» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Time' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:47
Shelby Public Records:6564
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:53
Middle Tennessee:226
East Tennessee:371
Other:2

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. US Consumer Sentiment Up in May to Highest in Nearly a Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans turned more optimistic about the economy in May than the previous month, buoyed by steady hiring and higher incomes.

The University of Michigan said Friday that its index of consumer sentiment rose to 94.7 in May, the highest in nearly a year. That's up from 89 in April.

2. Shelby County Unemployment Drops to 4.5 Percent -

Shelby County’s unemployment rate continued to drop in April, according to preliminary figures from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

The county’s unemployment rate measured 4.5 percent in April, a decrease of 0.2 percentage points from March and 1.7 percentage points lower than April 2015.

3. US Economy Showing Signs of Life After Slow Start to Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy is showing signs of more life after a less-than-stellar start to the year.

The government said Friday that first-quarter growth, while disappointing, wasn't as bad as first thought. And a number of more recent indicators are showing decent gains in key areas like consumer spending and housing.

4. Fast Money: Banks Making It Easier to Split the Tab -

NEW YORK (AP) – Splitting the bill for those pizzas you shared with your buddies or that utility bill that is suddenly due is going to get easier and faster even if you don't all use the same bank.

5. Janet Yellen Says Fed Could Raise Rates in Coming Months -

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that an interest rate hike would be appropriate in the coming months if the economy keeps improving.

While economic growth was relatively weak at the end of last year and beginning of this year, it appears to be picking up now based on recent data, Yellen said during a discussion at Harvard University.

6. Cellphone Radiation Study Raises Concerns Despite Low Risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A new federal study of the potential dangers of cellphone radiation, conducted in rats, found a slight increase in brain tumors in males and raised long-dormant concerns about the safety of spending so much time with cellphones glued to our ears.

7. The Week Ahead: May 30-June 5 -

It's time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from a Funkadelic party at the New Daisy to a Day of Merrymaking on the Greensward... 

8. How to Be a Confident Nonprofit Solicitor -

Editor’s note: Part two of a two-part series. Personally asking someone to make a gift to a nonprofit you believe in is one of the most valuable things you can do. For some this is done with comfort, ease and joy. For others there is a twinge of fear, or maybe a silent scream of terror.

9. Tethering the Void to Moonshot Ideas -

This talk was given by Donna Sturgess, executive in residence, Carnegie Mellon University, at the annual Front End of Innovation Conference in Boston this month.

“I’ve been spending a lot of time in the future,” is how Sturgess opened this evocative session. “Things get funded at Carnegie Mellon for big, breakthrough ideas, exponential innovations.”

10. Downtown Memphis Commission Taking Safety Actions -

At its May 26 board meeting, discussions at the Downtown Memphis Commission dove into the death of a teenager who was shot at the corner of Second Street and Peabody Place.

“I feel this personally,” said Terence Patterson, president of the Downtown Memphis Commission. “We’re really focusing on it and making sure we’re doing everything we can, but we have to have collaboration with MPD (Memphis Police Department). But we know that we’ve got to do more.”

11. MSO, University of Memphis Partnership Will Open New Doors -

A new partnership between the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and the University of Memphis may become a model for sustainability of fine arts organizations in a new economic landscape.

Earlier this month, the symphony and U of M announced a three-year, renewable partnership to bring the MSO into residence at the university. The partnership will reduce the annual operating budget for the financially strapped MSO by 40 percent and offer synergy for the two entities to build further revenue around programming and music education innovations.

12. Crime Stats Chronicle Recent Spike in Violent Crime -

Myneishia Johnson’s funeral was the day before she was supposed to graduate from high school.

The teenager’s death at the corner of Second Street and Peabody Place on May 22 came on one of the first busy Downtown weekends of the spring not connected to a Memphis in May International Festival event.

13. Snapshot: How Memphis-Based Public Companies are Faring -

Acquisitions have been a common theme among many Memphis-based public companies the past few quarters. Here is a roundup of those transactions and other business highlights from each of the companies.

14. Available Class-A Office Space Scarce in Memphis -

ServiceMaster is looking to relocate its headquarters into a Class A office building, and Memphis just doesn’t have room.

“For the past two years, we’ve been using those phrases,” said Ron Kastner, senior vice president with CBRE.

