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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Midtown Moves, A Spike in Chandler Numbers and Old School Expo -

The Brooks looking for a place outside of Overton Park is a huge story that broke Tuesday evening. And it is one of those stories that has a lot of dominoes you might say. Our story looks at some earlier options the museum developed mid recession, which is what delayed fuller consideration of this whole question.

2. Monuments Controversy May Mean Long Haul of Lawsuits, Negotiations -

When the Tennessee Historical Commission votes Oct. 13 on a waiver that would permit the city of Memphis to remove Confederate monuments from two city parks, it won’t be anywhere near the last word on the matter.

3. County Commission Joins City Call to Remove Confederate Monuments -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, Sept. 11, backing the city’s efforts to remove Confederate monuments with a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission. The resolution by commissioner Walter Bailey also backs the Memphis City Council’s move to an ordinance that could take down the monuments after the Oct. 13 decision if the historical commission does not grant the waiver.

4. Breather for Vols Before Traveling to Florida -

Get ready for another thrill ride, Tennessee fans. Your football team is at it again, just like last year.

Tennessee needed a comeback and overtime to beat Appalachian State in its 2016 season opener. The Vols needed comebacks to beat Virginia Tech and Florida and got a Hail Mary touchdown pass as time ran out to beat Georgia.

5. Halvorson Assumes New Role At Cumberland Trust -

Independent corporate trust firm Cumberland Trust has promoted Rebecca M. Halvorson to senior vice president of business development and manager of regional markets. Halvorson, who joined Cumberland in 2010, is based in the company’s Memphis office.

6. Pinnacle Named Among Best Banks to Work For -

Pinnacle Financial Partners is one of the nation’s Best Banks to Work For, ranking No. 6 on the annual list compiled by American Banker magazine and Best Companies Group. It is the firm’s fifth appearance on the list.

7. I Recommend a New Novel -

They read us like a book. When I was growing up, The Book Shelf was about where the northwest corner of the Kroger in Poplar Plaza is now. It smelled like books – not the library smell of tomes and the weight of knowledge, but the smell of brand-new information, shiny new possibilities, a world of discovery on a personal scale.

8. Pinnacle Named Among Best Banks to Work For -

Pinnacle Financial Partners is one of the nation’s Best Banks to Work For, ranking No. 6 on the annual list compiled by American Banker magazine and Best Companies Group. It is the firm’s fifth appearance on the list.

9. Ignite Your Website’s SEO -

You have likely invested, to some degree, in search engine optimization – or SEO – to improve how prospective customers find you via an internet search. Unfortunately, few companies continue to invest in this vital strategy.

10. Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to an $11 million, two-year contract with two one-year renewal options with Aetna.

11. County Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to Aetna in an $11 million two-year contract with two renewals of one year each.

12. Pottery Studio/Coffee House to Open on Highland Strip -

549 S. Highland St.
Memphis, TN 38122

Lease Size: 2,788 square feet

13. LA Fitness to Begin Work On East Memphis Gym -

L.A. Fitness has filed a $3.5 million building permit application to begin interior buildout work at its East Memphis gym, located at 4572 Poplar Ave. in Poplar Commons.

14. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

15. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

16. Orbison Headlines Memphis Music Hall Of Fame 2017 Class -

The Memphis Music Hall of Fame unveiled its list of 2017 inductees to a packed house Tuesday, Aug. 22, at Clayborn Temple in Downtown Memphis that included Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

Most notably among the seven-member class of 2017 were the Memphis Horns and Roy Orbison of “Pretty Woman” fame.

17. Memphis Music Hall of Fame Announces 2017 Class -

The Memphis Music Hall of Fame unveiled its list of 2017 inductees to a packed house Tuesday, Aug. 22, at Clayborn Temple in Downtown Memphis that included Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

Most notably among the seven-member class of 2017 were the Memphis Horns and Roy Orbison of “Pretty Woman” fame.

18. Artist Cat Peña Named Director Of CBU’s Ross Gallery -

Cat Peña, a Memphis-based artist, arts administrator and independent public art consultant, has been named director of the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University. As an artist, Peña’s work in recent years has centered on public art installations, including “There’s More To Be Proud Of,” a canopy of metallic streamers on display in the Edge District through next February. In addition, she is the founder of Collabortory, a creative platform that expands public art practices through collaborative and social practices.

