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Editorial Results (free)

1. Shelby County Schools Budgets – Past and Present – Amended -

The final numbers are in for Shelby County Schools and the quest for funding of the county’s largest public school system.

The SCS board approved Tuesday, July 26, the revised operating and capital budgets for the school system for the fiscal year that began 26 days earlier.

2. Ioby Starts Campaign For Overton Park Intersection -

Ioby (In Our Backyards), a nonprofit civic crowd-resourcing platform, is kicking off its second annual “Trick Out My Trip” campaign in Memphis Monday, July 25, to address transportation challenges.

3. Memphis Attorney Elected President of Association -

Memphis trial attorney Thomas Greer was elected president of the Tennessee Trial Lawyers Association at its annual convention held recently in Florida.

4. Dark Money Ads Surface in 8th District Primary -

As Republicans were either at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland or watching it on TV last week, “dark money” entered the crowded Republican primary for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district.

5. Ioby Launching Campaign For Overton Park Intersection -

Ioby (In Our Backyards), a nonprofit civic crowd-resourcing platform, is kicking off its second annual “Trick Out My Trip” campaign in Memphis Monday, July 25, to address transportation challenges.

6. Memphis Attorney Elected President of Association -

Memphis trial attorney Thomas Greer was elected president of the Tennessee Trial Lawyers Association at its annual convention held recently in Florida.

7. Astor Collection Documents Four Decades of Memphis’ Gay Community -

Vincent Astor knows his way around the Memphis-Shelby County Room at the Memphis Public Library’s Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library.

His 2013 book “Memphis Movie Theatres” relied heavily on the archive’s collection of photographs of long-gone movie palaces.

8. Last Word: Return of the Balloon Note, SCS and Migrant Teens & Greensward Doubts -

One of the prime culprits in the housing bubble burst that played a role in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is back – the adjustable rate mortgage.

Numbers from Chandler Reports, the real estate information company that is part of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc, show the number of such loans has spiked in the first half of this year and are the highest they’ve been since 2008, the year after the bubble burst nationally.

9. With Millions Covered, 'Repeal and Replace' Gets Riskier -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As Republicans gather to anoint their presidential ticket in Cleveland, uncompromising opposition to "Obamacare" is getting politically riskier.

Few people were covered under President Barack Obama's health care law when the GOP held its last convention in 2012. Now, Donald Trump's plan to replace the program would make 18 million people uninsured, according to a recent nonpartisan analysis.

10. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

11. Black Lives Matter Movement Defines Itself Beyond Single Leader -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figurehead” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

12. BLM Movement Leaders Add to Demands, Conley Says 'Time To Speak Up' -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figure head” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

13. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

14. Progress in Closing the Digital Divide -

When I worked in financial services I saw the information technology sector quickly grow to be the second largest sector, making up over 20 percent of the capital markets.

Now that I am back in Memphis and working to build high-growth entrepreneurial technology companies, I see firsthand how the lack of embracing information technology earlier here in Memphis hit us like a sledgehammer.

15. Black Lives Matter Protesters Arrested Outside Graceland -

Six Black Lives Matter protesters were arrested Tuesday, July 12, as they blocked Elvis Presley Boulevard at the gates of Graceland.

The arrests were out of a group of 100 protesters led by Frank Gotti, who was among the organizers of the Sunday rally turned march to the Hernando DeSoto Bridge.

16. Last Word: The Day After The Bridge, Big River Plans and the U of M Train Tracks -

The lure of the bridge was tempting some of the organizers of Sunday’s Black Lives Matter protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge on the day after the protest that drew thousands.

17. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

18. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

19. CDC Funds Will Help Tennessee Fight Zika -

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded Tennessee $377,376 to support efforts to protect citizens from Zika virus infection and associated adverse health outcomes, including microcephaly and the other serious birth defects.

20. Strickland and Rallings Urge Peace and Calm At End of Violent Week -

Memphis Police are “doubling up” on patrol for now, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings said Friday, July 8, and are sending more officers to respond to calls in the wake of a sniper attack in Dallas Thursday evening that killed five police officers.

