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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

2. The Week Ahead: July 18-24 -

It’s supposed to get hotter in Memphis this week, which is pretty normal for mid-July, and the coming week brings what could be a hot debate at the Memphis City Council meeting Tuesday on a plan to solve parking on the Overton Park Greensward. That and some other events planned this week include...

3. Last Word: Being Veep, Greensward Still Active and Tuition Goes Up -

On one of the most eventful days yet in the 2016 Presidential general election campaign, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker was on the campaign trail with presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. First there was a private meeting in New York where he was reportedly being vetted for the vice president’s position including a look at his financials – and then a Trump rally in Raleigh, N.C., where he was being road tested.

4. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

5. Strickland Unveils Greensward Solution, Zoo Not Happy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has put forth his plan to end parking on the Overton Park Greensward.

6. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

7. Five in One Social Club Opening on Summer Avenue -

The Five in One Social Club, a Midtown art studio, is opening a Summer Avenue location. Its 15,300-square-foot home in the former Bicycle Co. shop, a landmark along the Summer Avenue strip, will allow for more art classes and community events.

8. The Week Ahead: May 30-June 5 -

It's time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from a Funkadelic party at the New Daisy to a Day of Merrymaking on the Greensward... 

9. Medical Device Startup Founders Flock To Memphis for ZeroTo510 Cohort -

It was during a hospital stay for severe abdominal pain while Srinath Vaddepally was studying for his master’s degree that he got an idea for the product and company that would eventually bring him to Memphis.

10. Editorial: Look at the ‘Grand Plan,’ Then Look Beyond It -

From a supermarket to a community center. From a produce section to a climbing wall. That is now the plan for a major part of the Soulsville redevelopment.

It’s easy to be skeptical at moments like this. Part of the skepticism comes from a long civic experience of well-meaning people who have come to our city with the goal of doing something for us that they believed we should do but imagined we couldn’t or wouldn’t do.

11. Last Word: The Return of Chiwawa, Mud Island's Dilemma and A Good Map -

Chiwawa is back. But don’t call it a doughnut shop. And the owner says it won’t be called Chiwawa either. We presume it will still proclaim that Midtown is Memphis.

12. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

13. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

14. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

15. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

16. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

17. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

18. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

19. Last Word: The Bloody Shirt of Deannexation, More Boats and The Rise of ioby -

“Waving the bloody shirt” – get ready to hear that phrase a lot as a deannexation bill continues to be debated in Nashville – the one that the state House approved Monday evening.
There was a palpable frustration at City Hall during Tuesday’s council day that featured a light agenda but lots of attention to several challenges – many of them financial and hidden until recently – that the new mayor and council are facing.
As we mentioned in our Monday evening coverage of this, the skirmish lines over the deannexation bill and the larger issue are very close in Shelby County. Our legislative delegation is split between Memphis Democrats vocal in their outrage over the bill and Republicans in the county outside Memphis who are just as vehement in their support of the bill, especially the parts that apply to Memphis.

20. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

21. Elections Chief Finalists Have Political Histories -

The two finalists for the job of Shelby County Elections Administrator each told the Election Commission last week that if they get the job they will have some rebuilding work to do in how local elections are conducted.

22. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

23. Banks Now Giving Customers Access to Credit Scores for Free -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) – It might be the most important piece of financial information about you – and it's finally easier for you to actually get a look at it.

Big banks and credit card companies are increasingly offering customers free access to their FICO score. This score, named after the software and analytics company that developed it, is used by lenders to determine how risky you are when they are deciding whether to issue a new credit card, mortgage or auto loan.

24. Health Law Fines Double for Many Uninsured at Tax Time -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people who went without health insurance last year are now seeing fines more than double under President Barack Obama's health care law, tax preparation company H&R Block said Tuesday.

25. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

26. Arts-Focused Ignite Memphis Event Coming to Playhouse -

Playhouse on the Square in a few weeks will host a gathering of creatives and young Memphis professionals who share a love of the arts in Memphis.