19. LA Fitness to Begin Work on East Memphis Gym -

L.A. Fitness has filed a $3.5 million building permit application to begin interior buildout work at its East Memphis gym, located at 4572 Poplar Ave. in Poplar Commons.

20. World War II Soldier Returns Home 74 Years After Death -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A World War II soldier who was missing for nearly 74 years is returning home to Tennessee after his remains were recently identified.

The Tennessee Department of Veterans Services announced Monday that the remains of U.S. Army Staff Sgt. William Turner, of Nashville, will arrive at Nashville International Airport on Tuesday, The Tennessean reported . A graveside service at the Nashville National Cemetery is scheduled for Aug. 22

21. Hattiloo Plots a Bigger Stage for Its Audience -

The founder of Hattiloo Theatre says the black theater company is ready to become more regional and professional in its approach and influence. “Now it’s time for Hattiloo to become a major regional theater,” said Ekundayo Bandele before an opening-night performance of “Ruined.”

22. Commission Tries to Stop Charter School Plan -

Shelby County commissioners called on a charter school that planned to open in Memphis but instead wants to set up shop in Bartlett to stick by its original plan or put off opening Gateway University Charter School next week.

23. County Commission Calls For Halt to Gateway Charter Plans in Bartlett -

Shelby County Commissioners called on a charter school that planned to open in Memphis but instead is setting up shop in Bartlett to stick by its original plan or put off the opening of the Gateway University Charter School next week.

24. City Council Members Express Uncertainty, Doubt Over Instant Runoff Voting -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd questions why there should be runoff elections for the seven single-member district seats of the council.

Boyd made the comment as he and other council members continued to react to plans by the Shelby County Election Commission to implement Instant Runoff Voting, or Ranked Choice Voting (RCV), starting with the 2019 city elections.

25. Tigers’ Men’s Tennis Earns Academic Honor -

The University of Memphis men’s tennis team has earned its 13th Intercollegiate Tennis Association All-Academic Team honor for having a team GPA of 3.2 or higher. Memphis also had four players honored as ITA Scholar-Athletes for posting a GPA of 3.5 or higher during the past academic year.

26. Back to School Fair July 29 At Miss. Boulevard Church -

Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church and local partners will offer services to families and children in preparation of the first day of school during a Back to School and Community Health Fair on Saturday, July 29.

27. Back to School Fair Saturday at Miss. Blvd. Church -

Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church and local partners will offer services to families and children in preparation of the first day of school during a Back to School and Community Health Fair on Saturday, July 29.

28. Tigers’ Men’s Tennis Earns Academic Honor -

The University of Memphis men’s tennis team has earned its 13th Intercollegiate Tennis Association All-Academic Team honor for having a team GPA of 3.2 or higher. Memphis also had four players honored as ITA Scholar-Athletes for posting a GPA of 3.5 or higher during the past academic year.

29. Complacency is the No. 1 Business Killer -

While the actual activities take on different forms, at the end of the day, I’ve come to the realization that I’m a change agent for companies dissatisfied with their current sales and marketing outcomes. I was taken back years ago by the clarity offered from an area CEO in this statement: “We can’t expect a different outcome if we aren’t willing to change what we’re doing.”

30. Political Differences Endure After $4.11 Shelby County Tax Rate Compromise -

Shelby County commissioners were still calculating Monday, July 17, after they passed a compromised, $4.11 county property tax rate that appears will stay put long enough for the commission to take a final vote Wednesday at a special meeting.

31. Climbing Out When Stuck In Comfort Zone -

We all have them. We often go there looking for safety, acceptance, understanding or just a sense of the familiar. Our comfort zones are natural, but living there can keep you from fulfilling your purpose in life. A comfort zone, if you burrow in too deep, can become a rut you get stuck in.

32. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

33. Additional Sanitation Workers May Get Benefits -

The city of Memphis had 1,100 sanitation workers when the historic strike began in February 1968, with close to 1,000 of them walking off the job following the grisly deaths of two of their own trapped in the grinder of a garbage truck in East Memphis.

34. County Commission Leans Back to $4.13 Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners took a step Wednesday, July 12, toward taking back a 3-cent cut in the county property tax rate.

And in the budget committee session, commissioners favoring the tax cut to a $4.10 tax rate said they would reopen this week’s contentious budget debate if the $4.13 tax rate appears to have traction when the full commission meets Monday, July 17.

