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Editorial Results (free)

1. Report: Higher Premiums If Trump Halts 'Obamacare' Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Premiums for a popular type of individual health care plan would rise sharply, and more people would be left with no insurance options if President Donald Trump makes good on his threat to stop "Obamacare" payments to insurers, the Congressional Budget Office says.

2. Under Pressure, Trump Disbands Business Advisory Councils -

NEW YORK (AP) – With corporate chieftains fleeing, President Donald Trump announced Wednesday he is ending a pair of advisory business councils in the latest fallout over his remarks about the Charlottesville protests.

3. No Special Session to Take Rebel Symbol Off Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A spokesman says Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant won't call legislators back to the Capitol to consider removing the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag.

The Legislative Black Caucus says Bryant should set a special session because white supremacists marched with the battle flag last weekend in Virginia.

4. Tennessee Sen. Corker Calls Virginia Death 'Act of Terror' -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Sen. Bob Corker on Wednesday called it an "act of terror" for a car to be driven into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Virginia, but the Tennessee Republican declined to weigh in on President Donald Trump's comments blaming both white supremacists and counter-protesters for violent clashes.

5. Elvis Vigil Features Changes, Including Admission Fee -

Elvis Week was already going to be different this year with Graceland’s recent $137 million expansion and a new landscape across the boulevard from the Whitehaven mansion.

The candlelight vigil Tuesday, Aug. 15 – the high point of Elvis Week – was much different, and not all of the thousands of Elvis fans thought it was for the better.

6. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

7. Elvis Vigil Features Changes Including Admission Fee -

Elvis Week was already going to be different this year with Graceland’s recent $137 million expansion and a new landscape across the boulevard from the Whitehaven mansion.

The candlelight vigil Tuesday, Aug. 15 – the high point of Elvis Week – was much different and not all of the thousands of Elvis fans thought that change was for the better.

8. Prayer Circle Demands Removal of Confederate Statues, Vows to Continue Protests -

More than 100 citizens including local religious leaders called Tuesday, Aug. 15, for the city and state to remove statues of Confederate leader Jefferson Davis and Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forest from city parks.

9. Biz Leaders Quit Trump Panel After Charlottesville Comments -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A fourth business leader resigned Tuesday from President Donald Trump's White House jobs panel – the latest sign that corporate America's romance with Trump is faltering after his initial half-hearted response to violence by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia.

10. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

11. Trump's Denouncement Disappoints, Angers White Nationalists -

President Donald Trump's condemnation of hate groups – two days after his initially equivocal response to a deadly attack at a rally in Virginia – disappointed and even angered some of the white nationalists, white supremacists and neo-Nazis who supported and felt emboldened by his presidential campaign.

12. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

13. New Life for Medicaid After GOP's Health Care Debacle -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may not equal Social Security and Medicare as a "third rail" program that politicians touch at their own risk, yet Medicaid seems to have gotten stronger after the Republican failure to pass health care legislation.

14. Trump Names Hate Groups, Denouncing Charlottesville Violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Under relentless pressure, President Donald Trump on Monday named and condemned "repugnant" hate groups and declared that "racism is evil" in a far more forceful statement than he'd made earlier after deadly, race-fueled weekend clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia.

15. Local Leaders React To Charlottesville Violence -

Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend drew more than 100 people to Health Sciences Park Saturday, where they gathered around the statue of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest.

16. Hattiloo Plots a Bigger Stage for Its Audience -

The founder of Hattiloo Theatre says the black theater company is ready to become more regional and professional in its approach and influence. “Now it’s time for Hattiloo to become a major regional theater,” said Ekundayo Bandele before an opening-night performance of “Ruined.”

17. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

18. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

19. Forrest Statue Marks Rally Point Against Charlottesville Violence -

More than 100 people gathered Saturday, Aug. 12, in Health Science Park around the statue there of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest.

20. Tennessee Man Pleads Guilty in $43M Investment Scheme -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee man has pleaded guilty in a $43 million scheme that caused investors to lose $10 million, which he used to buy vehicles and real estate and start a used car lot.

21. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

22. Editorial: Back-to-School Stability Includes Unresolved Issues -

Another school year is underway in Memphis, and it’s arguably the most stable for the Shelby County Schools system in the last seven years – maybe longer. Yet, there is much about education in our community that remains unresolved.

23. Magazine: Law Didn't Require Consent to Tape Scaramucci Call -

NEW YORK (AP) – Anthony Scaramucci says his profanity-laced phone call that preceded his ouster as White House communications director was recorded without his permission.

But a representative for The New Yorker on Thursday notes that reporter Ryan Lizza wasn't required by law to get Scaramucci's consent to record the conversation.

24. Prosecutor: Police Justified in Shooting of Arkansas Teen -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A black teenager pointed a BB gun that looked like a handgun at police before he was fatally shot by officers outside an emergency youth center in eastern Arkansas, a prosecutor said in announcing no charges would be filed against the officers.

25. Renee White Adds Purpose to Numbers -

At the end of her third-grade year, Renee White’s elementary school switched math books. Why does White – now chief financial officer of Oak Hall – remember a textbook being retired 20 years ago?

26. Kelly, Legacy Teammates Ready for Final Season With Vols -

Todd Kelly Jr. can’t believe it’s his last hoorah. The senior safety from Webb School of Knoxville enters his final season at Tennessee with thoughts of how it all started in fall of 2014.

27. Under First-Year Manager Stubby Clapp, Redbirds Maximize Winning Formula -

Over the last quarter-century in the game, Stubby Clapp has learned many things. One is that the baseball gods do not believe in championships as entitlements.

“It doesn’t matter what level,” said Clapp, 44, and in his first year as manager of the Memphis Redbirds, “it’s a special achievement.”

28. Separated at Birth: Defensive Backs & Wide Receivers -

The wide receiver and the defensive back are exactly the same – until that point when the ball is in the air and then they are totally different.

The wideout wants to catch passes, run free, score touchdowns, and prance and dance. The DB wants to knock down passes, intercept passes, deliver teeth-jarring hits, and posture and strut.

29. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

30. Kentucky Governor Pursuing New Toyota, Mazda Plant -

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) – Kentucky's Republican governor says he is trying to convince two Japanese automakers to build a $1.6 billion plant in the state.

Toyota and Mazda announced last week they planned to build a joint factory to build Corollas and a new cross-over model for Mazda. WDRB-TV reports Gov. Matt Bevin told an automotive industry group that he plans "to be on that like white on rice."

31. Ten AGs Threaten Trump on Immigration -

The attorneys general of 10 states, led by Texas’ Ken Paxton with strong support from Tennessee AG Herbert Slatery III, are threatening to sue the federal government.

32. Grade-Changing, Misconduct Probe Continues -

Shelby County Schools board members will likely get a briefing this month from the three outside attorneys investigating allegations of misconduct by school officials that were made by a former high school principal.

33. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

34. Google Exec Denounces Employee's Views on Female Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Silicon Valley's efforts to promote workforce diversity haven't yielded many results – unless you count a backlash at Google, where a male engineer blamed biological differences for the paucity of female programmers.

35. College's New Board Dismisses Gender Discrimination Claim -

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Austin Peay University's new board of trustees has dismissed a complaint of gender discrimination in hiring.

WPLN-FM reports a search committee picked Jessica Morris earlier this year for an associate communications department professor job, but Provost Rex Gandy didn't approve because she lacked a doctorate.

36. First Day of School Begins With Greetings, Hopes -

The school year began Monday, Aug. 7, with some parents registering children on the first day, other children finding their way back into academic routines on their own and Shelby County Schools leaders awaiting the release of achievement test scores from the state that will set a new baseline for where students are academically.

37. Employer-Based Health Coverage Likely to Stay Awhile -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Get your insurance through your employer? The ongoing political turmoil around "Obamacare" all but guarantees you'll still be able to do that.

Ask Walt Rowen, whose business is etching glass but whose experience managing century-old, family-owned Susquehanna Glass makes him something of an expert on health care. He's provided coverage to employees, then canceled it, steering them to the health insurance exchange. But with those premiums rising, Rowen this year is again covering his 70 or so workers under the umbrella of employer-sponsored health insurance.

