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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Ballet Memphis will present its winter mixed-repertory show, “Places Beyond,” Friday through Sunday, Feb. 17-19, at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St. The show includes two new original works and a reprise of “Angels in the Architecture.” Visit balletmemphis.org for show times and tickets.

2. Events -

Opera Memphis will perform Gilbert & Sullivan’s family classic “The Pirates of Penzance” Friday through Sunday, Feb. 17-19, at Germantown Performing Arts Center, 1801 Exeter Road. In conjunction with the show, Opera Memphis and the Mid-South Buccaneers are hosting Pirate Fest – an afternoon of pirate games, art activities, stories and live music from the Bluff City Barnacles – Saturday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at GPAC. Pirate Fest is free for everyone (no tickets needed); tickets to the performance can be purchased at operamemphis.org.

3. Finding Weekend Escape in Tuscaloosa -

When I hear Tuscaloosa, it’s almost always in the classic voice of former college football announcer Keith Jackson as he welcomes TV viewers to the campus of the University of Alabama.

4. Culinary Medicine Takes Center Stage -

Church Health is ramping up its culinary medicine efforts as it prepares to move to Crosstown Concourse in the coming weeks, efforts that include forming an advisory board to help spread the word about culinary medicine in Memphis.

5. The Week Ahead: February 13-19 -

Music is a common theme this week, which is nice to know, isn’t it, Memphis? And the sounds of other balls – not the dribbling kind – will take the stage again as the Memphis Open gets into swing and the University of Memphis throws its first real pitch of the 2017 season. Check out this week's list of need-to-know happenings...

6. Strickland Studies Options in Face of Immigration Travel Ban Order -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been getting a crash course in immigration policies – federal and local – in the last week.

7. Strickland Proposes 7 Areas for Possible De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to at least discuss de-annexing seven parts of the city and reducing the city’s square mileage by 8 percent and thus increasing the city’s population density.

8. Strickland Proposes 7 Areas For Possible Deannexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to at least discuss de-annexing seven parts of the city and reducing the city’s square mileage by 8 percent and thus increasing the city’s population density.

9. Federal Utility TVA Going to Trial Over Pollution Claims -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Environmental groups are taking the Tennessee Valley Authority to trial over waste ash from an aging coal-fired power plant northeast of Nashville, saying it polluted the Cumberland River in violation of the Clean Water Act.

10. The Week Ahead: January 31- February 6 -

Good morning, Memphis! It will get up to 49 degrees Saturday, but the Mississippi River water temp will still be frigid when the annual Polar Bear Plunge for Special Olympics splashes off at Mud Island River Park. A busy week starts with Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address today.     

11. RDC’s Role Changes With New Riverfront Task Force -

The role of the Riverfront Development Corp., a nonprofit group raising private money and receiving a static amount of city funding that was a precursor to the county park conservancies of the last decade, changed this week.

12. Last Word: The Grizz Farm Club Moves, Changing the NAACP and $15 An Hour -

How many of you knew the Iowa Energy was what amounts to a minor league team connected to the Grizz? How many of you knew that before Wade Baldwin and Troy Williams got sent there last month?

13. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

14. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

15. Last Word: Convention Center Hotel, The Crime Discussion and A Gas Tax Hike Plan -

Grizzlies fall to the Clippers 115-106 in Los Angeles. They play Golden State Friday in another West Coast road game.

During the California sojourn, Chandler Parsons turned up on the tabloid TV show TMZ clubbing in the general vicinity of Kendall Jenner after New Year’s Eve with Kate Beckinsale.

16. Nonprofits Raised Value In 2016 In Many Ways -

In any given year, charitable giving might rise or fall. But when the Chronical of Philanthropy analyzed the giving of the country’s 50 largest cities via Internal Revenue Service data, it captured a larger sample size: 2006 through 2012.

17. Strickland Surprised by Record Homicide Rate, Defends ‘Brilliant at the Basics’ -

At the last Memphis City Council meeting of 2016, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland dropped by to give high marks for cooperation between his office and the council.

18. EPIcenter Logistics Accelerator Now Taking 2017 Applications -

With access to FedEx’s Super Hub, the largest river in North America, five Class I railroads and two major interstates, it’s no surprise that Memphis is dubbed “America’s Distribution Center.” Its unique blend of transportation options also makes the Bluff City the perfect place to develop and launch new logistical technologies and services.