35. Commission Goes Back to $4.13 County Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners took a step Wednesday, July 12, toward taking back a three-cent cut in the county property tax rate.

And in the budget committee session, commissioners favoring the tax cut to a $4.10 tax rate said they would reopen this week’s contentious budget debate if the $4.13 tax rate appears to have traction when the full commission meets Monday, July 17.

36. Reviving Prospects That Go Dark -

If you’ve been in sales, you’ve found yourself wondering about a prospect who was highly interested in your offering – and for whom you invested significant time – only to find them suddenly incommunicado.

37. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

38. Morris Recalls Brother’s Violent Death and Rage -

“Actually, the truth has never been told,” Charlie Morris said this week as he talked about the violent death of his brother 78 years ago in Arlington. Morris, now 96 years old, had family and friends gathered around him at the Memphis Branch NAACP headquarters Monday, July 3, as he marked the new state law that could reopen the investigation into the death of Jessie Lee Bond and other cold cases from the long arc of the civil rights movement.

39. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

40. Sessions Gets More Opposition to Ending DOJ Memorandum -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been getting a lot of mail from Memphis lately about Juvenile Court.

41. Last Word: A Second Juvenile Court Letter, Fred Smith's Tax Plan and Memphis Hops -

A group of 19 organizations including the Memphis Branch NAACP and 28 citizens sent a letter Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urging him to keep in place Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. The 12-page letter is a point-by-point detailed response to the June 9 letter from County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham asking Sessions to end the memorandum of agreement between county government and the Justice Department.

42. County Budget Vote Delayed But Government Continues To Operate -

Shelby County government’s fiscal year begins Saturday, July 1, but the county won’t have a new operating budget at least until July 10.

That’s when the Shelby County Commission meets in special session to take up an estimated $13 million in amendments various commissioners are proposing to the budget proposal of county mayor Mark Luttrell.

43. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

44. County Commission Opposes End To Juvenile Court Oversight, Delays Budget Vote -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, June 26, opposing an end to the Justice Department memorandum governing conditions at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court. And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said he will veto it.

45. Tennessee Weighs Commission to Examine Jim Crow Brutality -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

46. Arkansas Panel Approves Temporary Ban on Herbicide -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas took the first steps Friday toward temporarily banning the sale and use of an herbicide that has prompted hundreds of complaints and a federal lawsuit from farmers who say it has caused widespread damage to crops.

47. Budget Amendments, Tax Rate and Juvenile Court Top County Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners will have lots of amendments to the county’s proposed operating budget Monday, June 26, and at least one bid to change the proposed county property tax rate of $4.10 approved on first reading earlier this month.

48. Shelby County Commissioners Question Ending DOJ Agreement -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, June 21, commissioners complained of not being consulted before county Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

49. Last Word: Cyber Attacks, Second Farmers Market Downtown and The Council Way -

It’s on. Shelby County commissioners coming out Wednesday in committee against the idea of ending Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. And the discussion was, as always, an interesting one including not only critics like commissioner Van Turner but commissioner Terry Roland and County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

50. Juvenile Court Settlement Meets Resistance on County Commission -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, commissioners complained of not being consulted before County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

51. Juvenile Court Settlement Meets Resistance on County Commission -

The first reviews from Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, June 21, of the idea of dropping Justice Department oversight of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court were highly critical.

In committee sessions Wednesday afternoon, commissioners complained of not being consulted before County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham made the request to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

52. Haslam Scheduled to Sign Civil Rights Cold-Case Bill -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is scheduled to sign into law Wednesday, June 21, a bill to investigate unsolved murders from the civil rights era. The bill was sponsored by Rep. Johnnie Turner, a Memphis Democrat, and will create a special joint legislative committee specifically to look into unsolved civil rights crimes and cold cases.

53. Marketing Folks Should Try Thinking Like a CEO -

Many marketing professionals have found themselves at odds with their CEO, whether they are not on the same page, have competing priorities or have a different version of success. The same often holds true for marketing agencies and their clients’ leadership teams. The divide can be painful and, for some, impossible to bridge.

54. Pinnacle, BNC Shareholders Approve $1.9B Merger -

Shareholders of Pinnacle Financial Partners and BNC Bancorp have both approved a $1.9 billion merger of the two banks, which is expected to close soon.