It’s a new version of the popular “Ignite Memphis” series of events, held regularly at popular hotspots around the city, during which a group of participants make quick-hit presentations on lots of different topics. And this time around, for the Ignite event on April 4, there’s a new focus.

27. Graceland West Up Next as Guest House Tops Out -

As construction crews working on the 450-room Guest House at Graceland resort hotel marked the topping out of that Whitehaven project this week, work is about to begin on the other side of Elvis Presley Boulevard on the Graceland West project.

28. Retail Projects in Memphis Suburbs, Oxford Staple of Trezevant Realty Corp. -

Germantown-based Trezevant Realty Corp. has deep roots in the Mid-South commercial real estate market, and the uptick in the economy has more projects moving full-steam ahead.

29. The Week Ahead: Feb. 22, 2016 -

Good morning Memphis. The Monday holidays are gone for a while, we’re afraid, but you’ve got a whole week to finish that work instead of just four days. Here are a few items to look forward to this week, led by the annual announcement of performers who will descend on Memphis this May for the Beale Street Music Festival.

30. Last Word: The Trade, Hardaway-Todd Grudge Match and Tomato Aspic -

Jeff Green leaves the Grizzlies for the Clippers and Lance Stephenson leaves the Clippers for the Grizzlies.
That was the trade at the NBA’s Thursday afternoon deadline that caused much of Thursday’s deadline buzz as well as lots of social media reaction.
Some of the reaction was tempered by the other part, a protected lottery pick for the Grizz as well.

31. Last Word: Early Voting Begins, Marc Gasol's Right Foot and TNReady's Problem -

Trump and Sanders win big in New Hampshire with a Republican scramble for second the only matter to be decided in the nation’s first Presidential primaries. That as the road to Tennessee begins to see some traffic in the distance.
Meanwhile, Marc Gasol goes from a “right mid-foot injury” on the Grizzlies DL to a fractured right foot.

32. Helping Hand -

Cindy MacAulay started collecting a flurry of news articles last year about restaurants opening in Memphis, new businesses setting up shop here and on ways the city is improving and growing.

It was research about the city she’s in the process of making her new home.

33. Midtown Memphis Ready for Apartment Building Boom -

It’s been more than a decade since new apartments were built in Midtown, and that’s poised to change in a big way with a wave of new multifamily construction stretching from Binghampton to Crosstown.

34. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

35. Last Word: Time and The Greensward, Crosstown High and Race and Sports -

Remember how the schools merger story of about five years ago would change by the hour at times? That story has met its equal in what is becoming the first major challenge of the new Strickland administration at City Hall – the Overton Park Greensward.
So much happened before noon Tuesday on the first day of the short work week that it required waiting for the dust to settle on several fronts.
Here is the latest on a very fluid and volatile situation that could very well change as you are reading this.
Luckily we report at a time when you can change stories on line to keep up with such changes.
Zoos and parks and protests featuring brass bands suggest to a casual observer that this is not very serious as controversies go.
And maybe that was the case about a year and a half ago when a group of high school students decided to block the gravel driveway from the zoo parking lot onto the greensward.
But consider this:
The Memphis Zoo is working toward a March 1 opening of its new exhibit, Zambezi River Hippo Camp, a $22-million attraction that from what we saw just a few months ago will likely draw big crowds to the zoo in the spring.
The zoo was preparing for that starting with the removal of 27 trees from the north end of the greensward.
The best Mayor Jim Strickland could get from both sides – the zoo and Overton Park Conservancy – at his meeting with them Tuesday was a commitment to take his proposal for mediation to their respective boards.
The zoo board has authorized its leaders to file a lawsuit in Chancery Court over the greensward and it’s very likely the zoo would go to court before the March 1 opening because of the crowds on their way.
If the work to come by the zoo in advance of the March 1 opening involves heavy machinery, the reaction is likely to draw a much bigger protest than the ones Memphis Police have so far watched from a distance without making arrests.
As in all pressing political dramas, this controversy has the accelerant of timing.

36. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

37. School Guide Helps Parents Navigate Choices -

After five years of historic change in Shelby County public education, the traditional labels of “public” and “private” schools don’t adequately describe the range of options available to parents.

38. Sea Isle Signs -

By the numbers, Sea Isle Elementary has 36 students out of 517 who are hearing-impaired or deaf. Some are as young as 3 years old. Some are fifth-graders who in August will leave the East Memphis campus and their status as “Islanders” for the new frontier of middle school.

39. Shelby County Tax Property Sale Features Two Firsts -

When the Shelby County Trustee’s office puts a set of tax delinquent properties up for auction Jan. 19-21, it will be a first in several ways.

The auction will be the first such sale in Tennessee online and it will be the first tax sale with shorter redemption periods for some of the property, depending on how far behind the original owner is on their property taxes.

40. New Routes to a Healthier New Year -

About a year ago, Christina Charley launched Love Yourself Fitness, a virtual at-home personal training and holistic coaching business.

Now a year later, Charley’s new business is thriving and she’s in the process of expanding it.

41. Last Word: The River, Miss Cordelia's, OPEB and the Kumbaya Council -

Here comes the river. Not quite at 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge at Memphis overnight but getting there
For those who weren’t around in 2011 when the river crested at 48.3 feet, the second highest level ever recorded at Memphis, this is the part of the program where lots of people begin to gather at the river.
For some it will be to compare what they've seen before. For others it will be their first look and experience with the concept that nature is bigger than we are.
The smaller those first-time river visitors are, the easier it is for them to accept that. After all, when you are always looking up at the world everything is bigger than you are.
In Tom Lee Park you see them step onto the park's grass, their eyes riveted on the west, perhaps not seeing much beyond the grass at first, a small hand poking out of a coat sleeve shielding their eyes from the sun. And then their first glimpse of the running brown water. And the walk inevitably becomes a run and then a quick halt as the immensity of the river kicks in. Always the two together even when the river is just being eternal.

42. Last Word: The River, The New Mayor and Explaining Boll Weevils -

Hello, 2016. What’s your hurry?

First things first – the Mississippi River at our doorstep is above flood stage. But the crest is now predicted to come Friday and will be just over 40 feet – lower than predicted last week.
We will be posting web stories on the forecasts and other announcement from the county’s Office of Preparedness each evening to work with their schedule for summarizing where we are.
Floods are a slower moving cause for concern because we know what is happening upriver from us where the river is narrower. But this is also the Mississippi River, which is the definition of unpredictable.

43. Last Word: Out With the Old, In With The River -

We end 2015 with an eye on the Mississippi River as the city marks the New Year with three major New Year’s Eve outdoor celebrations – one on Beale Street, another in the newly-awakened Overton Square and yet another in the Broad Avenue Arts District.
Two come with lots of memories of past New Year’s eves – with soon-to-be memories.
Overton Square’s comeback as a theater district has been a big story of the last two years.
But Beale Street at the end of 2015 is an institution that has also seen a lot of change in the last year with the move to a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority at year’s end.
Broad is a different story with a different context. The context is a diversified Memphis whose crowd is likely to be at least slightly more local than the mix in Overton Square and on Beale Street.
It's example could very well show us the path to a New Year's eve with public celebrations from Whitehaven to Frayser.

44. Last Word: Highland Row, Late Hit in Birmingham and Hi-Fi -

A happy Day 363 into 364 depending on when you are reading this. Sounds festive doesn't it? But let's not have any party hats or popping corks just yet.

We’ve got the name of the first tenant in the recession-delayed Highland Row development by the University of Memphis.
It’s Char, a steakhouse restaurant that should start taking shape in March.

45. Oxford Feels Stress from Development Boom -

Kent Wunderlich travels to Oxford, Miss., often, in part because his grandson is the kicker on the University of Mississippi football team.

46. Memphis' Grocery Wars -

After Sprouts became one of the newest grocery chains to enter the Memphis market by opening stores in Lakeland and Germantown earlier this year, company spokesman Diego Romero described the chain’s arrival as practically a no-brainer.

