» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Community Development' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:9
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:34
Middle Tennessee:454
East Tennessee:5
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Exchange Club Family Center Names Executive Director -

The Exchange Club Family Center, an area nonprofit agency dedicated to ending the cycle of child abuse and domestic violence, has named Jennifer Balink as its new executive director.

Barbara King, the executive director of the Center for the past 23 years, announced her retirement at a board meeting last June.

2. South Front Hits its Stride as Standalone Corridor -

South Front Street, which stretches Downtown from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Central Station, is emerging as its own standalone residential and commercial corridor. What was once a heavy industrial area and warehousing district for South Main’s department stores is undergoing a transformation into Downtown’s most residentially dense neighborhood.

3. Density is Destiny for Memphis’ Creative Economy -

The lack of density in creative workers has worked against the cultivation of a creative economy in Memphis. Density turns out to play an outsized role in the cultivation of collective knowledge and access to the resources necessary to build creative solutions to power the modern-day economy.

4. EdR Reports Q1 Net Income of $16.7M -

Memphis-based EdR earned $16.7 million in net income, or 26 cents per diluted share, in the first quarter, the company announced Monday, May 2. That compares with net income of $6.9 million, or 14 cents per diluted share, during first quarter 2015.

5. Federal Regulators Close Memphis-Based Bank -

Trust Co. Bank of Memphis has failed, with state and federal regulators announcing Friday, April 29, they had closed all four branches of the West Tennessee financial institution and arranged a purchase agreement to protect depositors.

6. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

7. Women's Foundation Honors 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

The Women’s Foundation hosted its annual Legends Awards Tribute Luncheon on April 29 to honor women in Memphis leadership. Honey Scheidt received the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, received the Catalyst Award, and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, was recognized with the Innovation Award.

8. Haslam in Memphis Friday on Way to Asia -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam will be in Memphis Friday, April 29, as Circuit Court Judge Valerie Smith takes the ceremonial oath of office.

9. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

10. Memphis Jewish Home's Bobby Meadows Wins National Honor -

Bobby G. Meadows III, executive director of Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab, has been awarded the 2016 Young Executive Award by the Association of Jewish Aging Services. The award honors an executive younger than 45 who demonstrates significant potential in health care management by virtue of his or her cumulative achievements or innovative results in management or administration.
As executive director of MJHR, Meadows is responsible for day-to-day operations of the only glatt (strict) kosher, rehab long-term care facility in Tennessee and surrounding states. Operations include the oversight of more than 300 staff members, 160 patients, and a kosher deli.

11. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

12. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

13. Archimania Leads 2016 Architecture Awards -

Memphis architecture firm archimania was the biggest winner Saturday night at the 2016 AIA Memphis Design Awards, an annual bash that honors the city’s top architecture firms.

Also singled out for honors by the four members of the design awards jury - which this year was comprised of nationally recognized, award-winning architects from Raleigh, N.C. - were the firms designshop, Haizlip Studio and Self+Tucker Architects as part of a joint venture with archimania. There were 11 winners in all, and the honors were presented during the event at Clark Tower’s Tower Center by the awards’ jury chair Erin Sterling Lewis of Raleigh’s in situ studio.

14. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

15. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

16. Council Members Express Impatience with Minority Contracting Complexity -

Some Memphis City Council members want to challenge City Hall’s existing minority business system as its minority business effort is being streamlined.

The possible challenge includes questioning the idea of percentage goals in contracting based on a complex formula that includes multipliers.

17. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

18. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

19. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

20. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

21. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

22. EDGE Considering Fast-Track Incentive Program, Diversity Spend Changes -

The Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has started work on a new tax incentive program that would help Memphis compete with North Mississippi for industrial projects.

At its April 20 meeting, EDGE board chairman Al Bright appointed a committee to evaluate a proposed Fast Track PILOT and hammer out its policies and procedures.

23. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

24. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

25. Radical Team Dynamics for The Highly Productive -

Investing in people means the conventional and expected things. You can send high performers to leadership development, provide access and time for seminars and online learning. You can reward with money, praise and attention. Yet, three aspects of people investment tend to get overlooked, leaving the most driven and brightest unmotivated and rudderless, looking for the door.

26. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

27. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

28. Shadyac Takes Over Soulsville Project With ‘Different Type of Model’ -

Tom Shadyac wants to pump $10 million into the heart of Soulsville. That’s the initial ask for his community center concept, One Family Memphis.

