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Editorial Results (free)

1. TDZ Expansion Seen As Catalyst for 'Public Realm' Work -

In the five weeks since the Riverfront Development Corporation became the Memphis River Parks Partnership, Greenbelt Park on Mud Island and Martyr’s Park on the Memphis mainland have gotten some rehabbed park benches. The bench work includes the Bluffwalk as well as work on the RiverLine trail that runs behind the flood walls on the other side from the Pyramid.

2. Crazy Good -

STILL CRAZY. STILL RIGHT. Lauren Crews and I sipped coffee and talked about his crazy idea. Again. I’m writing about it. Again. Maybe we’re both crazy.

We first talked about it sipping whiskey years ago at sunset on the bluff behind the Metal Museum, gazing out on the river’s big, bold bend south of the Harahan, the most dramatic river view in Memphis, dramatic enough to accommodate big, bold vision.

3. Last Word: A New Council Member, Law Without Signature and Corker Down Under -

The Memphis City Council should be back up to full strength by the time Tuesday becomes Wednesday. Filling the Super District 9 seat left vacant by the resignation earlier this month of Philip Spinosa to join the leadership of the Greater Memphis Chamber is on the council’s agenda Tuesday afternoon – the last item on the agenda. But the council usually skips around.

4. Last Word: Monuments Ruling, The Open Council Seat and Not So Great Streets -

It is likely just the first round. But the city of Memphis prevailed on every major point in the Wednesday ruling out of Nashville by Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle upholding the removal of Confederate monuments this past December from two city parks.

5. Stengel Elected President Of Construction Counsel Association -

Evans Petree PC shareholder Elizabeth B. Stengel has been elected the first female president of the Tennessee Association of Construction Counsel, a not-for-profit professional association of Tennessee attorneys with practices related to the construction industry.

6. Events -

“Toward Justice: A City-Wide Upstanders’ Project” kicks off with a keynote by longtime civil rights leader Bob Zellner on Wednesday, May 2, at 7 p.m. at the Memphis Jewish Community Center, 6560 Poplar Ave. The monthlong “Toward Justice” project is presented by nearly a dozen local organizations and features exhibits, installations and more. All events are free and will be held at MJCC. Visit jccmemphis.org for a schedule.

7. Last Word: Last Day of Early Voting, Senate Poll and Legislature Goes to Overtime -

The last day of early voting before the May 1 election day is Thursday. And the turnout count through Wednesday has eclipsed the total early voting turnout in this same set of elections in 2010 and 2014. You can find a list of early voting locations and the hours at www.shelbyvote.com, the website of the Shelby County Election Commission. The winners on election night next Tuesday advance to the August county general election.

8. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

9. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

10. Last Word: Holder in Memphis for MLK 50, EDGE Sets a Date and South City Moves -

The week of MLK50 commemorations began Monday with a speech by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and the arrival Monday afternoon of Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meanwhile, Monday's day of free admission to the museum, underwritten by FedEx drew a long line. It also drew some remote trepidation that tends to make the situation seem worse than it is once you actually go there for yourself.

11. New Apartments Coming to Broad, Clark Tower Inks Another Tenant -

A multifamily project planned for Broad Avenue could provide the housing element that takes the arts district to the next level.


2542 Broad Ave.
Memphis, TN 38112

12. Community LIFT Looking to Build $5 Million Loan Pool Amid Growth -

An organization that pursues sources of financial, human and intellectual capital to strategically revitalize neighborhoods wants to build a $5 million loan pool for investing in Memphis communities and leaders.

13. Explore Bike Share Reveals Station Locations -

The launch of Explore Bike Share is getting closer with the nonprofit revealing Wednesday, March 28, the locations of the stations for the 600-bike system.

Explore Bike Share’s 60 stations span from Downtown, South Memphis and Cooper-Young to Orange Mound, Overton Square and Crosstown. The stations and bikes are being funded through a combination of donations from foundations and individuals, plus a $2.2 million federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality grant, said Explore Bike Share executive director Trey Moore.

