feb. 2, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Randy Boyd, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, will speak. Visit memphisrotary.org.

28. Save-A-Lot to Anchor New Sam Cooper Shopping Center -

Southeast Corner of Sam Cooper
Boulevard and Tillman Street
Memphis, TN 38104

Tenant: Save-A-Lot

Size: 16,300 square feet

Tenant’s Agent: Frank Dyer, Loeb Realty Group

29. Memphis Gets Federal Recognition for Local Food Infrastructure -

Memphis has received national recognition as a site of entrepreneurship and innovation in the agriculture sector. Through the federal 2016 Local Foods, Local Places Initiative, Memphis will receive technical support to integrate local food into community development efforts, increase access to healthy goods and create economic opportunities for local farmers and food entrepreneurs.

30. The Week Ahead: Feb. 1, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? The good news is you officially made it through January. Here’s a look at what’s happening this week, from a frigid swim to a FedExForum double-header…

31. Events -

Greater Memphis IT Council will host a Tech Tuesday event on Tuesday, Feb. 2, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis, 1900 Union Ave. Mark Stephens of First Horizon Corp. will present “Dashboards & Data Analytics.” Register at memphisitcouncil.com.

32. Nashville Developer Submits Plans for Downtown Memphis Housing -

Two plans recently filed with the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will turn empty lots into housing for disadvantaged Memphians.

Nashville developer Elmington Capital Group submitted plans for gated multifamily housing in Downtown's South End.

33. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

34. Save-A-Lot to Anchor Binghampton Retail Center -

Save-A-Lot Food Stores is the anchor tenant for the Binghampton Grocery Center, a new shopping complex at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street developed by the Binghampton Development Corp.

35. Events -

Ballet Memphis and The Booksellers at Laurelwood will host An Evening with Ballet Memphis: “Places” on Thursday, Feb. 4, at 7 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Enjoy a night of drinks, discussion and dance with the minds behind Ballet Memphis’ latest show. Visit thebooksellersatlaurelwood.com.

36. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

37. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

38. Highland Heights CDC Rehabs Five More Homes -

On his desk at Treadwell Middle School, Jared Myers keeps a colorful map marked by green, red and blue shapes.

39. Doug Carpenter & Associates Rebrands as DCA -

When Doug Carpenter started his eponymous advertising agency five years ago, what the name should be wasn’t too hard to figure out. It was an agency of one with the need to bank on Carpenter’s reputation in the community. So Doug Carpenter & Associates LLC was born.

40. Complex Path to Higher-Ed Reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

41. Let’s Hear It for Christine and Patrick! -

This column should be running in late January. Ten years ago, Susan and I flew out to Park City, Utah, for our first (and probably only) Sundance Film Festival. Where “Wordplay,” the award-winning documentary about the crossword puzzle industry, had its world premiere on Jan. 21, 2006.

42. Events -

Tennessee Small Business Development Center will present a workshop titled “Free Tools That Can Help You Grow” Thursday, Jan. 28, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. Learn about the free services and discounts available for TSBDC clients. Cost is free; registration required. Visit tsbdc.org/training for details.

43. County Commission Forms OPEB Committee -

Shelby County Commissioners have created an ad hoc committee to talk over the health insurance benefits liability of the former Memphis City Schools system and who is responsible for it.

Commission chairman Terry Roland announced Monday, Jan. 25, he had formed the committee, which includes leaders of the Shelby County Schools system and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration.

44. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

45. Save-A-Lot to Anchor Binghampton Retail Center -

Save-A-Lot Food Stores is the anchor tenant for the Binghampton Grocery Center, a new shopping complex at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street developed by the Binghampton Development Corp.

46. Events -

The Mutual Fund Store will host a free event titled “The 5 Biggest Risks to Your Retirement” Tuesday, Jan. 26, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Germantown Great Hall, 1900 S. Germantown Road. Call 901-751-7222 or visit mutualfundstore.com to reserve a seat.

47. Events -

32nd annual International Blues Challenge is Tuesday, Jan. 26, through Saturday, Jan. 30, with most events being held at clubs along Beale Street. More than 250 bands are expected for this annual international competition and showcase, which also features nightly jams, workshops and more. Visit blues.org/international-blues-challenge for details and a daily schedule.

48. The Week Ahead: Jan. 25, 2016 -

We hope everyone survived Snow Terror ‘16 and is looking forward to a fun, productive week ahead that’s free of milk and bread runs. (Saturday’s high temp is 60 degrees – woohoo!) Here’s your weekly rundown of events and happenings worth paying attention to…

49. Le Bonheur CEO Talks Big Development Projects on Tap -

It’s something of an understatement to say that Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital has big plans for 2016 and beyond.