In September, the Hollywood filmmaker-turned-University of Memphis professor purchased for $1.9 million the bankrupt New Towne Center, a 77,000-square-foot community anchor that a local community development corporation tried to develop during the economic downturn.

29. Beale Landing Architecture Wins International Honors -

Beale Street Landing has been named the best marina or port in the world for 2016 in the fourth annual Architizer A+Awards.

A jury of designers, urban planners and architects selected the landing, designed by RTN Architects of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as the most architecturally significant marina or port for 2016.

30. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

31. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

32. Fayette County Chosen for Property Evaluation Program -

Fayette County is getting help from state leaders to evaluate properties that could attract new business.

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development announced Fayette is one of eight counties chosen to participate in the Select Tennessee Property Evaluation Program (PEP) Spring Round. The other counties selected are Humphreys, Lawrence, Maury, Scott, Unicoi, Van Buren and White.

33. Beale Landing Architecture Wins International Honors -

Beale Street Landing has been named the best marina or port in the world for 2016 in the fourth annual Architizer A+Awards.

A jury of designers, urban planners and architects selected the landing, designed by RTN Architects of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as the most architecturally significant marina or port for 2016.

34. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

35. FedEx Unveils Latest Global Citizenship Report -

FedEx Corp. has been busy with more than worldwide package delivery and the operation of its sprawling logistics empire over the past year.

36. Former Tiger Charles Harris Joins U of M Scholarship Fund -

Former University of Memphis football player Charles Harris has returned to his alma mater as an athletic development coordinator for the Tiger Scholarship Fund.

37. Omni Charter School Buys Permanent Home -

3385 Austin Peay Highway
Memphis, TN 38128

Sale Amount: $1.3 million

Sale Date: Feb. 26, 2016

38. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

39. Events -

Memphis Child Advocacy Center will host its annual children’s memorial flag-raising on Wednesday, April 13, at noon on Civic Center Plaza outside Memphis City Hall, 125 N. Main St. The ceremony remembers Shelby County kids who have died as a result of abuse or neglect. Visit memphiscac.org.

40. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

41. Events -

ArtsMemphis will hold a free workshop for organizations interested in Arts Build Communities grants on Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The grants are open to nonprofits and government entities seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community. Visit tn.gov for details.

42. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

43. First Tennessee Launches $50M Community Fund -

First Tennessee has launched a $50 million Community Development Fund that the bank says will award up to $3 million annually in grants to community and nonprofit organizations serving low- to moderate-income people and neighborhoods.

44. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

45. Medical District Stakeholders: Neighborhood Full of Potential -

Some 2,500 new employees start jobs each year at employers in the Memphis Medical District, and about 1,300 new students each year start hitting the books at educational institutions there, too.

That’s according to Medical District Collaborative president Tommy Pacello, who says the 2.5-square-mile area between Midtown and Downtown that’s home to eight anchor institutions is full of untapped potential. So much so that his organization, which launched earlier this year, is leading a revitalization of the district that leans heavily on anchors like Regional One Health and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare to help in a buy local, live local and hire local push for the neighborhood.

46. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

47. United Housing Gets $1.1M Boost From Banks -

United Housing Inc. has gotten a boost from area financial institutions in recent days to the tune of $1.1 million.

48. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

49. First Tennessee Launches $50M Community Development Fund -

First Tennessee has launched a $50 million Community Development Fund that the bank says will award up to $3 million annually in grants to community and nonprofit organizations serving low- to moderate-income people and neighborhoods.

50. Spence Wilson To Keynote Dunavant Awards May 11 -

Spence Wilson, chairman of the board of Kemmons Wilson Companies, is the keynote speaker for the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be held May 11 at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis.

51. Southland Mall Sells In Foreclosure -

1215 E. Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2016
Buyer: 1215 East Shelby Drive Holdings LLC
Seller: Southland Mall Shopping Center LLC
Details: Southland Mall, Memphis’ first enclosed mall when it opened 50 years ago, has sold for $4.3 million in foreclosure.

52. Events -

Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be at Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Union Avenue campus on Wednesday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 737 Union Ave. Career Coach staff will help people create resumes and register with jobs4tn.gov, where more than 90,000 jobs are available.

53. Gaskins Leads Engineering Office -

Wain Gaskins has joined consulting engineering firm Cannon & Cannon Inc. as manager of the company’s new Memphis office as well as director of West Tennessee operations and business development. 

54. Fashion Week Organizers Launching Business Incubator -

The greater aim of Memphis Fashion Week is stitching together infrastructure to support a local fashion industry. But this week, the glamour is on full display.

