» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'University District' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Norris, Geater Named Dunavant Award Recipients -

Tennessee State Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville and Lisa Geater, chief of staff to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, are the recipients of the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be presented in May by the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

2. Constitutional Violations Easy as Pie -

His name is Cameron Ward. He was born in Montreal in 1957, graduated from the University of Waterloo in 1979, and received his law degree in 1983 from the University of Ottawa. He was admitted to the Bar of British Columbia in 1984, practiced with major Vancouver firms for nine years, and then founded his own firm in 1993.

3. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

4. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

5. Four Judicial Races on Aug. 4 Ballot -

Two years after the big ballot of judicial positions that are up for election once every eight years, there are four judicial races on the Aug. 4, 2016 ballot.

The two races for Bartlett Municipal Court Judge and races for Shelby County Circuit Court Judge and Shelby County Chancery Court reflect a last-minute ballot switch by the Shelby County Election Commission as well as continued turnover in countywide courts.

6. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

7. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

8. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

9. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

10. No New ASD Schools Added in 2017-2018 School Year -

The state-run Achievement School District will not add any new schools in the 2017-2018 school year, Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Friday, April 15.

ASD leaders said the decision isn’t a moratorium, but an extension of the state department’s decision to allow teachers to not have TNReady achievement test scores from this year used in their evaluations.

11. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

12. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

13. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

14. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

15. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from New Memphis Institute's popular “Memphis 101” crash course to the music- and culture-filled Africa in April festival.

16. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

17. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

18. Medical District Stakeholders: Neighborhood Full of Potential -

Some 2,500 new employees start jobs each year at employers in the Memphis Medical District, and about 1,300 new students each year start hitting the books at educational institutions there, too.

That’s according to Medical District Collaborative president Tommy Pacello, who says the 2.5-square-mile area between Midtown and Downtown that’s home to eight anchor institutions is full of untapped potential. So much so that his organization, which launched earlier this year, is leading a revitalization of the district that leans heavily on anchors like Regional One Health and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare to help in a buy local, live local and hire local push for the neighborhood.

19. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

20. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

21. FBI Continues to Debate Sharing iPhone Hack With Apple -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The FBI has not decided whether to share with Apple Inc. details about how the bureau hacked into an iPhone linked to a California terrorism investigation, the bureau's director says.

22. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

23. Last Word: A Day In The Park, Fashion Week and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -

The skid is over. The Grizzlies beat the Bulls at home and the post-season possibility drama continues in the land of Griss and the one year and done college home of Derrick Rose.

24. Plan Seeks To Make Medical District Even Greater Asset -

On the surface, it might seem unclear why Memphians outside the immediate vicinity should care about what’s going on in the Memphis medical district, an area home to more than 16,000 people and 8,000 students.

25. Doctors Applaud End of Tennessee's Fetal Assault Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Brittany Hudson was pregnant, addicted to painkillers and afraid of a Tennessee law that calls for the arrest of mothers of drug-dependent babies. She eventually gave birth without medical help, on the side of a road in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains.

26. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

27. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

28. Fertile Ground -

Residents of the Memphis Medical District have begun filing in to the Premier Palace ballroom on Madison Avenue, along with area stakeholders, planners and other attendees who have business interests in the area.

29. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

30. Levy Dermatology Adds Danielle Levine -

Dr. Danielle Levine has joined Levy Dermatology as a dermatologist from Harvard Medical School, where she ran high-risk skin cancer, melanoma, surgery and cosmetic clinics. Levine brings expertise in skin cancer detection and treatment, as well as minimally invasive techniques for facial and body rejuvenation.

31. Junior League Hosting First Memphis Women’s Summit -

The Junior League of Memphis is kicking off its first Memphis Women’s Summit, a one-day conference to celebrate and encourage local women leaders.

The summit will be held on Thursday, March 31, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the University of Memphis’ Michael D. Rose Theatre, 470 University St.

