» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Case Management' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:61
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:6
East Tennessee:1
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Phil Mickelson to Forfeit Nearly $1 Million in SEC Case -

NEW YORK (AP) – The professional golfer Phil Mickelson has agreed to forfeit nearly $1 million that the Securities and Exchange Commission said was unfairly earned on a tip from an insider trading scheme conducted by a former corporate director and a professional gambler.

2. Outsourcing Savings Estimates Strain ‘Credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

3. Sometimes, Adviser Just Saves Clients From Themselves -

Mike Cooper understands that the information is everywhere. Financial “experts” on radio and television offer unsolicited advice with little regard for whether the consumer is a 25-year-old single mother worried about her children’s college education or a 50-year-old man beginning to turn an eye toward retirement.

4. Sometimes, Financial Planner Mike Cooper Just Saves Clients From Themselves -

Mike Cooper understands that the information is everywhere. Financial “experts” on radio and television offer unsolicited advice with little regard for whether the consumer is a 25-year-old single mother worried about her children’s college education or a 50-year-old man beginning to turn an eye toward retirement.

5. More Than Just Hard Work -

One of the most common messages I received as a child was, “work hard and you will be rewarded.” This sentiment was echoed by loved ones, teachers, and mentors. There’s a good chance you heard the same rumor about life being fair and equitable.

6. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

7. Shelby Farms Park Transformation Started With Plan -

Two years ago this summer, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy had raised $52 million to start its “Heart of the Park” work that is scheduled to open in the late summer and early fall.

8. Stricter Rules Unveiled for Brokers Giving Retirement Advice -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration acted Wednesday to require that brokers who recommend investments for retirement savers meet a stricter standard that now applies to registered advisers: They must act as "fiduciaries" – trustees who are obligated to put their clients' best interests above all.

9. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

10. Fred’s Set for Rebound in 2016 -

Twenty-four years ago this month, Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. went public.Today, for a variety of reasons that include Fred’s ongoing shot at a turnaround, the company finds itself in a period of unprecedented change.

11. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

12. Stephenson Leverages Capital for Community Change -

Why start a bank? It’s a question that would never occur to most people. But to Susan Stephenson, the answer is obvious: “It’s infinite variety. You get to participate in other people’s dreams. In the morning, I can be a first-time homeowner. In the afternoon, I’m a small business looking to open a new location.”

13. Beale Authority Encounters Familiar Headwinds -

Somewhere near the beginning of the Thursday, March 17, meeting of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, Caren Nichol talked about how unique the entertainment district is because of its cultural and historical importance.

14. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

15. Last Word: The Bloody Shirt of Deannexation, More Boats and The Rise of ioby -

“Waving the bloody shirt” – get ready to hear that phrase a lot as a deannexation bill continues to be debated in Nashville – the one that the state House approved Monday evening.
There was a palpable frustration at City Hall during Tuesday’s council day that featured a light agenda but lots of attention to several challenges – many of them financial and hidden until recently – that the new mayor and council are facing.
As we mentioned in our Monday evening coverage of this, the skirmish lines over the deannexation bill and the larger issue are very close in Shelby County. Our legislative delegation is split between Memphis Democrats vocal in their outrage over the bill and Republicans in the county outside Memphis who are just as vehement in their support of the bill, especially the parts that apply to Memphis.

16. Graceland to Hold Muhammad Ali Auction -

Graceland Auctions is planning an auction of items and other memorabilia from Muhammad Ali Enterprises this fall.

The event is a first effort outside of recent auctions of Elvis Presley memorabilia for the auction division of Graceland Holdings LLC, the holding company that is the majority owner of Elvis Presley Enterprises.

17. Graceland To Hold Muhammad Ali Auction -

Graceland Auctions is planning an auction of items and other memorabilia from Muhammad Ali Enterprises this fall.

The event is a first effort outside of recent auctions of Elvis Presley memorabilia for the auction division of Graceland Holdings LLC, the holding company that is the majority owner of Elvis Presley Enterprises.

18. Millennials Hire Computers to Invest Their Money -

PHOENIX (AP) – Computers help us decide what route to take to the grocery store, who to date, and what music to listen to. Why shouldn't they also decide how we invest?