21. Scramble in the 8th District -

You might call it the calm before the storm. The Aug. 4 election, for which early voting starts July 15, is calmer than usual for the election cycle before a November presidential general election – the only election that more than half of Shelby County voters regularly show up for.

22. US Gives Tentative OK to Flights to Cuba From 10 US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government on Thursday tentatively approved scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities, further bridging the gulf between countries as close as 90 miles and an hour flight but long kept at a greater distance by the Cold War.

23. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

24. CDC Awards Tennessee Funds to Fight Zika Virus -

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded Tennessee $377,376 to support efforts to protect citizens from Zika virus infection and associated adverse health outcomes, including microcephaly and the other serious birth defects.

25. Strickland Unveils Greensward Solution, Zoo Not Happy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has put forth his plan to end parking on the Overton Park Greensward.

26. Roland Wants Revisit of Budget Cut -

The exact numbers always take a few weeks. That’s the nature of budgets forged by political compromise and groups of elected officials.

There are always changes and adjustments. And there are also second thoughts.

27. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

28. Mayor Strickland Defends Anonymity Of Memphis Police Director Applicants -

Releasing the names of everyone who has applied for the job of Memphis Police Director would have “a chilling effect” on good candidates for the critical public safety post and “hurt public safety,” Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says.

29. Shelby County Budget Shuffle Endures -

By the end of Shelby County government’s budget season, a lot of paper was being passed around the County Commission chambers.

It was in keeping with the rules set by chairman Terry Roland going into the Wednesday, June 29, session that stretched on for seven hours: All amendments had to be put in written resolution form.

30. Events -

Shelby County Juvenile Court’s Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative, in partnership with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, will hold a juvenile justice summit Thursday, June 30, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Gathering Place in Hickory Ridge Mall, 6075 Winchester Road. The summit aims to bring awareness to Shelby County juvenile reform efforts and encourage citizens to participate in them. James Bell, founder and executive director of the W. Haywood Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice Fairness and Equality, will present the keynote. Cost is free. For details, email kimbrell.owens@shelbycountytn.gov or call 901-222-0902.

31. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

32. Memphis Lawsuit Over Police Applicants Could Hinge on Nashville Legal Opinion -

The city of Memphis isn’t entitled to a list of everyone who applied for the job of Memphis Police director and will only get a list of five to six finalists from the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

33. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

34. City Responds to Police Search Lawsuit -

The city of Memphis isn’t entitled to a list of everyone who applied for the job of Memphis Police Director and will only get a list of 5 to 6 finalist from the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

35. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, June 29, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the University of Phoenix–Memphis Campus, 65 Germantown Court, first floor. The topic is The MasterMind Principle, based on the book “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz.

36. Last Word: Brexit, Grizz Picks in the NBA Draft and the Race for the 8th -

Brexit – British Exit – it is. The end of the European Union in the United Kingdom in Thursday’s referendum there began to make its presence known in financial markets even before the very close vote count was well established.

37. Medical, Edge Districts Eye Bike Share Connectivity -

Efforts to install a new bike share program in Memphis by next year are gaining traction, and organizers are envisioning a much more connected Memphis in the years to come.

Nonprofit upstart Explore Bike Share expects to launch its bike share system in Memphis in 2017, with approximately 600 bikes at 60 stations planned within the Interstate 240 loop.

38. Council Faces Yet Another Residency Requirement -

Memphis voters could take up the question of where city government employees should live for the fourth time in 12 years.

With no debate, Memphis City Council members approved on the first of three readings Tuesday, June 21, a referendum ordinance to go on the November ballot that would require city employees to “live and maintain a residence” within the boundaries of the city of Memphis.