32. Former City Attorney Founds Hagler Law Group -

Monice Hagler, a longtime Memphis lawyer who served as city attorney during the administrations of Mayors Dick Hackett and Willie Herenton, has founded a new law practice.

The Hagler Law Group PLLC is focused on real estate-related economic development as well as small- and minority-business development.

33. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

34. Methodist Makes 'Great Commitment' to Memphis With Expansion -

Methodist University Hospital CEO Jeff Liebman sees the $275 million that Methodist Healthcare is investing into the system’s flagship hospital as a “great commitment” to Memphis.

35. Former City Attorney Founds Hagler Law Group -

Monice Hagler, a longtime Memphis lawyer who served as city attorney during the administrations of Mayors Dick Hackett and Willie Herenton, has founded a new law practice.

The Hagler Law Group PLLC is focused on real estate-related economic development as well as small- and minority-business development.

36. Last Word: D-Day, Opera Festival Returns and Buying GMF After the Bond Default -

This is what you might call D-Day in Nashville. The “D’ in this case stands for deannexation.
The bill to permit deannexation by referendum has in the course of two weeks become the city’s dominant political issue.

37. Judge Dismisses Bulk of Criminal Charges Against FedEx -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – A federal judge dismissed the bulk of criminal charges against FedEx Corp. in a case alleging it knowingly shipped illegal prescription drugs.

38. Last Word: Monday Vote, Beale's Search and Longview Heights -

Look for the state Senate to vote on the deannexation bill Monday in Nashville. At least that’s the date on the Senate calendar.

That could change as a member of the Shelby County legislative delegation has at last asked the Tennessee Attorney General for a legal opinion on the proposal. But it’s not a straight-up question about whether the proposal is constitutional. It’s a question about the specific characterization of past Memphis annexations as “egregious” – what has come to be the key legal term in this considerable political controversy.

39. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

40. Valerie Smith Appointed Circuit Court Judge -

Memphis attorney Valerie L. Smith is the newest Shelby County Circuit Court judge.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Smith’s appointment Tuesday, March 8, to fill the vacancy created by the death last year of Judge D’Army Bailey.

41. ‘Fearless’ Stewart Embraces Battles With Supermajority -

Democratic state Rep. Mike Stewart lives on the front lines of the Tennessee General Assembly. As chairman of the House Democratic Caucus with 26 members, Stewart could employ a bunker mentality, but instead has chosen to take the fight to the other side of the aisle.

42. Up, Up and Away -

The modern-day drone is both a high-tech military tool and a safer way to play humanitarian and deliver medicine and supplies to the suffering people of war-torn Syria.

The drone is everything from a stalking device to track poachers creeping through the South African bush hunting rhinos to the impetus for a potential commercial growth industry right here in Memphis.

43. Blair Tower Getting Complete Renovation -

Development momentum in the Memphis Medical Center has attracted an out-of-town investor looking to jump on the area’s revival.

Blair Tower LLC, an affiliate of New York-based Hyde Capital, recently purchased the Blair Tower apartments for $9.7 million.

44. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

45. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

46. Valerie Smith Appointed Circuit Court Judge -

Memphis attorney Valerie L. Smith is the newest Shelby County Circuit Court judge.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Smith’s appointment Tuesday, March 8, to fill the vacancy created by the death last year of Judge D’Army Bailey.

47. The Week Ahead: March 7-13 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? In a few short days it’ll be time to “spring forward” – but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First, check out our weekly roundup of area happenings, from a discussion with local changemakers to the inaugural Memphis Black Restaurant Week…

48. Engineer Jonnye McElyea Joins Allen & Hoshall -

Jonnye McElyea has joined Allen & Hoshall as a structural engineer. McElyea, who designs structures such as buildings, bridges and retaining walls, is among the 19 percent of engineers who are women. Her previous experience includes time at Parsons Corporation and AFRAM Corp.

