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Editorial Results (free)

1. Gibson Becomes First African-American Woman Partner at Burch Porter & Johnson -

Tannera Gibson knew she wanted to be more than an attorney. She wanted to be an attorney at Burch Porter & Johnson PLLC, one of the city’s oldest law firms with a deep history in and out of court and the business of law.

2. Tourism Leaders Focus on City’s Complexity, Struggle -

Stax Records turns 60 years old this year, going back to its origins as a country music label called Satellite at a tiny studio in Brunswick. Next year marks 50 years since the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In August, it will be 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. And in 2019, the city of Memphis will mark 200 years since its founding.

3. Last Word: Cooper-Young Complications, The Mackin Investigation and Tuition Hike -

Landmarks status for Cooper-Young is on hold because part of the process for the status isn’t an official part of the application process. That would be the part that requires a certain number of signatures to get the status. And it has put on hold a similar process in Vollintine-Evergreen.

4. City Auto Owner Rises To NIADA President -

David Andrews, owner of City Auto in Memphis and other automotive enterprises, has taken over as president of the National Independent Automobile Dealers Association (NIADA) for the 2017-18 term.

5. Memphis Getting Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

6. June 23-29, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2014: Formal opening of the $301 million expansion of the Frayser Nike plant. As he tours the plant expansion, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam learns the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of same-sex marriage in an appeal of Tennessee’s constitutional amendment that specifically banned gay marriages.

7. Heavy Rain, Winds, Tornado Warnings as Cindy Heads Inland -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — High tides in the wake of a weakening Tropical Depression Cindy prompted a voluntary evacuation in a coastal Louisiana town Thursday, and the storm's effects were being felt throughout the Southeast, with intermittent bands of heavy rain, blasts of high wind and periodic warnings of possible tornadoes in multiple states.

8. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

9. Memphis NAACP Marks Centennial With Challenge -

When the Memphis Branch NAACP holds its annual Freedom Fund Luncheon Saturday, June 24, there will be a lot of memories and a lot of history.

The Memphis Branch’s largest annual event this year marks the centennial of an organization founded in the wake of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons. James Weldon Johnson, the NAACP national office’s investigator who came to the city to gather facts on the incident, encouraged Robert Church Jr. to start a local chapter.

10. Tropical Storm Cindy: Drenching Rains, Flood Threat on Coast -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Tropical Storm Cindy sent drenching rain bands over the north Gulf Coast on Wednesday, swamping low-lying coastal roads and pushing a waterspout ashore in one beachfront community as residents from east Texas to the Florida Panhandle warily eyed the storm's slow crawl toward land.

11. City Auto Owner Rises to NIADA President -

David Andrews, owner of City Auto in Memphis and other automotive enterprises, has taken over as president of the National Independent Automobile Dealers Association (NIADA) for the 2017-18 term.

12. Memphis Gets Federal Help On Long-Term Crime Strategy -

The city of Memphis is one of a dozen cities the U.S. Justice Department will work with to develop long-term strategies to drop violent crime rates.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday, June 20, the first 12 cities to join the National Public Safety Partnership. The Justice Department will help local authorities study crime patterns and create specially tailored plans to reduce gang and gun violence, Sessions said. Federal authorities will help cities find "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time.

13. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

14. Made By Project Generates New Ideas And Goals to Support Memphis Makers -

A new business plan competition and a nine-week cohort program are the first two recommendations to come out of a plan in support of Shelby County’s Made By Project, an effort to understand the needs and goals of “makers,” artisans and micro-manufacturers in Memphis and Shelby County.

15. County Seeks End to DOJ Memorandum -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the move by him and Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael to end a 5-year-old memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Justice Department over conditions at Juvenile Court indicated “significant progress,” but not that all of the problems at Juvenile Court are resolved.

16. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

17. Higher Prices Squeezing Both Renters and Would-Be Homeowners -

A diminished supply of available homes is swelling prices in large U.S. metro areas from New York to Miami to Los Angeles, squeezing out would-be buyers and pushing up rents as more people are forced to remain tenants.

18. The Week Ahead: June 19-25 -

Hello, Memphis! Summer officially arrives in our Central time zone at 11:24 p.m. on Tuesday, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac. Well, we know what summer in Memphis means – a heapin’ helpin’ of humidity. Stay cool with all these hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

19. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

20. Events -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority will participate in National Dump the Pump Day Thursday, June 15, by offering free rides in Memphis, Shelby County and West Memphis on its paratransit vehicles, fixed-route buses and rubber-tired trolley buses. For details and route maps, visit matatransit.com.