15. Baker Family Keeps Owen Brennan’s Going -

If you show up on a Sunday for Owen Brennan’s famous brunch, owner Jim Baker will be there to greet you, to say your name and smile at the thought of another round of mimosas being ordered.

16. Editorial: Innovation Must Link Memphis’ Needs, Promise -

The innovation efforts starting to bear fruit in Memphis’ medical community didn’t just appear miraculously.

Leaders of this effort started to plow rock-hard ground years ago.

While business innovation is difficult, health and medical innovation aimed at commercial applications is much more brutal. The reward for a breakthrough at this level is greater, but so is the risk, with investors’ capital burned through quickly whether or not an idea is brought to fruition.

17. Joe Walsh Books August Date At Mud Island -

Joe Walsh will play Mud Island Amphitheatre in August.

The Aug. 13 date was announced Thursday, May 26, by Beaver Productions. Tickets go on sale June 3 for the show, which includes opener JD & The Straight Shot.

18. Rose Guiding Memphis Symphony to Firm Financial Footing -

What is classical music good for? How can it remain relevant in the 21st century? For most people, these are abstract questions – but for Gayle Rose, they couldn’t be more pressing.

19. Downsize Your Expenses, Not Your Home -

Ray’s Take Millions of baby boomers are approaching, or have arrived at, retirement. Some may find themselves looking around their large homes where they raised their families and deciding they don’t need all that room anymore. The kids have grown up and moved out (maybe) and the money from a sale could really bulk up their retirement funds. It may also be time to consider a downstairs bedroom and other considerations for the next phase in life.

20. Cyclist Lucky – And Better Than Ever -

Phillip Poux smiles a lot these days. He laughs a lot and practically gushes about the Wolf River Greenway and the joy of riding his road bike in a safe and scenic environment.

He even says he wishes that he and wife Rhonda had moved to Memphis sooner.

21. Bartlett Native Wright Makes MLB Debut at Dodger Stadium -

When Daniel Wright stepped up on the pitcher’s mound at Dodger Stadium to make his major-league debut with the Cincinnati Reds the other night, a crowd of thousands was watching. And more than a dozen family members and friends from Memphis and Jonesboro, Ark., were there to root for him.

22. THDA to Resume Apartment Inspections -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency plans to inspect at least a dozen apartment complexes in Memphis where federal subsidies pay tenants’ rent.

THDA executive director Ralph Perrey said the agency’s authority to make the inspections resumes in July. And the agency isn’t saying which properties will be visited “so as not to ruin the surprise,” Perrey said Wednesday, May 25, as he announced the resumption of the inspections.

23. CEO Pay Climbs Again, Even As Their Stock Prices Don't -

NEW YORK (AP) – CEOs at the biggest companies got a 4.5 percent pay raise last year. That's almost double the typical American worker's, and a lot more than investors earned from owning their stocks – a big fat zero.

24. TSA Chief: Help is on the Way to Address Long Airport Lines -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The head of the Transportation Security Administration said Wednesday the beleaguered agency will add 768 new screeners by mid-June to deal with increasingly long airport security lines that have caused passengers to miss flights even before the busy summer travel season.

25. Feds Spend Billions to Run Museum-Ready Computer Systems -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government is squandering its technology budget maintaining museum-ready computer systems in critical areas from nuclear weapons to Social Security. They're still using floppy disks at the Pentagon.

26. THDA Resumes Inspections of HUD-Subsidized Apartments -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency plans to inspect at least a dozen apartment complexes in Memphis where federal subsidies pay tenants’ rent.

THDA executive director Ralph Perrey said the agency’s authority to make the inspections resumes in July. And the agency isn’t saying which properties will be visited “so as not to ruin the surprise,” Perrey said Wednesday, May 25, as he announced the resumption of the inspections.

27. Reminiscing on Football Days -

It is reported that yet another memorable and popular former NFLer, this one a quarterback, suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, or simply the concussion disease. And the report comes, as has been the rule, post-mortem. That is to say, after the subject dies.

28. Love for the Perfectly Imperfect -

When I was in third grade, there was a saying posted in the front of the classroom that read “Practice Makes Perfect.” I read it so many times that eventually it became a way of approaching every task, a way of thinking.

29. Council Committee Probes Grant Requests -

Memphis City Council Budget Committee Chairman Edmund Ford Jr. likens it to the television show “Shark Tank.”