This year’s Memphis Fashion Week, which runs through Saturday, April 9, kicked off Monday at an after-hours event in Chickasaw Oaks shopping center. Models, designers and supporters sipped cocktails and browsed the handcrafted outfits that will be part of this weekend’s runway shows.

55. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

56. Events -

Start Co. will offer small-business mentoring sessions Tuesday, April 5, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. This free program offers one-on-one counseling about starting or managing a small business. Visit memphislibrary.org for details.

57. Events -

Germantown Community Library will host Night of the Doctor on Monday, April 4, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at GCL, 1925 Exeter Road. Join fellow Whovians for an evening of Doctor Who-themed events and crafts for children, teens and adults. Dress up and arrive at 6:15 to participate in the costume contest. Pre-registration not required. Call 757-7323 for details.

58. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

59. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

60. Malco Pulls $6.5M Permit For Downtown Theater -

Downtown’s new movie theater is moving forward. Malco Theatres recently filed a $6.5 million building permit application for a seven-screen movie theater as part of the greater Central Station development spearheaded by Henry Turley Co. and Community Capital.

61. St. Jude, Methodist Make ‘Best Places to Work’ List -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare have been named to Becker's Hospital Review 2016 list of its 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare in the U.S.

The organizations featured on the list were chosen by the Becker's Hospital Review editorial team based on workforce-centric awards received; benefits offerings; wellness initiatives; and efforts to improve professional development, diversity and inclusion, work-life balance and a sense of community and unity among employees.

62. Cannon & Cannon Opens Local Engineering Office -

Cannon & Cannon Inc., a Knoxville-based, women-owned consulting engineering firm, has established a Memphis office.

CCI provides services in civil engineering specializing in transportation and traffic design, electrical engineering design, water, wastewater and gas design. Also, CCI offers services in community, commercial and industrial development, as well as municipal revenue enhancement. CCI has been providing engineering services for 20 years and counts the Tennessee Department of Transportation and the Knoxville Utility Board among its largest clients. CCI also has offices in Brentwood, Tenn., and Bowling Green, Ky.

63. Events -

Rhodes College will host the 2016 Brubeck Festival, highlighting the life and work of jazz pianist Dave Brubeck, Friday through Sunday, April 8-10. Highlights include Friday and Sunday performances of jazz musical “The Real Ambassadors” and a Saturday concert with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra, MasterSingers Chorale and three of Brubeck’s sons. Visit rhodes.edu/events/music for details.

64. Editorial: The Ponderosa Box -

Maybe we’ve got this all wrong. Some people have suggested bringing recalcitrant, Memphis-hating legislators from other parts of the state here to our city to show them what’s right about this place. Instead, maybe we should go to them.

65. Fertile Ground -

Residents of the Memphis Medical District have begun filing in to the Premier Palace ballroom on Madison Avenue, along with area stakeholders, planners and other attendees who have business interests in the area.

66. MEMFix East Targets Concrete Jungle Around i-Bank, Clark Towers -

East Memphis’ most prominent office towers, Clark Tower and the iBank Tower, are anchors in a strategy to make the Poplar Avenue-facing corner more walkable and memorable.

Late last year, In-Rel Properties purchased the iBank Tower, bringing both towers under the same ownership for the first time. The Florida-based real estate group plans to unite the 16-acre office campus with increased connections to the surrounding East Memphis restaurants and retail.

67. Malco Pulls $6.5M Permit For Downtown Theater -

Downtown’s new movie theater is moving forward. Malco Theaters recently filed a $6.5 million building permit application for a seven-screen movie theater as part of the greater Central Station development spearheaded by Henry Turley Co. and Community Capital. The permit also lists a rooftop seating area and a new box office and bar in the existing Power House building as part of the project.

68. $6.5 Million Permit Filed for Malco Theater Downtown -

Central Station’s planned seven-screen movie theater is moving forward.

Malco Theaters recently filed a $6.5 million building permit application for the cinema as part of the greater Central Station development spearheaded by Henry Turley Co. and Community Capital.

69. Last Word: Encore In D, A Bus Every 10 Minutes and Marc Cohn in Memphis -

Encore in Nashville.
The state Senate’s state and local government committee meets again Wednesday to vote on the de-annexation bill it completed amending Tuesday.