21. Hernando Ice Cream Parlor Preparing Crosstown Location -

1350 Concourse Ave.

Memphis, TN 38104

Permit Amount: $80,000

Application Date: June 2017

22. First Horizon CFO Talks Capital Bank Merger -

First Tennessee Bank’s parent company is a $30 billion financial institution that’s put its cash to work the last few years by buying back almost 10 percent of its shares and pursuing smaller mergers and acquisitions.

23. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will host the Food Truck Garden Party: Beach Party on Wednesday, June 14, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at MBG, 750 Cherry Road. Enjoy live music, cash bar, fun in the Play Zone and food trucks. Adult admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers (includes one drink); children’s admission is free for members and $5 for nonmembers. Buy tickets at memphisbotanicgarden.com/foodtruck or at the gate.

24. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

25. For St. Jude and Golf Fans, FedEx St. Jude Classic is Thriving -

Perspective can be too easy of a word. It can get thrown around casually, especially in big-time sports settings. But at the FedEx St. Jude Classic, “perspective” isn’t just a clichéd line for a moment in time.

26. Last Word: Double Berger, The CEO of Baptist and Storm Reflections -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the Monday deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare with more details to come Monday on how this came together.

27. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

28. The Week Ahead: June 12-18 -

Get ready to groove, Memphis, because this week we're welcoming the inimitable Ruthie Foster to town, along with the return of both the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival and the Soulsville Record Swap. Plus, we've got details on the state House District 95 election, free MATA rides and what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

29. Events -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority will participate in the 12th annual National Dump the Pump Day Thursday, June 15, by offering free rides in Memphis, Shelby County and West Memphis on its paratransit vehicles, fixed-route buses and rubber-tired trolley buses. For details and route maps, visit matatransit.com.

30. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

31. Events -

Our Own Voice Theatre Troupe will present “Unseen City,” written and directed by Alex Skitolsky with choreography by Kimberly Baker, Friday, June 9, through June 24 at 2085 Monroe Ave. Tickets (cash only) are $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Call 901-274-1000 to make reservations; visit ourownvoice.org for more information.

32. Van Cleef Supports Memphis Public Schools -

A national study found that Memphis has the highest percentage of “disconnected youth” – people between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither working nor in school – of any large U.S. city. While it’s possible to estimate what that costs taxpayers in lost productivity and social services, assessing the cost to an individual young person is much harder.

33. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

34. Last Word: Easy Fishing on Big River, Competing City Priorities and Durham's Fine -

The Arkansas side of the Big River Crossing opened Wednesday for the first time since May 2 when a rising Mississippi River prompted its closing while the crossing proper on the north side of the Harahan Bridge remained open. There is still some of the muddy river left on the Arkansas flood plain and several dozen cranes stopping in Wednesday afternoon for some easy fishing in the shallow waters.

35. Events -

A Teach901 Job Fair Will Take Place Thursday, June 8, From 6 P.m. To 8 P.m. At The Salvation Army Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway S. More Than Memphis-Area 30 School Operators Will Be Recruiting For A Range Of Positions In Public, Charter And Parochial Schools. Visit Teach901.Com For Details And Registration.

36. Last Word: Grade Tampering, The Tom Lee Storm and Fred's Strategy -

There are indications that allegations of grade-tampering at Shelby County Schools are not going to recede as rapidly as they did late last year when the allegations first came up. The first indication was word late last week that the state department of education will audit the grade transcripts of all SCS high schools. But there are still some fuzzy points in that about whether that is a new move or whether it is something that has been underway since last year.

37. Events -

Tennessee Small Business Development Center will host a workshop titled “Introduction to Importing” Thursday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. Topics cover various aspects of selling imported goods, including market research tools, costs unique to importing, and the role of a customs broker. Registration required. Visit tsbdc.org/training for details.

38. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

39. Brooks’ 100 New Acquisitions Mark End of Centennial, Start of Other Changes -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art has 100 new works of art in its permanent collection to mark its centennial. But the 100 items, grouped together through Aug. 27 in “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” point to a rethinking of the Brooks that began with a major renovation that debuted last year. The exhibition marks an end of centennial observances.

40. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

41. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still rotting and behind chain link fences and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

42. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still under construction and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

43. Green Drops Gubernatorial Bid After Failed Trump Nomination -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican state Sen. Mark Green announced Friday that he will not resume his bid for Tennessee governor after withdrawing from consideration as President Donald Trump's pick for Army secretary.