14. 3 Boys in Mississippi Find Part of Mastodon Jawbone -

VICKSBURG, Miss. (AP) – Three boys have found a part of a mastodon jawbone while exploring family property in Mississippi.

The Vicksburg Post reports that two brothers and a cousin made the discovery on plowed land near Bovina, a small community east of the Mississippi River.

15. Last Word: Pre-K's Longer Reach, Penny's Contract and Thad Cochran's Farewell -

The Arkansas gate of Big River Crossing will reopen Friday morning at 6 a.m. The gate to the West Memphis side of the crossing leading to the Big River Trail on the flood plain below has been closed since the Mississippi River at Memphis reached flood stage several weeks ago. The river level has been falling for about a week. The Big River Trail floodway portions remain closed for now as some of the debris from the river is removed in those areas. While the trails are closed this is a good time to get a look from the crossing at the flood plain’s transition when the river rises and then starts to go down.

16. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input on several topics as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

17. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present “James and the Giant Peach” Friday, March 16, through April 8 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

18. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

19. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

20. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

21. City Council Continues to Dabble In Art Issues -

Memphis City Council members were told Tuesday, March 6, that removing a mural from a private business front on Lamar Avenue will be difficult despite a council call to do so.

The zombie-like mural by the artist Dustin Spagnola has drawn most of the ire of council members for several months. Some have called it “satanic.” Others on the council argue the imagery isn’t respectful of the surrounding community.

22. Food Boxes, Not Stamps? Idea in Trump Budget Worries Grocers -

RANKIN, Pa. (AP) – Finding fresh food in this tiny riverside community that was hit hard by the steel industry's decline has always been a challenge. Then, seven years ago, Carl's Cafe opened.

23. Last Word: Corker & Blackburn, More Frost and Dale Watson's Move to The Haven -

It's possible around City Hall these days to get your RFQs mixed up with your RFPs. And there is a difference in requests for qualifications and requests for proposals. Usually RFQs come before RFPs – but there are exceptions – loopholes. The latest RFQ out of City Hall – album title or t-shirt slogan? – is for the adaptive reuse of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

24. High Point Climbing Takes Foothold in East Memphis -

By the end of the year, a parking lot just off Walnut Grove Road and North Humphreys Boulevard will be replaced with an outdoor climbing wall – one of the signature design elements of High Point Climbing and Fitness, which just began construction of its first ground-up facility in Memphis.

25. Events -

Calvary Episcopal Church’s 2018 Lenten Preaching Series and Waffle Shop is open Tuesdays to Fridays through March 27 at Calvary, 102 N. Second St. The Waffle Shop is open from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the preaching series takes place from 12:05 p.m. to 12:40 p.m. The evening series, Lent After Dark, is Wednesdays, with dinner from 5:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. and a speaker at 6:30 p.m. Visit calvarymemphis.org/lentenpreaching for the Waffle Shop menu and speaker schedule.

26. Events -

PizzaRev will hold a “Pizzas for a Purpose” fundraiser for Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Thursday, Feb. 15, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. at PizzaRev’s new Cordova location, 765 N. Germantown Parkway. Guests are invited to pay what they want for their first custom-built, personal-sized pizza, with all proceeds going to Le Bonheur. Visit pizzarev.com.

27. Female Songwriters in Nashville Say ‘Time's Up’ -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Female musicians in Nashville have long complained about the lack of representation on country radio, but now a collective of female songwriters are singing "Time's Up."

28. Pinnacle Files $1.3M Permit For Midtown Bank Branch -

Nashville-based Pinnacle Financial Partners has applied for a $1.3 million building permit for its planned bank branch at the corner of Union Avenue and Rozelle Street.

Pinnacle is building the more than 4,100-square-foot branch with drive-thru service at 155 Rozelle on property that’s been vacant since the former Sean’s Cafe burned down in 2016. Because the project falls under the Midtown Overlay portion of the Unified Development Code, the bank had to seek a variance last year with the Board of Adjustment for the orientation of the drive-thru, an alternative streetscape layout and the use of a 20-foot setback.

29. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

30. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

31. Resiliency Concept Goes Broader With Master Plan -

With three projects about to start moving dirt and $60 million in federal funding to do them, the concept of resiliency in Shelby County is moving, even though it’s in the shadows of other plans such as the Mid-South Greenprint and the development of the Wolf River Greenway.

32. MEGA HYPE -

In physics the larger an atom is, the more polarizing it can become. The same can be said of real estate development. So it’s not surprising that something referred to as a megasite can incite a range of opinions that are as vast as the site itself.

33. State Dropping Plans to Dump Megasite Wastewater Near Randolph -

After vocal opposition from residents in and around the community of Randolph, Tennessee, state officials have announced they are withdrawing their current plans for the Memphis Regional Megasite’s 35-mile long wastewater pipeline.

34. What a Kick -

Peter Freund is a baseball guy. Grew up on the New York Yankees. Today, not only is he principal owner of the Memphis Redbirds, he owns stakes in other minor league teams through his Trinity Baseball Holdings and even has a small slice of the Yankees. But make no mistake, he is a businessman. And it was the businessman in him that was convinced to bring a United Soccer League (USL) team to Memphis and AutoZone Park for the 2019 season.

35. Last Word: Snow Week, Liberal Arts and Their Critics and Tunica Casinos -

Snow Day 3 as this becomes a snow week for many of us. Granted one of those days was a federal holiday in which the temperature was above freezing and the sun was out. During the second consecutive snow day Wednesday for Shelby County Schools students, Candous Brown, a teacher at Raleigh Egypt High School held class anyway via Facebook.

36. Two New Distribution Facilities, Southaven ‘Town Square’ In the Works -

2481 Appling Road, Memphis, TN 38133: Salt Lake City, Utah-based aftermarket auto body parts distributer Certifit Inc. is planning to construct a 604,800-square-foot distribution facility at the southwest corner of Appling and Reese roads.

37. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

38. Editorial: National Black Theater Museum Would Be Big Bang for the Arts -

When Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele took his well-developed idea for a National Black Theater Museum in Overton Park to the Memphis City Council this month, he began by saying: “It doesn’t exist anywhere in the world. This didn’t come from anywhere.”

39. Council Preparing Plan to Provide Pre-K Funding -

The Memphis City Council has been out of the school funding business for just under a decade.

And there doesn’t seem to be a consensus among council members to change that by committing continuous funding from the city property tax rate, but they are about to meet with Shelby County commissioners, nonprofits, foundations and philanthropy groups about mapping out funding for pre-kindergarten classrooms.

40. Council Delays MLGW Rate Hike Vote to Wednesday -

Memphis City Council members meet again Wednesday, Dec. 20, to vote on Memphis Light Gas and Water Divisions proposals to raise water, gas and electricity rates starting next month.

The council was debating the 1.05 percent water rate hike proposal at its regularly scheduled Tuesday session when chairman Berlin Boyd announced the meeting would recess until 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall. It came as council members had a lot of questions about possible alternatives to the rate hikes across all three sectors of the publicly-owned utility.

41. 2017 a Year of Expansion for Memphis Banks -

The biggest banks in Memphis made aggressive pushes this year to raise their profiles and expand footprints, as competition in the sector heats up and the industry continues winning back the strength it enjoyed before the bust of 2008.

42. The Week Ahead: December 18-24 -

Good morning, Memphis! Winter officially begins this week, and Santa’s making one last pass on his naughty-or-nice list (though we know you’ve all been good this year). Check out a couple of ways you can give back – plus more fun happenings you need to know about – in The Week Ahead...

43. The Cutoff -

When Memphis leaders got together with suburban mayors in September at Agricenter, it was to talk about a unified countywide approach to getting Amazon’s $5 billion HQ2 project.

It was supposed to be a time for leaders of the county and its seven cities to talk about their common good, regionalism and all things they agree on, with none of what they disagree on at least for the moment.

44. Piece by Piece: Construction Projects Flourishing Throughout Mid-South -

With $11 billion spread out among more than 300 active projects in the Memphis area, according to data from brokerage firm Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors, it’s safe to say business in the region is good.