Younger investors, particularly those born in the early 1980s to late 1990s known as millennials, are increasingly adopting apps and what are known as robo-advisers to make their retirement decisions for them. In the last year Betterment, Wealthfront, Acorns and others have brought in several billions of dollars in assets that used to be handled by traditional brokerages or wealth advisers.

19. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

20. Profit from a Growth Mindset -

There can be many reasons that a company’s growth stalls – from competitive pressure to a rising cost of goods to the changing needs of the marketplace. The common thread among all of these challenges – and what’s really driving the stall – is the lack of a growth mindset among employees and leadership.

21. UT President Says School Thriving Despite Legal Troubles -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro pushed back against recent criticisms of the school, telling UT supporters that "the long arm of the government" is reaching further and further into university matters.

22. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

23. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

24. New Mental Health Court Aims for Intervention -

At any given time, around 525 of the people jailed at 201 Poplar have a persistent mental illness. That’s means 25 percent of the jail’s capacity, and exponential care and liability, are directed to people who commit crimes as a byproduct of illness.

25. Memphis Zoo CEO: Mediation, Court Action Can Coexist in Greensward Dispute -

The Memphis Zoo’s move to Chancery Court next week in the Overton Park greensward controversy does not damage the mediation process between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

That’s what zoo president and CEO Chuck Brady said as attorneys on both sides of the controversy prepare to make their cases in court.

26. NCRM Forum on Sports and Race Features Lively Dialogue -

Professional athletes pay a price when they speak out on issues outside of or larger than the games they play.

And ESPN commentator and retired NBA player Jalen Rose draws a distinction between the way players in Major League Baseball and players in “black sports” are treated by their teams.

27. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

28. Nike’s Global Expansion Connected to Memphis -

Name the earnings conference call this company CEO quote is from: “The success you see today and the opportunities ahead are driven by the strength of our portfolio.”

You could be forgiven for guessing it came from a FedEx Corp. call since Fred Smith, founder and CEO of the Memphis-based corporation, frequently speaks of the FedEx “portfolio.” He also frequently lectures analysts about the perils of judging FedEx by the performance of one part of the portfolio or looking at the portfolio a piece at a time.

29. The Titans Will Be Sold. Soon. Here’s Why -

Anybody got a spare $2 billion lying around? If so, the Tennessee Titans could be yours. Despite statements to the contrary by Titans management, there is growing sentiment locally and around the NFL that the team soon will be available to the highest bidder.

30. Autonomy Comes With Risk for State’s Universities -

Tennessee officials are lauding Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education in an effort to meet his goals for the Drive to 55.

The FOCUS Act proposed recently by the Republican governor to make sure 55 percent of Tennesseans hold a degree or postsecondary certificate by 2025 promises to launch a new era for the state’s colleges and universities.

31. Giving Tuesday -

Have you heard of Giving Tuesday? Thanksgiving is all about giving thanks for the blessings in our lives. Black Friday and Cyber Monday kick off the holiday shopping season. Then there’s Giving Tuesday which, as you may guess, is all about giving – this time to nonprofits.

32. Hamlet Offers Plan For Global Ministries Foundation's Inner-City Apartments -

Global Ministries Foundation founder Richard Hamlet has a multi-million dollar recapitalization plan to make extensive renovations at three inner-city apartment complexes his company owns.

33. Tennessee’s Landlords Find Hidden Costs of Privatization -

Murfreesboro businessman Tom Hyde felt the sting of Tennessee’s privatization practices two years ago when a representative of Jones Lang Lasalle notified him he would have to pay the company a commission as part of his next lease agreement.

34. Cybersecurity Starts With Employees -

Cybersecurity has been a hot topic for companies and individuals alike in recent years. Last month, the U.S. Senate passed the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, a new bill aimed to protect companies from hackers. The purpose is to allow businesses to communicate with each other and also share information with the government on cyber-criminal intelligence.

35. Supreme Court Declines to Review Insider Trading Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Monday it won't hear the Obama administration's appeal of a lower court ruling that made it tougher to prosecute people for trading on leaked inside information.