44. The Week Ahead: June 5-11 -

Hello, Memphis! This week, we’re getting into the swing of things with the FedEx St. Jude Golf Classic, jumping into the ring at the Germantown Charity Horse Show and catching a free flick at an outdoor movie screening. Check out the rest of our top picks in The Week Ahead…

45. Orpheum Names Winners Of High School Theatre Awards -

The Orpheum Theatre Group has announced the winners of the 2017 High School Musical Theatre Awards. Modeled after the Tony Awards and now in its eighth year, the Orpheum’s event is part of the Broadway League Foundation’s Jimmy Awards, which includes 37 programs from across the country.

46. Last Word: Foote Homes Falls, Kellogg Layoffs and The SCS Ask -

Once upon a time in South Memphis it could be difficult to tell where Foote Homes began and Cleaborn Homes ended or vice versa. The key to this was which side of Lauderdale you were looking at. The east side was Cleaborn and the west was Foote with Lauderdale as the dividing line.

47. Long-Awaited Demolition at Foote Homes Begins -

Foote Homes, the last large public housing project in Memphis, began coming down Tuesday, May 30, with a formal ceremony marking the start of demolition toward the broader South City redevelopment.

48. City Council Weighs $7.3M Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew nine of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

49. Reading With Purpose -

Books inspire movies all the time. And sometimes, one reading program emerges from another. So it was that Memphis Reads grew out of Fresh Reads, an initiative at Christian Brothers University.

The latest Memphis Reads community book selection is “The Book Thief” by Australian writer Markus Zusak and he will be giving three presentations in Memphis in September (more on the book and Memphis Reads in a moment).

50. City Council Discusses $7.3 Million Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew 9 of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

51. Orpheum Names Winners Of High School Theatre Awards -

The Orpheum Theatre Group has announced the winners of the 2017 High School Musical Theatre Awards. Modeled after the Tony Awards and now in its eighth year, the Orpheum’s event is part of the Broadway League Foundation’s Jimmy Awards, which includes 37 programs from across the country.

52. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

53. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

54. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

55. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

UPDATE: As of 9 a.m. Monday, May 29, 125,000 Memphis Light Gas and Water Division customers were without power. And 32 people were staying at the Red Cross shelter at the Orange Mound Community Center. City Public Works has hired more contractors to help clear downed trees and other debris from roads.

56. Tennessee Governor Signs NRA-Backed Metal Detector Gun Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Many Tennessee city and county buildings, parks and buses will either have to buy metal detectors, hire security guards and check people's bags, or let handgun permit holders bring in their guns, under a law signed Friday by Gov. Bill Haslam.

57. New 'Blue Lives Matter' Laws Raise Concerns Among Activists -

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – Following a spike in deadly attacks on police, more than a dozen states have responded this year with "Blue Lives Matter" laws that come down even harder on crimes against law enforcement officers, raising concern among some civil rights activists of a potential setback in police-community relations.

58. Bike Month Participants Rewarded With Free Lunch -

Commute Options Memphis will host a “Park(less) Picnic(more)” party as a culmination of its monthlong slate of activities for National Bike Month.

The event will be held Wednesday, May 31, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Health Sciences Park, at the corner of Madison Avenue and Dunlap Street, where food from the Fuel and Stickem food trucks will be available.

59. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

60. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

61. Big Names With UT Ties Eyed for Vol Baseball Job -

Tennessee baseball is starting a new era. Dave Serrano coached his final games for the Vols (27-25, 7-21 SEC) last weekend when the Vols were swept by Missouri (35-21, 14-16) in a three-game series at Lindsey Nelson Stadium.

62. Bank On Memphis Effort in National Spotlight -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir was in the nation’s capital this week, speaking by invitation on a panel at the 2017 Bank On national conference in Washington, D.C.

63. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

64. Last Word: Sticker Shock Questions, Council Day Recap and Mueller's Move -

It’s not the final vote on the county property tax rate. But Monday’s acceptance by the Shelby County Commission of the state-certified property tax rate is an important insight into how the state and local governments get together on setting a tax rate that takes into account changes in overall property values from the countywide property reappraisal to set a tax rate that produces the same amount of revenue as the current rate.

65. Vaco Risk Solutions' Brian Prentice Talks Data Breaches, Safety -

Vaco Memphis has added Brian Prentice as managing partner of Vaco Risk Solutions, a national consulting firm that works with organizations that have IT security, risk or compliance needs; have had a recent breach; are moving data centers; require a penetration test; or have any other project-based risk management needs.