47. Winmark to Bring New Resale Stores to Memphis -

The big sister store of Plato’s Closet is looking to come to Memphis, and new-to-market sports and music equipment resale concepts also are on the way.

Parent company Winmark Corp.’s presence in Memphis has steadily grown since 2008, when it opened Once Upon a Child and Plato’s Closet stores in Cordova. Presently, two franchisees operate seven stores across those two brands.

48. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

49. Could Amazon Challenge FedEx? -

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but depending on who’s doing the imitating, it could also represent a major threat.

The latter is the storyline that tends to result from technologically savvy enterprises, big and small, muscling their way into FedEx Corp. territory. The latest competitor whose moves are resulting in a crush of “FedEx might have reason to worry” headlines – Amazon, which is pushing to own more of the so-called “last mile” of the package delivery journey and to also become a package delivery giant in its own right.

50. Historic Clayborn Temple to be Restored -

Clayborn Temple, the home base for the sanitation worker strikes of 1968, is on its way to restoration after decades of neglect and four years on the market. Nonprofit Neighborhood Preservation Inc. is taking over what is expected to be a multimillion-dollar project to return the church to religious, educational and community uses.

51. Google is Latest Tech Giant to Claim Space in Mobile News -

NEW YORK (AP) — Technology giants including Apple, Facebook, Snapchat and now Google want to take charge of how we get and see news on our phones.

Google on Wednesday was the latest company to announce a news-focused tool. It is designed to speed up how fast stories appear on a phone's screen after a Google search. It's not widely available yet, but could emerge as a key source of traffic and ad revenue for publishers, and not just news providers, as people increasingly rely on their handheld gadgets.

52. Central Defense Security Eyes Expansion in Mississippi, Texas -

Memphis-based Central Defense Security has opened four branches in three states since first setting up shop in Memphis in July 2005.

Those offices have served the firm well for the first decade of its existence, helping it grow to employ today between 1,500 to 1,600 people, estimates chief operating officer Larry Carroll. The firm also has expanded its security plan services into an assortment of new industry categories, from hospitals to retail lots, office buildings and more.

53. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

54. Tennessee Craft Week Shines Light on Handcraft Artisans -

This fall the legacy of handmade craft art in Tennessee is getting some big promotion from a statewide weeklong celebration that coincides with American Craft Week in October.

“We want to put a spotlight on and build an appreciation for crafts artists,” said Teri Alea, executive director of Tennessee Craft. “They show up in lots of different ways throughout the community. Craft, especially high-end, is a big business and it has a big impact on the state economy.”

55. Is Now Time For a Fed Rate Hike? Here Are 2 Clashing Views -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For seven years — through political fights, Europe debt crises and market panic — investors could count on one thing: Short-term U.S. interest rates would stay locked near zero.

56. The Secret to Retaining Your Best Employees -

It’s that time of year again. Time to celebrate Labor Day, the holiday dedicated to recognizing the achievements of American workers. With an unemployment rate hovering around 5.3 percent, many employers are asking the same question: “How do we retain our best employees?”

57. US Stocks Close Flat Friday After Volatile Week -

U.S. stocks ended the day little changed Friday, letting investors breathe a little easier after a week where both the highs and lows were extreme.

The market gave investors a hard jolt the first two days of trading this week on concerns about the health of China's economy. The rebound Wednesday and Thursday was just as sharp as investors decided to scoop up beaten-up stocks.

58. Should Citizens Have to Pay to Look at Public Records? -

Lots is happening in the area of open government lately. In recent columns I’ve talked about legislation that would control access to police videos and about a proposed Supreme Court rule that would limit reporters’ use of electronic devices in courtrooms.

59. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

60. Preseason Analysis: Vols Will Defeat Oklahoma, Finish 8-4 -

Tennessee’s football team has something to prove as it concludes the first week of preseason practices and moves forward to the 2015 season.

The Vols must prove they belong in the national picture in Butch Jones’ third year as coach.

