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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

SRVS and West Tennessee disability services providers will host an Employment and Community First services career fair Wednesday, April 26, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Lipscomb & Pitts Building first-floor conference center, 2670 Union Ave. Staff will be conducting on-site interviews and hiring support staff and job coaches for ECF Services. Email kytrinia.miller@srvs.org for details.

2. Shaffer Named Executive Director Of Rebranded BLDG Memphis -

John Paul Shaffer recently was named executive director of BLDG Memphis, the rebranded entity that brings the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis and Livable Mem-phis under a single organizational identity.
In his new role, Shaffer’s job is to guide the organization in its mission of supporting neighborhood revitalization through a network of organizations and individuals working in the community development space – which BLDG Memphis does primarily through organizational capacity building, community education and engagement, and public policy and advocacy – as well as to promote the new brand. 

3. Wiseacre Tables Plans to Build Brewery in Coliseum -

Wiseacre Brewing Co.'s plans to expand into the Mid-South Coliseum are off but could re-emerge somewhere down the road as the city administration renews discussions about a fuller renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

4. Rudd Says University Redirecting Neighborhood -

The railroad tracks between Highland Avenue and Zach Curlin Drive have been a fact of life and a border of sorts for as long as there has been a University of Memphis – even before it was called the University of Memphis.

5. The Week Ahead: March 27-April 1 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! The Bluff City plays host to several big names this week, from acclaimed country musician Margo Price and influential feminist Dolores Huerta to the always-popular St. Louis Cardinals. Plus, Midtown celebrates its mojo and Germantown goes to the dogs, all in The Week Ahead… 

6. Lehman-Roberts’ Moore Lauded By Asphalt Industry Group -

Rick Moore, who is retiring as chairman of Lehman-Roberts Co. March 31 after 46 years with the company, has been named the National Asphalt Pavement Association’s Man of the Year. 

7. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

8. Israel to Lead Greenline Group As Organization’s Focus Shifts -

Andrew Israel recently was named executive director of the Greater Memphis Greenline as the organization shifts its focus to promoting healthy lifestyles and increasing the use of trails, parks and green spaces.
As executive director, Israel is the strategic leader and the chief relationship officer for GMG. Along with creating programs and opportunities to enhance and expand the use of green spaces, GMG works at the grassroots level with neighborhood organizations and individuals to help promote their activities and expand the resources that are available. 

9. Tapping Young Donors -

Amelia Thompson is everything a nonprofit is looking for now and in the future. A 30-year-old Memphian who graduated White Station High School, she has worked with a nonprofit in Washington, D.C. and been a buyer for Macy’s in New York.

10. Another Country -

On the road into the C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa in southwest Memphis, there is a sign you might not notice on your way to the museum and archaeological site.

An arrow pointing east is the way to Memphis. The western arrow reads Chucalissa.

11. Cities, Developers Reaping Rewards of Mixed-Use Shift -

Commercial real estate is shifting to mixed-use developments designed to create a sense of place for homeowners longing for the community of days gone by, and the trend is profiting many parties as commercial developers see stronger returns and cities undergo revitalization in their core.

12. Michael Keeney Reappointed To Airport Authority Board -

Michael Keeney has been reappointed to the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority board of commissioners by the Memphis City Council.

Keeney, whose term will expire on Dec 31, 2023, was appointed by Shelby County Mayor Mark H. Luttrell in July 2105.

13. Memphis Students Leave Their Beautiful Mark on Blighted Downtown Building -

A Memphis woman is using inspiration she found on a summer trip to help transform a blighted building in Downtown Memphis, giving credence to the sentiment that one person can make a difference.

Carolee Carlin, a Germantown resident who works at International Paper Co., was visiting her family in New England last summer when her mom took her to see an abandoned building. The boarded up windows had been replaced with plywood panels of art that had been created by local high school students.