66. Last Word: Minority Business Mic Drop, Truckers & Taxes and Confederate Statues -

Quite the buzz around the minority business discussion on “Behind The Headlines” – notably the progress report from Greater Memphis Chamber board chair Carolyn Hardy about what’s working and, more to the point, what is not working. In Hardy’s view that would be general minority business goals that she said amount to black-owned businesses being left out some three years into the renewed push for minority business growth – in government contracts and private business-to-business contracts.

67. JPMorgan Chase Pumps $17M Into Summer Job Programs -

BOSTON (AP) – JPMorgan Chase has announced a five-year, $17 million investment in a summer job program to give youth the skills needed to succeed in the modern business world.

The first phase of the Summer Youth Employment Program announced Monday includes $3 million to organizations in 19 U.S. cities that provide training and work experience to the young.

68. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

69. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

70. Present Day Issues Surface in Centennial of Persons Lynching -

The interfaith prayer ceremony Sunday, May 21, marking the centennial of the lynching of Ell Persons included several mentions of the removal of Confederate monuments in the last month in New Orleans.

71. Bike Summit Features Call for Changes in Push for Bike Ways -

The city’s former bicycle and pedestrian coordinator who put the city on the map nationally for bike lanes and bikeways says bicycle advocates have to think differently.

Kyle Wagenschutz is currently director of local innovation for “People for Bikes” – a Boulder, Colorado advocacy and advisory organization that works with cities nationally.

72. Hackett Retires From CMOM to Devote Effort to Grand Carousel Fundraising -

Former Memphis Mayor Richard C. Hackett is retiring as CEO of the Children’s Museum of Memphis in June to devote his attention to fundraising for the institution he helped create 30 years ago. Hackett became leader of the museum in 2006.

73. May 19-25, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1917: Ell Persons is lynched by a mob of more than 5,000 people at the Macon Road Bridge. Authorities concluded Persons had murdered and raped Antoinette Rappel because they believed the dead girl’s eyes had retained an image of Persons – a practice law enforcement once used that has been thoroughly discredited.

74. Dream a Baseball Dream -

Memphis is Hoops City, a hotbed of premier basketball talent. That’s why University of Memphis basketball coach Tubby Smith is under pressure. The best of those hometown players on his team, Dedric Lawson, has transferred to the University of Kansas and everyone’s worried Smith won’t get the elite local talent going forward.

75. Road to WCWS Once Again Goes Through UT -

Several of Tennessee’s athletic teams would just be glad to get an NCAA Tournament bid. UT’s softball team expects a lot more. Like getting to the Women’s College World Series.

76. Hanover College Class Visits Memphis on MLK Tour -

Hanover College president Lake Lambert is bringing a class from the private Indiana institution through Memphis this week as part of a nine-day trip examining the life, ministry and leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

77. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

78. Luttrell: Mend Issues That Divide Region -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says his hope for a more civil national political discourse may be “a little Alice in Wonderland.” And there are times when he sees local discussions veering in the direction of “Nashville and Washington,” he told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, May 16.

79. Last Word: Issues or Elections, City Impasse Decisions and Memphis Sk8s -

Those active in the Republican and Democratic parties at the local, state or national level will tell you their job is to elect candidates of their party to office at all levels of government. It's even in writing in just about any party's mission statement. And the inability of the local Democratic party to do that in countywide partisan elections is one of several factors that led to the state party disbanding the local party last year.

80. Eyewear Retailer SEE Opens at Saddle Creek -

National eyewear retailer SEE is opening its first Germantown location at the Shops of Saddle Creek at 7535 Poplar Ave.

81. Soulful Sounds Made in Memphis Again -

An original Stax Records sign hangs in the stairwell of the new Made in Memphis Entertainment facility as inspiration for artists and guests entering as they head up to the new company’s main offices.

82. Outdoors Inc. Opens Downtown Pop-Up Store -

Outdoors Inc. is trying something new for its sixth retail location, which opened its doors earlier this month at 100 Peabody Place Downtown.

83. The Week Ahead: May 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! This week, Downtown welcomes barbecue teams from around the world coming to compete in the Super Bowl of Swine. Plus, we’ve got details on the remembrance of a somber moment in Memphis history; a reading festival for kids of all ages; and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

84. Haslam Credits Republican Leadership for Budget, Economic Accomplishments -

With the legislative session finished, Gov. Bill Haslam is touting budget accomplishments and a strong economy as the result of Republican leadership.

In a Capitol Hill press conference shortly after the General Assembly adjourned for the year, the governor called passage of a $37 billion budget, the second consecutive one with no new debt, as the Legislature’s most important act.

85. Soaring Costs -

With more than 800 million passengers zipping through U.S. airports in 2016 and air cargo accounting for more than one-third of the world’s trade by value, the nation has become increasingly dependent on air travel to stay competitive. But what sometimes get lost is the amount of upkeep needed to maintain the infrastructure of these self-contained cities.

86. Last Word: Deeper on Beale, End of Session and Johnny Mathis -

Beale Street keeps its cover charge on Saturday nights during its Memphis In May peak. But the district has some complex questions to resolve about its future and who controls that future. If that wasn’t evident before, it became apparent at City Hall Tuesday. It wasn’t the council action on the Beale Street Bucks program that was significant as much as it was the council’s discussion.

87. Clark Tower Wraps Up $8 Million Renovation -

Commercial real estate firm Colliers International has announced the owner of Clark Tower, In-Rel Properties, has finished an $8 million renovation of the iconic East Memphis office building. Details on that and other top deals in this week's Real Estate Recap...

88. The Week Ahead: May 8-14 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Festival season rolls on this week with plenty of reasons to get outside, celebrate and … well, be festive. Plus, we’ve got details on a couple of great concerts to check out and the (completely unrelated) reason you might hear drumming around Mud Island in The Week Ahead…

89. ‘Great Streets’ Pilot Project Introduced -

Plans for protected bike lanes and pedestrian spaces between FedExForum and the Mississippi riverfront are being planned as part of “Great Streets” pilot project the city of Memphis is to announce Tuesday, May 2.

90. Tourism in Memphis Celebrated to the Tune of $3.2B Annually -

Officially, National Travel & Tourism Week runs May 7 through May 13. But Kevin Kane, president and CEO of Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau, got a jump on things this past week.

91. This Week in Memphis History: May 5-11 -

1990: Milli Vanilli at the Mid-South Coliseum. Months before the Memphis show, the duo of Fab Morvan and Rob Pilatus had won a Grammy Award as the Best New Artist, and in a Time magazine interview, Pilatus had referred to himself as “the new Elvis.”
The previous December one of the three actual singers on the hit record had said publicly that neither Morvan nor Pilatus sang a note. By November, Milli Vanilli’s producer admitted the duo didn’t sing on the record; their Grammy was taken back by the National Academy of Recordings Arts and Sciences four days later.

92. Raleigh Springs Town Center ‘On Track and On Budget’ -

It’s the end of an era with the final demolition of Raleigh Springs Mall underway, and city and community leaders hope it’s the beginning of a brighter future with the much-anticipated Raleigh Springs Town Center set to rise in its place.

93. Last Word: RiverPlay, New City Property Tax Rate and House Republican Rift -

The Memphis In May International Festival arrives Friday with the Beale Street Music Festival and hopefully with warmer temperatures than the Thursday chill. Meanwhile, RiverPlay, the conversion of Riverside Drive between Jefferson and Court to a pop-up park linking up Memphis and Mississippi River Parks, makes its debut Friday afternoon.

94. Senators Decry State of Air Travel After Passenger Incidents -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Air travel in the United States has become a combustible mix in which passengers aren't the only ones treated unfairly, senators were told Thursday. Travelers all too frequently take out their frustrations on airline employees, including flight attendants and gate agents, speakers said at a Senate hearing.

95. 5,000 Miles Of Smoke -

DANISH ISN’T JUST FOR BREAKFAST ANYMORE. The man was hauling gold up the steps from Riverside Drive as I waited at the top of the bluff. He was rising like smoke from all the cookers below, holding as he was something above the rest.

96. NFL: OK to Hit a Woman, But You Better Stand for Anthem -

Well, at least Johnny Manziel doesn’t have an NFL job. If Colin Kaepernick is seeking solace from his place on the quarterback unemployment line, perhaps he can begin there. 

97. Tennessee House Passes Gun-Lawsuit Bill -

Legislation making it easier for cities to be sued over gun restrictions eased through the state House Wednesday, May 3, even though it would allow those filing lawsuits to claim triple attorney fees.

98. Forum to Riverfront Corridor Debuts In June -

The area between FedExForum and the Mississippi River is getting a network of protected bike lanes and pedestrian plazas next month as part of a year-long pilot project.

The Great Streets Pilot Project has a one-year trial period for the commissioned art, painted crosswalks, barriers and planters as well as the lane changes.

99. Memphis May Day March Points To Deeper, Sustained Involvement -

Three months after a Downtown march protesting the first of President Donald Trump’s two immigration travel ban orders, the turnout was smaller Monday, May 1, along the same route between Clayborn Temple and the National Civil Rights Museum.

100. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.