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Editorial Results (free)

1. Titans Fire Coach Mike Mularkey After Playoff Win -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Titans believe the potential reward from quarterback Marcus Mariota working with his third head coach in his fourth NFL season outweighs the risk of change.

2. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

3. Pruitt Makes Most of Early Signing Date -

Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt could have done a lot worse during the Dec. 20-22 early signing period, the first-ever for high school recruits in college football.

It was a recruiting whirlwind for Pruitt, named UT’s coach Dec. 7 while still serving as Alabama’s defensive coordinator.

4. Battling Opioids -

Later this month, Shelby County government will roll out a public health effort led by the Shelby County Health Department to battle opioid addiction. “We’re taking a very long view of this. It’s not going to be a quick fix,” Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell told Shelby County Commission members Wednesday, Jan. 3, during committee sessions.

5. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

6. GOP's Senate Majority Shrinks With Jones Sworn Into Office -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Democrat Doug Jones of Alabama was sworn into office Wednesday, shrinking the Senate's Republican majority and leading lawmakers of both parties to plead for more bipartisanship as Congress tackles pressing issues in advance of the 2018 midterm elections.

7. Decade Since Recession: Thriving Cities Leave Others Behind -

As the nation's economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle's was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union district – and then expanded eight-fold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

8. State: Timeline, Rate Hike Overstated in Federal Ash Cleanup -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State environmental regulators say it shouldn't cost ratepayers more money or take as long as the nation's largest public utility has estimated to complete a massive, court-ordered coal ash cleanup at a Tennessee power plant.

9. Courier Company’s Name Used in Job Scam -

Email job offers to work for Able Express Courier Service, a Memphis delivery business, are a scam, according to the Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South.

The fake job offers are going to those who have posted their resumes on legitimate job search sites. They offer jobs receiving and reshipping merchandise the BBB says may have been stolen or purchased with stolen credit cards.

10. Powers of Attorney: A Big Part of the Plan -

Ray’s Take: There are multiple moving parts to a good estate plan and various powers of attorney are an important element. Power of attorney basically gives someone else the right to act on your behalf; there are two types of powers of attorney.

11. Recording Studio Owner Leaves Nashville for Memphis -

A little more than a year ago, Scott McEwen had an epiphany that would end up bringing the Nashville recording studio owner to Memphis.

12. Buoyed by Alabama Win, Democrats Eye Tennessee Senate Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democrats eager to take control of the Senate next year are turning to the state of Tennessee, where a popular Democratic former governor is running for the seat being vacated by the retirement of Republican Sen. Bob Corker.

13. Striking a Chord, NIH Taps the Brain to Find How Music Heals -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Like a friendly Pied Piper, the violinist keeps up a toe-tapping beat as dancers weave through busy hospital hallways and into the chemotherapy unit, patients looking up in surprised delight. Upstairs, a cellist plays an Irish folk tune for a patient in intensive care.

14. GOP Tax Overhaul Will Be Felt by State, Local Governments -

With Congress sending President Donald Trump a tax overhaul, state and local governments are preparing for some fallout.

A look at some of the ways it might affect them:

FEDERAL-STATE CONNECTIONS

15. To Be or Not to Be: Tennessee Shakespeare Company Expanding With New Facility -

Dan McCleary is the founder of the Tennessee Shakespeare Company. But that hasn’t obscured his view of reality, of the fact that many people were first introduced to Shakespeare in a high school classroom in a less than engaging way.

16. Hopson ‘Angry And Frustrated’ About Grade Changes -

The use of grade floors – a minimum grade a student can get – is a different matter than the grade-changing investigation that began at Trezevant High and is about to expand to seven other high schools in the Shelby County Schools system, according to SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson.

17. Last Word: Awaiting A Sell-Out, Public Art and Controversy and Southaven's Triangle -

The Grizz fall to 8-19 with a loss Monday to the Miami Heat 107-82 at the Forum. It is Tigers basketball Tuesday at the Forum with the Albany Great Danes. Meanwhile the Tigers football appearance in the Dec. 30 AutoZone Liberty Bowl is moving toward a sellout. The Tigers have sold 15,000 tickets to the bowl game including an initial allotment of 8,300. And offensive coordinator Darrell Dickey announced Monday he is leaving to take the same post at Texas A&M after nine seasons in Memphis.