14. Last Word: Connecting Downtown, Tranquil Treasure and Gas Tax Complexities -

Temple over the Tigers Wednesday in Philadelphia 77-66. East Carolina at the Forum is coming up Saturday. Grizz and Raptors at the Forum Wednesday evening and the Grizz win 101 – 99. The Grizz are on the road starting Friday against the Trail Blazers.

15. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

16. Growing Pains -

In many ways, Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe in 1971 shaped the way Midtown Memphis looks today, so it’s only fitting that the park continues to inspire citizens to fight for what they feel is right.

17. Medical District Collaborative Offers Financial Carrot for Residents -

Employees of five major medical and academic institutions of the Memphis Medical District Collaborative (MMDC) now have a financial incentive to live in the Medical District thanks to a new Live Local 901 initiative.

18. Tupelo Council Votes to Keep Flying State Flag -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi state flag will remain in the City of Tupelo.

Despite calls by some to remove the controversial flag from city property, the City Council ap-proved a policy Tuesday saying that any city-owned facility with more than one flag pole must display Mississippi's flag.

19. Midtown Kroger Opens With Pedestrian Focus on Busy Union Avenue -

The carillon at Idlewild Presbyterian Church played the University of Memphis fight song Wednesday, Nov. 2, as the parking lot of the Midtown Kroger filled with cars. A block away a fire truck’s siren mixed with the church bells as the truck left the Union Avenue fire station to a call.

20. Medical District Begins Buy Local Program -

Nine hospitals and universities within the Memphis Medical District are inviting Memphis-based innovators, entrepreneurs and existing companies to help solve operational challenges within their supply chain.

21. Airbnb Regulations Stripped of ‘Red Tape’ -

For several weeks, the coming of a city ordinance regulating Airbnbs looked like the model of how to achieve political compromise and consensus with the City Council brokering the process.

During the six-week process council member Edmund Ford Jr. worked with the hotel-motel industry and the short-term rental alliance to find common points and then worked through differences with them. Council member Berlin Boyd reviewed the provisions in his council committee as a neutral party both sides could go to as well.

22. Council Takes 'Red Tape' Out of Airbnb Regulations -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Oct. 18, there was too much red tape in a city ordinance to regulate Airbnbs and took out the city permitting process before approving it on third and final reading.

23. Last Word: Stop & Frisk, Council Day and The Big 12 Holds What It's Got -

We had quite the conversation with the two leaders of the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission about “stop and frisk” and what will be in the upcoming draft of a new Operation: Safe Community plan for Memphis.

24. City Council Vote to Focus On Highland Strip Project -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 18, on an economic impact plan for the Highland Strip area that sets the stage for the tax increment financing district to finance infrastructure changes in the private development hot spot.

25. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

26. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

27. Town Hall Meetings Reflect Shift in Protest Discussions -

Almost three months after Black Lives Matter movement protestors shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and as a result, opened talks with the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, some of the civic discussion has moved to economic issues.

28. Meet Olli -

With deep and well-funded resources such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, the Knoxville region is no stranger to innovation in science and technology.

But a new kid on the block, Local Motors, has the potential to spark a whole new era of manufacturing innovation and make Knoxville a hotbed for a technology sector widely considered to be truly revolutionary – self-driving cars.

29. Broad Avenue Alliance Hires Executive Director -

Continued growth in the Broad Avenue District since its revival about a decade ago has prompted the Broad Avenue Arts Alliance to hire an executive director.

Katie McWeeney Powell, a consistent volunteer at events in the district who has business and marketing experience, was chosen for the new post.

30. Fernandez Fights for Memphians’ Cybersecurity -

Managing information technology for a hospital system might not seem like a natural extension of a career in the U.S. Navy. But as vice president and chief technology officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, Gene Fernandez finds himself at the heart of the cybersecurity battle that health care providers are fighting.

31. U of M Gets Economic Boost, W.M. Barr PILOT Approved -

The University of Memphis will get a development incentive boost around its campus, a longstanding Memphis-based manufacturer has been granted tax incentives to expand on Presidents Island and a gift-wrap company has received an amendment to its tax incentive that will allow it to add staff.

32. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

33. Indianapolis Charter Star Lands in Memphis as Teacher Town CEO -

The former leader of a high-achieving charter school network in Indianapolis is the new CEO of a philanthropically funded initiative in Memphis known as Teacher Town.

Marcus Robinson is the first full-time CEO of the city’s teacher development and recruitment initiative now in its third year. He joined Teacher Town during the summer following a national search conducted by Boston-based Bellwether Education Partners.

34. Events -

Choose 901 will host a 901 Day celebration Thursday, Sept. 1, from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Loflin Yard, 7 W. Carolina Ave. The evening will feature food and Memphis-themed drinks for purchase, a live music showcase, local vendors and more. Admission is free. Visit choose901.com.

35. Memphians Invited to Tour Victorian Village Homes This Weekend -

Scott Blake lives in the kind of Memphis neighborhood where he can go three, sometimes four days without ever starting his car. Everything he needs, everywhere he has to go, is that close by.

36. Memphis Property Hub Using Micro-Level Data to Drive Solutions -

The effects of blight, like boarded-up windows and overgrown lawns, are clear to see. While the methods used to track blight are less apparent, an effort is underway to streamline property data so that government agencies and community development groups can tailor solutions at a neighborhood level.

37. Senator Seeks Reconvening of Congress Over Zika Virus -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the Zika virus in Florida (all Eastern times):

4 p.m.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson is asking Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to reconvene Congress so lawmakers can pass an emergency spending bill to fight the spread of the Zika virus.

38. Land Bridge Project Could Transform Entire University of Memphis Area -

The official planning phase has begun for the much anticipated $33 million University of Memphis land bridge, which will safely connect two sides of the university that are currently split by the Norfolk Southern railroad tracks and Southern Avenue.

39. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

40. Urban Child Institute Approves $1M Grant to Porter-Leath -

The Urban Child Institute board of directors has approved a new $1 million grant to Porter-Leath. The grant will help fund several proven programs at Porter-Leath, including Early Head Start, Teacher Excellence Program, Parents as Teachers and Preschool Partnership, among others.

41. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

42. South End Gets a $15 Million Apartment Complex -

250 E. G.E. Patterson Ave.
Memphis, TN 38126

Permit Amount: $14.6 million

Owner: Elmington Capital Group

43. The Casual Pint Coming to Highland Row -

In addition to its recent announcement about buying a Philadelphia-area shopping center, Memphis-based Poag Shopping Centers said a new market store and bar called The Casual Pint will open on Highland Row near the University of Memphis this fall.

44. The Casual Pint Coming to Highland Row Development -

In addition to its recent announcement about buying a Philadelphia area shopping center, Memphis-based Poag Shopping Centers said a new market store and bar called The Casual Pint will open on Highland Row near the University of Memphis this fall.

45. Time Running Out to Save Aretha Franklin’s Birth Home From Demolition -

A local business owner has stepped up with $15,000 to save Aretha Franklin's birth home, but the effort may be too little too late.

The dilapidated house at 406 Lucy Ave. is headed for demolition unless a realistic and fully-funded plan emerges within the week, said Steve Barlow, an attorney with blight-fighting law firm Brewer & Barlow PLC.

46. Editorial: Measuring a Memphis Summer -

If you’ve not consulted your calendar for the beginning of summer and assumed it is already here, that’s completely understandable.

The summer finds the Memphis Grizzlies and the University of Memphis basketball team – the city’s two dominant sports franchises – each rebuilding.

47. Young Brings Data Focus to City Planning -

Want to gaze into the future? Hop into Paul Young’s Infiniti and ride around Downtown for an hour. “These three blocks will be something of a spine for the neighborhood,” he says, as a light rain falls on the windshield. “We envision five- or six-story buildings with restaurants and retail at street level, commercial and residential up top.”