38. Jobless Rate Raises Question: How Much Better Can It Get? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A drop in the unemployment rate to a 16-year low raises a tantalizing question about the job market: How much better can it get?

Earlier this year, economists worried that the low unemployment rate meant businesses would struggle to find workers and that would drag down the pace of hiring. Those fears were heightened by a tiny job gain in March and modest hiring in May.

39. CBIZ MHM Adds Team Of Audit, Tax Professionals -

The Memphis office of CBIZ MHM LLC has hired several new professionals from accounting firm Elliott Davis Decosimo.

40. Problems Adrift -

David Ciarloni plants about 140 acres of soybeans on his 925-acre farm that straddles Shelby and Fayette counties. Those acres of beans are safe right now, but Ciarloni, who took over the family farm after his father recently retired, worries about a recent phenomenon that’s being called “dicamba drift.”

41. GOP Plan to Slash Legal Immigration Wins Trump's Support -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has embraced legislation that would dramatically reduce legal immigration and shift the nation toward a system that prioritizes merit and skills over family ties.

42. Trump Promotes Technology to Improve Veterans' Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump announced new efforts Thursday to use technology to improve veterans' health care, saying the programs will greatly expand access, especially for mental health care and suicide prevention. Veterans living in rural areas will also benefit, he said.

43. CBIZ MHM Adds Team Of Audit, Tax Professionals -

The Memphis office of CBIZ MHM LLC has hired several new professionals from accounting firm Elliott Davis Decosimo.

44. UTHSC’s Dr. David Stern Focusing on a Healthier Tennessee in New Role -

Getting invited to make a presentation at the White House last fall as part of a meeting on drug addiction turned into an epiphany of sorts for Dr. David Stern.

The discussion about substance use disorders and addictions – and how multidisciplinary clinical care can go a long way in addressing those challenges – touched a nerve with Stern. He’s spent the last six years as the Robert J. Kaplan executive dean and vice chancellor for clinical affairs at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, where his work has included recruiting more than 30 nationally recognized chairs and directors.

45. Kustoff: Window for Congressional Tax Reform Narrow -

When the House and Senate return to Washington from the August recess, the clock will be ticking on a tax-reform proposal that is a Republican priority.

And U.S. Rep. David Kustoff of Germantown says time is of the essence with 53 legislative days left in the year, as midterm election considerations in 2018 will make a tax-cut bill he and other Republicans favor more unlikely.

46. New St. Jude Grad School Welcomes Inaugural Class -

Following years of planning, development of curriculum and recruitment of staff and faculty, the first class of a dozen students has begun studies at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

47. Older People Dying on Job at Higher Rate Than All Workers -

Older people are dying on the job at a higher rate than workers overall, even as the rate of workplace fatalities decreases, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal statistics.

It's a trend that's particularly alarming as baby boomers reject the traditional retirement age of 65 and keep working. The U.S. government estimates that by 2024, older workers will account for 25 percent of the labor market.

48. Kushner Says Trump Campaign Was Too Dysfunctional to Collude -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's son-in-law told a group of congressional interns that the Trump campaign couldn't have colluded with Russia because the team was too dysfunctional and disorganized to coordinate with a foreign government.

49. Kelly Wins Praise Across The Aisle, But Bigger Task is Ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Raised voices could be heard through the thick door to the Oval Office as John Kelly – then secretary of Homeland Security – offered some tough talk to President Donald Trump.

50. Kustoff Says Russian Influence Not An Issue With Constituents -

Republican U.S. Rep. David Kustoff of Germantown says there is a “media bias” against President Donald Trump and that he doesn’t hear a lot from constituents about possible Russian influence on the 2016 presidential election or beyond the election.

51. Wilkins Launches MEMPOWER For Black Political Empowerment in Memphis -

Ricky E. Wilkins says he’s not upset about his 2014 loss in the Democratic congressional primary. He calls his loss to incumbent U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen “an education.”

52. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

53. Scaramucci Out of White House Job as John Kelly Takes Charge -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Anthony Scaramucci is out as White House communications director after just 11 days on the job – and just hours after President Donald Trump's new chief of staff, John Kelly, was sworn into office.

