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1. August 18-24, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1968: James Brown at the Mid-South Coliseum. Brown is touring the nation against a backdrop of two political assassinations – Martin Luther King Jr. in April and Robert Kennedy in June – racial and generational turmoil, and a heightened police response to gatherings like concerts where authorities believe the chance of violence is greater as a result.
By the time he arrives backstage in Memphis, Brown’s April 4 concert in Boston, televised live there the night of King’s assassination, has become a legendary chapter in the entertainer’s career. Brown isn’t resting on that, recording the breakthrough “Say It Loud, I’m Black and Proud” the same month the tour reached Memphis. By a year later, the anthem is gone from his set, with Brown later saying it had become obsolete in times that were changing fast.

2. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

3. Tyson Foods to Expand Operations in Union City -

State officials say Tyson Foods Inc. plans to expand operations in northwest Tennessee, adding more than 300 jobs in the process.

4. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

5. Last Word: 3 Vigils, A Decade Since the Recession and Fairgrounds Fast Track -

There were several vigils going on around this old town Tuesday night – two Downtown and one in Whitehaven. All involving lots of police – two about Confederate icons and one the king of rock and roll.

6. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

7. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

8. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

9. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

10. Last Word: Bakery Questions, Komen Name Change and the Price of A Run For Gov. -

City Hall opens a set of four public meetings on the Fairgrounds Thursday evening at 5 p.m. at the Salvation Army Kroc Center to start the movement again toward another master plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment. And it’s hard to tell at the outset what this will look like because there are so many possibilities. There are also so many fault lines in these discussions.

11. Opera Memphis Hires New Music Director -

No one really needed to twist Michael Sakir’s arm to sell him on the Bluff City in advance of taking the job Aug. 1 as Opera Memphis’ new music director.

For one thing, he’d already worked a little in the city as a kind of itinerant musician, helping out as guest director for Opera Memphis programs like its 30 Days of Opera series. Those visits also introduced him to what life in Memphis might be like, should he choose to live here, with Sakir building relationships and getting introduced to civic, artistic and cultural landmarks and institutions that he found himself falling in love with.

12. Last Word: Megasite Prospect, Crosstown Opening Plans and New Chandler Numbers -

Tennessee is pursuing the new $1.6 billion assembly plant Toyota and Mazda announced just last week to turn out 300,000 vehicles a year and there is that regional megasite in nearby Haywood County that isn’t being used. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he wants to add the joint facility to the state’s auto industry.

13. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

14. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

15. Tensions of Density -

With hundreds of units already announced and all signs indicating there are more to come, the Midtown apartment market is primed to explode.

But when it comes to development, it’s no secret that Midtown residents can be fiercely protective.

16. The Week Ahead: August 7-13 -

Hello, Memphis! While many local kids head back to school, plenty of Elvis fans are flocking to the city to celebrate The King’s life and legacy. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

17. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

18. First Alliance Bank Inks 10-Year Lease to Move to Clark Tower -

Memphis-based First Alliance Bank has signed a 10-year lease to relocate its Poplar Avenue branch into the recently remodeled Clark Tower office building.


5100 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38137

19. Rough Start at Kansas for Dedric Lawson -

Admit it: If you first saw news of a Lawson suspended at the University of Kansas, you assumed it would be K.J. It was K.J, after all, who exited the University of Memphis giving coach Tubby Smith double-bird via social media, saying inappropriate things, and let’s not forget this: playing with a selfishness on the court that could make you wince.

20. Remember Memphis? Titans Would Rather Not -

Time flies, doesn’t it? A lot can happen in 20 years. Think about it: In 1997, Bill Clinton was sworn in for his second term as president. Princess Di was killed in a car crash. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 8,000 for the first time. And the Tennessee Oilers played their home games in Memphis.

21. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

22. Last Word: Alexander and Corker Differ, Instant Runoff React and Kroger On Hold -

Tennessee’s two U.S. Senators split their votes Tuesday in Washington on the vote that followed the vote to open debate on a repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both voted yes on the debate motion. But then Corker was one of the nine Republican Senate votes that killed the Obamacare replacement plan known as BCRA, while Alexander voted for it.

23. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

24. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

25. Venezuela Strike Erupts Into Sporadic Violence -

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A nationwide strike against plans to rewrite the constitution shut down much of Venezuelan's capital Thursday before erupting into sporadic violence when protesters clashed with riot police and burned a post office near the headquarters of the main state-run broadcaster.

26. Graceland Prepares for August Test of Expansion -

The Guest House at Graceland has been sold out for Elvis Week in August for quite a while, with bookings even before the Whitehaven hotel-resort opened last October.

And most of the events marking the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death are slated for Elvis Presley’s Memphis, the entertainment complex across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the mansion that opened in March.

27. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

28. The Redbirds’ Dream Season is Not Being Duplicated in St. Louis -

On Monday, July 17, in Oklahoma City, the Memphis Redbirds pulled off their third win in their last at-bat as Patrick Wisdom hit a ninth-inning home run in a 5-3 victory. It was their seventh straight win and their 15th in their last 17 games.

29. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

30. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

31. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

32. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

33. July 14-20, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2015: Former President Bill Clinton is in Memphis to speak at funeral services for Circuit Court Judge D’Army Bailey at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church. The day before, Bailey lies in state at the National Civil Rights Museum, which he helped found.

34. NAACP Asks for Removal of Confederate Statue From Courthouse -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee chapter of the NAACP is urging officials to remove a statue of a Confederate general from in front of a county courthouse, echoing similar efforts throughout the South.

35. Herwig Engineers With a Sense of Responsibility -

“I always liked building things and working with my hands,” Josh Herwig muses, holding out a prototype of the medical device he’s designed and engineered.

Now chief technology officer of SOMAVAC Medical Solutions, Herwig continuously gravitated toward science. Talking with a visitor to the SOMAVAC offices (housed within the Memphis Bioworks Foundation building, in the Medical District), Herwig recalls the steps that brought him here. The son of a particle physicist – his father has worked at Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories – Herwig grew up fascinated by the possibilities and magic of science.

36. New Memphis Plans to Expand Programming for Millennials -

Through the end of this month, the New Memphis Institute is continuing the yearly Summer Experience it hosts each year that’s comprised of free events for local and visiting college students and recent graduates, all with a view toward encouraging them to put down roots in Memphis.

37. Crust Named MSO Assistant, Youth Symphony Conductor -

Andrew Crust, who recently was named assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Memphis Youth Symphony, shares why young musicians inspire him and how orchestras can reach a younger audience in this week's Newsmakers Q&A.

38. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

39. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

40. Memphis Nonprofits to Get $1.7M in AmeriCorps Funds -

Volunteer Tennessee, the governor-appointed commission on volunteerism and service, has been awarded more than $4 million in AmeriCorps funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service, with $1.7 million of that to go to Memphis nonprofits.

41. Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

42. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

43. July 7-13, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1984: Armadillo Jack’s, a restaurant, opened in the Beale Street Landing building at Beale Street and Riverside Drive. The opening features armadillo races.

Meanwhile renovation and restoration work are underway at Calvary Episcopal Church, including a rebuilding of the church’s Aeolean-Skinner organ – the largest church organ in the Mid-South – and a renovation of Calvary’s Parish House to include an elevator, new library and courtyard. The church’s mural room, home to the Lenten season Waffle Shop, also doubles in size with the undertaking.

44. MATA Eyes Greener Future, Prepares For Upcoming Service Changes -

Despite being hampered by a tight budget, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is making strides to be more green and environmentally sensitive, including participating in National Dump the Pump Day in June and offering reduced fares on “Ozone Days” throughout the year, as well as recently collaborating with the EPA to install air pollution-monitoring stations.

45. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

46. Not Ours, Not Theirs -

Not the apple of the apple's eye. The only other person on the subway platform that night years ago was in a hood-up hoodie and seemed to be about 8 feet tall, and seemed to get taller as he walked toward me. Even sober, I wouldn’t be able to do anything about whatever he had in mind, and I was far from sober after a three-hour meal in Tribeca. I was done.

47. Last Word: The List Lawsuit, Charlie Morris on 1939 and New Rules for Democrats -

This looks like the end of Grit ‘n’ Grind as we wait for the other shoe to drop following Zach Randolph’s exit from the Grizzlies to Sacramento. There were a lot of rumors Wednesday, the day after Randolph’s $24 million free agency deal, including some about Marc Gasol and the Celtics. And then Tony Allen dropped a Grizz reference from his Twitter account causing even more speculation.

48. Memphis Nonprofits to Get $1.7M in AmeriCorps Funds -

Volunteer Tennessee, the governor-appointed commission on volunteerism and service, has been awarded more than $4 million in AmeriCorps funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service, with $1.7 million of that to go to Memphis nonprofits.

49. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

50. The Week Ahead: July 3-July 9 -

Hello, Memphis – and happy almost-Fourth of July. Not sure where to catch the fireworks this week? We have a few suggestions, plus more local happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

51. June 30-July 6, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: On the first day of the NBA’s free agency period, the Memphis Grizzlies offer point guard Mike Conley $153 million over five years to stay with the team – an NBA record contract. The same day in a related move, the Grizzlies come to terms with power forward Chandler Parsons on a four-year $94 million contract.

52. Editorial: Memphis Tourism Has Its Own Unique Ride -

Memphis is never, ever going to be a theme park built for the delight of visitors from around the world.

Memphis tourism is increasingly about exploration and personal experiences that tell someone on a journey a few things about themselves as well as this city by the river.

53. Stiff Competition -

Selling Memphis as a place to visit may be easier now than it’s ever been. Conversely, it may also be as difficult as it’s ever been. That dichotomy arises from the fact that Memphis has more amenities, more things to do, see and eat than ever before.

54. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

55. Last Word: Ransomware, Memphis Charitable Giving and The Race for Governor -

The ransomware problem got so serious Wednesday that trading in FedEx stock was stopped briefly during the afternoon. The virus was specifically aimed at TNT Express operations. Here’s a more detailed story via Bloomberg on what happened.

56. Individual Giving Fuels Memphis, National Philanthropic Economy -

Americans give. So do Memphians. The “Giving USA 2017” report showed that in 2016 Americans gave $390.1 billion.

And while Memphis hasn’t had a separate report prepared since 2008 for 2007, it indicated that 83 percent of Memphis households gave to charities. By contrast, the 2017 Giving USA Report showed that 59 percent of the American population gave to charitable causes.

57. Gibson Becomes First African-American Woman Partner at Burch, Porter & Johnson -

Tannera Gibson knew she wanted to be more than an attorney. She wanted to be an attorney at Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC, one of the city’s oldest law firms with a deep history in and out of court and the business of law.

58. Tourism Leaders Focus on City’s Complexity, Struggle -

Stax Records turns 60 years old this year, going back to its origins as a country music label called Satellite at a tiny studio in Brunswick. Next year marks 50 years since the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In August, it will be 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. And in 2019, the city of Memphis will mark 200 years since its founding.

59. Last Word: Cooper-Young Complications, The Mackin Investigation and Tuition Hike -

Landmarks status for Cooper-Young is on hold because part of the process for the status isn’t an official part of the application process. That would be the part that requires a certain number of signatures to get the status. And it has put on hold a similar process in Vollintine-Evergreen.

60. City Auto Owner Rises To NIADA President -

David Andrews, owner of City Auto in Memphis and other automotive enterprises, has taken over as president of the National Independent Automobile Dealers Association (NIADA) for the 2017-18 term.