48. One Family -

An unprecedented private investment aims to restore a commercial heart to the Soulsville USA neighborhood, where a pair of sprawling buildings take up nearly a full block across from the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. It isn’t an eyesore, but inactivity within those walls has been a drag on the community.

49. Last Word: The Return of Chiwawa, Mud Island's Dilemma and A Good Map -

Chiwawa is back. But don’t call it a doughnut shop. And the owner says it won’t be called Chiwawa either. We presume it will still proclaim that Midtown is Memphis.

50. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

51. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

52. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

53. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

54. Medical District Stakeholders: Neighborhood Full of Potential -

Some 2,500 new employees start jobs each year at employers in the Memphis Medical District, and about 1,300 new students each year start hitting the books at educational institutions there, too.

That’s according to Medical District Collaborative president Tommy Pacello, who says the 2.5-square-mile area between Midtown and Downtown that’s home to eight anchor institutions is full of untapped potential. So much so that his organization, which launched earlier this year, is leading a revitalization of the district that leans heavily on anchors like Regional One Health and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare to help in a buy local, live local and hire local push for the neighborhood.

55. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

56. Fertile Ground -

Residents of the Memphis Medical District have begun filing in to the Premier Palace ballroom on Madison Avenue, along with area stakeholders, planners and other attendees who have business interests in the area.

57. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

58. Five to Watch -

“You can’t live in Memphis without some kind of side hustle, right?” That’s the way former WMC-TV reporter Lauren Squires Ready sees it. Her side hustle, the passion project she’s been pursuing in her free time separate from all the writing, reporting and live shots as an on-air news personality?

59. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

60. Klondike Wants Plan To Stave Off Gentrification -

With multimillion-dollar investments growing up around it in the Crosstown and Uptown neighborhoods, the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp. is working with the University of Memphis on a grassroots action plan to stave off gentrification.

61. The Week Ahead: March 7-13 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? In a few short days it’ll be time to “spring forward” – but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First, check out our weekly roundup of area happenings, from a discussion with local changemakers to the inaugural Memphis Black Restaurant Week…

62. Duke Takes Reins at Friends for Life -

Longtime nonprofit administrator Diane Duke recently took the helm of Friends for Life as its new executive director. In her new role, the Los Angeles native leads and oversees an organization that’s helping those affected by HIV/AIDS through the provision of education, housing, food, transportation and healthy life skills training.

63. Medical Area Ready For Residential Development -

Every week day, 16,000 people go to work in the two-and-a-half square mile area that is the Memphis Medical Center District.

Add the 8,000 students to the workers at the eight major institutions in the district and you have more than a sell-out crowd for an event at FedExForum in that area every working day.

64. Under Pressure -

The Urban Child Institute’s research produces data. That data provides guidance for making decisions about how to best help Memphis children age 3 and younger. And The Urban Child Institute’s assets, around $150 million in 2013, offer a means to that end.

65. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

66. Oxford Feels Stress from Development Boom -

Kent Wunderlich travels to Oxford, Miss., often, in part because his grandson is the kicker on the University of Mississippi football team.

67. Home Values Point to a Sharp Wealth Divide Within US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's still possible in Boston for a mail carrier, an accountant and a Harvard-trained psychiatrist — basically, the crowd from "Cheers" — to live as neighbors.

That finding by the real estate brokerage Redfin makes the capital of Massachusetts a rarity at a time when neighborhoods in most U.S. cities are increasingly isolated from each other by income and home values.

68. I Choose Memphis: Amy Grow -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Amy Grow

Job title and company: International Paper, Communications Department, Meetings & Events

69. The Week Ahead: Nov. 9, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from revenge on the Warriors to crime reduction through urban planning…

It’s still election season in 70 percent of the city, which sounds like a weather forecast – part warning and part advisory.
But the seven-day outlook calls for an increased chance of political engagement this week. Early voting in the set of five Memphis City Council runoff races continues this week at eight satellite locations as well as the Downtown site, 157 Poplar Ave.
The runoff elections in council districts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 will determine the identity of a council that will have at least six, possibly seven new members. Super District council members Philip Spinosa and Martavius Jones, the two confirmed new faces on the council, were elected outright on Oct. 8.

70. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

71. Earlier Conversions Leave Lessons for Foote Homes Project -

The coming redevelopment of Foote Homes will be different from previous public housing conversions, incorporating lessons learned from relocating residents.

The last phase of neighboring Cleaborn Homes’ conversion to a mixed-use, mixed-income development is under construction on the other side of Lauderdale Street. It will create 67 multifamily units and should be completed by the end of the year.

72. South Front Antiques Expands Via Web, Social Media -

South Front Antiques has been a landmark in Downtown Memphis for decades, but the second generation of the Nielsen family is launching the past into the future with an expanded web presence and social media platform to make their one-of-a-kind pieces available far and wide.

73. Memphis Mayoral Contenders Talk Public Transit -

The four major contenders for Memphis mayor all favor keeping the Mid-South Coliseum in some form and a Memphis Zoo parking garage.

But the positions were limited to yes-or-no answers during the Memphis Rotary Club debate Tuesday, Sept. 22, among Mayor A C Wharton and challengers Harold Collins, Jim Strickland and Mike Williams.

74. Tennessee Housing Agency Adopts Green-Building Standards -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency wants to build healthy communities from the ground up.

Under new guidelines to be incorporated later this year, affordable housing developers seeking Low-Income Housing Tax Credits will have to qualify for full certification from Enterprise Green Communities. The certification was first introduced nationally in 2004, and the THDA board recently approved incorporation of the revamped 2015 criteria.

75. Memphis Mayoral Debate Participants Announced -

The field is set for an upcoming televised Memphis mayoral debate scheduled for the eve of early voting.

The four mayoral contenders who will participate in the Sept. 17 debate, sponsored by The Daily News and Urban Land Institute Memphis, are incumbent Mayor A C Wharton, city council members Harold Collins and Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams.

76. ‘Bigger Than Ballet’ -

As a child growing up in Frayser with an unstable home life, Briana Brown latched on to dance classes at the New Ballet Ensemble & School as a source of stability.

Sitting at her University of Memphis dorm surrounded by psychology textbooks, she is ready to leap into the path built on 11 years of educational and professional development provided by her support system at New Ballet Ensemble.

77. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

78. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

79. Binghampton Retail Plan Goes to Land Use Board -

Neighborhood retail in Binghampton tops the Thursday, Aug. 13, agenda of the Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

Among the 25 items on the board’s agenda is Binghampton Development Corp.’s request for a planned development to accommodate a retail center with grocery store on 4.87 acres at Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street.

80. Binghampton Retail Plan Goes to Memphis Land Use Board -

Neighborhood retail in Binghampton tops the Thursday, Aug. 13, agenda of the Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

Among the 25 items on the board’s agenda is Binghampton Development Corp.'s request for a planned development to accommodate a retail center with grocery store on 4.87 acres at Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street.

81. Speakers Set For Inaugural TEDxMemphis Event -

A few weeks from now, Memphians will have a chance to hear from Kimbal Musk, the brother of billionaire Tesla founder Elon Musk, about his plans for the restaurant and garden concepts he’s bringing to Memphis.

82. East of Cleveland -

Consultants for the Memphis Area Transit Authority are exploring an extension of the Madison Avenue trolley line east of Cleveland Street to Overton Square and North Cooper Street.

It is one of seven Midtown routes the transit authority might change or enhance with a bus rapid transit concept that involves fewer stops, fewer turns off main thoroughfares and shorter travel times.

83. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

84. Frayser Community Fair Scheduled for Saturday -

NeighborWorks America’s national NeighborWorks Week puts redevelopment, empowerment and civic pride at center stage with a variety of events, including a Frayser community fair this Saturday.