54. City Council Members Express Uncertainty, Doubt Over Instant Runoff Voting -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd questions why there should be runoff elections for the seven single-member district seats of the council.

Boyd made the comment as he and other council members continued to react to plans by the Shelby County Election Commission to implement Instant Runoff Voting, or Ranked Choice Voting (RCV), starting with the 2019 city elections.

55. Man Sentenced to 25 Years in Memphis Officer Shooting -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A judge sentenced a Tennessee man to 25 years in federal prison Friday on charges connected to the fatal shooting of a police officer in 2015.

U.S. District Judge Sheryl Lipman sentenced Tremaine Wilbourn, 31, during a hearing in Memphis federal court.

56. Last Word: More Intermodals, 20 Years After the Oilers In Memphis and New Path -

The "skinny" repeal of Obamacare comes up short in the U.S. Senate in an after midnight Friday vote in D.C. And it appears U.S. Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee voted for the repeal measure that came up short. Here are the basics early Friday morning from The New York Times.

57. July 28-August 3, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1975: The Peabody Hotel is sold out of receivership at auction for $400,000 – with another $140,000 for its belongings – to secret bidders through attorney Raymond Shainberg. The only other bid is $100,000 from Robert “Prince Mongo” Hodges.
Shainberg’s clients are father and son Philip and Jack Belz, who undertake a $20 million renovation and reopen the hotel in 1981. Years later, Jack Belz says he and his family expected more competition in the bidding and may have intended to quickly sell the hotel again but instead undertook the renovation.

58. Memphian Donald Gray’s Journey To Being MSU’s No. 1 Receiver -

When Donald Gray was just a boy, not yet 10 years old, he played in a church basketball league. His father, Donald Gray Sr., remembers that his son had a good time playing with the other kids. It was fun, something to do.

59. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

60. Trump Says Transgender People Should be Barred From Military -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump said Wednesday he wants transgender people barred from serving in the U.S. military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

61. Last Word: Alexander and Corker Differ, Instant Runoff React and Kroger On Hold -

Tennessee’s two U.S. Senators split their votes Tuesday in Washington on the vote that followed the vote to open debate on a repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both voted yes on the debate motion. But then Corker was one of the nine Republican Senate votes that killed the Obamacare replacement plan known as BCRA, while Alexander voted for it.

62. Civil Rights Marker Rededicated on Birthdate of Lynch Victim -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Mississippi historical marker about a notorious lynching that galvanized the civil rights movement was rededicated Tuesday, weeks after it was vandalized and repaired.

63. No Charges for Deputies Who Shot Knife-Wielding Man -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee prosecutor says no charges will be filed against two deputies who fatally shot a man last year.

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich said Monday the deputies fired only after 48-year-old Jimmy Lee Lawson ran at them with a knife and refused to obey orders to drop the weapon and get on the ground.

64. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

65. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

66. Spicer Abruptly Resigns as Trump Press Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House press secretary Sean Spicer abruptly resigned his position Friday, ending a rocky six-month tenure that made his news briefings defending President Donald Trump must-see TV. He said Trump's White House "could benefit from a clean slate."

67. Tennessee Inmates Get Reduced Sentences for Birth Control -

SPARTA, Tenn. (AP) — A program in a Tennessee county reduces inmates' jail time if they voluntarily undergo birth control procedures, in a move that has drawn criticism from the local district attorney and the American Civil Liberties Union.

68. Guest Op-Ed: Memphis 3.0? Let’s Think More About Memphis 10.0 -

Lately I’ve been asking myself a question, “What would it take for Memphis to reduce poverty by 50 percent in the next 15 years?” Furthermore, “What would it take for Memphis to be the size of New York in 50 years?”

69. Publicly Skewered by His Boss, Sessions Says He's Staying On -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions, publicly skewered by his boss for stepping aside from the Russia-Trump investigations, declared Thursday he still loves his job and plans to stay on. Yet Donald Trump's airing of his long-simmering frustrations with Sessions raised significant new questions about the future of the nation's top prosecutor.