61. Lot Shortage Looms Over Shelby County -

A shortage of developed lots in Shelby County is dragging down the new housing market, according to homebuilding officials.

Homebuilding activity in Memphis and Shelby County slowed in the second quarter, with builders filing fewer permits and selling fewer new homes than in the same three-month period last year.

62. Bedrock Eats & Sweets Opens Downtown -

One of the newest additions to the Downtown dining scene is a healthy eating option that Brandi Marter has expanded from a commercial kitchen in YoLo’s Midtown location to now a space of her own.

Marter’s Bedrock Eats & Sweets, which got started back in 2013 as a way for people to order pre-made healthy meals, has moved into the former Frank’s Market & Deli space, at 327 S. Main. Marter, an avid Crossfit athlete, signed a lease for the space earlier this year after scouting potential locations beyond Downtown, including on Broad Avenue.

63. Vols, Titans Fight to Fill Empty Stadium Seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

64. Want to Get Into Knoxville-Area Showbiz? Here’s How -

“Chasing the fun” keeps Jaime Hemsley, founder and owner of Gage Models and Talent Agency, in high gear to find her clients opportunities in the entertainment business.

“There’s lots of different ways to get involved in the industry,” she says, adding that her clients work both locally and nationally. Her agency recently booked a client with a TV reality dating show. Gage is headquartered in Knoxville but has clients throughout the southeast and works with agencies in New York and Los Angeles.

65. Buying a House? Here’s 12 Things You Must Do -

Anyone buying any home anywhere should have a checklist of things to do. In this area, there are several.

• Get a home inspection. Old or new, things may not be what they seem. As attorney Jean Harrison says of new homes, “Passing codes means they got at least a D-.” A home that has been pre-inspected could have serious flaws undiscovered by the seller’s inspector.

66. Seeds of Nutrition in South Memphis -

Second in a series of profiles on the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ GiVE 365 grantees.

The community garden/urban farming concept literally took root years ago. Knowledge Quest founder and director Marlon Foster remembers well the 25-by-25-foot plot at the Fowler Homes housing project back in 1999. It was a humble beginning planted with a few seeds and a lot of faith and hope.

67. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

68. Speltz’s Design Flair Transforms Downtown Memphis -

Christopher Speltz’s work as an architectural designer for Renaissance Group hinges on transformation. As an illustrator for multifamily spaces 266 Memphis Lofts, Printer's Alley and the Annex Lofts, he's bringing much-needed flair to a stretch of South Front Street.

69. Conquering Fear of Heights on Mt. LeConte -

I was standing on the edge of a cliff during a hike to Mt. LeConte about two weeks ago.

Holding onto a thin metal handrail cable, I was walking a path maybe two feet wide on jagged rock with some water running through it, on the side of the mountain, about 4,000 feet above sea level.

70. Getting to the Bottom -

A BIG BASS PROBLEM. We’ve done it. Just like a lure, the light reflects off a shiny object and draws a crowd.

A huge shiny object. A huge crowd. And we’ve done it again. We’re letting something tiny by comparison, a minnow to a record catfish, foul the water and spoil the catch.

71. At Long Last -

It’s taken the city of Memphis 10 years to reel in Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, and business owners in the nearby Pinch District hope it will be a catalytic force they’ve been waiting for.

72. ‘Pioneering is a Bitch’ -

Christy Shuff was robbed on the night she moved some equipment into her soon-to-open new business, Rumours Gallery, on 12South Avenue.

That was 12 years ago, and Shuff, now 40, and her then-husband Will Shuff were aspiring urban pioneers, ready to take a chance on the downtrodden, but affordable 12South area, then home to a few businesses and mostly older houses.

73. Bass Pro Announces Opening Week Lineup -

Bass Pro Shops has unveiled the celebrity lineup and schedule for its opening festivities, kicking off with a free Evening for Conservation event Wednesday, April 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Here is the press release from Bass Pro:

74. Injuries Slow Development of Vols Defensive Players -

Tennessee football fans might want to look past the defensive lineup for the Orange & White Spring Game. It will bear little resemblance to the unit that will start the 2015 season opener against Bowling Green on Sept. 5 at Nashville’s LP Field.

75. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

76. US Car Buyers Tap the Brakes in March, Following Torrid Run -

DETROIT (AP) – U.S. car buyers tapped the brakes in March, a sign of a long-expected slowdown in the blistering pace of sales.

March sales were up less than 1 percent compared with the same month a year ago. U.S. consumers bought 1.5 million new cars and trucks in March, according to Autodata Corp.

77. Affordability? It’s All in the Eye of the Buyer -

The new construction at 2314 Castleman sold last week for $1,365,000 after Brent Morris of Parks listed the home for $1,395,000. Morris has developed a niche in locating infill lots and teardowns – to use the plural of the now-popular noun created by adding verb to adverb – in the Green Hills area.

78. Ryan: Be Flexible On Location For More Office Space Options -

After 22 years heading up the Metro Housing and Development Authority for Nashville, Phil Ryan certainly knows the Middle Tennessee housing market.

He left MDHA in 2013, and in his current role as an affiliate broker with Cherry & Associates, he’s taking a look at the local real-estate mix from the corporate side.

79. Eakin: Rising Rents Hitting All of Middle Tennessee -

Selling business people on the idea of relocating to Nashville is easy for commercial real estate broker Barry R. Smith because he, too, bought into the city’s charm when he first came to town in 1981.

80. Restless Winter -

For most of its 103-year life as city property, the Mid-South Fairgrounds has been a place where Memphians remember why they came there in the past, as local leaders have periodically pushed to remake its landscape and in turn create more memories going forward.

81. Southaven Plans to Become Regional Shopping Destination -

Local officials are expecting the outlet mall under construction by Tanger and Poag Shopping Centers to make Southaven a regional business destination.

“We are 250 miles from six states and we will probably draw from all of them,” Carmen Kyle, executive director of the Southaven Chamber of Commerce, told The Commercial Appeal. “This isn’t your local mall.”

82. Wharton: Tourism Is Serious Business -

Sometimes in tourism, it is the little things that count. But “little” is relative. Consider the digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center – big enough to be seen by eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge – which local leaders debuted this month after three years of planning.

83. Cassius Cash Begins Job as New Superintendent of Smokies -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) – Growing up in Memphis, the son of a homicide detective and a cosmetologist, Cassius Cash didn't dream of one day being the superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

84. Dr. Phil Delivers Hockey Therapy to the Masses -

Dr. Phil toys with me as he allows me to work my center and left wing to get the puck tantalizingly close to his net.

Then that big smile erupts on the face of a man who hands out “Live With Happiness” dog-tags – like the one dangling beneath his Hawaiian shirt – as he passes through life. With a couple of cagey quick twists of his wrists, Dr. Phil clears his end of the rink and fires a slap shot past my befuddled defensemen and goalie.…

85. Editorial: Crosstown Redevelopment Signals More Change to Come -

Few Memphians can remember the view north on Cleveland when the Sears Crosstown building did not define the horizon.

And there is a whole generation of Memphians who have always known the colossal structure as a boarded-up relic of the era when big stores were really big stores. In this case, the big store could sell you all of the materials to build a house as well as everything you would need for the interior of the house.

86. Balancing Campaign and Small Business on Vitter's Agenda -

NEW YORK (AP) – The new chairman of the Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship has big issues on his agenda, but he'll have to fit them in with a high-profile gubernatorial campaign.

87. ‘Government’s Too Big and People are Sick of It’ -

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett is an enigma of the modern civil servant, a career politician who doesn’t seem to take himself too seriously. He thinks he’s paid too much (his salary is state mandated) and brings it up often in interviews with the media.

88. Growth is Great, But Where Will Workers Live? -

For the past two years, developers, property owners and Realtors alike have been treated to what some call the best real estate market in the country. Sellers are realizing astronomical returns on their investments as they shed properties that they have been strapped with for years.