45. Last Word: 'Coach Killer', Collierville's Industrial Growth and Ice Cream & Soup -

Lots of discussion the day after his firing about David Fizdale’s value off the court for the city and just where that fits with whether the Grizz win or lose and who is held responsible when they lose too much. Losing too much is what the Grizz front office said caused the change and not Marc Gasol being a “coach-killer” to quote Grizz GM Chris Wallace. And this is not just a Memphis discussion. LeBron James on the Fizdale firing via CBSSports. This was before James got ejected from a game Tuesday evening for the first time in his career.

46. Generating Flow -

Last year, the Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC) partnered with the city of Memphis Division Housing and Community Development and Shelby County government to host a series of public meetings to brainstorm creative ways to revitalize the Pinch District, both artistically and developmentally.

47. Mississippi Choctaws Voting on Proposal to Create 4th Casino -

PHILADELPHIA, Miss. (AP) – Members of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians will vote on developing a fourth casino, which would be on tribal land at the center of the state.

Choctaws will decide Thursday whether to create a gambling site on tribal land in the Red Water community just north of Carthage, The Clarion-Ledger reported.

48. Last Word: Mega-Site, New Chandler Real Estate Numbers and Grizz Second Unit -

When the state’s new commissioner of Economic and Community Development met several months ago with local leaders in Arlington, Bob Rolfe said Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam had made it clear that Rolfe’s primary task between then and when Haslam leaves office at the end of 2018 is to find a tenant for the west Tennessee megasite in Haywood County. Toyota-Mazda executives told the state this week that their $1.6 billion electric car plant to be built in the U.S. and create 4,000 jobs will not be considering the megasite and another un-named prospect has also walked away, according to the state.

49. Events -

The St. George’s Independent School Art Show takes place Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 9-11, at its Collierville campus, 1880 Wolf River Blvd. More than 50 local and regional artists will display and sell sculptures, paintings, mixed-media pieces and more. Visit sgisartshow.org for hours and tickets.

50. Boyd Completes Statewide Trek at Beale Street Landing -

The finish line was uphill Tuesday, Nov. 7, as Republican contender for Tennessee governor Randy Boyd completed a 537.3-mile run across the state that began in August at the Tennessee-Virginia state line in Bristol.

51. County Commission OKs Emissions Fee Hike -

Shelby County commissioners advanced on the first of three readings Monday, Oct. 30, an ordinance that would increase the county’s air pollution emission fee and the major and minimum source permit fees for non-automobile emissions.

52. Events -

The Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest judging seminar will be held Saturday, Nov. 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in SpringHill Suites’ Kress ballroom, 85 Court Ave. The seminar is the only chance this year to qualify as a judge for the 2018 contest. Cost is $95 and includes judging manual, training materials and lunch. Registration deadline is Monday, Nov. 6. Visit memphisinmay.org for details and application.

53. Events -

Beale Street Caravan and Fourth Bluff kick off their Album Sessions lunchtime listening parties with Don Bryant and the Bo-Keys’ “Don’t Give Up on Love” Friday, Nov. 3, on the promenade behind the Cossitt Library. All listening sessions will start at 12:15 p.m. and are free and open to all ages. Silent disco headphones will be provided; headphones reservations are recommended. Attendees are welcome to bring their own lunches. Visit thefourthbluff.com for a fall programming lineup.

54. County Commission OKs Emissions Fee Hike -

Shelby County commissioners advanced on the first of three readings Monday, Oct. 30, an ordinance that would increase the county’s air pollution emission fee and the major and minimum source permit fees for non-automobile emissions.

55. County Pay Raises Short of Votes, In Search of Compromise -

Proposed pay raises for 19 of Shelby County government’s top elected positions don’t appear to have the nine votes necessary to pass on third and final reading in two weeks.

So Shelby County commissioner Van Turner is looking for a compromise that might put the double-digit percentage pay raises to voters in a 2018 referendum or tie future pay raises to any raises that county government rank and file employees get.