Instead of entrepreneurs, leaders of nonprofits made their pitches to the budget committee Tuesday, May 24, for grants from the council as part of the budget process.

30. ASD's Raleigh Offer Makes School Board Skeptical -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools in a possible change of plans by the ASD for its takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

31. University of Memphis Students to Cover Rio Olympics -

When Chip Williams came to the University of Memphis he never could have imagined that he would be going to the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

“I started as an accounting major,” he said. “I was sort of blinded by the money.”

32. Last Word: Graduation Day and Our Outrage, An ASD Offer In Raleigh and Fashion -

According to Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson, 15,000 people have watched the several dozen high school graduation ceremonies the school system has streamed live on its website including the 14 graduations held Saturday.

33. Court: State Must Provide TennCare Applicants Fair Hearing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A federal appeals court has upheld an order requiring Tennessee's Medicaid program to provide applicants with a fair hearing if it cannot process their requests on time.

34. Monsanto Rejects $62B Bayer Bid, But Still Open to Talks -

NEW YORK (AP) – Monsanto rejected Bayer's $62 billion takeover bid, calling it "incomplete and financially inadequate."

However, the seed company suggested Tuesday that a higher bid might be accepted, saying that it remains open to talks.

35. Google Maps Directions May Soon Lead You to ... More Ads -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – You might start seeing more ads when getting directions from Google's popular mapping service.

The ads, called "promoted pins," will highlight restaurants and other merchants located along your way. They'll show up inside the directions map as Google routes you to your destination.

36. Coming Soon to Twitter: More Room to Tweet -

NEW YORK (AP) – Twitter is making some big changes, at least in the context of 140 characters or fewer.

The social media service said Tuesday that in coming months, photos, videos and other media won't count toward Twitter's 140-character limit. Now, for example, when a user posts a photo, it counts for about 24 characters.

37. Stacking Your Odds for Success -

Looking through his old toys, my son found his stacking cups and challenged me to a competition. Cup stacking is a bizarre game of skill and speed with the goal being to build pyramids out of cups as quickly as possible and then collapse them and build again.

38. A Lesson From Oprah -

The service industry just isn’t what it used to be. Mediocre is the norm, and attention to detail seems all but lost in this fast-paced world. That’s why companies that actually deliver on what they say they will, when they say they will, stand a breed apart.

39. You Aren’t Made for Every Job -

The number one reason employees change jobs varies depending on the source you’re reading. One list includes “appreciation and recognition” while another says “unsatisfied with upper management.” Whatever the reason given, one thing’s for sure. These answers can all be grouped under one important category – cultural fit.

40. Sports Notebook: If He’s Available, Should Grizzlies Take Labissiere In First Round? -

While it’s difficult to imagine the NBA matching the NFL for draft night drama this year – hopefully there are no Twitter bong photos seconds before tipoff – the mock drafts don’t seem to agree a lot beyond LSU forward Ben Simmons going to Philadelphia first overall and Duke forward Brandon Ingram going second overall to the Los Angeles Lakers.

41. City Opens Up Mid-South Coliseum to Reviews -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” has a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

42. Memphis Fashion Incubator Looking for Permanent Space -

Andrea Fenise lays a sheet of ivory fabric over her desk and cuts diagonally with precision.

“Actually, today is my off day,” she said. “This is personal. It’s my baby’s flower girl dress.”

43. Commission, Shelby County Schools Leaders Talk Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners set the stage for a Wednesday, May 25, budget committee session on school funding by holding up $2.8 million in redirected Shelby County Schools funding at its Monday meeting.

44. Last Word: The Hot Seat, The Cohen-Rubio Letter and a New Historical Marker -

The hottest seat in a room of hot seats in city government can be being director of the Memphis Animal Shelter.

You wouldn’t think that from the job description, which seems pretty basic. Round up stray animals and put them up for adoption. But that’s being overly simplistic because it begs a lot of questions about how many animals and what happens if you run out of space.

45. Pugh Takes Politically Volatile Shelter Position -

The new director of the Memphis Animal Shelter says a shelter that doesn’t euthanize animals because of time or space is a goal.

But Alexis Pugh, who starts the job next month, is quick to add that public safety is the immediate priority.

46. Tribune Rejects Second Gannett Bid; Sets the Stage for Talks -

NEW YORK (AP) – Tribune Publishing rejected a second takeover bid from USA Today owner Gannett, but did say Monday that it was open to further talks.