18. WA -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest “Star Wars” movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there’s plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here’s what you need to know about in The Week Ahead – no Jedi powers required.

19. Week Ahead -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest “Star Wars” movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there’s plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here’s what you need to know about in The Week Ahead – no Jedi powers required.

20. The Week Ahead: Dec. 11-17 -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest "Star Wars" movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there's plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here's what you need to know about in The Week Ahead - no Jedi powers required.

21. Are 3-D Mammograms Really Better? US Puts Scans to the Test -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A better mammogram? Increasingly women are asked if they want a 3-D mammogram instead of the regular X-ray – and now U.S. health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier choice really improves screening for breast cancer.

22. Trucking Firms Prepare for Electronic Logging Device Mandate -

The trucking industry’s controversial electronic logging device mandate goes into effect Dec. 18, and local trucking companies and drivers have been preparing for most of the year. The ELD helps measure and monitor that drivers are not on the road too many hours each day, that they take mandatory breaks at the appropriate times, and that they are not driving too many hours during a consecutive seven-day period.

23. GM to Launch Self-Driving Vehicles in Big US Cities in 2019 -

DETROIT (AP) – General Motors Co. expects to carry passengers and deliver goods with self-driving vehicles in big cities sometime in 2019, telling investors it's moving quickly and plans to be ahead of other automakers and tech companies.

24. A New First -

The steel framework for a new First United Methodist Church Downtown has stood for so long that when the new sanctuary is completed early next year some of the framework will be visible in the building’s interior.

25. Lake District Developer Pays Back Lender, Project 'Gathering Steam' -

A little more than a month after Gilad Development Co. began demolition of the shuttered Lakeland Factory Outlet Mall to pave way for the $375 million Lake District project, the developers have cleared another major hurdle.

26. Apocalypse Not -

Much has been said about the so-called “Retail Apocalypse,” a frightening term that conjures images of a desolate landscape littered with boarded-up malls and shopping centers representing the death of American capitalism. 

27. Grab a Gun, Go See Your State Representative -

When legislative leaders started to allow guns in the Legislative Plaza nearly two years ago, the Sierra Club’s Scott Banbury had his daughter take pictures of him wearing his holstered Ruger and lobbyist ID card to put on lawmakers’ desks with the question: “Is this what you want?”

28. Women in Memphis Higher Ed Detail Common Challenges, Goals -

In less than three years, women have taken the top leadership posts at three of Memphis’ largest higher education institutions. Southwest Tennessee Community College president Tracy Hall, Rhodes College president Marjorie Hass and LeMoyne-Owen College president Andrea Miller lead a diverse mix of institutions with different missions, but they share common thoughts about the challenges and opportunities facing higher education today.

29. Medical Marijuana Might Finally Get Past Objections -

Medical marijuana legislation is evolving, not to ease people’s debilitating pain but to help it pass the General Assembly, where it’s giving some lawmakers heartburn.

State Rep. Jeremy Faison, an East Tennessee Republican ferrying the bill through the House, is offering several changes to a bill he is sponsoring with Sen. Steve Dickerson, a Nashville Republican, to soothe the nerves of state bureaucrats and lawmakers who get shaky when the word marijuana is mentioned.

30. Editorial: Finding Memphis In An Era of Big Changes -

Day by day it seems we see new evidence of change in a city that many of us believe doesn’t change much and even then changes very slowly and gradually.

The face of the change tends to be bricks and mortar like those underway in Overton Park’s institutions – the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art and the Memphis College of Art. Or the Gibson guitar plant planning to leave a key piece of real estate south of Beale Street.

31. Clicking on All Cylinders -

Memphis is a city on the precipice of change as projects that were once deemed impossible – like ServiceMaster’s Downtown headquarters or Crosstown Concourse – have emboldened developers and city officials to shoot for the moon.

32. Trump Declares Opioids a Public Health Emergency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In ringing and personal terms, President Donald Trump on Thursday pledged to "overcome addiction in America," declaring the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency and announcing new steps to combat what he described as the worst drug crisis in U.S. history.