Nashville-based Pinnacle, parent company of Pinnacle Bank, currently is building its Memphis headquarters in Boyle Investment Co.’s new Class A office building in Ridgeway Center in East Memphis. Pinnacle will be the building’s anchor tenant with signage rights, and plans to occupy 35,000 square feet in the 155,000-square-foot facility, along with two drive-thru banking lanes and an ATM lane on the ground floor.

55. From LinkedIn Amateur to Pro -

Editor's Note: This is the second in a two-part series. LinkedIn is one of the few social platforms that still allows your network to see your organic, unpaid content. It also is the single largest social platform focused exclusively on the business sector. So, if all you use it for is accepting the occasional connection request, it’s time to stop playing and get serious.

56. County Commission Debates 3-Cent Tax Rate Cut -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a 3-cent reduction in the county property tax rate Monday, June 12, on the first of three readings but delayed a vote on the operating budget resolution for more discussion about how to account for the tax-rate cut.

57. County Commission Continues Tax Cut Calculations -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a three-cent reduction in the county property tax rate Monday, June 12, on the first of three readings but delayed a vote on the operating budget resolution for more discussion about how to account for a cut in the tax rate.

58. First Tennessee Bank Complaint vs. Pinnacle Financial to Go to Trial -

A legal fight brought in the wake of Pinnacle Financial Partners’ arrival into the Memphis market appears set for a jury trial.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle on Tuesday, June 6, denied a motion for partial summary judgment made by Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank, which filed its complaint against Pinnacle in February 2016.  First Tennessee originally brought the action in 2015 only against Damon Bell, a First Tennessee executive vice president recruited to be Pinnacle’s Memphis president.

59. Stop Playing & Get Serious About LinkedIn -

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series. Would it shock you to learn that one out of every three professionals on the planet and two-thirds of working-age Memphians are on LinkedIn? Perhaps even more surprising is that only one-third of LinkedIn users report fully leveraging it. That’s an enormous amount of unproductive effort and missed opportunity. 

60. Flintco Files $25 Million Permit for ServiceMaster HQ -

150 Peabody Place
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Amount: $25 million

Application Date: May 2017 

61. Methodist University Hospital Continues Modernization -

Methodist University Hospital is seeking a $2.5 million building permit to continue work on its $280 million modernization project on its campus, 1265 Union Ave.

62. Local Democratic Reorganization Starts to Come Into Focus -

Shelby County Democrats should have a framework for a reorganized local party soon.

Discussions at town hall meetings around the county in the last month show it will probably be a party with a less complex structure and a more stable size from election to election. And a draft of the bylaws will probably include a larger policy council of sorts that meets on a quarterly basis to talk over larger issues than winning the next elections.

63. Commission Wades Into TIFs, Minority Businesses -

Shelby County Commissioners took a dive into the technical Monday, May 22, on several fronts in county government.

The commission approved a tweak in an economic impact plan for the Lake District development in Lakeland. The mixed-use development is to include hotels, retail, office uses, assisted living and restaurants. The public improvements or infrastructure are financed with a tax increment finance, or TIF, district that amounts to an increment of the property taxes – Lakeland and Shelby County – paid by the owners of the district.

64. Baseball Tigers Still Alive In AAC Tournament -

Colton Neel threw three scoreless innings of relief and provided a walk-off single in extra innings to give the University of Memphis a wild 15-14 win on Wednesday, May 24, over Cincinnati to stay alive in the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

65. Commission Wades Into TIFs, Minority Businesses -

Shelby County Commissioners took a dive into the technical Monday, May 22, on several fronts in county government.

The commission approved a tweak in an economic impact plan for the Lake District development in Lakeland. The mixed-use development is to include hotels, retail, office uses, assisted living and restaurants. The public improvements or infrastructure are financed with a tax increment finance, or TIF, district that amounts to an increment of the property taxes – Lakeland and Shelby County – paid by the owners of the district.

66. Officials: Manchester Bomber Was Local Man of Libyan Descent -

MANCHESTER, England (AP) — The man who police say blew himself up in a packed concert arena in Manchester, killing 22 people, did not make a strong impression on his neighbors.

Residents of the Manchester suburb of modest brick semi-detached homes where 22-year-old Salman Abedi lived remembered seeing the tall, thin young man who often wore traditional Islamic dress. But few said they knew him well.