Gannett last week raised its per-share bid for the owner of the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and other newspapers to $15, from $12.25. Gannett, based in McLean, Virginia, put the total value of the revised offer at about $864 million, which includes some $385 million in debt.

47. Appeals Court Reverses Fraud Finding Against Bank of America -

NEW YORK (AP) – Bank of America Corp. was not liable for fraud and subject to a penalty of over $1.2 billion for its actions before the economy collapsed in 2008 despite a jury's finding to the contrary, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.

48. Fundraising Matchmaking: Solicitors and Prospects -

Editor’s note: Part one of a two-part series. Because it is impossible to personally solicit every current or prospective donor, personal solicitation is reserved for individuals who can make a major gift. While the definition of a major gift will vary by organization, what’s most important is the care and planning that goes into soliciting these gifts. Here are some suggestions followed by things to avoid.

49. Innovation From The Inside-Out -

A talk from Karen Hersherson, clay street project leader, Proctor & Gamble. Innovation for P&G is about platforms and pipelines that create long-lasting value. To get these types of results, the company had to build an incubator for project teams, named “clay street.”

50. Global Ministries Continues to Take More Heat -

The receiver for the Warren and Tulane Apartments is in place with the notice filed in Memphis federal court last week that Foresite Realty Management LLC had accepted the job and that its bonding is in place.

51. Small Neighborhood Improvements Can Add Up Big -

Memphians have raised half a million dollars and counting for neighborhood improvements through a Livable Memphis and ioby strategic partnership.

“A lot of times you’re waiting for that check, that one big investment,” said John Paul Shaffer, program director for Livable Memphis. “And that can create a stasis in a neighborhood.”

52. Baptist Adding ICU at Children’s Hospital -

The Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital has hit its ceiling and is now expanding to meet increased demand. When the 19,000-square-foot pediatric emergency department opened last year, Baptist Memorial Health Care expected to treat 35 children a day. That figure is more like 65 to 70 children, with the hospital expecting to exceed 20,000 patients in its first year.

53. Last Word: Graduation Day, St. Jude's New Office Tower and Another Bike Map -

The chances are pretty good that you encountered someone in a cap and gown this weekend.

It is graduation season and Shelby County Schools kicked it off Saturday with 14 high school graduations – that’s in one day.

54. City Opens Coliseum To Experts In June -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” was announced by the city Friday, May 20, with a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

55. City Opens Coliseum To Experts In June -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” was announced by the city Friday, May 20, with a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

56. Haslam Allows Tennessee Refugees Lawsuit to Move Forward -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has decided not to veto a resolution demanding a lawsuit be filed over the federal refugee resettlement program in Tennessee.

The governor announced Friday that despite his concerns about the measure, he was allowing it to go forward without his signature.

57. Journey, Doobie Brothers Playing FedExForum May 25 -

Journey and the Doobie Brothers will bring the “San Francisco Fest 2016” tour to FedExForum on Wednesday, May 25, bringing together two of the iconic groups that helped define the “San Francisco Sound.” The show, produced by Beaver Productions, includes special guest Dave Mason.

58. Grizzlies’ Drew Graham Selected Trainer of the Year -

The National Basketball Athletic Trainers Association (NBATA) has named Memphis Grizzlies head athletic trainer and vice president of player care Drew Graham as its 2015-16 Joe O’Toole Athletic Trainer of the Year.

59. The Week Ahead: May 23-29 -

Alright, Memphis, it’s time to get this week started with our roundup of happenings you need to know about. 

The 2016 Memphis In May International Festival closes out Saturday with a pair of new additions to the monthlong lineup.
The Saturday by the river begins with the Great American River Run – a half-marathon and a 5K run with a riverside and Downtown route. There is, of course, a post-race party, which then segues into 901Fest – four stages in Tom Lee Park featuring local music and arts, from Al Kapone and Frayser Boy to the North Mississippi Allstars to Opera Memphis and the New Ballet Ensemble & School.
The idea here, and it may be an evolving concept, seems to be local and diverse and not as much of an emphasis on the stages and what happens there at the expense of those who stay after the run and those who come for the music and the arts.
To dot the I on that point, 901Fest also includes an air show.