56. Montgomery Martin Builds an Urban Renaissance -

Montgomery Martin has Memphis grit on his feet. He’s spent the afternoon walking through the Tennessee Brewery building, a 125-year-old South Bluff structure being reimagined and renovated with the help of Montgomery Martin Contractors. In other cities, an aging giant like the Brewery might be seen as condemned – too daunting to be granted new life. But Martin says, “We’re not afraid of old buildings – we figure out how to get it done.” And, he adds, “all this is coming together to draw people back into the city.”

57. Lendermon Retires As Riverfront Plans Evolve -

Benny Lendermon was familiar with the controversy that comes with plans for the city’s riverfront before the Riverfront Development Corp. started in 2000 and he became its founding president.

58. Last Word: T.A. Talks Memphis, EDGE Debate and Politics, Lots of Politics -

Grizz season opener at the Forum Wednesday is a win over NOLA 103 – 91. And Tony Allen’s Grizz jersey is retired. The day before, Allen wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune on the Memphis experience and it is just about the best thing that will happen to you all day. He just walks right off the court and into the soul of this place.

59. Brooks Move, Riverfront Plan Come in Focus -

Three months after yet another riverfront redevelopment concept plan was unveiled with some skepticism, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has the catalyst his administration needs to get parts of the plan moving.

60. Brooks Pursues Riverfront Site for New Museum -

The board of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art announced Tuesday, Oct. 17, it is working with city government to relocate the museum from its Overton Park home to a Downtown site on Front Street between Union and Monroe avenues.

61. Monuments, Elections, TDZ Expansion All Before Council -

Memphis City Council members take a third and final vote Tuesday, Oct. 17, on an ordinance directing the administration to act on “immediate” removal of Confederate monuments from two city parks.

62. Memphis Launches Public Campaign for Amazon Bid -

Memphis’ bid to land Amazon’s second U.S. headquarters got a new public component Wednesday, Oct. 11, with the launch of a social media push and the lighting of Big River Crossing in Amazon’s signature orange color to help raise the city’s profile amid intense competition.

63. Last Word: 'Seismic Shift,' Mason Village and Running A Store From A Cloud -

It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to drive through the old town part of Cordova near its one-time train station and see the potential. Now word of a new restaurant opening later this month in what is known as Farley House. The old town is an interesting mix of new development and old development including an iconic country Baptist church that not too long ago turned 100 years old. And then there is the trail head for the Shelby Farms Greenline that runs near the train station.

64. First Music Project Funded Through Memphis Slim House Loan Program -

Attendees of the Eric Hughes Band’s CD release party next week won’t see everything that goes into making a collection of tunes like the band’s latest.

The album – “Meet Me in Memphis” – and band will be feted Oct. 21 at the warehouse behind Earnestine & Hazel’s during a bash that includes live music and food by Central BBQ. Among the things that won’t be apparent amid the festivities, though, is all the work that goes into an undertaking like this, and the honing of chops that for Hughes has meant playing about 3,000 shows in Memphis since 2001.

65. Last Word: The Corker Tweets, Market Stabilization and The Rise of the Landshark -

In the “That Didn’t Take Long” department, whatever diplomacy there was in the relationship between President Donald Trump and U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee vanished over the weekend – vanished in the course of several tweets starting with one from Trump claiming he refused an endorsement of Corker in a re-election bid next year and that resulted in Corker’s decision not to seek re-election. He claims Corker “begged” for his endorsement. “Said he could not win without my endorsement,” Trump added. “He also wanted to be Secretary of State, I said, ‘NO THANKS.’ He is also largely responsible for the horrendous Iran Deal.”

66. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

67. Connecting The Pieces -

The Pinch District – a Downtown mini-neighborhood of only a few blocks sandwiched between the Memphis Cook Convention Center, Uptown, The Pyramid and the campus of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – has been a neglected donut hole of development for years, as investments have poured into other areas of Downtown around it.

68. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

69. City Council Delays Final Vote on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members delayed a third and final vote on an ordinance that would direct the city administration to remove Confederate monuments in two city parks if the state historical commission doesn’t allow it later this month.