70. Musk Says Government Likes Plan for High-Speed Tunnels -

DETROIT (AP) — In a tantalizing Tweet, Elon Musk says he has "verbal government approval" to build a tunnel for high-speed transportation from New York to Washington.

The billionaire entrepreneur didn't say who gave him the approval.

71. Haslam Touts IMPROVE Act At Interchange Opening -

It looked like another day at the Interstate 40-240 interchange Wednesday, July 19, from the roof of a building by the state’s tallest interchange.

Inside the building tucked away in a residential area off White Station Road, a bank of video monitors on the wall of the local offices of the Tennessee Department of Transportation showed the same – cars and trucks moving smoothly there and elsewhere on the county’s interstate system.

72. Made-In-USA Goods Can Be Pricey and Elusive. Just Ask Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's push this week to get Americans to buy goods "made in America" is harder than it might seem.

Even for Trump.

The gold-plated pens the president uses to sign laws are assembled in Rhode Island but lacquered and engraved in China. The Boeing jet he posed with to showcase America's industrial might is 30 percent foreign-made. The firetruck the administration parked at the White House this week to promote U.S.-made goods gets about 10 percent of its parts from abroad.

73. Memphis 3.0? Let’s Make Memphis 10.0 -

Lately I’ve been asking myself a question, “What would it take for Memphis to reduce poverty by 50 percent in the next 15 years?” Furthermore, “What would it take for Memphis to be the size of New York in 50 years?”

74. 'Let Obamacare Fail,' Trump Says After GOP Plan Collapses -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump declared Tuesday it's time to "let Obamacare fail" after the latest GOP health care plan crashed and burned in the Senate, a stunning failure for the president, Republican leader Mitch McConnell and a party that has vowed for years to abolish the law.

75. US to Create Independent Military Cyber Command -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

76. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

77. ‘Fifth Wave’ of Federal Judicial Appointments Comes with Political Undercurrents -

The White House called it the “fifth wave” of federal judicial nominees. Among the 11 nominees announced by President Donald Trump Thursday, July 13, were two for the Memphis federal court bench. And the wave comes with a few political undercurrents.

78. Saturday Night Scenes on Beale Street -

Some observations from three consecutive Saturday nights on Beale Street at and after 10 p.m.

Beale Street just before 10 p.m. is about bubbles. Street vendors selling bubble guns – toy guns that shoot bubbles – do a brisk business before 10. A girl in a stroller watches with wide eyes as her finger is locked on the trigger and bubbles spew forth. By the time she reaches the middle of the block between B.B. King Boulevard and Second Street, the stream of bubbles begins to slow.

79. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

80. Senate Confirms Tenn. Businessman Picked by Trump as Japan Envoy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate has confirmed Tennessee businessman William F. Hagerty as President Donald Trump's ambassador to Japan.

Senators voted 86-12 on Thursday to approve Hagerty's nomination.

81. County Budget Talks Reveal Political Divide -

When Shelby County Commissioners convene Monday, July 17, it will be their third meeting in a week – following committee sessions Wednesday and the special meeting to approve a county operating budget two days before that.

82. Climbing Out When Stuck In Comfort Zone -

We all have them. We often go there looking for safety, acceptance, understanding or just a sense of the familiar. Our comfort zones are natural, but living there can keep you from fulfilling your purpose in life. A comfort zone, if you burrow in too deep, can become a rut you get stuck in.

83. Enough Expectations to Go Around as SEC Football Season Approaches -

HOOVER, Ala. – The countdown to the start of the next college football season is now measured in weeks, not months. But at an event such as SEC Media Days, the future is always framed by the past.

84. Microsoft Announces Rural Broadband Initiative -

Microsoft wants to extend broadband services to rural America by using the buffer zones separating individual television channels in the airwaves.

Microsoft plans to partner with rural telecommunications providers in 12 states, from the Dakotas and Arizona to a far eastern edge of Maine. The strategy calls for a combination of private and public investments and regulatory cooperation from the Federal Communications Commission to get about 2 million rural Americans connected to high-speed internet in the next five years.

