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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

2. Quarterback and Tight End Leaving University of Memphis -

Brady Davis, a quarterback recruited by former University of Memphis coach Justin Fuente, announced via social media he has been granted his release and will seek to continue his collegiate career elsewhere.

3. Pruitt Pumped Up for ‘Exciting’ Spring Game -

Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt loosened up a bit as the Vols went through spring practices last week, talking at length about individual players for the first time.

Big deal? Yeah, probably for media and fans starved for information about Pruitt’s first team of Vols.

4. George W. Bush Says His Mother Didn't Fear Death -

HOUSTON (AP) — Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday that his mother, Barbara Bush, didn't fear death because she believed in an afterlife and that she would be "wonderfully received in the arms of a loving God."

5. GOP's Regulatory Fight Goes to Another Level Over Car Loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The GOP-led Senate voted Wednesday to block Obama-era guidance a consumer protection agency issued five years ago to help ensure lenders don't charge blacks and Hispanics higher interest rates on car loans.

6. Sex Week Seems Tame Compared to Session Antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

7. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

8. NYC Removes Statue of Doctor Who Experimented on Slaves -

NEW YORK (AP) — A bronze statue of a 19th century doctor who did experimental surgery without anesthesia on enslaved African-American women was removed from Central Park on Tuesday.

New York City's Public Design Commission voted Monday to accept a mayoral panel's recommendation to remove the statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims for relocation to Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery, where Sims is buried, accompanied by signage with historical context.

9. Starbucks to Close Stores for Afternoon for Bias Training -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks, trying to tamp down a racially charged uproar over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores in Philadelphia, plans to close more than 8,000 U.S. stores for several hours next month to conduct racial-bias training for its nearly 175,000 workers.

10. Trump, Abe to Meet Despite Strain Over North Korea, Tariffs -

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Top Trump administration officials say that major concessions, including a possible exemption from steel and aluminum tariffs, could be on the table for Japan as President Donald Trump and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe meet in Florida to discuss trade issues and Trump's potential meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

11. Bill Prohibiting Sterilization Incentives Passes State House -

A proposal by State Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the state House of Representatives by a vote of 70-23 Tuesday, April 17. The legislation now awaits the signature of Gov. Bill Haslam.

12. Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation Puts $5 Million in Whitehaven Park Renovation -

A Whitehaven park is getting a $5 million remake, including a $900,000 endowment fund to keep the new David Carnes Park ready for recreation.

13. First Weekend of Early Voting Logs More Than 7,000 Votes in County Primaries -

More than 7,000 early votes were cast in the 2018 Shelby County government primaries through the first weekend of the early voting period.

The primary-only elections will be held May 1. Of the 7,255 early voters through Saturday, April 14, 3,983 voted in the Democratic primaries and 3,2727 voted in the Republican primaries.

14. Early Voting Tops 7,000 in County Primaries Through Saturday -

More than 7,000 citizens voted early in Shelby County through the first weekend of the early voting period in the 2018 county government primaries.

The 7,255 early voters in advance of the May 1 election day through Saturday, April 14, are voting in a primary only election with 3,983 voting in the Democratic primaries and 3,272 voting in the Republican primaries.

15. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

16. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

17. April 13-19, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: Striking Memphis sanitation workers vote to accept a pay raise of 15 cents an hour from the city, ending their strike after 64 days. Ten cents of the raise will go into effect in May, with the other 5 cents being added on Sept. 1.
The amount has come up before in the negotiations, which are being watched closely by The White House and federal labor officials following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Memphis Mayor Henry Loeb balks at the proposal presented by his team, saying he would agree to a raise effective with the new fiscal year beginning July 1 and not before. He also says the raise will be less than 15 cents an hour. Philanthropist Abe Plough secretly agrees to pay the difference needed for the entire pay raise starting May 1, contributing a total of $60,000 to cover the cost. Plough’s role remains a secret until his death in 1984.

18. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

19. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

20. Lawmakers Urge That Ex-President James Polk Be Exhumed Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nearly 170 years after President James K. Polk died, the Tennessee Legislature is urging that his remains be exhumed and taken to a fourth resting place – but it might take a while longer before the shovels hit the ground.

21. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

22. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

23. Trump Says All Calm at White House, Vents About Russia Probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump insisted that all was "very calm and calculated" at the White House, even as he vented Wednesday about the Russia probe, complained about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and served noticed that "nice and new and 'smart'" missiles will be coming down on Syria.

24. Study: South Should Spend on Schools, Train Homegrown Talent -

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) – As teachers in multiple states protest for better pay, a new study warns that the fast-growing South region must invest more in public schools and higher education to ensure its homegrown talent shares in its economic prosperity.

25. Mississippi's New US Senator Sets Top Staff Jobs -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's new U.S. senator is keeping some top staff members who worked for her predecessor.

Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith is also filling other top staff jobs with people who worked for her when she was Mississippi commissioner of agriculture.

26. House Committee Revives Bill That Would Charge Local Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee bill that would allow local officials to be charged with a felony for passing sanctuary city ordinances or measures that would illegally remove Confederate statues has gotten new life.

27. Haslam Appoints New UT Board Members -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed 10 people to a new University of Tennessee Board of Trustees following passage of legislation he backed to overhaul the board.

Haslam's appointees are all UT alumni. They include: former President of PepsiCo John Compton; Former Lady Vol and ESPN analyst Kara Lawson; CEO and founder of the Trust Co. Sharon Pryse; President and CEO of River City Co. Kim White; CEO of AutoZone Bill Rhodes; Former Tennessee Supreme Court Special Justice Melvin Malone; former Director and CEO of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Bill Evans; CEO of Denark Construction Raja Jubran; and former UT Vols football player and current partner in the Nashville law office of Adams and Reese Brad Lampley.

28. A/B Test Your Way to Email Success -

In years past, plenty of brands adopted a “set it and forget it” email-automation mentality. Once a marketing email was released, it became a distant memory.

There’s a much better way, though, to leverage the still-popular email marketing technique and more closely connect to reader preferences as a way to obtain an end goal.

29. Last Word: Pera's Move, The Catechism of 1968 and Whitehaven's ER -

A day ahead of the last game of the season for the Grizz on the road, the team’s majority owner, Robert Pera, acted Monday to clear up questions about the ownership of the team going forward. Pera emailed season ticket holders Monday evening that he will not be exercising a buy-sell agreement with his partners who have minority shares of the franchise.

30. Analysis: Tax Cuts, Spending to Raise Deficit to $1T by 2019 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The combined effect of President Donald Trump's tax cuts and last month's budget-busting spending bill is sending the government's budget deficit toward the $1 trillion mark next year, according to a new analysis by the Congressional Budget Office.

31. At the EEOC, Harassment Cases Can Languish for Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal agency handling workplace harassment complaints has become a crowded waystation in an overwhelmed bureaucracy, with wait times often stretching years. And as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission takes on renewed significance in light of the growing #MeToo movement, lawyers worry the increased caseload will lead to even longer delays.

32. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

33. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

34. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

35. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

36. Out of Flowers? Flour? Businesses Contend With Supply Crises -

NEW YORK (AP) – When heavy rain pelted Central America, Shane Pliska couldn't get shipments of taupe-colored roses he needed for clients' weddings.

"Of course, this was the season when everyone wanted champagne- and gold-themed weddings, and the champagne part was all taupe roses," says Pliska, owner of Planterra, a commercial florist and owner of a wedding venue where the decor is all about flowers and plants.

37. Football Tigers Holding April 7 Practice in Nashville -

For the second time in Mike Norvell’s three seasons at Memphis, the Tiger football team will venture east on Interstate 40 to Nashville for an open practice. The team will practice on Saturday, April 7, at 3 p.m. at Brentwood Academy, 219 Granny White Pike in Brentwood.

38. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20.  Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

39. ER Visits Show Methodist South Filling Primary Care Gap in Whitehaven -

Methodist South Hospital in Whitehaven has for more than a year been the site of a flurry of construction projects, including an $8.7 million expansion of the emergency department that wrapped up last year, while an upgrade of the intensive care unit is underway now.

40. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Filing Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

41. Resolution Denouncing Neo-Nazis Dies Again in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A resolution denouncing neo-Nazis and white nationalists has died in the Tennessee legislature for the second time in recent weeks.

The Tennessean reports House Republican Caucus Chair Rep. Ryan Williams, R-Cookeville, requested Monday that the resolution be withdrawn from consideration by the Delayed Bills Committee.

42. Who Starts on Defense? You’ll Have to Wait -

Jeremy Pruitt hasn’t been afraid to change things around during his first spring practice as Tennessee’s head football coach.

43. Under Hardaway, Memphis Again Can Have Hometown Heroes -

Headline from the future: “Alex Lomax Leads Memphis Tigers into the Sweet 16.”

A certainty? Of course not. But it’s a possibility because Lomax has committed to Penny Hardaway and the University of Memphis. You know, as opposed to staying with his earlier choice of Gregg Marshall and Wichita State.

44. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

45. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20. Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

46. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

47. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

48. Anniversary of King's Assassination Marked With Marches, Rallies -

Several thousand people marching under the banners of unions and civil rights organizations marched peacefully Wednesday, April 4, from the headquarters of the American Federal of State County and Municipal Employees at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard to Mason Temple Church of God in Christ.

49. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

50. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

51. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

52. ‘Revolutionary Times’ -

The youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. hopes to prove him wrong in only one respect. The Rev. Bernice King has been talking about the quote from one of her father’s now institutionalized speeches for at least the last two years.

53. Football Tigers Holding April 7 Practice in Nashville -

For the second time in Mike Norvell’s three seasons at Memphis, the Tiger football team will venture east on Interstate 40 to Nashville for an open practice. The team will practice on Saturday, April 7, at 3 p.m. at Brentwood Academy, 219 Granny White Pike in Brentwood.

54. China Raises Tariffs on US Pork, Fruit in Trade Dispute -

BEIJING (AP) – China raised import duties on a $3 billion list of U.S. pork, apples and other products Monday in an escalating dispute with Washington over trade and industrial policy.

55. Analysis: Blacks Largely Left Out of High-Paying Jobs -

BOSTON (AP) – Jonathan Garland's fascination with architecture started early: He spent much of his childhood designing Lego houses and gazing at Boston buildings on rides with his father away from their largely minority neighborhood.

56. Commitment to King's Unfinished Work Remains 50 Years Later -

ATLANTA (AP) – Tyrone Brooks was 22 years old and 400 miles away, seeking clues to an unsolved lynching as old as he was, when he got the news that Martin Luther King Jr. was dead. Stunned, Brooks dropped everything and drove to Memphis, crying all the way.

57. 'This Was Like A War': Witnesses Remember Day MLK Was Shot -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Clara Ester's eyes were fixed on the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as he stood on the concrete balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

58. Holder: After King, Political System is 'Far From Fair' -

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder told a University of Memphis and National Civil Rights Museum symposium Monday, April 2, that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. helped create “a new country” in 39 years of life but that “it is necessary to be indignant and be impatient” 50 years after King’s death.

59. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

60. The Aftermath: Memphis' Political Journey Since 1968 -

For 50 years and counting, April 4 has been an important day in the life of Memphis.

To some Memphians, it is a holy day; to others, it’s a day of reflection, or perhaps one of action and service.

61. Stock Market Grocery Spurs Interest In Lakeland’s Lake District Project -

After more than a decade of preparation, The Lake District multiuse development in Lakeland is seeing some concrete progress. In fact, the developer, Los Angeles-based Gilad Development Inc., has signed its first tenant to the location on the southeast corner of the intersection of I-40 and Canada Road.

62. Editorial: 50 Years After King's Death, What Have We Learned? -

When sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker were crushed by a garbage truck compactor on Feb. 1, 1968, it sparked a 64-day strike that reverberated throughout Memphis and beyond.

63. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

64. The Doctor is In: White House Physician Nominated to Lead VA -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin and nominated White House doctor Ronny Jackson to replace him following a bruising ethics scandal and a mounting rebellion within the agency.

65. President Trump Goes After a Favorite Target, Amazon -

NEW YORK (AP) – President Donald Trump took another shot at Amazon.com Thursday, tweeting that the online retailer pays "little or no taxes" and that it uses the U.S. Postal Service as "their Delivery Boy."

66. Football Can’t Arrive Soon Enough for Vols Fans -

Thank goodness Tennessee spring football is here. Vol Nation needs a diversion with all that’s happened the past couple of weeks, like the men’s basketball team losing to Loyola-Chicago in the NCAA Tournament’s second round, and Loyola advancing to the Final Four.

67. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

68. Hurricanes: Six Months Later -

The 2017 hurricane season ranked as the fifth-most active, leaving long-lasting effects on several Caribbean islands.

I have a particular interest in how those islands recover, with my first cruise experience coming up this summer and taking us to five Southern Caribbean islands from Puerto Rico. Hurricane Irma alone hit three of the islands on my approaching itinerary – Antigua and Barbuda, St. Maarten, and St. Kitts and Nevis. Then Hurricane Maria made landfall as a Category 4 in Puerto Rico, the strongest storm there in 85 years.

69. AP-NORC Poll: Trump's Approval Rating Up From Historic Lows -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The good news for President Donald Trump? His approval rating is up 7 points since last month, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

70. Aggressively Grow Email Subscribers -

One of the most cost-effective strategies for driving web traffic and generating online leads is email marketing. Unfortunately, most small and mid-sized companies have an email database filled mostly of current clients, business partners and other friends of the firm. To put a fire under your email marketing and dramatically boost results, follow these five steps for growing your email database.

71. Frontier Gun Maker Remington Seeks Bankruptcy Protection -

Remington, the storied gun maker that began turning out flintlock rifles when there were only 19 states in the Union, has filed for bankruptcy reorganization amid years of slumping sales and legal and financial pressure over the Sandy Hook school massacre.

72. Lawmakers Seek to Ease Jack Daniel’s Tax Burden -

NASHVILLE – Jack Daniel’s is over a barrel – literally – regarding a tax assessment, an attorney general’s opinion and the potential impact of President Donald Trump’s trade tariff.

73. Mississippi Names First Black Higher Education Commissioner -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The first-ever African American has been named to oversee Mississippi's eight public universities.

The state College Board announced Friday that Alfred Rankins Jr. will become higher education commissioner July 1 when Glenn Boyce retires. Rankins is the current president of Alcorn State University.

74. Trump Signs $1.3 Trillion Budget After Threatening Veto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed a $1.3 trillion spending measure Friday, averting a midnight government shutdown just hours after declaring he was considering a veto.

Trump said he was "very disappointed" in the package, in part because it did not fully fund his plans for a border wall with Mexico and did not address some 700,000 "Dreamer" immigrants who are now protected from deportation under a program that he has moved to eliminate.

75. Memphians Taking Part In March Against Gun Violence -

Memphis will join cities in all 50 states Saturday, March 24, in responding to the national call to action against gun violence by March For Our Lives.

Organized by a grassroots coalition of high school youth from across greater Memphis, the local march is an officially recognized partner of the national March For Our Lives movement and will mirror the youth-led march on Washington, D.C.

76. $23M HarborChase Slated For Completion in 2019 -

In just 12 years, one out of every five Americans will be 65 or older. In the senior housing industry, the Greatest Generation is increasingly giving way to their children, the baby boomers. And that means developers and operators are changing retirement communities to suit the tastes of this next wave of residents.

77. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

78. Mueller Examining Cambridge Analytica, Trump Campaign Ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Special counsel Robert Mueller is scrutinizing the connections between President Donald Trump's campaign and the data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, which has come under fierce criticism over reports that it swiped the data of more than 50 million Facebook users to sway elections.

79. Parkinson to Introduce Bill Phasing Out State’s Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Antonio Parkinson is set to make a push to remove Memphis schools from the state’s Achievement School District and dissolve the state district because of its failure to pull them out of Tennessee’s bottom 5 percent for performance.

80. Memphians Taking Part In March Against Gun Violence -

Memphis will join? ?cities in all 50 states Saturday, March 24, in responding to the national call to action against gun violence by March For Our Lives.

Organized by a grassroots coalition of high school youth from across greater Memphis, the local march is an officially recognized partner of the national March For Our Lives movement? and will mirror the youth-led march on Washington, D.C.

81. Facebook Crisis-Management Lesson: What Not to Do -

NEW YORK (AP) – The crisis-management playbook is pretty simple: Get ahead of the story, update authorities and the public regularly, assume responsibility and take decisive action. Crisis-management experts say Facebook is 0-for-4.

82. Council Makes First Moves On Prekindergarten Funding -

Memphis City Council members took first votes Tuesday, March 20, approving the city’s move toward funding $6 million of a $16 million expansion of local prekindergarten programs.

Ordinances approved on the first of three readings establish a city account for prekindergarten with funding coming from one penny on the city property tax rate and incremental city property tax revenue that comes when tax abatements provided for economic development projects expire.

83. Children’s Central -

The first career choice a child has in mind isn’t always the right one. Stephanie Butler, who today is the new executive director of the Children’s Museum of Memphis, thought she wanted to be a doctor.

84. Last Word: SCS Plans For $15, IRIS Matinees and The Hard Hit Fund -

“From a financial standpoint, we need our fans back and we need them back now.” University of Memphis president David Rudd breaking the university’s silence on the basketball coaching change that was made formal Tuesday with the announcement that Penny Hardaway is indeed the new coach. And Hardaway had a lot to say that Tigers fans and Memphians wanted to hear.

85. City Council Gives Preliminary Approval to Pre-K Funding -

Memphis City Council members took first votes Tuesday, March 20, approving the city’s move toward funding $6 million of a $16-million expansion of prekindergarten locally.

The ordinances approved on the first of three readings an establish the city fund for prekindergarten and the funding with the equivalent of a penny on the existing city property tax rate and incremental city property tax revenue as economic development projects begin paying a higher tax rate when their tax abatements expire.

86. Trump Opioid Plan Includes Death Penalty for Traffickers -

MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) – President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid drug addiction calls for stiffer penalties for drug traffickers, including the death penalty where appropriate under current law, a top administration official said. It's a fate for drug dealers that Trump has been highlighting publicly in recent weeks.

87. Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Indicted on 43 Counts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The man accused of fatally shooting a woman and wounding six people at a Tennessee church in September faces a 43-count indictment, including first-degree murder, attempted murder and felony civil rights intimidation charges.

88. Dean: ‘It’s Kind of Our Turn’ in Governor’s Race -

Democratic contender for governor Karl Dean is pushing hard the idea that Democrats can win one of the two statewide races on the Tennessee ballot this year.

89. This Week In Memphis History: March 16-22, 2018 -

2008: Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton proposes closing several public libraries, including the Cossitt, Gaston, Highland, Levi and Poplar-White Station branches. He floats the proposal to City Council members, saying it would save the city $1.5 million to $2 million.
“I don’t need to hear from any council member about their district,” he says later. “I have to look at the city. Some of these libraries are in the ghetto. Some of them are on Poplar.” Herenton adds that his upcoming budget proposal will call for a city property tax hike. “I think it’s inevitable,” he says. “But with these cuts, it won’t be as much.” The move to close the Cossitt, the city’s first public library, is also part of a still-general plan by Herenton to redevelop the city’s riverfront and use the land the library is on for other purposes.

90. Making Art Work -

After he’d finished his part in a Memphis Symphony Orchestra performance a few weeks ago that included Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade for Violin, guest violinist Charles Yang came out on stage and did something unexpected.

91. The Whole Truth -

TRUTH BE TOLD. Truth is the truth. It isn’t inconvenient, inconsistent or incomplete. It isn’t uncomfortable or unpleasant and certainly not untrue.

But what we’ve made of the truth is all of those things.

92. Candidates’ Choices -

Polls, phone banking, messaging, yard signs, who is paid and who is a volunteer – all are elements of a campaign. And each is part of an overall strategy.

But most campaigns struggle with a schedule of which events to attend and which to forgo. And in the 2018 campaign season, the number of events is only growing as the May 1 county primary elections near, followed by the county general election and state and federal primaries in August, then the state and federal general elections in November.

93. Last Word: The Memphis Hub Modernization, Gun Protests and MLK 50 Plans -

Back in January, the FedEx board approved a $3.2 billion package that had pay raises, bonuses and similar items that have become the corporate reaction to federal tax reform that set a lower rate of taxation for companies that repatriate money they have overseas. There was a mention of $1.5 billion for the Indianapolis hub and unspecified plans for the Memphis hub to come later. And later was yesterday in a pretty modest announcement at Signature Air given the scope of what FedEx has planned for its Super Hub here.

94. Bill Making It a Felony for Unauthorized Monument Action Dies for the Session -

NASHVILLE – One of several bills considered retribution against the city of Memphis for the removal of Confederate statues died in a House committee today amid questions about its constitutionality.

95. Trump Picks Camera-Proven Kudlow as Top Economic Aide -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has chosen Larry Kudlow to be his top economic aide, elevating the influence of a long-time fixture on the CNBC business news network who previously served in the Reagan administration and has emerged as a leading evangelist for tax cuts and a smaller government.

96. 'Enough is Enough': US Students Stage Walkouts Against Guns -

Declaring enough is enough, tens of thousands of young people from Maine to California walked out of school to demand action on gun violence Wednesday in one of the biggest student protests since the Vietnam era.

97. Tennessee In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Clears 1st Hurdle -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee House subcommittee has approved legislation with in-state tuition for public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally.

98. Trump Considers TV Commentator as Possible Economic Adviser -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump said Tuesday he's strongly considering selecting CNBC senior contributor Larry Kudlow to succeed Gary Cohn as his top economic adviser, praising the veteran financial commentator and campaign supporter.

99. Wiuff Looks to Boost Engagement As MAAR Board President -

Lauren Harkins Wiuff, a broker at Marx-Bensdorf Realtors, has begun her tenure as the 2018 president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors board of directors. Wiuff, who will serve a one-year term as board president, is also a lifetime member of MAAR’s Multi Million Dollar Club. At Marx-Bensdorf, she leads a team that includes her sister, Stephanie Sheahan.

100. High School Student Starts New St. Jude Fundraiser, Heels 4 Healing -

Students of all ages are getting involved in service and fundraising earlier in life, and one local Memphis high school senior is no exception.

Samantha Tancredi, a senior at Hutchison School, will be hosting Heels 4 Healing on March 24 at 9 a.m. at Shelby Farms Park. The event is a 5K race and community celebration with live music, food trucks and other fun activities to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.