39. Cox to Lead Asset Management at Lehman-Roberts -

Matt Cox has been promoted to director of asset management at Lehman-Roberts Co. Cox most recently served as total process reliability coordinator for three years. In his new role, he is responsible for the full lifecycle of all construction equipment supplied to Lehman-Roberts’ operations divisions, including acquiring equipment, maintaining nearly 600 pieces of rolling stock and disposing of equipment as necessary.

40. Shelby County Budget Delay Centers on $3.5 Million for Schools -

Most of the declarations Monday, June 20, before the Shelby County Commission delayed final votes on local schools funding to next week came from the audience.

“For too long we’ve bled, died, cried and pled for education,” former Memphis City Council and Memphis City Schools board member TaJuan Stout-Mitchell told the commission.

41. XQ Super Schools Reform Effort Looks at Memphis -

On a dry erase board by the National Civil Rights Museum, a new education reform group in town last week asked citizens to fill in the blanks about their high school experience with a sentence that began, “I thought high school would be…”

42. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

43. Juneteenth – What History Can Teach Us -

Everyone knows July 4th is America’s birthday – the day we celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence and the creation of a nation where “all men are created equal.”

44. Local LGBT Community Stands in Solidarity After Orlando Massacre -

Flags across the state of Tennessee were at half staff Sunday, June 12, following the Sunday morning mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

And a vigil for the victims of the Orlando shooting was scheduled Sunday at 8:30 p.m. at the Memphis Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Cooper-Young.

45. Weekend Crime Rampage Frames Criminal Justice Debate -

Now what? The two-word question was one of many reactions as the week began to a Downtown crime spree Saturday night in which a Memphis Police officer died and three people were shot and wounded – two in critical condition Sunday at Regional One Health center.

46. Civil Rights Museum Highlights Lorraine Hotel’s Storied History -

The balcony is usually the part of the National Civil Rights Museum’s exterior that is the center of attention.

Visitors know the mid-20th century wrought iron railing and other features of the post-World War II Lorraine Motel’s motor court. It’s usually from pictures and videos of the April 4, 1968, assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on a second-story balcony outside room 306.

47. Pugh Takes Politically Volatile Shelter Position -

The new director of the Memphis Animal Shelter says a shelter that doesn’t euthanize animals because of time or space is a goal.

But Alexis Pugh, who starts the job next month, is quick to add that public safety is the immediate priority.

48. EDGE OKs Fast Track PILOT Program -

The board of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has approved a new tax incentive package designed to give Memphis a more competitive edge against North Mississippi.

The EDGE board green-lighted the Fast Track PILOT program at its Wednesday, May 18, meeting, making it EDGE’s fifth payment-in-lieu-of-taxes program.

49. Overton Mediation Looks at Reality Of North Parkway On-Street Parking -

Where shuttle buses will drop off those bound for Overton Park and the Memphis Zoo in particular, as well as the public’s reaction to newly created on-street parking on North Parkway are issues being discussed in mediation to resolve the park’s Greensward controversy.

50. Reader Says Massacre Backstory is Complex -

Mr. Dries, whether one calls the events of May 1866 riots, a massacre, or civil disturbances is not that relevant.
The occurrence was deplorable, but the current reporting on this marker is lacking. A major contributor to the violence was the conduct of the federal troops of occupation that abused, burgled, robbed, and murdered citizens while especially targeting the police. These abuses began during the war and continued up through Reconstruction. In February 1866, a police officer named O’Brien was beaten and robbed by soldiers. He died the next day. Later, officer William Mower was shot and killed by Federal soldiers. These abuses and many others are well documented in the press of that era including the Memphis Daily Post, a pro Union newspaper edited and published by two Union army officers. These officers were former professors at Oberlin College in Ohio. The Congressional investigation is quite thorough, but its conclusion is also an example of the anti-Irish bigotry often seen in mid-19th century America. The minority report, authored by Congressman G.S. Shanklin of Kentucky, gives additional insight into the ongoing tensions between the Federal soldiers and the Police. The Fort’s commanders allowed the soldiers to abuse the citizens for months leading up to the riots. Nothing can excuse nor mitigate the crimes of May 1, 2, and 3, 1866; however, if the Federal authorities had cooperated with the civilian authorities and enforced discipline over their troops in the preceding months, it might never have happened.

51. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

52. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

53. Dave Thomas Named CEO Of Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as chief executive officer. In this role, he’s responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations and also is tasked with growing the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance company. Thomas has 40 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently serving as CEO of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

54. University of Memphis, MSO Form Partnership -

The University of Memphis and the Memphis Symphony Orchestra have announced a unique partnership, creating a new Mid-South destination for music training and performance, music outreach and arts-centered, cross-sector community development.

55. Kemmons Wilson Insurance Hires Experienced CEO -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as its CEO. Thomas will lead the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance group in day-to-day operations and long-term growth.

56. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

57. University of Memphis, MSO Form Partnership -

The University of Memphis and the Memphis Symphony Orchestra have announced a unique partnership. In an unprecedented collaboration between a university and a professional symphony orchestra, MSO will partner with the U of M to create the premier destination in the Mid-South for music training and performance, music outreach and arts-centered, cross-sector community development.

58. Geater Claims Dunavant Honor for Job Without a Description -

Lisa Geater likens the job of the Memphis City Council’s staff to being wallpaper. After 27 years working in the council office at City Hall, including 20 as the administrator running the office, Geater said her advice for new staff members was simple.

59. Kemmons Wilson Insurance Hires Experienced CEO -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as its CEO. Thomas will lead the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance group in day-to-day operations and long-term growth.

60. Council Approves Overton Boundary Ordinance on First Reading -

Memphis City Council members approved an ordinance Tuesday, May 3, on the first of three readings to set boundaries in Overton Park including the use of the park Greensward.

But some council members who supported a March 1 resolution that gave the Memphis Zoo control of the greensward were much more hesitant about the ordinance two months later.

61. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

62. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

63. MLGW's Plus-1 Jam Returns During Memphis in May -

After a hiatus in 2015, Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division will once again celebrate Memphis music during Memphis in May celebrations with live music on an MLGW stage on Beale Street near the Elvis statue north of MLGW’s Administration Building.

64. Arlington Woman Indicted On Embezzlement Charges -

An Arlington woman has been indicted on felony charges of embezzling tens of thousands of dollars from the two businesses for whom she worked.

Amy Speight, 44, was indicted on charges of theft of property over $60,000 and forgery over $1,000, according to Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich’s office. Speight is free on $50,000 bond.

65. This Week in Memphis History: April 29-May 5 -

2015: Formal opening of Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, an adaptation of a former 20,000-seat arena that took a decade to pull off. City leaders approached Bass Pro Shops about opening a store with other attractions in the arena after a look at other adaptive reuses of arenas across the country.

66. Speaker Harwell's Health Care Task Force Holds First Meeting -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Members of a health care task force assigned with proposing alternatives to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's Insure Tennessee plan on Tuesday stressed their desire to include "circuit breakers" to prevent out-of-control costs.

67. Tennessee AG to Appeal Recount Order on Abortion Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The office of Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery announced on Tuesday that it is going to appeal a federal judge's ruling requiring a recount of a 2014 vote that made it easier to restrict abortions in the state.

68. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

69. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

70. 2014 Abortion Amendment Recount Ordered -

Almost two years after Tennessee voters approved an amendment to the Tennessee Constitution limiting abortion access, a federal judge in Nashville has ordered a recount of the vote – not a new vote but a recounting of the 2014 election returns.

71. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

72. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

73. Finding a Compromise on the Greensward Issue -

The current debate over the Memphis Zoo’s use of the Greensward for overflow parking is more complex than most realize. Opponents of this usage try to paint a very compelling picture of the Zoo as a massive, profit-driven enterprise which came into Overton Park like an invasive species and has recklessly expanded, gobbling up park land and taking it away from the citizens.

74. Legislature Passes Online Voter Registration Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The General Assembly passed legislation Tuesday that would allow Tennesseans to register to vote online.