61. Memphis Getting Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

62. June 23-29, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2014: Formal opening of the $301 million expansion of the Frayser Nike plant. As he tours the plant expansion, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam learns the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of same-sex marriage in an appeal of Tennessee’s constitutional amendment that specifically banned gay marriages.

63. Heavy Rain, Winds, Tornado Warnings as Cindy Heads Inland -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — High tides in the wake of a weakening Tropical Depression Cindy prompted a voluntary evacuation in a coastal Louisiana town Thursday, and the storm's effects were being felt throughout the Southeast, with intermittent bands of heavy rain, blasts of high wind and periodic warnings of possible tornadoes in multiple states.

64. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

65. Memphis NAACP Marks Centennial With Challenge -

When the Memphis Branch NAACP holds its annual Freedom Fund Luncheon Saturday, June 24, there will be a lot of memories and a lot of history.

The Memphis Branch’s largest annual event this year marks the centennial of an organization founded in the wake of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons. James Weldon Johnson, the NAACP national office’s investigator who came to the city to gather facts on the incident, encouraged Robert Church Jr. to start a local chapter.

66. Tropical Storm Cindy: Drenching Rains, Flood Threat on Coast -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Tropical Storm Cindy sent drenching rain bands over the north Gulf Coast on Wednesday, swamping low-lying coastal roads and pushing a waterspout ashore in one beachfront community as residents from east Texas to the Florida Panhandle warily eyed the storm's slow crawl toward land.

67. City Auto Owner Rises to NIADA President -

David Andrews, owner of City Auto in Memphis and other automotive enterprises, has taken over as president of the National Independent Automobile Dealers Association (NIADA) for the 2017-18 term.

68. Memphis Gets Federal Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

69. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

70. Made By Project Generates New Ideas And Goals to Support Memphis Makers -

A new business plan competition and a nine-week cohort program are the first two recommendations to come out of a plan in support of Shelby County’s Made By Project, an effort to understand the needs and goals of “makers,” artisans and micro-manufacturers in Memphis and Shelby County.

71. County Seeks End to DOJ Memorandum -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the move by him and Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael to end a 5-year-old memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Justice Department over conditions at Juvenile Court indicated “significant progress,” but not that all of the problems at Juvenile Court are resolved.

72. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

73. Higher Prices Squeezing Both Renters and Would-Be Homeowners -

A diminished supply of available homes is swelling prices in large U.S. metro areas from New York to Miami to Los Angeles, squeezing out would-be buyers and pushing up rents as more people are forced to remain tenants.

74. The Week Ahead: June 19-25 -

Hello, Memphis! Summer officially arrives in our Central time zone at 11:24 p.m. on Tuesday, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac. Well, we know what summer in Memphis means – a heapin’ helpin’ of humidity. Stay cool with all these hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

75. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

76. Events -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority will participate in National Dump the Pump Day Thursday, June 15, by offering free rides in Memphis, Shelby County and West Memphis on its paratransit vehicles, fixed-route buses and rubber-tired trolley buses. For details and route maps, visit matatransit.com.

77. Hernando Ice Cream Parlor Preparing Crosstown Location -

1350 Concourse Ave.

Memphis, TN 38104

Permit Amount: $80,000

Application Date: June 2017

78. First Horizon CFO Talks Capital Bank Merger -

First Tennessee Bank’s parent company is a $30 billion financial institution that’s put its cash to work the last few years by buying back almost 10 percent of its shares and pursuing smaller mergers and acquisitions.

79. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will host the Food Truck Garden Party: Beach Party on Wednesday, June 14, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at MBG, 750 Cherry Road. Enjoy live music, cash bar, fun in the Play Zone and food trucks. Adult admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers (includes one drink); children’s admission is free for members and $5 for nonmembers. Buy tickets at memphisbotanicgarden.com/foodtruck or at the gate.

80. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

81. For St. Jude and Golf Fans, FedEx St. Jude Classic is Thriving -

Perspective can be too easy of a word. It can get thrown around casually, especially in big-time sports settings. But at the FedEx St. Jude Classic, “perspective” isn’t just a clichéd line for a moment in time.

82. Last Word: Double Berger, The CEO of Baptist and Storm Reflections -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the Monday deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare with more details to come Monday on how this came together.

83. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

84. The Week Ahead: June 12-18 -

Get ready to groove, Memphis, because this week we're welcoming the inimitable Ruthie Foster to town, along with the return of both the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival and the Soulsville Record Swap. Plus, we've got details on the state House District 95 election, free MATA rides and what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

85. Events -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority will participate in the 12th annual National Dump the Pump Day Thursday, June 15, by offering free rides in Memphis, Shelby County and West Memphis on its paratransit vehicles, fixed-route buses and rubber-tired trolley buses. For details and route maps, visit matatransit.com.

86. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

87. Events -

Our Own Voice Theatre Troupe will present “Unseen City,” written and directed by Alex Skitolsky with choreography by Kimberly Baker, Friday, June 9, through June 24 at 2085 Monroe Ave. Tickets (cash only) are $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Call 901-274-1000 to make reservations; visit ourownvoice.org for more information.

88. Van Cleef Supports Memphis Public Schools -

A national study found that Memphis has the highest percentage of “disconnected youth” – people between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither working nor in school – of any large U.S. city. While it’s possible to estimate what that costs taxpayers in lost productivity and social services, assessing the cost to an individual young person is much harder.

89. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

90. Last Word: Easy Fishing on Big River, Competing City Priorities and Durham's Fine -

The Arkansas side of the Big River Crossing opened Wednesday for the first time since May 2 when a rising Mississippi River prompted its closing while the crossing proper on the north side of the Harahan Bridge remained open. There is still some of the muddy river left on the Arkansas flood plain and several dozen cranes stopping in Wednesday afternoon for some easy fishing in the shallow waters.

91. Events -

A Teach901 Job Fair Will Take Place Thursday, June 8, From 6 P.m. To 8 P.m. At The Salvation Army Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway S. More Than Memphis-Area 30 School Operators Will Be Recruiting For A Range Of Positions In Public, Charter And Parochial Schools. Visit Teach901.Com For Details And Registration.

92. Last Word: Grade Tampering, The Tom Lee Storm and Fred's Strategy -

There are indications that allegations of grade-tampering at Shelby County Schools are not going to recede as rapidly as they did late last year when the allegations first came up. The first indication was word late last week that the state department of education will audit the grade transcripts of all SCS high schools. But there are still some fuzzy points in that about whether that is a new move or whether it is something that has been underway since last year.

93. Events -

Tennessee Small Business Development Center will host a workshop titled “Introduction to Importing” Thursday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. Topics cover various aspects of selling imported goods, including market research tools, costs unique to importing, and the role of a customs broker. Registration required. Visit tsbdc.org/training for details.

94. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

95. Brooks’ 100 New Acquisitions Mark End of Centennial, Start of Other Changes -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art has 100 new works of art in its permanent collection to mark its centennial. But the 100 items, grouped together through Aug. 27 in “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” point to a rethinking of the Brooks that began with a major renovation that debuted last year. The exhibition marks an end of centennial observances.

96. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

97. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still rotting and behind chain link fences and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

98. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still under construction and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

99. Green Drops Gubernatorial Bid After Failed Trump Nomination -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican state Sen. Mark Green announced Friday that he will not resume his bid for Tennessee governor after withdrawing from consideration as President Donald Trump's pick for Army secretary.

100. The Week Ahead: June 5-11 -

Hello, Memphis! This week, we’re getting into the swing of things with the FedEx St. Jude Golf Classic, jumping into the ring at the Germantown Charity Horse Show and catching a free flick at an outdoor movie screening. Check out the rest of our top picks in The Week Ahead…