33. Consortium Seeks Breast Cancer Policy Reforms -

Two-time breast cancer survivor Dr. Debra Bartelli and members of the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium are pushing to increase awareness of breast cancer in Memphis because they know first-hand that early detection and treatment will lead to higher survival rates.

34. Effects Of E-commerce, Amazon Among Seminar Topics -

The growth of e-commerce has been one of the most transformative trends in real estate over the past few years and Memphis’ unique geography has it poised to reap the benefits.

While the more traditional industrial projects like Amazon’s proposed 615,440-square-foot receiving center at 3292 Holmes Road or DHL’s planned 580,000-square-foot distribution facility less than a mile to the south come to mind, the ripple effects of this can be felt in other areas as well, such as in typical brick-and-mortar retail operations.

35. Senators Push For More Online Transparency In Elections -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators are moving to boost transparency for online political ads, unveiling on Thursday what could be the first of several pieces of legislation to try to lessen influence from Russia or other foreign actors on U.S. elections.

36. Sewer Cut-Off Aligns With Developing Densely -

When the city decided in August to end all new connections to the sewer system by developments outside of the Memphis city limits effective immediately, it was about much more than the sewer system.

37. Unlocking Daily Creativity -

A Day of Innovation session led by Monica Kang, founder & CEO, InnovatorsBox. How can you face your fear and use it as a strength?

38. Coming Back -

Heavy machinery has been moving dirt around for a few months now on the E.H. Crump Boulevard lot that was once the site of the Fowler Homes public housing development. Leaders with the city of Memphis and the Memphis-based Church of God in Christ (COGIC) got around to the formalities Wednesday, Oct. 11, of breaking ground for construction of Mason Village – a $12.5 million development of 77 affordable townhomes on the site.

39. FDA: Drug Shortages Possible Due to Puerto Rico Power Outage -

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday warned that U.S. drug shortages are possible because power outages in Puerto Rico have stopped or limited production at many medicine factories there.

Nearly 10 percent of the medicines used by Americans, plus numerous medical devices, are made in Puerto Rico, which lost most electricity when it was hit hard by Hurricane Maria about two weeks ago.

40. UT QBs, Receivers, Coaches Struggling So Far -

Tennessee’s football players are on fall break this weekend during the open date. You’ve got to wonder how many players fifth-year UT coach Butch Jones will get back after the break.

Fallout from last Saturday’s 41-0 loss to No. 5 Georgia is massive. Fans were leaving Neyland Stadium by halftime with the Vols trailing 24-0. Jones took a beating from fans on social media and sports talk radio all week.

41. Corker Says He 'Struggled' With Decision To Leave Senate -

No further clues from U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee about his political plans after he leaves the Senate, during an interview Sunday, Oct. 1, on “Meet The Press.”

But Corker said on the NBC news program that he “struggled” since January with the decision on whether or not to go for a third term in the Senate.

42. Shaky Start Exposes Raw Nerves as Dawgs Roll In -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones had more than Georgia on his mind this week. Rumors on message boards and reports on sports talk radio flamed the fires around Jones and the Vols after last Saturday’s 17-13 victory over Massachusetts at Neyland Stadium.

43. News Coming Soon on Sale of CA Building -

Leadership at The Commercial Appeal has told employees that the Gannett-owned paper hopes to have news by the end of the year on the sale of its building at 495 Union Ave., which was put on the market this year in tandem with a series of other cost-cutting moves.

44. Congress at Crossroads After Another GOP Health Care Failure -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress is at a crossroads after Republicans' stinging failure to repeal Barack Obama's health care law. But what's next – more partisan conflict or a pragmatic shift toward cooperation?

45. What Road Signs Mark Your Career Path? -

Shall I stay or shall I go? It’s a simple question with complex answers, especially when you are contemplating a career change. However, the fact that you’re asking it is a good indication of restlessness. That feeling can be a good thing when it gives you the nudge you need to point your career in a better direction. But when the feeling of ambivalence that one has when trying to make a major decision takes root in that process, confusion takes over.