Walking through several of the big-budget development projects on tap for the hospital over the short and long term, Le Bonheur president and CEO Meri Armour describes this as a consequential moment for the 2,300-employee health care organization. Expansions of service, facilities, treatment and more are all on the way for a hospital built around the fact that inside the 100 mile-radius around Memphis, according to Armour, there are about 1.6 million children.

50. Blight Authority of Memphis Convenes to Tackle Problem Properties -

“This is historic,” attorney Steve Barlow said at the inaugural meeting of the Blight Authority of Memphis, held Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Downtown Memphis Commission’s office.

51. Sledge Joins Paragon Private Banking Team -

Julia Sledge has joined Paragon Bank as portfolio manager in private banking. Sledge has more than 30 years of experience in the banking industry, holding leadership positions at both Union Planters Bank and Cadence Bank. In her new role, she’ll provide service and support to Paragon’s private banking team.

52. Clean Memphis, Chamber Work to Spruce Up City -

Janet Boscarino’s career in business development had her traveling frequently. And while she always enjoyed coming home, one thing stood out that she hated: the amount of litter she saw across Memphis, especially compared to some of the cities she visited for business.

53. Last Word: No Bern, Say No More and The Daily Mail Comes For A Visit -

Democratic presidential contender and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders didn’t make it the city after all following the weekend’s debate among the Democratic presidential contenders.

54. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host King Day 2016 on Monday, Jan. 18, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the museum, 450 Mulberry St. This year’s theme is “Speaking Truth to Power,” and activities will include family entertainment, youth-centered learning, Mid-South Food Bank and Lifeblood drives, and more. Admission is $5 for all ages, $3 with food bank donation, or free with blood donation. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

55. The Week Ahead: Jan. 18, 2016 -

How was your weekend Memphis? Here are some local events to keep on your radar this week, from a full slate of MLK activities to a David Bowie tribute to a Marco Rubio fundraiser…

56. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

57. Annual Homeless Survey Planned for Jan. 27 -

Community Alliance for the Homeless is set to lead the annual Point-in-Time Count for Memphis and Shelby County on Jan. 27, starting at 4 a.m.

This annual count of unsheltered homeless persons on a single January night is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and it’s a way the alliance measures efforts to reduce homelessness. The Salvation Army at 696 Jackson Ave. will serve as the command center for this year’s event.

58. Ioby Secures $33K Grant From Livable Memphis -

The Memphis chapter of ioby, a national crowd-resourcing platform, has received a $33,000 grant through Livable Memphis to support neighborhood leaders and grassroots groups in activating public parks and green spaces.

59. First Tennessee Invests in Tri-State Bank -

As of Dec. 31, Tri-State Bank of Memphis has secured almost $5 million in new capital, an investment fueled in part by an “unprecedented transaction” between it and First Tennessee Bank.

60. Events -

SCORE Memphis will host a business essentials workshop titled “Are You Ready to Start Your Own Business?” Tuesday, Jan. 19, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Germantown Community Library, 1925 Exeter Road. Cost is free; pre-registration required. Visit scorememphis.org.

61. First Building Permit Pulled For Crosstown Concourse Build-Out -

495 N. Watkins St.
Memphis, TN 38104

Permit Amount: $15.6 million

Application Date: January 2016

62. Outside the Box -

Southwest Tennessee Community College is opening its new Whitehaven Center on Tuesday, Jan. 19. The building, which accommodates nearly 2,000 students at 1234 Finley Road off Elvis Presley Boulevard, is seeing new life following its run as a Kroger store that closed in 2011.

63. Church Health Center Begins Crosstown Construction -

The Church Health Center is the first Crosstown Concourse founding partner to begin its build-out.

On behalf of the Church Health Center, contractor Grinder, Taber & Grinder has applied for a $15.6 million building permit for new construction in the mixed-used development at 495 N. Watkins St.

64. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host King Day 2016 on Monday, Jan. 18, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the museum, 450 Mulberry St. Activities will include family entertainment, youth-centered learning, Mid-South Food Bank and Lifeblood drives, and more. Admission is $5 for all ages, $3 with food bank donation, or free with blood donation. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

65. Tennessee Startups Chasing Greater Opportunities -

When it comes to launching startup companies, Tennessee is best described as “early stage.”