36. DU Makes First Wetlands Mitigation Bank Transaction -

Ducks Unlimited’s 160-acre wetlands restoration of what was once crop land in Fayette County has put it in the banking business – a wetlands mitigation bank.

The Memphis-based conservation organization recently sold the first mitigation credits from the Mt. Tena Creek project to the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

37. Haslam Paying $612,000 Annually to 3 Outsourcing Consultants -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Three part-time outsourcing consultants stand to be paid $612,000 annually by the state even as Republican Gov. Bill Haslam insists that no decision has been made about privatization efforts.

38. DU Makes First Wetlands Mitigation Bank Transaction -

Ducks Unlimited’s 160-acre wetlands restoration of what was once crop land in Fayette County has put it in the banking business – a wetlands mitigation bank.

The Memphis-based conservation organization recently sold the first mitigation credits from the Mt. Tena Creek project to the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

39. US Jobless Rate Falls to 7-Year Low; Fed Move Still Unclear -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. unemployment rate fell to a seven-year low in August as employers added a modest 173,000 jobs, a key piece of evidence for the Federal Reserve in deciding whether to raise interest rates from record lows later this month.

40. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

41. Restoring Your Online Reputation is a Task for Experts -

As a property manager, Mark Hill is used to putting out fires. But when a disgruntled tenant took to the Internet to flame him and his business, Hill was the one calling for help.

42. Steady US Job Gains Likely Foretell a New Era: Higher Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A new era of higher rates on home and car loans, steeper borrowing costs for businesses and the government – maybe even a bit more return for savers – is about to arrive.

43. Spending Every Dime – Is It Feasible? -

Ray’s Take In the good old days, when you retired you got a gold watch and a pension and didn’t worry about much else.

Investment management was somebody else’s problem. You watched the sunset, not CNBC. This gave way to more recent retirement planning where you worked 30 or 40 years, saving along the way and when you got to 67 (or older) you quit, and lived on your Social Security and 401(k) savings and sometimes some part-time work. If you did it “right” you withdrew a set percentage of the funds and lived comfortably until age 85, as long as you didn’t hit some kind of devastatingly expensive health event.

44. Cooking Companies -

One indication of the pervasiveness of an area’s startup culture is arguably the presence of incubators and accelerators focused on a variety of narrow purposes.

It’s why the Memphis area is home to plenty of such organizations focused on tech startups, social startups, medical device startups and startups led by women. And it’s why a kitchen incubator in West Memphis that launched in recent weeks is focused on startups in the food industry.

45. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

46. With Data Breaches, Bad News Can Show Up Well Down the Road -

NEW YORK (AP) – The revelation that the data breach at the U.S. government's personnel office was actually much worse than the government originally thought is following a familiar script.

47. Under Fire for Data Breach, Obama Personnel Chief Steps Down -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The embattled head of the government's personnel office abruptly stepped down Friday, bowing to mounting pressure following the unprecedented breach of private information her agency was entrusted to protect.

48. Boner, Peel and a Reporter’s Call Spark a City’s Embarrassment -

Nashville’s mayor broke into a broad smile and funny walk, pointing across the main dining room at the old TGI Friday’s on Elliston Place to a young reporter seated at a long table with eight colleagues and friends.

49. Trade Schools Have to Find Grads Jobs, or Lose Financial Aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Exotic dancers hired as admissions counselors. Recruiters told to seek out "impatient" individuals who have "few people in their lives who care about them." Military personnel still recovering from brain damage told to sign on the dotted line.

50. Boosting Overtime: Obama Calls for Broader Coverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) – They're called managers, and they sometimes work grueling schedules at fast food chains and retail stores. But with no overtime eligibility, their pay may be lower per hour than many workers they supervise.

51. Memphian Will Hogue Finding Success on Long Drive Tour -

Will Hogue won last weekend’s Bluff City Shootout long drive competition by defeating 2014 world champion Jeff Flagg. And that would seem to bode well for Hogue’s chances at this year’s world championships, except that right now there isn’t going to be one.

52. Sales Volume Raises Risk of Closing Snafus -

The Greater Nashville Association of Realtors’ May sales data show sales continuing to rise.