70. Retired FedEx Exec Rodriguez Becomes City of Memphis CIO -

Mike Rodriguez recently became the city of Memphis’ director of information services and chief information officer, a role he took on after retiring from a 27-year career at FedEx Corp. Rodriguez, who most recently served as FedEx’s director of information security, was nominated as city CIO by Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the Memphis City Council Sept. 23.

71. 100-Year-Old Question -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art was already more than 10 years old when Sears, Roebuck & Co. opened its nearby Crosstown store in 1927 and the rest of the neighborhood began to fill in, so it was shock for many Memphians to hear about the possibility of the iconic institution leaving the only home it’s ever known.

72. The Week Ahead: Sept. 4-10 -

Hello, Memphis – and Happy Labor Day! Hopefully the promise of an exciting football season and Memphis Redbirds playoff games will help ease you back into work mode after the three-day weekend. Both are in store – along with Goat Days and much more – in The Week Ahead...

73. Editorial: Memphis Still on Road To Becoming ‘Bike Community’ -

The Shelby County Board of Adjustment this week approved a proposed multifamily development in the Cooper-Young Historic District, a small project by many standards on a 0.4-acre tract near the neighborhood’s namesake, the intersection of Cooper Street and Young Avenue.

74. Artist Cat Peña Named Director Of CBU’s Ross Gallery -

Cat Peña, a Memphis-based artist, arts administrator and independent public art consultant, has been named director of the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University. As an artist, Peña’s work in recent years has centered on public art installations, including “There’s More To Be Proud Of,” a canopy of metallic streamers on display in the Edge District through next February. In addition, she is the founder of Collabortory, a creative platform that expands public art practices through collaborative and social practices.

75. Remaking Crosstown -

As he was leading tours through Crosstown Concourse this month, Todd Richardson took a small group to a set of windows for a balcony view of an addition being constructed on the north side of the property.

76. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

77. Local Startup Ecosystem In Focus At Seminar -

During an interview with Bloomberg TV anchor Emily Chang earlier this month, former U.S. chief technology officer during the Obama administration Megan Smith gave a shout-out to Memphis’ startup ecosystem.

78. The Week Ahead: Aug. 14-20 -

Hello, Memphis! School was the big opening last week, but this week it’s the majestic Crosstown Concourse, the 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Cleveland Street at North Parkway. It is hosting a six-hour extravaganza of tours, music, food and the arts. Check out the details, plus more Elvis Week events and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead...

79. Cordova Apartment Community Sells for $27.9M -

The Charleston, a 284-unit apartment community on the east side of Houston Levee Road just south of U.S. 64, has sold for $27.9 million, marking a new chapter for a property that was built just last year.

80. Flying Ace Sully Makes Case Against Privatization -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Who are you going to trust when it comes to what's best for the flying public? Members of Congress or the hero of the Miracle on the Hudson, retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger?

81. Civil Rights Marker Rededicated on Birthdate of Lynch Victim -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Mississippi historical marker about a notorious lynching that galvanized the civil rights movement was rededicated Tuesday, weeks after it was vandalized and repaired.

82. Peaceful Bridge Anniversary Protests Draw Moving Police Presence -

A heavy but moving and shifting Memphis Police presence responded Sunday, July 9, to a set of peaceful protests and gatherings on the first anniversary of the protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the Mississippi River.

83. Last Word: Cooper-Young Complications, The Mackin Investigation and Tuition Hike -

Landmarks status for Cooper-Young is on hold because part of the process for the status isn’t an official part of the application process. That would be the part that requires a certain number of signatures to get the status. And it has put on hold a similar process in Vollintine-Evergreen.

84. Tropical Storm Cindy: Drenching Rains, Flood Threat on Coast -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Tropical Storm Cindy sent drenching rain bands over the north Gulf Coast on Wednesday, swamping low-lying coastal roads and pushing a waterspout ashore in one beachfront community as residents from east Texas to the Florida Panhandle warily eyed the storm's slow crawl toward land.

85. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

86. Gunman Who Shot Congressman Had History of Anti-GOP Activity -

BELLEVILLE, Ill. (AP) – The gunman who shot a top GOP congressman and several other people Wednesday at a baseball practice outside the nation's capital had a long history of lashing out at Republicans and once frightened a neighbor by firing a rifle into a field behind his Illinois house.