The less than $200 million in venture capital invested in Tennessee businesses in 2014 is a rounding error compared to the $30 billion invested in California. And when the final tally for 2015 comes out later this month, the disparity won’t be much smaller.

66. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

67. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

68. 4 Applicants Up for Beale Street Gig -

A Fortune 500 corporation, the Memphis-based company behind the Delta Fair, a Memphis real estate management firm with office experience, and a newly formed group of Memphians with experience in real estate, entertainment and restaurants as well as commercial development and financing. Those are the four companies that have applied to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

69. Annual Homeless Survey Planned for Jan. 27 -

Community Alliance for the Homeless is set to lead the annual Point-in-Time Count for Memphis and Shelby County on Jan. 27, starting at 4 a.m.

This annual count of unsheltered homeless persons on a single January night is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and it’s a way the alliance measures efforts to reduce homelessness. The Salvation Army at 696 Jackson Ave. will serve as the command center for this year’s event.

70. Ioby Secures $33K Grant From Livable Memphis -

The Memphis chapter of ioby, a national crowd-resourcing platform, has received a $33,000 grant through Livable Memphis to support neighborhood leaders and grassroots groups in activating public parks and green spaces.

71. Chancellor Steps Aside, Avoids Fight -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education didn’t take long to shake up the hierarchy.

It led to the early retirement of Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan, who blasted the proposal in a letter to the governor, before legislation even hit the printing press. The longtime state official said he would rather step down than support a plan he feels will be detrimental to colleges and universities.

72. Tourism Goes Beyond Graceland, Beale Street -

This week, hundreds of investors, community builders and federal leaders gathered at the third annual Rural Opportunity Investment Conference, which ended with a discussion of spurring economic development through tourism.

73. Crime-Ridden, Neglected Apartments Come Under Fire -

Several Memphis apartment complexes with long records of neglect and crime issues are the targets of a renewed political and bureaucratic push to improve conditions.

The efforts are a new front in the recent city movement to tackle Memphis’ blight problem. And it’s a front that invites skepticism.

74. Church Health Center Begins Crosstown Construction -

The Church Health Center is the first Crosstown Concourse founding partner to begin its build-out.

On behalf of the Church Health Center, contractor Grinder, Taber & Grinder has applied for a $15.6 million building permit for new construction in the mixed-used development at 495 N. Watkins St.

75. Hughes Promoted at Harris Shelton -

Brett Hughes has been promoted to managing member at Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC law firm. In his new role, Hughes will provide managerial support to the firm’s three offices. His primary responsibility will be to manage the firm’s administration and committees, particularly on issues that impact client service, as well as the morale, compensation, growth and development of the firm.

76. Shelby County Mortgage Activity Solid in 2015 -

The Shelby County mortgage market had a strong 2015, and lenders expect the momentum to continue for the foreseeable future.

Among loans made at the time of purchase, banks and mortgage lenders made 9,368 mortgages in Shelby County during 2015, up 11 percent from the 8,470 mortgages during 2014, according to the latest data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

77. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present Roald Dahl’s “Matilda” Tuesday, Jan. 12, through Jan. 17 at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

78. Collierville Assisted Living Facility Sells for $17 Million -

601 Wolf River Blvd.
Collierville, TN 38017

Sale Amount: $17 million

Sale Date: Dec. 29, 2015

79. Muller: Memphis On Strong Footing, With Bright Future -

A key Greater Memphis Chamber official is preparing to retire this week after 15 years, at a time when he thinks the city of Memphis is on strong footing, and with a bright future that abounds with potential.

80. New UCI Board Chair Pledges More Grants, Transparency -

Jill Crocker, new board chairman of The Urban Child Institute, says the organization is essentially starting with a clean slate.

81. University of Memphis Institutes Team Up for Biologistics Partnership -

Two research institutes at the University of Memphis – the FedEx Institute of Technology and the Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute – have teamed up to launch a biologistics partnership.

The FedEx institute is referring to partnerships like the new one around biologistics as “clusters,” research areas around which the institute wants to collect projects, research efforts and programming. It’s part of a push by the institute to try and put itself at the center of innovation in the city, according to Cody Behles, the institute’s manager of innovation and research support.

82. After Criticism, Urban Child Institute Ups its Grant Game -

The Urban Child Institute has approved a 5 percent annual granting strategy that will equate to giving about $8 million to local organizations to support children’s needs.

The announcement comes out of The Urban Child Institute’s Thursday, Jan. 7, board meeting, at which Jill Crocker, a Bank of America executive, was elected chairwoman.