This begins at 2:30 p.m. and we will be providing live Tweets of the action @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols. So join us.
Because there was so much debate and parliamentary swordplay Tuesday, the Wednesday session will probably be pretty matter of fact by comparison.
Here’s our account of how it went down with the committee upping the percentage of voters signatures it takes to get a deannexation call on the ballot. And those who do vote to deannex can add payments for benefits liability to what they would also pay as their share of capital debt. There is also reaction from Greater Memphis Chamber president Phil Trenary.
Trenary had some choice words for Chattanooga state Senator Todd Gardenhire who called out Memphis specifically for what he viewed as trying to make the deannexed pay twice for benefits of city workers.
The looming question is what will the reaction to this be in the House which passed a very different version of this.
The proponents of the bill in the House and Senate have fundamentally different views that appear to be the kind of differences that would take some time to reconcile.

70. GOP Lawmaker Questions Haslam's Secret $30M Development Deal -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state senator on Tuesday questioned fellow Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to earmark $30 million for an undisclosed economic development project in Tennessee.

71. St. Jude, Methodist Make ‘Best Places to Work’ List -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare have been named to Becker's Hospital Review 2016 list of its 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare in the U.S.

The organizations featured on the list were chosen by the Becker's Hospital Review editorial team based on workforce-centric awards received; benefits offerings; wellness initiatives; and efforts to improve professional development, diversity and inclusion, work-life balance and a sense of community and unity among employees.

72. SweetBio Reaches $1 Million in Secondary Funding -

The dust has settled after New Orleans Entrepreneurship Week, and several Memphis startups have returned home as winners.

“It’s like South by Southwest, but for entrepreneurs in the South,” said Kayla Rodriguez, co-founder and chief operating officer of SweetBio, of the week-long event.

73. Last Word: Saturday In The Park, Lipscomb's Successor and Fred's Looks Up -

Quite the Easter weekend on the Overton Park Greensward.
Greensward partisans planned a Saturday Easter Egg hunt, Memphis Zoo parking crews found the eggs and a crowd of several hundred people blocked overflow parking briefly that afternoon.

74. Engineering Firm Cannon & Cannon Opens Memphis Office -

Cannon & Cannon Inc., a Knoxville-based, women-owned consulting engineering firm, has established a Memphis office.

75. Two City Entities Thriving in MWBE Participation -

Recently released disparity studies say that minority- and women-owned businesses are only getting a sliver of contracts in the local business world.

Of all $128.6 billion in revenue flowing through Memphis in 2012, black-owned firms garnered 0.83 percent of those receipts. In Shelby County, 88.3 percent, or $168.2 million, of county contracts went to white-owned businesses between 2012 and 2014.

76. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

77. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

78. Stephenson Leverages Capital for Community Change -

Why start a bank? It’s a question that would never occur to most people. But to Susan Stephenson, the answer is obvious: “It’s infinite variety. You get to participate in other people’s dreams. In the morning, I can be a first-time homeowner. In the afternoon, I’m a small business looking to open a new location.”

79. Sugar Services, an Elephant in South End Room, Plans to Stay -

In operation since 1969, Sugar Services is one of the last vestiges of the South End’s legacy as a heavy industrial area. While the factory has continued to process bulk sugar into liquid sugar from its site at 15 W. G.E. Patterson, at the southeast corner of Tennessee Street, developers attracted to the South Main Arts District have built condos and apartments on either side.

80. Chemical Firm Announces 150-Worker Factory in DeSoto County -

OLIVE BRANCH, Miss. (AP) – A contract chemical maker will open a factory in Olive Branch, with plans to hire 150 people over three years.

BPI Packaging of Memphis, Tennessee, will invest $8 million, buying a 291,000 square-foot building formerly occupied by Sherwin Williams.

81. Mural Sets Scene for 107 S. Main Revelopment -

The long-blighted building at 107 S. Main St. is headed for active use and will see the addition of a mural by May 1.

At its March 16 meeting, the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. approved to put $10,000 toward a colorful mural designed by Chicago artist Damon Lamar Reed.

82. Last Word: A Trip to Committee, Minority Business Moves and the Issue With Reissues -

So those who support the general concept of de-annexation in the Tennessee state Senate were the most vocal Monday in sending the proposal back to committee for a more intense examination.