49. Hopson: Help ASD Improve, At Least for Now -

The state-run Achievement School District has a problem in how it engages with the public, especially in areas where it is about to take over a school.

But Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson isn’t ready to say it is time for the state to pick a winner and a loser and fund either the ASD or Innovation Zone schools run by SCS.

50. Report: Racial History Fuels Some Backlash Against ASD -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Some of the backlash against the state's Achievement School District is rooted in the historical experience of Memphis and the River City's history of highly charged racial dynamics that date back to the 19th century, a new report says.

51. Last Word: The Road To Memphis, Medical District Plans and A Greensward Update -

The Republican presidential field is coming this way in the gap between early voting, which ends Tuesday evening, and the March 1 election day
Donald Trump, John Kasich and Ben Carson are booked for this coming weekend.

52. Medical Area Ready For Residential Development -

Every week day, 16,000 people go to work in the two-and-a-half square mile area that is the Memphis Medical Center District.

Add the 8,000 students to the workers at the eight major institutions in the district and you have more than a sell-out crowd for an event at FedExForum in that area every working day.

53. Last Word: Drum Circles and Voting, Lincoln Day and Carolyn Hardy's Clients -

I think I may have stumbled upon a way to increase voter turnout in Memphis.
I would say nationally, but we all know what works in Memphis does not always work elsewhere and what works elsewhere does not always work in Memphis.
It came to me as I was at Overton Park ever so briefly Saturday. It’s part of my weekend run whenever the weather is spring-like or actually spring to see what will happen in the nearly three-year Greensward controversy.
Lots of people having fun and a few kite-flyers coexisting on the greensward with zoo overflow parking but no protest with brass band.
As I filed that away I wondered what happened to that park institution -- the drum circle.
Audubon Park had one too along with the Society for Creative Ananchronism – the folks who dress up like Game of Thrones only they were doing it before the television show.
Anyway, I started hearing the drums in my head as I imagined drum circles outside the early voting places because that's how my mind works in a career spent covering politicians since before I was old enough to vote.
Of course the drums would be outside the 100-foot limits for physical campaigning that state law requires.
But imagine you are in the area of let’s say Agricenter, maybe in Shelby Farms Park, and in the distance you hear drums. Wouldn’t you be curious? If you had the time would you try to find the source? And if you discovered it was outside an early voting place and you were of voting age and registered and if you had not already voted (for you may vote early but not often) would you not vote, once your curiosity had been satisfied?
I thought your answer to all of the above would be a resounding yes.

54. Tentative Agreement Emerges for Pinch Hotel -

After six months of negotiations and delays in votes by the Memphis City Council, there is an agreement for the construction of a hotel with retail space across Front Street from The Pyramid.

The council delayed a vote on the development Tuesday, Feb. 16, until the March 1 council meeting.

55. Council Debates, Forms Minority Business Committee -

Memphis City Council members debated at length Tuesday, Feb. 16, whether or not to form a committee to explore the lack of minority business growth locally.

The council ultimately voted to form an ad hoc committee tasked with coming up within three months a set of recommendations to improve city government’s contract spending with minority businesses.

56. Council Debates, Forms Minority Business Committee -

Memphis City Council members debated at length Tuesday, Feb. 16, whether or not to form a committee to explore the lack of minority business growth locally.

The council ultimately voted to form an ad hoc committee tasked with coming up within three months a set of recommendations to improve city government’s contract spending with minority businesses.

57. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from circus clowns to Republican senators…

Both U.S. Senators representing Tennessee will be in Memphis Saturday for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, historically the local party’s largest annual fundraising event.
Sen. Bob Corker is the keynote speaker with Sen. Lamar Alexander as a special guest.
The Lincoln Day gatherings are county-by-county events across the state that can extend far beyond the shadow of Presidents Day: A few of the Lincoln Day dinners have been known to find a place on the calendar in April.
This is the 41st Lincoln Day event in Shelby County, which puts the local event’s origins squarely in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, a low-point for Republican fortunes nationally after the state’s modern Republican party was formed and prospered in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
The event always comes with a large helping of local candidates testing the political waters among the dinner tables between podium speeches.
This year, the Shelby County event is sure to feature partisans from the various Republican presidential campaigns because of its place on the February calendar during the early voting period before the March 1 election day.