83. Shelby County Tax Property Sale Features Two Firsts -

When the Shelby County Trustee’s office puts a set of tax delinquent properties up for auction Jan. 19-21, it will be a first in several ways.

The auction will be the first such sale in Tennessee online and it will be the first tax sale with shorter redemption periods for some of the property, depending on how far behind the original owner is on their property taxes.

84. Graffiti Green Light -

Brandon Marshall is a full-time artist, making a living painting commissioned murals for clients. He’s also well-versed in the graffiti world of Memphis, a small but determined group of artists who tag properties around the city.

85. Assessment of Broadband Access and Usage in Tennessee Begins -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A state official is announcing the launch of an assessment of broadband access and usage in Tennessee.

Department of Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd said the assessment is an impartial survey of broadband access, adoption and usage in Tennessee's rural, suburban and urban communities. The department will then offer strategies to drive broadband usage.

86. Council OKs Strickland's Directors, He Defends Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Mayor Jim Strickland’s slate of 12 division chiefs and directors Tuesday, Jan. 5, at the first council meeting of 2016. And Strickland defended the pay raises for some of those positions compared to the salaries those appointed positions paid in the Wharton administration.

87. Mall of Memphis Property Bought by Trucking Company -

113-Acre Former
Mall of Memphis Site
Sale Amount: $3.9 million

Sale Date: Dec. 29, 2015
Buyer: TAG Real Estate Holdings LLC
Seller: Memphis Industrial Properties LLC (Johnson Development Associates Inc.)
Loan Amount: $23 million
Loan Date: Dec. 29, 2015
Lender: Mercedes-Benz Financial Services USA LLC
Details: The 113-acre former Mall of Memphis property has a new owner. TAG Real Estate Holdings, an affiliate of Memphis-based TAG Truck Enterprises LLC, paid $3.9 million, or $34,513 an acre, to buy the property from Johnson Development Associates Inc., acting as Memphis Industrial Properties LLC.

88. Tri-State Bank Sells Downtown Memphis Headquarters -

A prime piece of Downtown real estate linking Beale Street and the South Main district has been sold.

Tri-State Bank of Memphis is selling its headquarters at 180 S. Main St., on the northeast corner of Main and Beale Street, to Belz Investco GP in a $3 million deal announced New Year’s Eve.

89. McKinney Appointed as Shelby County Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

90. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

91. Under Pressure -

The Urban Child Institute’s research produces data. That data provides guidance for making decisions about how to best help Memphis children age 3 and younger. And The Urban Child Institute’s assets, around $150 million in 2013, offer a means to that end.

92. McKinney Appointed as New County Government Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

93. Family Safety Center Awarded Grant for Shelter Services -

For women escaping domestic violence, overcrowded shelters only aggravate a fragile transition. To ensure safety, the Family Safety Center of Memphis and Shelby County is adding temporary hotel and apartment housing to its list of domestic violence services.

94. Corefire App Could Bring Real Change to Memphis -

The numbers are startling: Only 43 percent of African-American males in Memphis graduate from high school, and the city’s poverty rate for families with children younger than 18 is 44.3 percent, double the national average.

95. Sullivan Leaves MHA for Chattanooga Post -

Maura Black Sullivan is leaving as interim director of the Memphis Housing Authority at the end of December to become the chief operating officer of Chattanooga city government.

Chattanooga mayor Andy Berke announced her appointment Thursday, Dec. 17.

96. Germantown Names Federal Transportation Projects -

Three weeks after Congressional leaders in Washington agreed on a five-year Surface Transportation Program, the city of Germantown is among local governments moving quickly to identify how they intend to use the coming infusion of federal funding.

97. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

98. Shipping Containers to Become Shelters for LGBTQ Youth -

Memphis’ homeless shelters aren’t safe for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth, says Memphis Gay and Lesbian Community Center executive director Will Batts. He’s seen too many kids kicked out of their homes only to be assaulted in shelters or turn to drastic measures.

99. Memphis Business Community Shows Giving is 365 Days a Year -

Parties, family gatherings, checking off lists, decorations – it’s no wonder the holidays add a whole extra layer of stress during December.

But in Memphis, where there are so many needs that are only magnified during the holidays, it’s a time that the business community steps out to help the city’s vast nonprofit community provide a little extra Christmas spirit.

100. Google to Locate Data Center in Middle Tennessee -

Google is buying the former Hemlock Semiconductor site in Clarksville and plans to invest $600 million to convert it into its eighth U.S. data center, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Tuesday, Dec. 22.