19. Last Word: Epping Way, Conley's Return and 'Ascend' -

What is the encore after a year that has included the opening of Big River Crossing, the eastward expansion of the Shelby Farms Greenline across Germantown Parkway to the old town part of Cordova and the opening of Shelby Farms Park’s Heart of the Park renovation? Two words: Epping Way.

20. Tourists Stream Back to Gatlinburg, But Rebuilding Looms -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) — Visitors jammed the main roads and sidewalks in Gatlinburg as the tourism city reopened to the public Friday for the first time since wildfires killed 14 people.

21. Evolving PILOT Programs in Memphis Look to Restore Competitive Balance -

When the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine approved its Fast Track payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) program earlier this year, it was with the hopes of bringing back a competitive balance between Memphis and North Mississippi.

22. Last Word: Boca, Poe Killed by Politics and Embedding In The Real Memphis -

BOCA BOWL – As expected, the University of Memphis Tigers football team is going south for the post season. They got and accepted Sunday the formal invitation to play in the Boca Raton Bowl on Dec. 20 against Western Kentucky. Ticket information should be forthcoming Monday for those of you who didn’t get enough during the Emerald Coast Classic with the basketball Tigers not too long ago.

23. The Pinch District ‘Vision’ Plan Meets Reality -

A final public meeting Tuesday, Nov. 22, on the still tentative redevelopment plan for the Pinch District came with a call by some property owners and a Shelby County commissioner for the city to end a moratorium on approving parcel-by-parcel redevelopment plans in the nine-block area.

24. Pinch "Vision" Plan Moves to Funding Reality -

A final public meeting Tuesday, Nov. 22, on the still tentative redevelopment plan for the Pinch came with a call by some property owners and a Shelby County Commissioner for the city to end a moratorium on approving parcel-by-parcel redevelopment plans in the nine-block area. It also included some general ideas about and renderings of Overton Avenue becoming a walkable well-lit and more heavily developed east-west corridor between the campus of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid.

25. The Week Ahead: November 14-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s finally feeling like fall outside – just in time for Graceland to flip with switch on Elvis’ Christmas light display. Plus, we have details on a couple of autumn-themed parties, plenty of basketball, and more to keep you busy in The Week Ahead…

26. Last Word: Beale Street Blues, Feds Review MPD and Midtown Kroger -

It’s the Grizz season opener against the Minnesota Timberwolves at FedExForum Wednesday. But there was plenty of drama in the Grizzlies office Tuesday afternoon of the non-Grizz variety but nevertheless a shade of Beale Street blue.

27. Wolf River Access and Federal Grant Highlight Preservation Efforts -

The road in Piperton near Albert Spillers Bridge on state Highway 196 is gravel and it is steep. But it is the way to a new boat access point onto the Wolf River that is formally dedicated Wednesday, Oct. 26.

28. McDonald Murrmann Women’s Clinic Successful and Thriving in 20th Year -

Early in their careers Dr. Mary McDonald and Dr. Susan Murrmann ended up in the same Memphis OB/GYN group. A private management company offered to buy the group, Murrmann recalls, and every physician was in line to get about a half-million dollars right up front.

29. The Week Ahead: October 17-23 -

This will be a historic week for Memphis, so mark your calendar for Saturday, Oct. 22, when a boardwalk across the Harahan Bridge opens to the public that will give Memphians and visitors alike an intimate experience with the Mighty Mississippi. The Big River Crossing also will link Memphis to West Memphis, Arkansas, and provide bicycle enthusiasts miles of trails along the river levee that will be unique in the world. There’s only one Mississippi River, the world’s second-largest inland waterway, and there’s only one Memphis! This crossing will be an unmatched amenity for the city for years to come.   

30. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

31. Last Word: Memphis-Temple, Southwest's Remake and Death Penalty Arguments -

Memphis 34 –Temple 27 Thursday evening at the Liberty Bowl and on ESPN. Whatever happened during halftime, the Tigers were a very different team from the first half when they emerged.

32. SEACAP Financial Helping Clients Navigate Economic Waves -

What, a prospective client might fairly wonder, is a Memphis-based business advisory group doing with the name SEACAP Financial? Don’t they realize their nearest shore is beside the Mississippi River?

33. Study: Memphis Among Cheapest Cities for Startup Costs -

A newly published national study focused on the cost of launching a startup in the U.S. has given props to the startup ecosystem in Memphis, ranking it one of the lowest-cost cities in which to launch a startup.

34. Can Alan Zucker Do for Titans’ Marcus Mariota What He’s Done for Mannings & Taylor Swift? -

As an NFL quarterback, Sunday is show time for Marcus Mariota. That’s when he suits up and does everything in his power to help the Tennessee Titans win football games.