“We wanted to have a fair that connected neighbors and neighborhoods to resources,” said Amy Schaftlein, director of development at United Housing Inc.

85. Buster's Boom: Popular Liquor and Wine Store Expanding -

Buster’s Liquors & Wines is expanding its footprint. The popular wine and liquor store near the University of Memphis is taking over the space occupied by La Hacienda Mexican Restaurant in the University Center retail development at Poplar Avenue and Highland Street.

86. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

87. Events -

Tennessee Shakespeare Company will present “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Thursday, June 4, through June 21 in the University of Memphis Mainstage Theater, 3745 Central Ave. Buy tickets at tnshakespeare.org.

88. 1 in 4 US Renters Must Use Half Their Pay for Housing Costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than one in four U.S. renters have to use at least half their family income to pay for housing and utilities.

That's the finding of an analysis of Census data by Enterprise Community Partners, a nonprofit that helps finance affordable housing. The number of such households has jumped 26 percent to 11.25 million since 2007.

89. Foote Homes Effort Gets Rebrand, New Details -

With Bass Pro Shops formally opening this week, the next big project on City Hall’s drawing board is a remake of Foote Homes.

The ambitious plan to demolish and rebuild the city’s last large public housing project, using it as a catalyst for redevelopment of the much larger south Downtown into South Memphis area, has been on the books longer than The Pyramid. That’s if you start the timeline with the demolition of the first large housing project, LeMoyne Gardens, in the late 1990s.

90. City Blight Efforts Evolve Beyond Demolition -

The Frayser Community Development Corp. knew the house it wanted on University Street. There were plenty to choose from with multiple abandoned houses on the block. But it wanted the worst one, at 3200 University St.

91. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

92. Bike Fest Leaders Rally for Positive Change -

It is rewarding when people who seemingly have nothing in common, of being worlds apart, find common ground. And it is nothing short of inspirational when what they build on that common ground makes life better for all of us.

93. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

94. Taking Action -

The windows on the old Executive Inn on Airways Boulevard where Brooks Road dead ends had been busted out for several years, leaving the curtains in its long-empty rooms fluttering in the wind.

But in January, demolition crews began ripping away at the blighted property at 3222 Airways, providing relief to residents and business owners whose own property values suffered because of the neglected property in that corner of Whitehaven.

95. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

96. Pera Elected Vice President of Tennessee Bar -

Lucian T. Pera, partner in the Memphis office of Adams and Reese LLP, has been elected vice president of the Tennessee Bar Association and will automatically become president of the organization in 2017-2018. Pera, who joined Adams and Reese in 2006, concentrates his practice in commercial litigation, media law, and legal ethics and professional responsibility.

97. Path to Crosstown Difficult, Unexpected -

When Staley Cates bought the Sears Crosstown building in 2007 and the development team behind what is now Crosstown Concourse was taking shape to redevelop the property, another developer dropped by Cates’ office.

98. Dream Realized -

Around 2010, Francis Ssebikindu saw people exploring the Sears Crosstown property, kicking the tires of the long-vacant retail and distribution building.

“Five years ago I saw a bunch of guys looking around in my area and I said, ‘what are they doing here?’” said Ssebikindu, pastor of Living Water Community Church near the Sears Crosstown building

99. Crosstown Project Named Crosstown Concourse -

Developers of the old Sears Crosstown building formally broke ground Saturday, Feb. 21, on the project that was five years in the planning and gave it a new name – Crosstown Concourse.

Nearly a thousand people packed a tent in the shadow of the mammoth 1.5 million square foot building on a rainy, cold and overcast day that marked 88 years to the day that ground was broken in 1927 on the original Crosstown structure including the tower that will serve as an apartment building in the multi-use redevelopment.

100. Alternative Ending -

The city of Memphis secured $6.7 million in federal funding last week to improve and rehab public housing.

Meanwhile, the city’s application for a much larger federal grant to demolish the city’s last large public housing development was making the rounds at the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.