60. Multifamily Rents Increase Significantly in First Quarter -

Memphis area market rents increased an annualized 4.7 percent during the first quarter of the year, reaching $795, according to a first-quarter report from ARA Memphis, a Newmark company.

It is the largest increase in rents for a first quarter in more than a decade and a half. A mild winter and an improving job market were considered likely factors in the significant increase, the report noted. The Memphis unemployment rate dropped below the national rate in March, the first time it has done so since 1999.

61. Tennessee Congressman Diagnosed With Cancer -

Longtime U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr. says he’s been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Duncan told the Knoxville News Sentinel that the cancer was found six or seven months ago during a routine exam. He said doctors have decided no treatment is necessary at this stage after tests showed the cancer is isolated.

62. Global Ministries’ Bonds Downgraded for 2nd Time -

For the second time this year, S&P Global Ratings has downgraded bonds used to support Global Ministries Foundation’s apartment projects.

On May 3, S&P Global Ratings, formerly known as Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, lowered its investment rating on 23 multifamily bonds issued on behalf of GMF. S&P removed all 23 ratings from CreditWatch, where the bonds had been placed in February, with negative implications.

63. Huey’s Participating in National Burger Day -

Patrons of Huey's will get the chance to win a free burger on May 28 in celebration of National Burger Day.

As usual on that day, all Huey burgers will be presented with a frill pick in the middle of the bun. However, all day on National Burger Day, customers can be surprised with a gold frill pick in lieu of the standard colors. Guests who order a Huey burger that comes out with the special gold pick will get their meal free.

64. U of M Study Abroad Adviser Awarded Fulbright Grant -

Jonathan Holland, Study Abroad adviser for the University of Memphis, has been awarded a Fulbright grant to participate in the International Education Administrators’ 2016 Seminar in Japan. Holland is a two-time Fulbright recipient; he taught English and American studies in Ukraine during the 2010-2011 academic year through the Fulbright program.

65. Whitehaven Empowerment Zone Begins To Take Shape -

Public education is a “noble profession,” Whitehaven High School principal Vincent Hunter told a group of 100 parents and teachers in the high school’s auditorium last week.

66. Lendermon Sports Medicine Explores Non-Surgical Healing Methods -

Laura Lendermon is amazed at how the body works. As a former college athlete and lifelong runner, she’s familiar with the aches and pains athletes experience. As a doctor, she’s knowledgeable on a much deeper level of the magic of the human body.

67. One Family -

An unprecedented private investment aims to restore a commercial heart to the Soulsville USA neighborhood, where a pair of sprawling buildings take up nearly a full block across from the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. It isn’t an eyesore, but inactivity within those walls has been a drag on the community.

68. BRIDGES Celebrates Retirement of CFO Bob Rogalski -

The BRIDGES mission is as clear as it is bold: “To unite and inspire diverse young people to become confident and courageous leaders committed to community transformation.”

But every bridge needs support. For 11 years, Bob Rogalski has served as the nonprofit’s vice president of finance and CFO. He is retiring on June 30, the end of BRIDGES’ 2016 fiscal year. Endowment earnings for this fiscal year were $720,000 and next year’s endowment should be around $765,000, Rogalski said.

69. Last Word: The Return of Chiwawa, Mud Island's Dilemma and A Good Map -

Chiwawa is back. But don’t call it a doughnut shop. And the owner says it won’t be called Chiwawa either. We presume it will still proclaim that Midtown is Memphis.

70. Multifamily Rents Soar To 15-Year Record in Q1 -

Memphis area market rents increased an annualized 4.7 percent during the first quarter of the year, reaching $795, according to a first-quarter report from ARA Memphis, a Newmark company.

It is the largest increase in rents for a first quarter in more than a decade and a half. A mild winter and an improving job market were considered likely factors in the significant increase, the report noted. The Memphis unemployment rate dropped below the national rate in March, the first time it has done so since 1999.

71. Hardy Makes Art Accessible for Millennials -

Whitney Hardy is a woman on the move. The day we meet, she’s supervising 200 tons of soybeans as they make their way from hopper trucks onto train cars. Then she’s off to the premier of “Genesis,” a collection of new works presented by Collage Dance Collective.

72. Family Planning – Beyond the Diaper Fund -

Ray’s Take: So, you’re planning to start your family. Have you considered the finances involved beyond painting a room and knowing it’s going to take a lot of diapers? Three can certainly live as cheaply as two – as long as one of them doesn’t eat or wear clothes.