But a recent Sunday morning was a different kind of show time. Mariota spent four hours on the opposite side of the Cumberland River from Nissan Stadium on a commercial shoot. A camera crew captured footage of him jogging in downtown Nashville and posing in front of various landmarks.

35. Getting Mile High in Denver -

Get out of Dodge. That was the only thing on my mind as we pulled out of downtown Dodge City, Kansas, and pointed the rental car north through the amber waves of grain that stretched for miles on both sides of the two-lane highway in rural Kansas.

36. Last Word: SEC and GMF, Wiseacre's Growth and Apartment Action -

The Securities and Exchange Commission has been investigating Global Ministries Foundation since mid-July. The revelation turned up Wednesday in a Memphis Federal Court filing by the receiver appointed to oversee and sell the Tulane and Warren apartments.

37. Last Word: The Sound of Dominoes, Brexit Anxiety and Schilling Farms Backstory -

The Memphis Newspaper Guild makes it official – filing grievances against Gannett, the new owner of The Commercial Appeal, over the first significant changes in how the paper is put out. Those changes involve abolishing copy editing positions and making them part of the new job of digital producers.

38. Last Word: Farewell Northside, Roland's Stand and Wayne Jackson -

Northside High School is no more. The Klondike-Smoky City institution graduated its last class last month.

The Shelby County Schools board had voted that same month to give the high school one more school year.

39. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

40. Mississippi Community College Fees Rise 7 Percent on Average -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Tuition will rise almost 7 percent on average this fall at Mississippi's 15 community and junior colleges.

A student will pay $2,748 for two semesters of full-time classes, on average, up from $2,577 in the 2015-2016 year, according to figures from the state Community College Board.

41. Donors Providing $12 Million To Light Mississippi River Bridges -

With the Big River Crossing on the north side of the Harahan Bridge moving toward a fall opening, the city of Memphis has reached an agreement with a group of anonymous donors for the lighting of the bridge by the Oct. 22 opening of the pedestrian and bicycle boardwalk.

42. Greensward Protests See First Arrests -

Two protesters blocking cars from parking on the Overton Park Greensward were arrested Monday, May 30.

The arrests of Fergus Nolan and Maureen Spain are the first in protests that began in the spring of 2014.

43. Greensward Protests See First Arrests -

Two protestors blocking cars from parking on the Overton Park Greensward were arrested Monday, May 30.

The arrests of Fergus Nolan and Maureen Spain are the first in protests that began in the spring of 2014.

44. $21.6 Million in Construction Headed to Graceland -

1064 Craft Road

Memphis, TN 38116

Permit Amount: $18.1 million

Project Cost: $21.6 million

45. Balink Chosen to Lead The Exchange Club Family Center -

Jennifer Balink has been named executive director of The Exchange Club Family Center, where she’ll begin her duties July 1. In her new role, Balink aims to secure and direct every available resource toward breaking the cycle of child abuse and family violence in the Memphis community. 

46. Last Word: Graduation Day, St. Jude's New Office Tower and Another Bike Map -

The chances are pretty good that you encountered someone in a cap and gown this weekend.

It is graduation season and Shelby County Schools kicked it off Saturday with 14 high school graduations – that’s in one day.

47. Last Word: South of Crump, Council Day and Haslam on the Fed's Bathroom Memo -

Neon is coming back to E. H. Crump Boulevard and the momentum of development continues to move further south to the Crump border with South Memphis.

Ghost River Brewing Co. is making plans for a tap room that opens this fall as part of its existing brewery at South Main and Crump.

48. The Week Ahead: May 16-22 -

With a barbecue-filled weekend behind us, it’s time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the Memphis in May Triathlon (where you can work off that pork belly) to the city’s first Palestine Festival (where, yes, there will be even more food).

49. Dave Thomas Named CEO Of Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as chief executive officer. In this role, he’s responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations and also is tasked with growing the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance company. Thomas has 40 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently serving as CEO of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

50. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

51. French Fort Motel Compromise Hard-Fought -

The developer of the old Marine Hospital south of E.H. Crump Avenue at the Memphis-Arkansas Bridge across the Mississippi River and the leader of the French Fort neighborhood association never actually talked to each other Wednesday, May 4.

52. Startup Teams Announced for ‘Summer Of Acceleration’ -

Monday, May 2, marked Day One of Memphis’ first “summer of acceleration,” a joint program of seven startup accelerators running concurrently that have collectively drawn the participation of 18 startup teams and dozens of founders hailing from as far away as Slovenia and Israel.

53. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

54. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

55. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

56. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

57. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

58. Editorial: The Ponderosa Box -

Maybe we’ve got this all wrong. Some people have suggested bringing recalcitrant, Memphis-hating legislators from other parts of the state here to our city to show them what’s right about this place. Instead, maybe we should go to them.

59. Tony Allen Sees his Bleak Chicago Existence in JIFF Kids -

As Tony Allen tells it, “I grew up in some of the hardest parts of Chicago.” And when he says “grew up,” he means survived.

60. The Week Ahead: March 21-27 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first Great River Indoor Food Truck Festival to a celebration of late Memphis wrestler Sputnik Monroe.

61. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

62. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

63. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

64. Events -

The Southern Women’s Show will be held Friday through Sunday, March 11-13, at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. The show will feature shopping, cooking, makeovers, seminars and celebrity appearances. Hours are Friday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visit southernshows.com for updates and advance discount tickets.

65. Departing Methodist CEO Looks Back, Forward -

It was the sense of mission and the opportunity to make a difference in peoples’ lives that Gary Shorb says ultimately compelled him to pursue a career in health care.

As he prepares to step down at year’s end as CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare - a job he’s held for the past 15 years, in addition to other leadership roles at Methodist and a prior stint as president at what’s now known as Regional One Health - Shorb still loves the profession. Not only that, he’s as optimistic as ever about the pace of change; Methodist’s significant capital projects under way; the impact that providers and health care professionals can have; and more.

66. Last Word: Trump, Clinton and Stanton, The Greensward Vote and Cover Letters -

This will be a relatively short edition of Last Word given the crush of an exceptional Tuesday in which a day at City Hall was more exciting than the state’s presidential primaries.

67. Report: Racial History Fuels Some Backlash Against ASD -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Some of the backlash against the state's Achievement School District is rooted in the historical experience of Memphis and the River City's history of highly charged racial dynamics that date back to the 19th century, a new report says.

68. Events -

Central Defense Staffing will host a recruitment event Wednesday, Feb. 10, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 6084 Apple Tree Drive, suite 10. CDS is seeking to fill positions for all shifts at various accounts in Memphis and North Mississippi. Applicants must bring two forms of ID and be able to pass drug screening and background checks. Visit centraldefensestaffing.com or call 901-473-6385, ext. 400.

69. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

70. The Week Ahead: Feb. 1, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? The good news is you officially made it through January. Here’s a look at what’s happening this week, from a frigid swim to a FedExForum double-header…

71. Q&A: U of M’s Dan Pallme Points to Shipping Changes, Challenges in 2016 -

Dan Pallme is heavily involved in the University of Memphis’ logistics industry departments. He runs the Freight Transportation Leadership Academy, a program that consists of technical tours, sessions with industry experts, and overviews of historic and current trends to encourage leadership in Memphis’ primary modes: rail, river, road and runway.
He is also the senior associate director and freight industry liaison for the U of M’s Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute and the private-sector coordinator for the Southeast Transportation Workforce Center. He has worked with air, rail and trucking companies over the past 25 years.

72. Memphis Zoo CEO: Mediation, Court Action Can Coexist in Greensward Dispute -

The Memphis Zoo’s move to Chancery Court next week in the Overton Park greensward controversy does not damage the mediation process between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

That’s what zoo president and CEO Chuck Brady said as attorneys on both sides of the controversy prepare to make their cases in court.

73. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

74. Morris Marketing Group Built on Strong Relationships -

In some respects, Valerie Morris’ career prepared her to open a PR and marketing agency, even if it didn’t always seem so obvious.

75. Ursula Madden: From Broadcast News to Memphis Communications Chief -

She didn’t realize it at the time, but Ursula Madden was training for her career as a local television anchor.

This was when she was a girl, growing up in Portland, Oregon. Little Ursula might have been sent outdoors to play all the time, but her mother had other ideas.

76. Fort Lauderdale for Beach, Adventure -

Fort Lauderdale screams “Hello Sunny,” but the tourism slogan isn’t necessary to get the point across for visitors once they arrive. It’s undeniable when stepping out from the airport to prepare for a few days in this South Florida hotspot.

77. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

78. Collierville Assisted Living Facility Sells for $17 Million -

601 Wolf River Blvd.
Collierville, TN 38017

Sale Amount: $17 million

Sale Date: Dec. 29, 2015

79. Muller: Memphis On Strong Footing, With Bright Future -

A key Greater Memphis Chamber official is preparing to retire this week after 15 years, at a time when he thinks the city of Memphis is on strong footing, and with a bright future that abounds with potential.

80. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

81. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

82. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

83. Interstate 55 Roundabout Delay Creates Frustration -

Lauren Crews admits that the old, vacant motel he owns on the border between Interstate 55 and the French Fort neighborhood is an eyesore.

84. ConAgra Cuts 1,500 Jobs; Moving HQ From Omaha to Chicago -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — ConAgra will cut about 1,500 jobs, or approximately 30 percent of its global, office-based workforce, and move its headquarters to Chicago from Omaha, Nebraska, the company said Thursday.

85. Wharton’s Accomplishments Weighted With Controversy -

It’s a set of events just about any incumbent would envy during a re-election bid.

Overnight riverboat cruises on the Mississippi River picked up just as Beale Street Landing opened in mid-2014. In late April, the long-dormant Pyramid reopened as a Bass Pro Shops megastore with a hotel and other attractions.

86. Tennessee Housing Agency Adopts Green-Building Standards -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency wants to build healthy communities from the ground up.

Under new guidelines to be incorporated later this year, affordable housing developers seeking Low-Income Housing Tax Credits will have to qualify for full certification from Enterprise Green Communities. The certification was first introduced nationally in 2004, and the THDA board recently approved incorporation of the revamped 2015 criteria.

87. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

88. Tennessee Craft Week Shines Light on Handcraft Artisans -

This fall the legacy of handmade craft art in Tennessee is getting some big promotion from a statewide weeklong celebration that coincides with American Craft Week in October.

“We want to put a spotlight on and build an appreciation for crafts artists,” said Teri Alea, executive director of Tennessee Craft. “They show up in lots of different ways throughout the community. Craft, especially high-end, is a big business and it has a big impact on the state economy.”

89. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

90. Cooper-Young City Market Opens, More On the Way -

A new grocery store and deli has now opened its doors in Cooper-Young. City Market’s second location, outside of its original Downtown spot, is now up and running, a result that stems from owners Sunny and Hamida Mandani developing their initial interest in the neighborhood toward the end of 2014.

91. Chisca Rising -

Sitting vacant for more than 20 years didn’t do any favors for the Chisca Hotel property along South Main Street. But this week marks a major milestone in the historic structure’s story as residents begin moving into the Plaza, the newer of The Chisca on Main’s two buildings.

92. The Remarkable Life of Dr. Richard Briggs -

Richard Briggs is recognized in East Tennessee as a respected heart and lung surgeon, a one-time county commissioner and most recently an elected state senator, the Republican who defeated Stacey Campfield in 2014, ending his rather colorful tenure in the General Assembly.

93. 'En Fuego' -

When Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite took office in June 2013, one of the first tasks that landed on his desk was a long-planned regional outlet mall.

The outlet mall, planned for a roughly 33-acre site at Church Road and Interstate 55 in the DeSoto County city, had been on the drawing board for some time, but the recession and its aftermath caused developers and Mississippi officials to put it on hold.

94. ‘Honda Girl’ Ashley Blair Finds Career Outside Car Ads -

Ten-year-old actress Ashley Blair takes her job seriously. She’s like many other actors in the region working to improve her craft and looking for the next project. The Knoxville area has a thriving community of actors, writers, directors, and producers, all trying to showcase their best work, both locally and nationally.

95. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.

96. Wild Side -

No chance of being attacked by a hippo, which despite its size can outrun a man and is responsible for more human deaths in Africa than any other large animal.

No chance of being caught between the powerful jaws of a Nile crocodile and dragged underwater, drowned and devoured like a wildebeest in a National Geographic video.

97. Cycling Ahead -

Unless you've seen the ubiquitous stations in cities like Knoxville and Nashville, it's difficult to imagine how bike sharing could connect Memphis.

Tourists and citizens can check out a bike on a per-ride or membership basis and return it to a separate station when they've reached their destination.

98. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

99. Knoxville’s Amazing Network of Trails, Parks and Waterways -

With the Great Smoky Mountains looming in the distance, and no shortage of ball fields and other outdoor recreation sites closer at hand, Knoxville and its surrounding communities don’t lack for recreational opportunities.

100. Nashville’s Long, Hot, Delicious Summer -

Summertime brings us wedges of juicy watermelon and drippy ice cream cones. It yields pies piled with blackberries and peaches so fresh they can fill a room with their aroma.

It offers jewel-toned tomatoes for slicing and piling onto BLTs.