58. McQueen Watching Teaching Methods, ASD Controversy Closely -

At the last of three schools that Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen visited last week, Lester Prep principal Brearn Wright got right to the heart of the matter.

59. The Week Ahead: Feb. 8, 2016 -

Guys, there’s an important holiday coming up that forgetting about would mean immense trouble for you. Luckily, City & State is coming to the rescue. Head over to the Broad Avenue retailer on Friday, two days before Valentine’s Day, for “BYOB” (Bring your own Bailey’s).
Bring something like Bailey’s, Irish cream, whisky, whatever, and City & State will add it to any item you order over on the coffee side of the shop. Meanwhile, the shop has also invited the makers behind Paper & Clay and Question the Answer to be on hand with their wares to take some of the pressure off trying to decide what to buy your significant other for Valentine’s Day.

60. Choose901 Heads to D.C. for Recruitment -

The Choose901 organization went to the nation’s capital for a weeklong recruiting blitz.

The effort from Feb. 1-6 was aimed at attracting professionals and soon-to-be college graduates to Memphis, and as part of that Choose901 hosted networking events and information sessions to highlight job opportunities and to talk about the impact of millennials in Memphis.

61. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

62. Details of Bass Pro-St. Jude Pinch Plan Near -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Bass Pro Shops have agreed on a tentative and general plan for future development of the Pinch District, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

63. Collaborative Aims to Enhance Memphis Medical District -

In 2016, the Memphis Medical Center will see $1.8 million in upgrades and enhancements aimed at creating a unified, livable district. That’s the annual budget for the newly established Medical District Collaborative, a nonprofit entity made up of the area’s stakeholders and executives.

64. Hinds Joins Martin Tate Law Firm -

Rebecca Hinds has joined Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston P.C. as an associate attorney in the firm’s litigation section. In this role, Hinds represents clients in civil and commercial litigation matters, including business law, transportation liability, construction disputes, breach-of-contract matters and employment law. She also helps commercial clients obtain tax incentives and advises individuals and businesses in the drafting and negotiation of contracts. 

65. Last Word: Post Caucus, Fincher's Exit, 1919 Handwriting and Your Rolodex -

That close (very little light between index finger and thumb) between Clinton and Sanders in Iowa Monday evening.
Both live to fight another day in another state—New Hampshire.
And because it is Iowa – they each get to declare victory as long as they don’t go into a lot of detail about the totals.
This is one of those cases where it is like horsehoes and hand grenades – close does count.

66. Haslam Outlines Conservative Approach to Surplus -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told state legislators Monday, Feb. 1, that the state’s estimated $500 million surplus has to be balanced with a global economy that could change for the worse.

“Our approach is to realize that good times are not going to last forever,” Haslam said in his annual state of the state address on Capitol Hill in Nashville.

67. Haslam Touts New Spending On Teacher Raises, Urges Caution In Use of Reserve -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told state legislators Monday, Feb. 1, that the state’s estimated $500 million surplus has to be balanced with a global economy that could change for the worse.

“Our approach is to realize that good times are not going to last forever,” Haslam said in his annual state of the state address on Capitol Hill in Nashville.

68. New Superintendent Says ASD Not Monolithic -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District says critics of the district for the state’s lowest-performing schools don’t understand that the organization doesn’t operation conventionally.

69. Choose901 Heads to D.C. for Recruitment -

The Choose901 organization is headed to the nation’s capital for a weeklong recruiting blitz.