46. ‘Catching Up’ -

Memphis’ desire to land Amazon’s multibillion-dollar second headquarters faces several headwinds. While many critics have pointed to the city’s insufficient labor pool and lack of direct flights to the West Coast as the most likely deal breakers, Memphis lags behind many of the consensus top contenders in another area: connectivity.

47. Last Word: HOT, Post Secondary Meets High School and Downtown Home Prices -

Even a power outage Downtown didn’t stop the Bruno Mars show at FedExForum Sunday that capped an eventful and HOT weekend around the city. The forum was not affected by the outage.

48. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

49. Strategic Financial Partners In Growth Mode -

Strategic Financial Partners president Russ VanderSteeg has been thinking about the future of his company and how to bring more younger financial advisers into an industry that has been going gray fast for at least a few years now.

50. City Hall Stands Ready to Assist Brooks Museum -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s first and only home is owned by the city of Memphis, and the institution is the state’s largest art museum. Those two facts make city government more than an interested onlooker in what happens next as the museum’s board explores possibly moving out of Overton Park to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city.

51. Company Culture Crucial For Success -

Company culture should be at the top of every leader’s priority list.

With pressing items like maintaining visibility in the marketplace and increasing bottom lines, company culture may seem to be less important or even get lost in today’s business environment.

52. Developer: Lake District Project 'Moving Forward' -

Developer Yehuda Netanel said you can’t measure a development by how many bumps in the road it has, but by how many bumps in the road it overcomes, which is a fitting summary of his company's ambitious Lake District project over the last few weeks.

53. Fewer Americans Buying Insurance in Coastal Areas -

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) – Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home's flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn't hit and her home isn't in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due next week, to another use.

54. Rotary Moves Meetings to Clayborn Temple -

The Memphis Rotary Club is moving its weekly luncheon meetings to Clayborn Temple starting next month after several years at the University Club.

The service organization, chartered in 1914, announced its decision Wednesday, Aug. 16, after a debate and vote by the club’s board.

55. One Gimpy WR No Longer a Big Problem -

Tennessee Titans rookie receiver Corey Davis limped off the practice field last Thursday with a hamstring injury.

56. TCAT Students See the Future, Get Prepared -

Bryan Rippy, 38, chuckles when he says he’s in the prime of his life. But sharpening his skills is no laughing matter, and he understands the importance of raising his value in the job market.

57. Heidi Shafer Claims Commission Chairmanship With Consistency -

Heidi Shafer was first elected to the Shelby County Commission in 2010. But when she is talking about the way county government works, she often goes further back than that to her experience as an aide to her predecessor on the commission, Dr. George Flinn.

58. Red-Hot Growth for Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza -

Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza has blazed quite a trail over the past five years by growing to five Memphis-area locations, and now co-owners Chad Foreman and Kirk Cotham are turning their sights toward expansion through the southeastern U.S.

59. Marching Band to NFL: Vanderbilt Doctor’s Unlikely Path -

When the NFL sought a worthy selection for the first chief medical officer in league history, it turned its eyes to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

In hiring Dr. Allen Sills earlier this year, the league brought on a whirlwind of intelligence and energy with a lengthy curriculum vitae.

60. Malco Moves Forward With Adjusted South Main Theater Plans -

The Malco Powerhouse Cinema proposed for Downtown’s South Main Historic Arts District is still a go, despite delays that have already pushed it well past its expected opening day.

But the roughly $8 million project is going to look a little different than initially proposed, Malco officials disclosed recently, due to projected costs that came back much too high.

61. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

62. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

63. Malco Theatres Moves Forward With Adjusted Powerhouse Cinema Plans -

The Malco Powerhouse Cinema proposed for Downtown’s South Main Historic Arts District is still a go, despite delays that have already pushed it well past its expected opening day.

But the roughly $8 million project is going to look a little different than initially proposed, Malco officials disclosed recently, due to projected costs that came back much too high.

64. Haslam Touts IMPROVE Act At Interchange Opening -

It looked like another day at the Interstate 40-240 interchange Wednesday, July 19, from the roof of a building by the state’s tallest interchange.

Inside the building tucked away in a residential area off White Station Road, a bank of video monitors on the wall of the local offices of the Tennessee Department of Transportation showed the same – cars and trucks moving smoothly there and elsewhere on the county’s interstate system.

65. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

66. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

67. MATA Eyes Greener Future, Prepares For Upcoming Service Changes -

Despite being hampered by a tight budget, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is making strides to be more green and environmentally sensitive, including participating in National Dump the Pump Day in June and offering reduced fares on “Ozone Days” throughout the year, as well as recently collaborating with the EPA to install air pollution-monitoring stations.

68. Need For Speed -

Access to high-speed broadband is a growing issue in Tennessee as technological advances in business and education become more digitally based. For the rural areas around Memphis and across the state, it is becoming a matter of disparity both on the workforce-training front and in classrooms. And the two are inextricably linked.

69. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

70. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

71. Wield a Red Pen Like a Pro -

You’re probably thinking a lot about how your marketing looks. You’ve created a compelling brand, made videos to showcase your best work, and even tried Facebook Live to document exciting events.

With this focus on visual content, you may not be able to bring in a professional copywriter to go over every adverb and comma, even if you know that the last place you want your beautiful marketing to end up is on Buzzfeed’s latest list of “Funniest Grammar Mistakes.”

72. In Midst of Changes, ArchInc Becomes Woman-Owned Biz -

The Memphis-based architecture firm formerly known as Architecture Inc. is in the midst of some major changes. The 23-year-old firm has rebranded as ArchInc; promoted Valentina Puppione Cochran to president and majority shareholder; and added preservation architect and urban designer Charles “Chooch” Pickard as a partner.
Cochran has been with ArchInc for 13 years, and her promotion makes the firm a woman-owned small business, which ArchInc says will boost the firm’s minority participation on projects.

73. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

74. Finals Run Gives Predators Look at Young Talent -

As if the Nashville Predators’ march to the Stanley Cup Final wasn’t riveting enough on its own, the journey has also provided fans with some unexpected glimpses into the team’s future.

75. 3-Attorney Panel to Review Mackin's Allegations Against Shelby County Schools -

A panel of three attorneys, including former U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton are investigating allegations of a cover-up, sexual harassment, theft and widespread grade tampering made last week by former Trezevant High School principal Ronnie Mackin.

76. Walmart Touts Investment in People, Technology as Advantages -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Walmart CEO Doug McMillon touted the company's investments in people and technology, but also said the company may have reached an employment peak and urged employees not to be afraid of automation.

77. SEC Coaches Unanimously Object to NCAA Recruiting Reforms -

DESTIN, Fla. (AP) – Southeastern Conference coaches unanimously agree on one topic at the league's spring meetings this week: They disapprove of NCAA recruiting reforms passed in May.

"I think it's reckless, really," Mississippi coach Hugh Freeze said.

78. Financial Federal Hits $500M in Assets -

Financial Federal has hit a milestone in recent weeks – reaching $500 million in assets – that bank president William Tayloe said confirms the plan the bank is following to achieve organic growth is working.

79. Wal-Mart Works to Close Gap Between Itself and Amazon -

HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) – Even after an online spending spree, it may be hard for Wal-Mart to escape the Amazon in the room.

Wal-Mart's acquisition of Jet.com and brands that appeal to younger shoppers have given it an e-commerce boost as it works to close the gap between itself and the online leader. The world's largest retailer is betting on essentials like cereal and diapers, and has adjusted its shipping strategy to better compete with Amazon's Prime program.

80. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

81. Memphis Jewish Home Turns 90, Plans Expansion -

Eugenia Levitch and Martha Mitchell have only known each other for about a year, yet they've got their comedy routine down pat.

82. National Foundation for Transplants Looks to Expand Beyond Memphis HQ -

The Memphis-based National Foundation for Transplants serves about 3,500 clients each year, and since its establishment in 1983 has distributed more than $80 million to pay for transplant-related expenses, in addition to promoting and advocating for organ and tissue donation.

83. Dorothy Day House Embraces Families in Need -

About 30 percent of Memphians live below the poverty line and 50 percent of them are children under age 18. It's a problem that Tracey Burgess, director of development and communication at the Dorothy Day House in Memphis, calls an "epidemic."