There were 3,558 closings, up 15.6 percent from last May. In comparison, there were 1,783 closings in May 2009. So closings have almost doubled since the Recession. And, as everyone knows, inventory has dropped dramatically.

53. Why Isn't Stolen Data on Federal Employees for Sale? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is increasingly confident that China's government, not criminal hackers, was responsible for the extraordinary theft of personal information about as many as 14 million current and former federal employees and others, The Associated Press has learned. One sign: None of the data has been credibly offered for sale on underground markets popular among professional identity thieves.

54. What’s Next? -

When Steven Baldwin started his freshman year at Austin Peay State University in 2012, he had a smart, carefully considered plan for his future.

55. Justices Make It Easier to Sue Over 401(k) Retirement Plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday in favor of participants in employee retirement plans who object to companies' investment decisions that eat into retirement savings.

56. Long-Delayed Nuclear Plant in Tennessee Nears Completion -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – Tom Wallace started working at the Watts Bar nuclear plant as a young man in 1979, hoping he could eventually become a reactor operator.

57. Total Concept Launching Fully Online Enterprise -

If you’ve learned about an in-store sale while shopping for groceries, this Memphis-based printing company could have been the one to help you save those extra pennies.

For nearly 20 years, Total Concept has worked as a full-service printing company for large manufacturers and retail chains in the Memphis area. This year, it will launch a fully online enterprise, Eco Signs and Banners Memphis, within the parent company.

58. Daily News Seminar Brings Focus to Economy -

As part of his keynote address during The Daily News’ latest seminar, this time focused on the economy, Century Wealth Management president and founder Jay Healy pointed to a photo depicting a crowd a decade ago assembled near St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican.

59. Do We Have a Deal? Yes, Until We Don’t -

People are angry now. Angrier than ever. In the past, there may have been a slight skirmish or two, but now there are battles that often escalate into full-scale wars.

Buyers feel they have paid too much, and sellers feel they are being waterboarded during the inspection process.

60. Norris Says TennCare Review ‘Essential’ -

The majority leader of the Tennessee State Senate says the legislature is not done with a proposed expansion of Medicaid.

But Republican Sen. Mark Norris of Collierville is quick to add that the expansion proposed by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam should be part of a larger re-examination of the existing TennCare program.

61. UAW Reports 55 Percent Membership at VW Plant in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The United Auto Workers union has 816 members at the Volkswagen plant in Tennessee, or about 55 percent of the total blue collar work force, according the union's latest disclosure with the U.S. Department of Labor.

62. Goodwill Games -

When a group of elected leaders gathered a week ago at Goodwill Village apartments in North Memphis, they came to convey some sense of urgency about deteriorating conditions at the 47-year-old federally subsidized apartment complex.

63. Major Changes -

Aside from Christmas bells for its annual red kettle campaign, The Salvation Army historically has had a “quiet presence” in Memphis, according to Ellen Westbook, director of community relations and development.

64. HJ Heinz Buys Kraft To Build $28 Billion Food Giant -

NEW YORK (AP) – Some of the most familiar names in ketchup, pickles, cheese and hot dogs are set to come under the same roof after H.J. Heinz Co. announced plans Wednesday to buy Kraft and create one of the world's largest food and beverage companies.

65. Rhodes Results -

Capital campaigns are usually about buildings. And the just-completed capital campaign at Rhodes College includes a new science building that will break ground in the summer and complete the quadrangle of the private liberal arts college’s scenic campus.

66. Survey: Uninsured Rate Hit New Low in 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even as it faces another Supreme Court challenge, President Barack Obama's health care law has steadily reduced the number of uninsured Americans, according to an extensive survey released Tuesday.

67. Tennessee Lawmaker Operated Hog Farm Without Proper Permits -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker from northwestern Tennessee operated his hog farm without proper state permits, and an inspector said he was discouraged by upper management from enforcing violations.

68. Drones Rule: Proposed Rules for Commercial Unmanned Aircraft -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Drone on, the government says.

Just not through the night sky. Or close to an airport. Or out of the operator's sight. And probably not winging its way with a pizza or package, any time soon.