89. Great Dishes From Nashville’s Landmark Restaurants -

When a restaurant’s been around for a decade or eight, that’s usually a pretty good indication that the food is palatable. We’ve rounded up some of the best dishes to try at Nashville’s longest standing dining establishments, and, of course, it’s impossible to pick just one thing. Feel free to recommend your own favorites in the online comments.

90. Automakers Report January US Sales Jumps, Led By GM, Toyota -

DETROIT (AP) – Automakers reported double-digit U.S. sales increases in January, a sign that car sales didn't spin out even with a major snowstorm hitting the Northeast.

General Motors led the way with an 18 percent gain over last January. Encouraged by low gas prices, buyers snapped up GM's big SUVs like the Chevrolet Tahoe and GMC Yukon.

91. When Vacation Rentals Make More Sense -

With just one child, my wife and I don’t find ourselves stressing out about the need for a large hotel room suite or adjoining rooms so our family has enough room to spread around. 

But with the need for privacy or an opportunity to sleep in – our son wakes earlier than my wife and he likes to watch TV – we find sleeping in one hotel room is increasingly tough on our travels.

92. Airlines Expect Another Big Year With Help From Cheaper Fuel -

DALLAS (AP) – Leaders of United and Southwest gave an upbeat forecast for 2015 that combined strong travel demand and cheaper fuel. Airline stocks soared on Thursday.

The price of jet fuel has dropped by about half since September, boosting airline profits and tamping down fear that global economic weakness could hurt the carriers. Analysts expect all four of the biggest U.S. airline operators to post bigger profits this year than in 2014.

93. Hello, Josephine! -

Wikipedia indicates that a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew “charted #7 on the Billboard R&B charts and #14 on the Billboard pop charts” in 1960. The actual title of the song was “My Girl Josephine,” although “in various cover versions,” it became known as “Hello Josephine.” It’s a bluesy number, easy to play on the guitar, and the lyrics begin:

94. Got Help Paying for Health Care? Watch Your Mailbox -

WASHINGTON (AP) – If you're among the millions of consumers who got financial help for health insurance last year under President Barack Obama's law, better keep an eye on your mailbox.

95. Elvis Birthday Proves Eventful on Several Fronts -

Jack Soden, the head of Elvis Presley Enterprises, looked out at a crowd on the front lawn of Graceland last week in single-digit temperatures and talked about the durability of Elvis Presley’s appeal.

96. Shelby County Homebuilding Activity Continues to Slow -

Homebuilding in Shelby County was off last year’s pace again in November, with builders pulling fewer permits and selling fewer homes than in November 2013.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 43 permits last month, down 29.5 percent from 61 permits in November 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. The 43 permits filed in November is down 31.7 percent from the 63 permits filed in October.

97. Blackie’s Body Shop Endures Changing Industry -

Cars are a lot different, and the business of an auto body shop is too, since Delmus “Blackie” Moore opened a body shop on Fourth Street in Downtown Memphis in 1951.

The business of body work is much faster, with less time for the custom work that once was much of Blackie Moore’s stock in trade.

98. Music City Christmas -

In years past, Carl Haley has offered his Grand Avenue transportation passengers the customary Christmas lights tour packages – about the same as other tours in Nashville – with a cruise by Opryland and a trip to a few choice, heavily decorated neighborhoods.

99. Ivey, U of M Seek to Boost Transportation Sector -

Dr. Stephanie Ivey never intended to get into the transportation field. After earning her doctorate in engineering from the University of Memphis, Ivey had planned on being involved in environmental work but, through a series of twists and turns, accepted a position at the U of M focused on transportation.

100. Edison Park Finds Ally in Habitat for Humanity -

This Thanksgiving marks two years that Aisha Lbhalla, her husband and their two young sons have lived in Edison Park.

They have a single-family home that backs up to her older son’s school, Thomas A. Edison Elementary. The house has four bedrooms, brick facing, a garage and nearly 1,500 square feet, Lbhalla says.