The effort from Feb. 1-6 will be to attract professionals and soon-to-be college graduates to Memphis, and as part of that Choose901 will host networking events and information sessions to highlight job opportunities and to talk about the impact of millennials in Memphis.

70. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

71. Few US Neighborhoods Affordable, Walkable With Good Schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Few neighborhoods can match the perks of Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C. — a reality that reflects a broader problem for the U.S. housing market.

Residents of Adams Morgan enjoy a bevy of bars, restaurants, exercise studios and shopping, just steps from their row houses and condo buildings. Home values are reasonable relative to neighborhood incomes. And in general, the area schools rate as better than average nationally.

72. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

73. Black Caucus Demanding Change To Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Legislature’s Black Caucus, led by Memphis members, has its sights set squarely on the Achievement School District, either eliminating it or putting it on hold until major improvements are made.

74. Crosstown High School Plans Emerge -

As more details emerged this week of a new high school in the mammoth Crosstown Concourse redevelopment, there remained many other details to work out before the August 2017 planned opening.

Crosstown High School, which would use the University of Memphis’ Campus School as a model, has been talked about behind the scenes since Gestalt Community Services pulled out of Concourse last year. SCS board members got their first look at the plan Tuesday, Jan. 19.

75. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

76. School Guide Helps Parents Navigate Choices -

After five years of historic change in Shelby County public education, the traditional labels of “public” and “private” schools don’t adequately describe the range of options available to parents.

77. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

78. Haslam: No Gas Tax Push, For Now -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam confirmed Thursday, Jan. 14, that there won’t be a state gas tax hike proposal in this year’s session of the Tennessee Legislature.

But Haslam, who previously said he wasn’t necessarily pushing for such a tax hike as a solution to funding road projects, said that is the most likely future option.

79. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

80. The Week Ahead: Jan. 11, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from drones and robot research to the Grizzlies’ annual MLK symposium at the National Civil Rights Museum...

81. PRSA Honors Armstrong As Top Communicator -

The Memphis chapter of the Public Relations Society of America has named Memphis Police Department director Toney Armstrong as its 2015 Communicator of the Year.

Armstrong will receive the annual award, given since 1976, at a Jan. 14 luncheon at the University Club. Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich and U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton will join him.

82. Events -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis will host the 14th annual Valero Memphis Refinery Tool Box Bash on Friday, Jan. 15, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road. The event will include live and silent auctions, whiskey tasting, live music and more. Tickets are $60 at toolboxbash.com or 901-322-3532.

83. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

84. Events -

The Memphis Irish Society is enrolling for its 2016 Irish Gaelic class, set to begin Saturday, Jan. 9, in the Germantown area (contact for exact venue). The class is free, informal, and is open to all adults and children of middle-school age and older. It will meet most Saturdays throughout the year with some breaks. Email erin.shepherd@memphisirish.com for details.

85. Last Word: Council Round-Up, One Beale's Third Tower and the Battle Over the ASD -

On a clear day, the song goes, you can see forever.
In Memphis though, it seems that no two politicians will see exactly the same thing or have precisely the same opinion.
On a somewhat sunny but not necessarily clear Tuesday in our fair city there was a lot to see.

86. PRSA Honors Armstrong As Top Communicator -

The Memphis chapter of the Public Relations Society of America has named Memphis Police Department director Toney Armstrong as its 2015 Communicator of the Year.

Armstrong will receive the annual award, given since 1976, at a Jan. 14 luncheon at the University Club. Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich and U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton will join him.

87. Memphis Legislators Sound Off On State-Run School District -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

88. St. Jude, Methodist, Le Bonheur Prep For a Year of Expansion -

Flush with updated master plans, plentiful resources and abundant cash to spend, the arrival of 2016 finds at least three Memphis hospitals with ambitious New Year’s resolutions.