69. Imminent Danger -

The risk is real. And the evidence is in the charges of second-degree murder against the owner of New England Compounding Center Inc., and pharmacists and others employed by the company.

70. Lack of Innovation at Nonprofits -

Through the Southern Growth Studio, I have the great honor to work with nonprofits. Big ones. Growing ones. And ones on the verge of collapse.

There is an odd tendency for almost all of these organizations to respond to innovations in the same way; they desire them deeply but are wildly timid. It’s a dizzying and paralyzing fear-based response. “What if it doesn’t work? I don’t know. …” They yearn to roll out a new program or re-create an experience that gets better results, but something nagging in the culture keeps them from enacting the very thing that may set them apart and catalyze their potential.

71. Open Records Advocate: Citizens Have Tougher Time Than Media -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Denial of public records, excessive fees to find out what the government is doing, violations of open meetings law and long delays in getting information are some of the problems open records advocates find in Tennessee.

72. How To Determine Nonprofit Software Costs -

Part two of a two-part series. Software is at the heart of so many nonprofit functions. You can’t afford down time. And you don’t want to find out your new system won’t talk to an existing one after it is up and running. What’s a nonprofit leader to do? In search of guidance we talked with Janna Finch of Software Advice, an online firm that reviews nonprofit technology.

73. Elton John Fdtn. Awards Grant to Friends for Life -

Friends For Life has received a $75,000 grant from The Elton John AIDS Foundation. The Foundation tackles the most difficult issues related to HIV and has raised more than $300 million since its inception in 1992.

74. Editorial: ‘We Come in Peace’ -

It doesn’t seem enough just to say the role of minority-owned businesses must be greater in the Memphis economy.

The basic premise is undeniable in a city whose population is two-thirds African-American and 6.3 percent Latino.

75. Elton John Foundation Awards Grant to Friends for Life -

Friends For Life has received a $75,000 grant from The Elton John AIDS Foundation. The Foundation tackles the most difficult issues related to HIV and has raised more than $300 million since its inception in 1992.

76. Medicare Chief Steps Down, Ran Health Care Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare's top administrator unexpectedly resigned Friday, becoming the latest casualty in the turmoil over the president's health care law, which is still struggling for acceptance even as millions benefit from expanded coverage.

77. Three Ways to Evaluate Nonprofit Technology -

Part one of a two-part series. “The main reason nonprofits look to update or implement technology is to acquire additional functionality that will automate more tasks, which they hope will free up time to work on more strategic projects.” – Janna Finch

78. Batts Joins HealthChoice as Complex Care Manager -

Kenneth Batts has joined HealthChoice’s new Population Health team as complex care manager. In his new role, Batts will reach out to patients identified with complex medical needs to schedule home visits, where he’ll provide customized intervention and condition education, including goal setting, care coordination, and long-term support with the goal to achieve improvements in their health.

79. Media Coverage: More Than a Press Release -

Will 2015 be the year your nonprofit is highlighted in news stories and feature pieces? Will those who could benefit from the work of your organization read about you in the newspaper, see a story on TV, or listen to an interview on the radio?

80. Council to Vote on Beale Street Tourism Authority -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Jan. 6, on the creation of a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority to oversee the future of the entertainment district.

The proposal by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. sets up a nine-member body appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the City Council to issue bonds for construction projects in the district, levy fees to pay off the debt and to make lease agreements with tenants.

81. Council to Weigh Next Moves on Beale -

A Beale Street Tourism Development Authority with a nine-member appointed board would oversee the development and management of the entertainment district under the terms of a 13-page resolution that goes to the Memphis City Council this week for discussion.

82. Drug Deal Murder Brings Interstate Commerce Violation -

Robbing a drug dealer can be a federal crime.

James Earl McCracken and the street gang he reputedly heads robbed and killed a man McCracken allegedly believed to be a drug dealer in July 2011, according to a Memphis federal grand jury.

83. Why Corporate Innovations Fail -

Iliya Rybchin of the Highnote Foundry and formally of Bloomberg discusses where innovations break down in the corporate world. He was stronger than a good cup of coffee.

He comes out swinging. Warning: "I'm going to offend some people here." The room perked up. Then, Rybchin notes the most critical points of failure.

84. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

85. UAW Says Recognition Near at Tennessee VW Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The United Auto Workers union is hailing a new Volkswagen policy as a vehicle to soon gain representation of workers at its first foreign auto plant in the South.

86. Local Ebola Response Rolls With Changes -

The medical and public health response to Ebola has changed since the disease came to America because the science around the disease has changed in that time, says the infectious disease consultant to Baptist Memorial Health Care.

87. Not So Sweet: Chocolate Prices Are Set to Rise -

NEW YORK (AP) – That bowl of chocolates for ninjas and ghosts won't cost you more this Halloween. Picking the perfect sweet for your Valentine could.

The cost of ingredients in chocolate bars is rising, and the nation's biggest candy makers have already warned of price hikes next year. And it's not just costs that are pushing up prices. A growing sweet tooth around the world means more demand for chocolate.

88. UTHSC Names Snyder Associate Dean -

Dr. Clint W. Snyder has been appointed as the senior associate dean and chair for the new Department of Medical Education in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) College of Medicine.

89. UTHSC Announces Medical Education Appointment -

Clint W. Snyder, PhD, MBA, has been appointed as the senior associate dean and chair for the new Department of Medical Education in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) College of Medicine.

90. Local Ebola Response Relies On Experience -

Five years ago this month, there was a triage tent on the grounds of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and Memphis was a hot spot for the H1N1 flu pandemic.

Doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists from the hospital’s emergency room and intensive care units were the first in the nation to get vaccinations against H1N1. So were pediatricians and Shelby County Health Department employees on the front line of the city’s battle with the pandemic.

91. Harpeth Hall: ‘Tenacious’ Curriculum, Dedication to Tradition -

Harpeth Hall’s new head of school is a fierce proponent of single-sex education who says that an all-girls school can nurture a female mind, especially one interested in going into a STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math.

92. How Much Longer Till Titans Fans Simply Stay Home? -

Just for a moment, I’m going to let you in on something that not a lot of people know about.

I’m actually a Titans season ticketholder.

Of course, I don’t get to use the seats myself, since I’m working in the pressbox, but my wife and son like to go to the games on occasion to root for the home team and enjoy some football.

93. Launching Your Own ‘Ice-Bucket Challenge’ -

Last week we focused on the excitement – and revenue! – generated by the ALS Foundation’s “ice bucket challenge.” We’re talking millions and millions of dollars. And we imagine your nonprofit organization or college is thinking “why didn’t we think of that?!” Or maybe a board member has approached your executive or development director with a request launch your own challenge.

94. Steffner Adds SIOR Role to Real Estate Resume -

Since Joe Steffner opened his own commercial real estate firm 10 years ago, the industry veteran has had a front row seat to some wild changes in the industry.

He experienced everything from the boom days of the early- and mid-2000s to the depths of the recession and its crushing aftermath as the decade ended.

95. More Charges Loom for FedEx -

The U.S. Department of Justice could bring additional charges against FedEx Corp. for its role in shipping prescription medications from illegal online pharmacies, according to court records.

96. More Charges Loom for FedEx -

The U.S. Department of Justice could bring additional charges against FedEx Corp. for its role in shipping prescription medications from illegal online pharmacies, according to court records.

97. Exiting Your Job Gracefully -

There’s a lot to be said for grace. Although many interpretations of the word exist, my favorite is Merriam-Webster’s. They define it as “a controlled, polite, and pleasant way of behaving.” After a number of questions from people about how to quit their jobs, I wanted to share a few thoughts with you.

98. Editorial: Park Situation Speaks to Bigger City Issues -

The parking controversy at Overton Park is probably the best place to begin to think more about what happens when we get our wish for more density within the parkways.

More people living and working or going to the same area or park, in this case, means change on a lot of different levels.

99. Parking Wars -

It’s been a hot, humid and restless spring at Overton Park.

The park has been crowded, but not as crowded as expected given the political tempest over parking on Overton’s greensward.

100. Future Uncertain But Innovation Team’s Work to Continue -

Though the future of the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team in Memphis is uncertain at this point, the work it’s involved in – incubating businesses and activating neighborhoods, for example – appears set to continue.