The House unanimously passed a bill that the Senate had earlier approved. The measure allows Tennesseans to go online to register to vote or update their registration records. Applicants would be directed to apply on paper if their name, date of birth or other identifying information could not be confirmed with the Department of Safety.

75. Melzie Wilson Appointed To Commerce Advisory Committee -

Melzie Wilson, vice president of compliance at Mallory Alexander International Logistics, has been appointed to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness by secretary of commerce Penny Pritzker. In her role at Mallory Alexander, Wilson is responsible for all government regulations the company must comply with, both in the U.S. and globally.
She’s also responsible, along with a compliance team, for ensuring Mallory Alexander’s clients stay compliant.

76. Dyer Confirmed to State Court of Criminal Appeals -

Shelby County Attorney Ross Dyer became a state appellate court judge Monday, April 18, as members of both chambers of the Tennessee Legislature met in a joint session to confirm Dyer’s appointment as a judge on the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals.

77. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

78. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

79. Editorial: Baseball's Impact Goes Beyond the Outfield -

Memphis is not a baseball town. And at times there are questions about the rest of the country.

But while the fields are fresh and the ballpark air is a mix of the last winter chill and a premonition of the summer heat, there is the game that beckons.

80. FedEx Unveils Latest Global Citizenship Report -

FedEx Corp. has been busy with more than worldwide package delivery and the operation of its sprawling logistics empire over the past year.

81. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

82. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

83. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

84. Greensward Controversy Shows Complex Mix of Groups -

No one from the Memphis Zoo or City Hall showed up for the Greensward box luncheon Saturday, April 9, despite the invitations sent out by Citizens to Preserve Overton Park.

CPOP leaders nevertheless gathered on the other side of the metal parking barrier in place on the Greensward for the second weekend. They dutifully stacked the box lunches and set a vase of flowers on another table near plastic cups and a glass pitcher of water.

85. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

86. Editorial: Memphis Police Director Search Needs Better Sense of Urgency -

Sixty-one homicides in 90 days, including a March death that was classified as a homicide by police on the other side of April.

This will likely get worse before it gets better because there is no quick fix.

87. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

88. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

89. Events -

Metal Museum will host Whet Thursday on April 7 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can participate in a foundry class, tour the galleries, and enjoy food trucks, cash bar and live music. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

90. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

91. Travel in a World of Warnings -

In the pre-dawn hours of March 22 I found myself awake and decided to check Facebook on my phone before attempting to go back to sleep.

The first update was from a friend who lives in Paris. Just four months prior, that friend declared herself safe on Facebook following the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks there.

92. Bill to Make Bible Tennessee's State Book Heads to Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Derided by critics as everything from unconstitutional to sacrilegious, Tennessee lawmakers nevertheless plowed ahead with designating the Holy Bible as the state's official book.

93. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

94. Legislation to Seal Police Body Cam Footage Dies -

A proposal in the Tennessee Legislature that would seal police body camera footage from the public is dead for the year.

Supporters of the legislation say it protects bystanders, crime victims and police officers.

95. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

96. Last Word: Greensward Truce, Connor Schilling Retires and MEMFix Goes East -

You’ve heard of the mediation process surrounding the long-term use of the Overton Park Greensward by the Memphis Zoo for its overflow parking.
It appears there is now a less formal mediation process underway when it comes to the use of the greensward during the park’s spring peak season which is now underway.

97. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

98. Longtime TennCare Director Darin Gordon Retiring in June -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – TennCare Director Darin Gordon, who spearheaded Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's unsuccessful Insure Tennessee proposal, announced Wednesday that he is stepping down after 10 years in charge of the state's expanded Medicaid program.

99. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

100. New Haslam Spending Proposed for Roads, TennCare, Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Monday proposed new spending on Tennessee roads, TennCare and schools.

The annual budget amendment reflects the governor's priorities for spending about $65 million in savings beyond what was originally projected for the budget year beginning July 1.