73. In a Players’ League, a Coach Is Captive to His Roster -

As the Memphis Grizzlies continue The Great Coach Search, it’s fair to ask this basic, and at some level, almost offensive, question:

Does it really matter that much?

Specifically, will the next Grizzlies’ coach, be he a veteran like former Indiana Pacers coach Frank Vogel (which appears more unlikely all the time), or an untested current NBA assistant, ultimately determine the direction of the franchise?

74. Mud Island Search Becomes Dilemma -

The Riverfront Development Corp.’s time before the Memphis City Council’s budget committee this week was short.

75. Baptist Executive Vaughn Receives U of M’s Highest Alumni Award -

Anita Vaughn’s notable 43-year career with Baptist Memorial Hospital started on a whim.

“I went to University of Memphis for a year thinking I was going to be a commercial artist,” Vaughn said. “Then a friend just happened to say, ‘You know what? I’m going down to Baptist School of Nursing,’ and I said, ‘Well, OK. Me too!’

76. Bakery, Cafe Planned For Chiwawa Space -

Daniel Flanagan is moving forward with a new concept at 2059 Madison Ave., the Overton Square space where his restaurant Chiwawa closed almost a year ago and where he apparently has plans for a bakery and cafe.

77. Haslam Questions Need for Special Session on Bathroom Rules -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam on Wednesday questioned the need for a special legislative session that some fellow Republican lawmakers want to convene over a directive issued by President Barack Obama's administration about transgender bathroom policies in public schools.

78. Phil Mickelson to Forfeit Nearly $1 Million in SEC Case -

NEW YORK (AP) – The professional golfer Phil Mickelson has agreed to forfeit nearly $1 million that the Securities and Exchange Commission said was unfairly earned on a tip from an insider trading scheme conducted by a former corporate director and a professional gambler.

79. Poll: Two-Thirds of US Would Struggle to Cover $1,000 Crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) – Two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to an exclusive poll released Thursday, a signal that despite years of recovery from the Great Recession, Americans' financial conditions remain precarious as ever.

80. Last Word: $4.8 Billion of TNT, North Parkway Complications and Graceland West -

FedEx sets a date next week for its acquisition of TNT Express – a $4.8 billion deal that was approved by TNT shareholders Wednesday.

81. Poll: Americans More Upbeat About Own Finances Than Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are of two minds about the economy in the midst of an elec-tion race that largely hinges on the issue. They are strikingly pessimistic about the national econ-omy yet comparatively upbeat about their own financial circumstances.

82. Say Goodbye to Time Warner Cable: Sale Leads to Name Change -

NEW YORK (AP) – Soon you'll have a new cable company to hate. It'll take some practice, but in time you'll get used to swearing at Spectrum.

Time Warner Cable, the largest cable provider in New York and Los Angeles, among other markets, was just bought by Charter Communications Inc., which has mostly operated in the Midwest. The Stamford, Connecticut-based company also bought Bright House Networks Wednesday. That makes Charter the second-largest home Internet provider and third-largest video provider in the U.S. Over the next year and a half, Charter will phase out the Time Warner Cable and Bright House names in favor of its own brand, Spectrum.

83. More Work, More Pay? New Rule Extends Overtime to Millions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More pay could become a reality for millions of U.S. workers who now toil long hours without overtime under a new rule issued Wednesday by the Obama administration.

The rule seeks to bolster overtime protections that have been eroded in recent decades by inflation. A diminishing proportion of workers have benefited from overtime regulations, which date to the 1930s and require employers to pay 1 1/2 times a worker's wage for work that exceeds 40 hours a week.

84. Longtime Tennessee Congressman Diagnosed With Cancer -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Longtime U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr. says he's been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Duncan told the Knoxville News Sentinel (http://bit.ly/203FGe4) that the cancer was found six or seven months ago during a routine exam. He said doctors have decided no treatment is necessary at this stage after tests showed the cancer is isolated.

85. Global Ministries’ Bonds Downgraded for 2nd Time -

For the second time this year, S&P Global Ratings has downgraded bonds used to support Global Ministries Foundation’s apartment projects.

On May 3, S&P Global Ratings, formerly known as Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, lowered its investment rating on 23 multifamily bonds issued on behalf of GMF. S&P removed all 23 ratings from CreditWatch, where the bonds had been placed in February, with negative implications.