67. County Certified Property Tax Rate Comes In At $4.13 -

Shelby County Commissioners set the certified county property tax rate at $4.13 Monday, May 22, a 24-cent drop from the current tax rate of $4.37.

The resolution approved reflects the state-approved estimate of a tax rate that will produce the same amount of revenue for county government as the current tax rate once new property values from the 2017 countywide property reappraisal are factored in.

68. County Commission to Pick Up Budget Deliberations Monday -

Shelby County Commissioners meet Monday, May 22, and take up some budget and tax items on their way to a later final approval of all budget season matters at future meetings.

Among the items on the agenda is a resolution setting a recertified Shelby County property tax rate of $4.13. The new rate would be 24 cents below the current county rate of $4.37, reflecting changes in value from the Shelby County Assessor’s 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

69. Luttrell: Mend Issues That Divide Region -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says his hope for a more civil national political discourse may be “a little Alice in Wonderland.” And there are times when he sees local discussions veering in the direction of “Nashville and Washington,” he told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, May 16.

70. House Approves Education Fund Concept, But Senate Action Put on Hold -

House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh pushed his K-12 education fund to passage Tuesday, May 9, but the possibility of funding and Senate approval will have to wait until 2018.

Dubbed the “K-12 Block Grant Act,” the measure calls for setting aside $250 million in excess state revenue for interest-generating investment to provide grant money for school systems statewide. Each system could use the funds for state-approved programs such as reading coaches or dual enrollment, items not funded through Tennessee’s Basic Education Program.

71. View From the Hill: Forrest Kerfuffle Might Be Sign of Bigger Problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

72. House Leader Casada Backs Towns’ Slavery Amendment to State Constitution -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to remove slavery from the state Constitution is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

73. Towns’ Slavery Amendment Gets Backing From House Leader -

Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to remove slavery from the state Constitution is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

74. Lack of Available Labor Defines Workforce Landscape -

If the American South were its own country it would have a larger economy than Germany, which is one of the reasons why coordinating regional workforce efforts in the Mid-South is paramount.

At the second annual RegionSmart Summit Thursday, April 27, hosted by the Mid-South Mayors’ Council, Michael Randle, owner and publisher of Southern Business and Development, shared this and other interesting statistics of the labor force during his presentation.

75. Influencer Marketing To Dominate in 2017 -

I am part of Generation X – the last generation that ever scheduled their childhood evenings around when a beloved TV program was set to air. It was a time when television created celebrities that brands coveted as spokespeople to promote their products. Think of Michael Jordan for Nike, Suzanne Somers for the ThighMaster or Michael Jackson for Pepsi.

76. Often-Arrested Lee Sisters Get Civil Rights Due on Capitol Hill -

During the civil rights era, the Lee sisters wouldn’t have been welcomed at the State Capitol. Half a century later, legislators honored the Memphis family on the House floor, recognizing their efforts in the 1960s when they participated in protests across the city and Southeast as high school and college students.

77. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

78. Hitting the Ceiling -

Nearly every growing company faces a phenomenon – at multiple points in its growth trajectory – where the leadership team feels stuck, growth stalls or halts, and everything starts to feel complex. The strategies of the past that served them so well are no longer working. Revenue has plateaued and frustration is creeping into the organization.

79. Shelby County Commissioners Pledge to ‘Push It’ on Minority Business Contracts -

Shelby County commissioners took a hard line Monday, April 17, on increasing the share of county government contracts for minority and locally owned businesses now that it has a plan for tackling a documented disparity for such contracts.

80. Coalition Urges City Funding For Memphis Schools -

A group of 13 organization and 17 citizens including Shelby County Schools board chairman Chris Caldwell and state Representatives Raumesh Akbari and G.A. Hardaway are calling on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to include at least $10 million in funding for schools in the budget he takes to the Memphis City Council next week.

81. First Budget Moves, Minority Business Measures Top Commission Session -

Shelby County Commissioners set the tone for the upcoming county government budget season Monday, April 17, with approval of a refinancing of county debt with up to $120 million in bonds over time.

82. First Budget Moves, Minority Business Measures Top Commission Session -

Shelby County Commissioners set the tone for the upcoming county government budget season Monday, April 17, with approval of a refinancing of county debt with up to $120 million in bonds over time.

83. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

84. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

85. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

86. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

87. Immigrant Student Tuition Bill Fails In House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

88. Immigrant Student Bill Fails in House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

89. Avoid the ‘Me, Me, Me’ Trap -

It’s official – you are on the social media bandwagon. Your company has a presence on major social-media platforms because you want to drive traffic to your website, engage customers in conversation and learn their insights, build brand loyalty, deliver better customer service and manage your reputation. But just being on Facebook and Twitter won’t make those things happen. You have to work for it. Positioning your company as an information source can help you achieve those goals.

90. U of M Students, Faculty Do Social Work on the Hill -

The University of Memphis Department of Social Work recently participated in the annual Social Work Day on the Hill.

More than 50 students and six faculty members in bachelor’s and master’s programs traveled to Nashville to gain practical experience in speaking to legislators, building interdisciplinary professional relationships, and advocating for policies primarily related to mental health and child welfare.

91. U of M Students, Faculty Do Social Work on the Hill -

The University of Memphis Department of Social Work recently participated in the annual Social Work Day on the Hill.

More than 50 students and six faculty members in bachelor’s and master’s programs traveled to Nashville to gain practical experience in speaking to legislators, building interdisciplinary professional relationships, and advocating for policies primarily related to mental health and child welfare.

92. Responding to Bad Reviews -

It’s a catch-22 type of situation. You need to put your business out there in this age of social media, but in doing so, you open yourself up to criticism, bad reviews and the like.

Despite the risks, social media is a marketing tactic that is a must for most companies. If you aren’t out there, your competitors are, and that is riskier than the possibility of a bad review. Knowing you won’t please all of the people all of the time, understand that an occasional bad review will happen. Knowing what to do next is key.

93. Marker Commemorates King’s Final Flight to Memphis -

John Hope Bryant has come through Memphis International Airport many times on business. The founder of the financial literacy nonprofit “Operation HOPE” was always aware the airport was Martin Luther King’s last arrival point on the way to his assassination in 1968.

94. Pinnacle Ramps Up Investment in Memphis -

Since its entry into Memphis, Nashville-based Pinnacle Financial Partners has been slowly ramping up and investing in its presence here, a trend that has continued unabated in recent weeks.

The bank, among other things, struck a deal to bring a Starbucks store inside its Wolf River office at 1264 S. Germantown Road. It’s also gone on a hiring binge in recent weeks, and it’s filed a $2.3 million building permit for interior tenant work for its Memphis headquarters at 949 S. Shady Grove Road.

95. PR is Your Fire Department -

Public relations departments are like fire departments. PR folks would much rather prevent your organizational fire than put it out. So, why is it that PR is almost always brought in after a crisis occurs? It’s simple. Many executives only see PR playing a role in generating earned media or planning events. While it involves that, it’s so much more.

96. Sit-In Protests Get First Historical Marker -

Nobody kept count until Jet magazine came to Memphis in 1965 to feature a group of seven sisters the influential magazine billed as “the most arrested family” in the country.

With a picture of the seven Lee sisters, the magazine said Lee family members have “been arrested 17 times for civil rights activities.”

97. Dairy's Parking Lot Plan In Overton Square Withdrawn -

A proposal for a parking lot at the Turner Dairy plant in Overton Square was withdrawn by developers before a Memphis City Council vote on the matter scheduled for Tuesday, March 21.

The dairy is expanding but needed council approval for a parking lot that was to be a part of the expansion. The parking lot plan had drawn opposition from neighbors and the entertainment district. It also had been rejected by the Land Use Control Board.

98. Last Word: Veep Visit, Women and Baseball and Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Game time at FedExForum for the NCAA South semifinals and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be here to cheer on the Butler Bulldogs. The Butler mascot – a live bulldog – was already in town Thursday making the rounds. I think March Madness requires that all involved up their mascot game if they get this far. So UCLA, we expect to see a live bear roaming Beale Street. You might be able to work a deal with the zoo on this. But if there’s a cost split make sure you nail down those percentages.

99. Turner Seeks Study of Civil Rights Cold Cases -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner can still feel the physical and emotional pain she endured for riding at the front of Memphis city buses while going home from LeMoyne-Owen College during the civil rights movement.

100. Last Word: The Overton Park Split, Democrats Help The Gas Tax Bill and LaVar Ball -

The city's tallest building, the fenced-off, derelict, 38-story 100 N. Main Building, cited in the past by fire officials for code violations including fire alarms that don't work -- had a small fire Wednesday 34 floors up.