85. Stern Working to Expand UTHSC’s Community Reach -

When the University of Tennessee Health Science Center launched its Center for Addiction Science in the College of Medicine last year, it represented an ambitious bid by the school to help people beat a variety of addictions and to research the causes of substance abuse.

86. Last Word: Marathon County Budget Session, New Chandler Numbers and Confluence -

As we post this edition of Last Word, there is still some confusion about the KC-130 Marine cargo plane that crashed near the Leflore-Sunflower County line in Mississippi Monday evening.

All 16 people on board were killed in the crash.

87. Low-Key FBI Director Pick Would Lead Agency Through Tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The attorney selected to replace James Comey as FBI director is described by those close to him as admirably low-key, yet he'd be taking over the law enforcement agency at a moment that's anything but tranquil.

88. Canadian Delegation Hears Border Concerns During Memphis Visit -

Business crossing the U.S.-Canadian border and the uncertainty about U.S. immigration policy six months into President Donald Trump’s administration dominated a meeting last week between about 30 Memphis business leaders and the head of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

89. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

90. Ole Miss to Recognize Slave Labor on Pre-Civil War Buildings -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The University of Mississippi will post signs acknowledging that slaves built some structures on the main campus founded before the Civil War.

The university made the announcement Thursday, also saying Ole Miss will strip the name of James K. Vardaman off a building. Vardaman, a white supremacist, was a Mississippi governor and U.S. senator in the early 20th century.

91. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

92. Morris Recalls Brother’s Violent Death and Rage -

“Actually, the truth has never been told,” Charlie Morris said this week as he talked about the violent death of his brother 78 years ago in Arlington. Morris, now 96 years old, had family and friends gathered around him at the Memphis Branch NAACP headquarters Monday, July 3, as he marked the new state law that could reopen the investigation into the death of Jessie Lee Bond and other cold cases from the long arc of the civil rights movement.

93. Last Word: St. Peter's Picnic, Frayser Spike and Ferguson at Camp -

Hopefully you are reading this with a slight breeze blowing around you as you contemplate evening fireworks and very little in the way of work between now and then, although daytime fireworks might be a trend to watch for on future Fourth of Julys from a few events I’ve come across on social media.

94. St. Jude Names Thomas VP Of Clinical Trials Operations -

Tangie Thomas has joined St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as vice president of clinical trials operations. In that role, Thomas will lead support for clinical research at St. Jude and its affiliate sites, with duties that include implementing strategic goals, overseeing recruitment efforts and determining how resources are allocated for offices that support clinical research. Thomas previously served as director of clinical affairs at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville.

95. Tractor-Trailer Spills 7,400 Gallons of Gas Into Tennessee Creek -

WHITE HOUSE, Tenn. (AP) – About 7,400 gallons of gasoline spilled into a White House creek after a tractor trailer tipped over on Interstate 65 in Robertson County.

The Tennessean reports that emergency workers said in a statement that residents should turn of their air conditioners if they smell fumes and to call 911 if the fumes cause medical issues. The spill happened on Saturday near Highway 76.

96. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

97. African-American Museums Get $400K in State Funding -

A group of eight Tennessee museums that focus on the history of African-Americans in the state will get $400,000 in state funding.

The Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators announced the funding agreement Monday, June 26, with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam as part of the state’s 2017-2018 budget.

98. Former Cottage Restaurant Site to Be Demolished -

The tiny white house at the corner of Summer Avenue and Holmes Road stood out in stark contrast to the surrounding auto dealerships and gas stations, but for more than 50 years, the restaurant aptly-named The Cottage provided customers a hearty breakfast and bucolic atmosphere despite its urban setting.

99. Debt Deadline Now October, CBO Says As Deficit Spikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The drop-dead deadline for Congress to increase the government's borrowing authority and avoid a devastating economic default is early to mid-October, says a government estimate released Thursday that delivered another challenge to Republican leaders.

100. The Latest: Trump Promises 'Big Surprise' on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Republican legislation to repeal and replace the Obama health care law (all times EDT):

2:30 p.m.

President Donald Trump says the Republican health care effort is "working along very well" and suggested there could be a "big surprise coming." The White House did not elaborate on what Trump meant.