84. Haslam: Achievement School District Still Needed, But Changes Near -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says there is a continuing need for the state-run Achievement School District. But the school district for the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state, in terms of academic achievement, is being “streamlined,” Haslam said last week during a visit to the Aspire Coleman Elementary School in Raleigh.

85. PGA Tour Extends FedEx Cup Sponsorship for 10 Years -

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) – The PGA Tour announced a 10-year extension for the title sponsorship of the FedEx Cup, giving the lucrative series continuity for another decade and allowing some flexibility as the tour explores reshaping its season.

86. Mid-South Realty Endures Market Fluctuations -

Much like the famous Property Brothers on HGTV, Jerry and George Couloubaritsis make realty a family affair. Their company, Mid-South Realty, is turning 25 years old in October, and is a respected institution in the world of Memphis real estate.

87. Moving Enterprise Email Up to the Cloud -

Even in today’s world of texting and social media messaging, email is still an integral part of keeping in touch with clients, customers and co-workers. As a business owner, hosting your own email can be costly and managing storage can be a challenge for your I.T. team. 

88. Dream About to Become Reality at Youth Villages -

Earlier this week, Youth Villages CEO Patrick Lawler presided over the groundbreaking of a $22 million expansion at the Bartlett campus that will result in a 148,000-square-foot center designed to enhance the treatment of the community’s most at-risk and vulnerable youth.

89. Exit Now: 9 Signs of a Bad Client -

Not all client-consultant relationships are equal. Like a good marriage, both parties must be capable and willing to work together. Listening respectfully to one another is key to success, as is being able to perform at the highest potential capacity on the scope of work without adding unnecessary obstacles. Being able to accept and capitalize on ongoing feedback is also a two-way street.

90. Parkinson Calls for Elimination of Achievement School District -

State Rep. Antonio Parkinson is renewing his call for an end to the Achievement School District amid revelations a charter school operator hired a convicted felon to run Lester Prep.

91. Memphis Airport Unveils Updated Modernization Plan -

The Memphis International Airport unveiled an updated $214 million, multiyear plan to completely overhaul its B Concourse, where almost all of the airport’s operations will be consolidated upon completion.

92. PRIZM Music Camp and Festival Expands -

Memphis’ PRIZM music camp and international chamber music festival is adding a new location as well as an extra week of programming.

The PRIZM Ensemble, formed in 2004, consists of classically trained Memphis musicians who specialize in chamber music and work to develop and promote Memphis-area talent through education and performance opportunities.

93. Vols Work to Impress NFL Scouts in Advance of Draft -

Derek Barnett knows he will hear his name called in the April 27-29 NFL Draft. He’s just not sure when.

“Earliest as possible,” says the Nashville native and former Tennessee defensive end. “But it’s out of my control.”

94. Davis to Lead Next Phase of Development at Active Implants -

Ted Davis was happy to be able to stay in Memphis when he took over his newest leadership role as president and chief executive officer of medical device company Active Implants Corp.

95. Award-Winner McCloy Brings Modern Applications to Library System -

Keenon McCloy got around to doing the math on her time at City Hall. “I just crossed over 25 years,” said McCloy, director of the Memphis Public Libraries system, a position she has held for 10 years. Before that she was director of the city’s Division of Public Service, head of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center and started as director of the transition office for Memphis Mayor-elect Willie Herenton in 1991, one of four mayors whose administrations she has worked in.

96. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans To Defeat Outsourcing of State Assets -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

97. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans to Defeat Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

98. MLGW Moving Office Off Summer Avenue -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division is moving from its North Community Office, 2424 Summer Ave., though the utility says it will no longer pursue a site on East Parkway across from Overton Park as a possible location.

99. EDGE's ICED Loan Program Gives Small-Business Owners a Hand Up -

Camy Archer had built a loyal following of customers at her eponymous Midtown restaurant over the course of two decades and business was good.

But when her landlord struck a deal with another tenant in 2015, she was suddenly scrambling to find a new home for her business before she ended up losing everything she worked so hard to create.

100. Sustaining the Rally -

Innings come to an end, games come to an end, and seasons come to an end. Yet the Memphis Redbirds are forever playing against their best selves – those grand and glorious days when AutoZone Park was new and the Triple-A baseball team competed in the highest-level pro sports league in town.