There were plenty of Memphians in the Senate chambers Monday despite the rumors that this was on its way back to committee.
Staying put until the deal is done has been a lesson won through bitter experience for some Memphis leaders.
Despite hearing from legislators in other parts of the state who are uneasy about this, the opposition remains a Memphis thing in Nashville.
But the Senate sponsor, Bo Watson, stumped his toe badly on this when he shut down an amendment Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville wanted to allow the voluntarily de-annexation of an area Millington recently took into its city limits.
So when the state and local government committee meets at noon Wednesday, it will be round – frankly, I forget which round it is. Just ring the bell and let’s see what happens.

83. Report: Automation May Replace Millions of Jobs in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A report released by the state of Tennessee suggests that up to 1.4 million people are at risk of losing their jobs to automation.

Citing a study by the Center for Economic Research in Tennessee, the Knoxville News Sentinel (http://bit.ly/22qNbBD) reports that automation could replace nearly 50 percent of the state's workforce.

84. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

85. Visible Music College Developing Whalum Center -

Visible Music College is developing a new academic center on the fifth floor of its Downtown Memphis campus named in honor of Grammy-winning saxophonist Kirk Whalum and his family.

The new Whalum Center for Music will include the college library and student center. Central to its literary and audio collection will be jazz and gospel influences and emerging genres curated and developed by the Whalum family and by Whalum himself. All music styles will be represented through themed rooms designed for instrument and voice practice, audio listening and media.

86. Council Working to Build Local Manufacturing for Device Industry -

The medical device industry fuels Memphis’ backbone. With a $2.6 billion local economic impact and nearly 17,000 direct and indirect jobs, original equipment manufacturers like Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Group, Medtronic Spinal & Biologistics and Microport Orthopedics have made the Memphis area their base for products and medical devices.

87. Sweetening the Pot -

The role of the private and public sectors in growing minority wealth came to a head at the March 16 board meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

EDGE says that requiring companies that are receiving tax breaks to contract with minority- and women-owned companies makes for good public policy.

88. Five to Watch -

“You can’t live in Memphis without some kind of side hustle, right?” That’s the way former WMC-TV reporter Lauren Squires Ready sees it. Her side hustle, the passion project she’s been pursuing in her free time separate from all the writing, reporting and live shots as an on-air news personality?

89. Memphis Habitat Receives Statewide Grant Funds -

Memphis Habitat has received a $13,500 grant from the Tennessee Housing Development Agency through Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to support the construction of a new home in Uptown.

The funds were part of a $500,000 grant Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee received from the THDA Housing Trust Fund to distribute among the 50 Habitat affiliates across Tennessee to aid in the construction of 20 homes statewide.

90. The $10.6 Million Question: Fire Josh Pastner or Keep Him? -

The Hall-of-Fame coach was speaking on ESPN Radio’s “Mike & Mike,” his team sitting on the outside looking in on this year’s NCAA Tournament because of his university’s own imposed ban:

91. Pacific Hires Damon Stoudamire as Basketball Coach -

STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) – University of Memphis assistant coach Damon Stoudamire was hired Wednesday, March 16, as the new coach at the University of the Pacific. Stoudamire, who also played for the Memphis Grizzlies for three seasons (2005-2008) and later served as a Grizzlies assistant coach, was introduced on the Stockton, Calif., campus Wednesday by Pacific's athletic director, Ted Leland.

92. Conference Aims to Empower Women Professionally and Personally -

Later this month Young Women Philanthropists, an auxiliary of the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis (WFGM), will put on its fourth Modern Day Woman’s Conference to empower, engage and educate women ages 25-45 on how to take the next step in their professional, civic, community and personal journeys.

93. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

94. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

95. Visible Music College Developing Whalum Center -

Visible Music College is developing a new academic center on the fifth floor of its Downtown Memphis campus named in honor of Grammy-winning saxophonist Kirk Whalum and his family.

The new Whalum Center for Music will include the college library and student center. Central to its literary and audio collection will be jazz and gospel influences and emerging genres curated and developed by the Whalum family and by Whalum himself. All music styles will be represented through themed rooms designed for instrument and voice practice, audio listening and media.

96. Blight Fight Touts New Pathway, Partnerships -

The local effort to fight blight has been in recent years a machete-like action to cut through bureaucratic red tape and get possession of the most blighted properties.

So there have been a lot of press conferences where bulldozers are featured prominently to demolish the targeted property.

97. Tri-State Bank Prepares For Big Year -

The way longtime Memphis banking executive Christine Munson sees it, a small community bank has to carve out a clearly defined identity for itself - something that sets it apart from the myriad competitors of similar size, with comparable products and rates - if it wants to be successful.

98. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

99. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

100. City Has Offer On Adams Police Station -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Ave.