A flurry of announcements over the past month has set the stage for a veritable building and investment boom Downtown and in the medical district between Methodist University Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The activity will play out starting this year and beyond, resulting in everything from expanded campus footprints to the deployment of new cutting-edge equipment.

89. Last Word: Out With the Old, In With The River -

We end 2015 with an eye on the Mississippi River as the city marks the New Year with three major New Year’s Eve outdoor celebrations – one on Beale Street, another in the newly-awakened Overton Square and yet another in the Broad Avenue Arts District.
Two come with lots of memories of past New Year’s eves – with soon-to-be memories.
Overton Square’s comeback as a theater district has been a big story of the last two years.
But Beale Street at the end of 2015 is an institution that has also seen a lot of change in the last year with the move to a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority at year’s end.
Broad is a different story with a different context. The context is a diversified Memphis whose crowd is likely to be at least slightly more local than the mix in Overton Square and on Beale Street.
It's example could very well show us the path to a New Year's eve with public celebrations from Whitehaven to Frayser.

90. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

91. Last Word: Drones, Haslam's Year and Bygone Sports Logos -

Drones. Yes, drones -- which seem to be an odd match for a column called Last Word since there will be many more words written about them and their technological impact.

The FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis has funding for 11 research projects that will includes drones as well as robotics and autonomous vehicles.

92. Earthman Promoted at Geotechnology -

Doug Earthman Jr. has been promoted to business development associate at Geotechnology Inc., a geotechnical engineering and environmental services firm. In his new role, he’ll develop and maintain relationships with clients throughout Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas in markets that include transportation, manufacturing, energy, institutional and commercial developments.

93. Last Word: Recovery in North Mississippi, Opera in 2016 and Uptown North of Chelsea -

It’s been a holiday season of challenged hopes and muted emotions in our corner of the world.
The beginning of the series of storms and tornadoes they spawned killed eight people in North Mississippi where recovery is still a fact of life in this last week of 2015.
This will be a week of funerals and damage assessments for federal disaster aid throughout our region.
And you will hear more stories of escapes and new beginnings after losing everything of any material value.
But even in our spared city, our thoughts will return instinctively to the young lives taken so suddenly and so close to the family gatherings in which our youngest give so much more in the way of hope than they will realize at this tender age.

94. ASD, I-Zone Competition Becoming Heated Debate -

Before winter break, Vanderbilt University released a study on achievement test results for students in the state-run Achievement Schools District and locally operated Innovation Zone schools, and the study has created a tipping point in an increasingly heated education debate.

95. Last Word: More Medical Expansions, Norris & Harris and Christmas In Hell's Kitchen -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

96. Birmingham Offers More Than Bowl Game -

University of Memphis football fans will head to Birmingham, Ala., next week to celebrate a bowl game appearance that could see the team finish with 10 wins for a second straight season.

It’s been a historical run, and the Birmingham Bowl appearance will give the Tigers a rare chance to play against Auburn University. The game’s 11 a.m. kickoff makes it a plausible day trip, but then Birmingham has plenty to offer anyone thinking of spending a night or two.

97. Norris: Gas Tax Proposal Not Happening in 2016 -

Don’t look for a gas tax hike in the 2016 session of the Tennessee legislature, says the state Senate majority leader.

“We’re not going to do a gas tax in 2016,” Rep. Mark Norris of Collierville said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We are going to have to address it soon enough and these conversations are very important.”

98. City Council Votes On Graceland, Liberty Bowl -

The Memphis City Council approved the Graceland West planned development Tuesday, Dec. 15, the third phase of Graceland’s expansion to a 120-acre campus on both sides of Elvis Presley Boulevard.

99. Last Word: The Force Reawakens, Methodist Expands and Setting Up 2016 -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

100. City Council Votes On Graceland, Liberty Bowl -

The Memphis City Council approved the Graceland West planned development Tuesday, Dec. 15, the third phase of Graceland’s expansion to a 120-acre campus on both sides of Elvis Presley Boulevard.