87. View From the Hill: GOP Points True North on State’s Moral Compass -

It was billed as the start of the 2018 governor’s race, but the GOP’s Reagan Day Dinner in Murfreesboro last week often sounded more like a tent revival.

Vote for one of these candidates and you’re guaranteed a place in heaven, ran the subtext of the evening, because, after all, everyone knows only Republicans know the road to salvation.

88. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

89. Trump Seeks to End Program for Older Jobless Americans -

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) – Nathan Singletary is beyond the traditional retirement age, but he's only just beginning a new career – helping other low-income, unemployed Americans over age 55 find jobs.

90. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

91. Present Day Issues Surface in Centennial of Persons Lynching -

The interfaith prayer ceremony Sunday, May 21, marking the centennial of the lynching of Ell Persons included several mentions of the removal of Confederate monuments in the last month in New Orleans.

92. Last Word: Weekend Sonic Boom, CLERB's Response and Irvin Salky -

Yes, those were the United States Navy Blue Angels buzzing Downtown Thursday afternoon in advance of their appearance at the Memphis Airshow Saturday and Sunday in Millington. That sound you heard after the flyover wasn’t a sonic boom. I don’t think they have those anymore. It was the sound of a really busy weekend following close behind.

93. The Week Ahead: May 8-14 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Festival season rolls on this week with plenty of reasons to get outside, celebrate and … well, be festive. Plus, we’ve got details on a couple of great concerts to check out and the (completely unrelated) reason you might hear drumming around Mud Island in The Week Ahead…

94. Our Best Point of View -

Editor’s note: At press time, The Daily News learned a proposal to construct two silos on the riverfront was withdrawn from the Board of Adjustment agenda.

WE DON’T JUST LOSE THE VIEW – WE LOSE THE VISION. My father had an interesting theory about Memphis expansion. Even though the most beautiful rolling land in Shelby County is north, Memphis expanded east. Dad said that was because industry was oriented to the river from the beginning, and a state line was just south, so, “they put all the crap along the river mostly north, and nobody wants to drive through all that to get to the office.”

95. Memphis Looks to Detroit’s Riverfront for Inspiration -

In a lot of ways Memphis and Detroit are kindred spirits. Both cities have similar populations, demographics, soul-laced musical legacies and are both looking to rebuild their economies after getting hammered by the recession.

96. Last Word: Derailed, The View From Pyramid Harbor and New History -

“Do Not Occupy” notices posted Thursday afternoon on most but not all of the newly-opened Railgarten complex on Central Avenue east of Cooper in Midtown. Local code officers acted after questions about whether the owners of the complex had approval for intermodal containers being used as part of the structure. The restaurant part of the structure in what was once an ice house remains open. There was already a lot of grumbling from neighbors about the music volume and late hours as well as parking for the development

97. Malco Moving Forward With Downtown Theater -

45 E. G.E. Patterson Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103 

Permit Amount: $5 million

Project Cost: $55 million

Application Date: March 2017

98. Malco Moving Forward With Downtown Theater -

Malco Theatre’s multimillion-dollar Downtown movie theater has taken another step toward completion.

A $5 million building permit application for the foundation of a new seven-screen movie theater was filed with the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement.

99. Pinnacle Ramps Up Investment in Memphis -

Since its entry into Memphis, Nashville-based Pinnacle Financial Partners has been slowly ramping up and investing in its presence here, a trend that has continued unabated in recent weeks.

The bank, among other things, struck a deal to bring a Starbucks store inside its Wolf River office at 1264 S. Germantown Road. It’s also gone on a hiring binge in recent weeks, and it’s filed a $2.3 million building permit for interior tenant work for its Memphis headquarters at 949 S. Shady Grove Road.

100. Malco Moving Forward With Downtown Theater -

Malco Theatre’s multimillion-dollar Downtown movie theater has taken another step toward completion.

A $5 million building permit application for the foundation of a new seven-screen movie theater was filed with the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement.