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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

2. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

3. U.S. Home Prices Rise at Solid Pace in February -

U.S. home prices continued their steady upward march in February as buyers competed for a limited number of available properties.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 5.4 percent that month compared with a year earlier, according to a report released Tuesday. That's down slightly from January's 5.7 percent rise.

4. Women's Foundation Honors 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

The Women’s Foundation hosted its annual Legends Awards Tribute Luncheon on April 29 to honor women in Memphis leadership. Honey Scheidt received the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, received the Catalyst Award, and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, was recognized with the Innovation Award.

5. Grinding Recovery -

Michael Drury is watching the current U.S. presidential season with a combination of professional detachment and an air of resignation.

Detachment, because part of his job as chief economist at Memphis-based McVean Trading & Investments is to keep abreast of what makes economies around the world tick. Part of that, of course, means at least some degree of focus on the man – or, possibly a few months from now, the woman – who sits astride the dominant global economy.

6. Memphis Attractions Touted at MCVB Tourism Party -

To kick off tourism season, the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau will host a tourism “Party in the Park” where more than 50 Memphis attractions will be on hand with interactive booths and giveaways. Food trucks will be selling food and there will be live music. Admission is free and open to the public. The Party in the Park will take place Tuesday, May 3, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Downtown’s Court Square

7. Grand Carousel’s New Home Ready for Construction -

By mid-summer 2017, the historic Memphis Grand Carousel will be spinning in its new home at the Children’s Museum of Memphis.

On April 27, designshop pllc garnered the necessary approvals from the Board of Adjustment to begin work on a 20,000-square-foot addition to the Midtown museum to house the carousel and event rentals. The new building on the northwest corner of the campus will connect to the existing museum and older administration building.

8. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

9. Kyles Played Big Role in Civil Rights Movement -

The world knows him through his story of standing near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in 1968 just seconds before King was assassinated.

10. US Home Prices Rise At Solid Pace -

U.S. home prices continued their steady upward march in February as buyers competed for a limited number of properties.

The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 5.4 percent that month compared with a year earlier, according to a report released Tuesday. That’s down slightly from January’s 5.7 percent rise.

11. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

12. Archimania Leads 2016 Architecture Awards -

Memphis architecture firm archimania was the biggest winner Saturday night at the 2016 AIA Memphis Design Awards, an annual bash that honors the city’s top architecture firms.

Also singled out for honors by the four members of the design awards jury - which this year was comprised of nationally recognized, award-winning architects from Raleigh, N.C. - were the firms designshop, Haizlip Studio and Self+Tucker Architects as part of a joint venture with archimania. There were 11 winners in all, and the honors were presented during the event at Clark Tower’s Tower Center by the awards’ jury chair Erin Sterling Lewis of Raleigh’s in situ studio.

13. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

14. Artspace Lofts Gets $25,000 State Boost -

The Tennessee Arts Commission has donated $25,000 to support the South Main Artspace Lofts.

The $17 million project will convert a South Main warehouse into 58 affordable apartments for working artists. Rents will range from $450 to $770, and artists will have access to studios and shared gallery space.

15. Memphis Health & Ed Board Can Resume Issuing Bonds -

The Memphis Health, Education and Housing Facility Board is back in business. In a letter sent Wednesday, April 20, Tennessee Housing and Development Agency executive director Ralph Perrey told the Health & Ed board that it may immediately resume issuing bonds.

16. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

17. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

18. Focusing on Financial Literacy -

Teaching Memphians how to manage money is of vital importance to helping our community members achieve their personal and financial goals. April is Financial Literacy Month – a national initiative offering an opportunity for individuals to learn how to adopt effective financial strategies.

19. Press Box: Like Marc Gasol, Mike Conley Will Choose 901 -

Mike Conley is gone. We know this because one unsubstantiated national report beget another.

And then came the indisputable proof: a blogger created a slideshow listing the five most likely landing spots for the Grizzlies’ free agent point guard.

20. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

21. State Lifts Memphis Health & Ed Board Bond Moratorium -

The Memphis Health, Education and Housing Facility Board is back in business.

In a letter sent Wednesday, April 20, Tennessee Housing and Development Agency executive director Ralph Perrey told the Health & Ed board that it may immediately resume issuing bonds.

22. Artspace Lofts Gets $25,000 State Boost -

The Tennessee Arts Commission has donated $25,000 to support the South Main Artspace Lofts.

The $17 million project will convert a South Main warehouse into 58 affordable apartments for working artists. Rents will range from $450 to $770, and artists will have access to studios and shared gallery space.

23. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

24. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

25. Tennessee Unemployment Dips to 4.5 Pct. in March -

Tennessee’s unemployment rate dipped to 4.5 percent in March, four-tenths of a percentage point from the February revised rate of 4.9 percent, according to preliminary figures from Tennessee Labor & Workforce Development Commissioner Burns Phillips.

26. Horn Lake Among Top Cities for African-Americans -

Horn Lake has been named one of 2016’s 10 Best Cities for African-Americans by relocation website Livability.com.

The site’s editors, which put Horn Lake at No. 8 on the list, studied basic indicators spanning a range of topics, such as cost of living, crime, climate, health care availability and economic equality. They then looked for areas with larger-than-average African-American populations and places where they are succeeding in terms of income, homeownership and academic achievement. Other factors included desirability – areas where African-Americans are moving to at higher rates – and lifestyle and consumer data.

27. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

28. Editorial: Baseball's Impact Goes Beyond the Outfield -

Memphis is not a baseball town. And at times there are questions about the rest of the country.

But while the fields are fresh and the ballpark air is a mix of the last winter chill and a premonition of the summer heat, there is the game that beckons.

29. Tennessee Unemployment Dips to 4.5 Percent in March -

Tennessee’s unemployment rate dipped to 4.5 percent in March, four-tenths of a percentage point from the February revised rate of 4.9 percent, according to preliminary figures from Tennessee Labor & Workforce Development Commissioner Burns Phillips.

30. Memphis Gets Proven Commodity in Tubby Smith -

It started immediately, before the hiring was even official. The audible sighs on sports talk radio, the Twitter whining, and the figurative eye-rolling.

Tubby Smith? Really? That old guy?

If they didn’t call him “old” outright, they inferred it in every way imaginable.

31. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

32. University of Memphis Alumna’s Book Sheds Light on Jackie O -

For about three decades, Tina Santi Flaherty and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis lived in the same New York City apartment building. “I wasn’t friends with Jackie,” Flaherty said. “But I’d see her in the lobby and we had a nod-and-smile acquaintance.”

33. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

34. Horn Lake Ranked Among Top Cities for African-Americans -

Horn Lake has been named one of 2016’s 10 Best Cities for African-Americans by relocation website Livability.com.

The site’s editors, which put Horn Lake at No. 8 on the list, studied basic indicators spanning a range of topics, such as cost of living, crime, climate, health care availability and economic equality. They then looked for areas with larger-than-average African-American populations and places where they are succeeding in terms of income, homeownership and academic achievement. Other factors included desirability – areas where African-Americans are moving to at higher rates – and lifestyle and consumer data.

35. State Halts City Board From Issuing Bonds -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational & Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

36. Experts Caution Self-Driving Cars Aren't Ready for Roads -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Self-driving cars are more likely to hurt than help public safety because of unsolved technical issues, engineers and safety advocates told the government Friday, countering a push by innovators to speed government approval.

37. State Halts Memphis Health & Ed Board From Doing Business -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing and Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

38. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

39. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

40. Daughter of Duality, Gibbs is Building a Better Justice System -

Say you stole a television worth $300. How long should you be punished? A year? Five years? Whatever you answered, it probably wasn’t “for the rest of your life.” But that’s how the U.S. legal system currently treats many people who have been convicted of felonies.

41. Gaskins Leads Engineering Office -

Wain Gaskins has joined consulting engineering firm Cannon & Cannon Inc. as manager of the company’s new Memphis office as well as director of West Tennessee operations and business development. 

42. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

43. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

44. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

45. Open to Progress -

WE CANNOT REMAIN STILL. When the news of the assassination broke on April 4, 1968, I ran to the dorm phone to call home to find out what in my world was going on, if my city was on fire, my family safe. All the lines to Memphis were busy, the answers would have to wait.

46. 'Fight for 15' Campaign to Target McDonald's Stores April 14 -

NEW YORK (AP) – McDonald's customers stopping in for a Big Mac on the eve of Tax Day may be greeted by demonstrators calling for pay of $15 an hour and a union.

Labor organizers say they're planning another day of strikes and protests exclusively targeting McDonald's stores in dozens of cities on April 14, following similar demonstrations outside a variety of fast-food restaurants a year ago.

47. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

48. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

49. Food as the Crossover -

Last week, upon experiencing SXSW in my old stomping grounds of Austin, I listened, networked, and ate far more in one concentrated period than I ever thought possible. The sights and tastes were exhilarating, and the opportunities were empowering.

50. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

51. Rudd + Bowen + Pastner = PR Nightmare at Memphis -

You keep thinking the story can’t get worse, and then it does. What we have here is an ongoing public relations disaster that is the University of Memphis athletic department as it pertains to all matters regarding the men’s basketball program.

52. Over $20M in Construction Headed to Brewery District -

495 Tennessee St.
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Amount: $18.8 million

Owner: 495 Tennessee LLC

Tenant: Brewery Master Tenant

53. Shipmon Joins Lending Team at Paragon -

Thomas “Tee” Shipmon has joined Paragon Bank as senior vice president, specialty lending. In this role, Shipmon is responsible for developing products for Paragon that solve customers’ challenges and that are profitable to the bank. Currently, specialty lending is providing short-term commercial construction loans to companies, often franchisees, that are expanding operations.

54. Last Word: D-Day, Opera Festival Returns and Buying GMF After the Bond Default -

This is what you might call D-Day in Nashville. The “D’ in this case stands for deannexation.
The bill to permit deannexation by referendum has in the course of two weeks become the city’s dominant political issue.

55. The Week Ahead: March 21-27 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first Great River Indoor Food Truck Festival to a celebration of late Memphis wrestler Sputnik Monroe.

56. Beale Authority Encounters Familiar Headwinds -

Somewhere near the beginning of the Thursday, March 17, meeting of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, Caren Nichol talked about how unique the entertainment district is because of its cultural and historical importance.

57. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

58. Careful What You’re Being Sold -

ZOO DOO IS BACK. In the early ’90s, an enterprise started in Memphis to market recycled zoo dung – talk about organic – called the Zoo Doo Compost Co. A pungent and powerful fertilizer, raw product supplied seven days a week, a clever name, a great promotional headline, “Gardeners Love This Crap.”

59. Clark Butcher is Pedaling to Glory -

It’s 6 a.m. on a rainy Wednesday morning. Outside, the sun has not yet risen. But inside Victory Bicycle Studio, they’re already playing Rihanna. “We’re gonna start with some two-minute openers,” shouts Clark Butcher, over the thump of the music. “I want you at 70 percent of your max. Let’s go!”

60. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

61. Road Trip Across Northern England -

American families considering travel to Europe often think of London, Paris and Rome.

But for those travelers wanting to get a real feel of a country and its people, immerse themselves in history, and discover the natural beauty and literary heritage of a nation, Northern England provides ample opportunities.

62. CDC Guidelines Aim to Curb Painkiller Prescribing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin.

63. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

64. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

65. Up, Up and Away -

The modern-day drone is both a high-tech military tool and a safer way to play humanitarian and deliver medicine and supplies to the suffering people of war-torn Syria.

The drone is everything from a stalking device to track poachers creeping through the South African bush hunting rhinos to the impetus for a potential commercial growth industry right here in Memphis.

66. City Crews Work Overtime on Rain Overflow -

Street flooding across Memphis, Shelby County outside the city and north Mississippi on the third day of a rainy week Thursday, March 10, has city public works crews working overtime.

And Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said Thursday, March 10, all city agencies are on alert.

67. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

68. A ‘Blue Streak’ Of Kindness -

There is a place where the struggles of Memphis in overcoming crime, blight, poverty, hunger and a myriad of societal ills meets those who are driven by a purpose in life that goes beyond oneself, a need to do the right thing, and who use their talents, skills and wisdom to change Memphis for the better.

69. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

70. August Election Ballot Filling Out Ahead of April 7 Deadline -

The presidential contenders have moved on to other states and closed up their Memphis storefronts.

And the excitement of the national campaigns that burst into town all in one weekend just before the March 1 Tennessee primaries has shifted to the same frenetic political activity in other states.

71. Study: Renters' Rise Extends Beyond Big US Cities to Suburbs -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the American imagination, suburbs are places to buy a house and put down roots. But a growing percentage of suburbanites rent, according to a new study.

About 29 percent of metropolitan-area suburbanites were renters in 2014, up from 23 percent in 2006, according to a report being released Tuesday by New York University's Furman Center real estate think tank and the bank Capital One.

72. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

73. Memphis Lags on State Minority Contracts -

The state of Tennessee did $400 million in business with minority- and women-owned businesses in 2015. It’s a share local minority business and civic leaders judge as a good number, considering the state spends $2.5 billion in contracts a year.

74. March 4-10, 2016: This Week in Memphis History -

1966: On the front page of The Daily News, Memphis State University begins season ticket sales for the Tigers’ 1966 season with 5,000 more prime seats available.
The student section at Memphis Memorial Stadium is moved to the east side of the stadium from its former location on the same side as the season ticket holders.
Season tickets at a rate of $20 per ticket – $3 less than buying individual tickets to the five home games – can also be bought for the first time through Dixiemart and Corondolet stores, along with 200 other retailers, by using the charge accounts for those stores.
And there is the “Tiger Note” method through the big three local banks – First National, National Bank of Commerce and Union Planters – as well as Murdock Insurance Corp. Tickets can be ordered on credit through the four institutions and paid later with no interest or carrying charges.

75. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

76. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

77. Council Rejects Hotel at Jackson and Front -

Memphis City Council members rejected a hotel with retail Tuesday, March 1, on the northeast corner of Jackson Avenue and Front Street, across from The Pyramid in the Pinch District, that was first proposed last year.

78. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

79. Memphis Gas Prices Rise, Still Lower than US Average -

Memphis gas prices have risen slightly in recent days but still remain below the national average, according to gasoline price website GasBuddy.com.

Memphis’ average retail price rose 1 cent per gallon over the past week, averaging $1.56 per gallon on Sunday, Feb. 28, according to GasBuddy’s daily survey of 439 gas outlets across the city. The national average, meanwhile, rose 3.7 cents to $1.74 per gallon.

80. City Council Considers Frayser Truck Stop -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, March 1, on a 20.8-acre convenience store, hotel, restaurant and truck wash at the Hollywood Street and Interstate 40.

The development by Hospitality Builders of America Inc. is on the site of the old Treasury department store.

81. The Week Ahead: February 29, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? We know what you’ll be doing Tuesday (voting, of course!), but plenty of nonpolitical happenings grace this week’s calendar too – from a trio of Grizzlies games to a fundraiser supporting fair housing.

82. Archer Malmo Wins Best in Show at 2016 ADDYs -

The Memphis chapter of the American Advertising Federation brought creative directors from Chicago, Austin and Santa Monica to Memphis over the weekend to judge 724 entries in the chapter’s 49th annual American Advertising Awards competition for creative excellence.

83. Numbers Show Memphis’ Commercial Real Estate Market Stable in 2015 -

Across all sectors, the Memphis market was stable in 2015.

That’s according to the latest data from Integra Realty Resources, a national appraisal and advisory firm. At its annual Viewpoint local market presentation Wednesday, Feb. 24, local Integra leaders spoke on the industrial sector’s banner year, multifamily’s expansion cycle, what’s next for an office market without any remaining Class A space, and growth in the retail sector.

84. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

85. US Home Market: Sales, Prices Up But Not Enough Supply -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home sales are climbing. Prices are rising, too. So the outlook for the housing market is golden, right?

Not entirely.

A series of reports released Tuesday pointed to potential cracks in the foundations of America's residential real estate market.

86. David Lusk Gallery Turns Page in New Space -

More than most weeks, David Lusk is especially ready for Friday this week. Eight months after renovation work began, Lusk is ready to host a public celebration officially unveiling his longtime art gallery’s new home at 97 Tillman St. on Feb. 26.

87. Last Word: The Road To Memphis, Medical District Plans and A Greensward Update -

The Republican presidential field is coming this way in the gap between early voting, which ends Tuesday evening, and the March 1 election day
Donald Trump, John Kasich and Ben Carson are booked for this coming weekend.

88. Strickland to Sign Police Director Search Contract -

It will cost the city $30,000 to $40,000 for the national search for a Memphis police director.

That is the estimate from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which will be conducting the search for the city.

89. This week in Memphis history: February 19-25 -

1985: Robert Cray Band at Huey’s a year ahead of his breakthrough album “Strong Persuader.” There was only one Huey’s at the time – on Madison Avenue in Midtown.
Source: “Memphis Rocks” by Ron Hall

90. NAWBO’s Dixon Using Experience To Help Other Women in Business -

Dianne Dixon, president of the Memphis chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners, has spent her life and career earning a seat at the table for herself, and now she’s holding the door open for a new generation of women business owners.

91. Picking Up Speed -

Forbes recently penned 2016 as the year of the female entrepreneur, and the local landscape isn’t far behind for women business owners in Memphis.

In her article, “Why The Force Will Be With Women Entrepreneurs in 2016,” contributor Geri Stengel outlines that the media is celebrating stories of women leaders while the sheer numbers of women-owned firms is growing.

92. Last Word: 901Fest, First Tennessee Sues Pinnacle and EDGE Responds -

U of M Tigers 73 – UCF Knights 56 at FedExForum and on ESPN Wednesday evening.

As that was underway, Vice President Joe Biden was on his way out of the Memphis area after a visit to the Norfolk Southern intermodal facility in Rossville.
Here’s the basic web story account from Wednesday evening of Biden’s visit which comes on the seventh anniversary of the enactment of the federal stimulus act.
More on the larger themes in the visit and three-city tour by Biden in the print version that hits online Thursday afternoon.

93. Think About Spring Break A New Way -

If you’re planning a spring break trip to the Gulf Coast or Orlando, you’re not alone in that decision. College students and families alike flock to popular beach communities and Florida theme parks year after year.

94. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

95. Strickland to Sign Police Director Search Contract -

It will cost the city $30,000 to $40,000 for the national search for a Memphis police director.

That is the estimate from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which will be conducting the search for the city.

96. Democratic Presidential Campaigns Battle for Memphis Voters -

Former local Democratic Party chairman and Shelby County Commissioner Matt Kuhn got right to the point Saturday, Feb. 13, as the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign opened its Memphis headquarters in the Chickasaw Crossing shopping center.

97. Grizzlies Sign KD in Free Agency, Trade Mike Conley? No, Don’t Think So -

So there’s a national report out there saying the Memphis Grizzlies will make a strong play to sign free agent Kevin Durant after the season.

98. ArtsMemphis Joins National Economic Impact Study -

As one of Tennessee’s leading arts organizations, ArtsMemphis will participate in a national study designed to reveal how nonprofit and cultural organizations impact the local economy.

In partnership with the Tennessee Arts Commission and Americans for the Arts, ArtsMemphis will spearhead the local effort to collect data from nonprofit arts and cultural organizations that will measure the impact of arts and culture spending on local jobs, income paid to local residents and revenue generated to local and state governments.

99. Urban Treasure -

They were at the 2007 National Recreation and Park Association conference in Indianapolis and they had been dutifully attending the seminars and taking notes. But one day this two-woman contingent from Memphis and the newly formed Shelby Farms Park Conservancy skipped out of the afternoon workshops.

100. Strickland Wants Contract, Pay Boost for Memphis' Next Police Director -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to offer the next Memphis Police Department director a multi-year contract for more than the $150,000 the city is currently paying interim police director Michael Rallings.