86. Ifs, Etc. -

A wordier version of this column ran in 2008. That would have been shortly after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette ran a certain editorial. In which it asserted that to say there are “no ifs, ands or buts” is wrong. The correct phrase, it averred, is “no ifs, ans or buts.”

87. Grant Touts Ghost River Brewing as Neighborhood Asset -

The Center City Development Corp. has awarded its largest storefront improvement grant to date to Ghost River Brewing Co., which plans to use the $65,500 to building an outside patio and taproom at its 827 S. Main St. facility.

88. Latest 'High Gear' Book Maps Success for College Grads, Millennials -

The 21 million U.S. students enrolled in postsecondary schools grew up with technology and the hourly clock of life ticking ever faster. Yet this has not always translated into a generation of young people ready to attack a world that waits for no one.

89. Time Running Out to Vote for Conley in NBA Cares Contest -

The NBA recently announced Mike Conley as a finalist for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award presented by Kaiser Permanente. Fan voting continues through Wednesday, May 18, for the league-wide award.

90. Target Names Nordstrom Exec As Chief Merchandising Officer -

NEW YORK (AP) – Target has poached Nordstrom for its new chief merchandising officer, a crucial position and the one who determines what appears on store shelves.

Mark Tritton was president of Nordstrom Product Group where he oversaw the merchandising, design, manufacturing, marketing and omnichannel distribution of more than 50 private-label brands across Nordstrom's full-price and off-price portfolio.

91. NTSB Blames Distracted Engineer for Deadly Amtrak Wreck -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The speeding Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia last year, killing eight people, most likely ran off the rails because the engineer was distracted by word of a nearby commuter train getting hit by a rock, federal investigators concluded Tuesday.

92. Huey’s Participating In National Burger Day -

Patrons of Huey’s will get the chance to win a free burger on May 28 in celebration of National Burger Day.

As usual on that day, all Huey burgers will be presented with a frill pick in the middle of the bun. However, all day on National Burger Day, customers can be surprised with a gold frill pick in lieu of the standard colors. Guests who order a Huey burger that comes out with the special gold pick will get their meal free.

93. U of M Study Abroad Adviser Awarded Fulbright Grant -

Jonathan Holland, Study Abroad adviser for the University of Memphis, has been awarded a Fulbright grant to participate in the International Education Administrators’ 2016 Seminar in Japan. Holland is a two-time Fulbright recipient; he taught English and American studies in Ukraine during the 2010-2011 academic year through the Fulbright program.

94. Twitter's 140 Character Limit – Time to Ditch It? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Many Twitter users – and more importantly, the billions more who don't use Twitter – feel constrained by the company's somewhat archaic 140-

And there's the character limit imposed by Twitter. Is it time to ditch it as Twitter searches for ways to grow its stagnant user base?

95. Rise of the Subscription Economy -

Today, you can buy almost anything on subscription, including dog toys from BarkBox, razors from Dollar Shave Club, streaming video content from Netflix, music from Spotify, beauty samples from Birchbox, ready-to-make meals from Blue Apron and even rental cars from Zipcars.

96. PFM Group Promotes Lowe To Managing Director -

Lauren Lowe has been promoted to managing director of The PFM Group, a leading provider of independent financial and investment advisory services to state and local governments and not-for-profit institutions. Based in PFM’s Memphis office, Lowe serves the firm’s municipal advisory clients. Her areas of expertise include debt transactions and structuring, strategic planning, pricing and cash flow analysis as well as advising many of her local government clients on policy development.

97. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

98. New Schools Giving Memphis Suburbs More Autonomy -

Some of the trees along East Shelby Drive on the 158 acres at Sycamore Road are in rows. It’s the unmistakable sign of a tree nursery. And before that it was considered a prime dove hunting location.

99. Report Says Amazon to Expand its Store-Brand Offerings -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon is planning to expand the store-brand items it sells to new categories including food and household products, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.

The new products could include nuts and spices and other consumer goods such as diapers and laundry detergent.

100. Got a Minute for the Minutes? -

We recently facilitated two board meetings for two very different types of organizations. One was an institution that is over 100 years old with a multimillion-dollar budget. The other was an emerging grassroots, community-based organization. At both meetings the focus was fundraising, and board members were actively engaged.