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Editorial Results (free)

1. Historic Mansion Being Restored Into Exclusive French-Asian Restaurant -

The Nineteenth Century Club, one of the last great mansions of Union Avenue, was slated to become a strip mall. Next door to the 107-year-old building is a Taco Bell, which stands on the site of the Nineteenth Century Club’s former ballroom.

2. Webb: ‘The Most Important Thing is Talent’ -

When Roblin Webb graduated from Rhodes College with an urban studies major, she knew she wanted to make a difference, and working as a civil rights lawyer seemed like the right way to do it. So she headed to law school and grad school at Rutgers, in New Jersey, then came back to Memphis and got a job at a law firm. 

3. New Data Tracking System Will Save Memphis Educators Hours Every Week, Officials Say -

The system for sharing student data with educators in Tennessee’s largest school district has been laborsome and time-intensive at best, but that’s about to change.

Shelby County Schools has begun trainings with team leaders from each school as part of this year’s rollout of a new database system called Ed-Fi.

4. Study: Memphis Among Cheapest Cities for Startup Costs -

A newly published national study focused on the cost of launching a startup in the U.S. has given props to the startup ecosystem in Memphis, ranking it one of the lowest-cost cities in which to launch a startup.

5. Leadership Germantown Seeks Cohort Participants -

Leadership Germantown is accepting applications for the 2017 cohort of its community leader development program. The program consists of nine session days between January and June.

Leadership Germantown participants work closely with the city of Germantown and learn how the city integrates and influences Shelby County and the State of Tennessee.

6. The Week Ahead: September 5-11 -

Happy Labor Day, Memphis! We hope you’re wrapping up this three-day weekend on a relaxing note – and, if you buy into arbitrary fashion etiquette, that you’re enjoying wearing your white clothing and seersucker suits one last time. There’s plenty going on this week, from Mid-South Book Fest to the Southern Heritage Classic, so let’s get right to it…

7. Concerts, Pop-Up Events and Beer Gardens Are Feeding Business at The TapBox -

A traveling beer-mobile with a variety of taps on the side for easy pouring might sound like a dream straight from Homer Simpson’s head, but partners McCauley Williams, J.R. Kingsley and Justin Brooks of The TapBox have turned that dream into a reality, creating several multi-tap refrigerated devices that are popping up at more events across Memphis.

8. Tennessee Exchange Insurance Rates Soar Higher -

People with health care insurance through the Tennessee Health Insurance Marketplace can expect significant rate hikes starting next year. The Tennessee Department of Insurance recently approved and released final rates for Individual ACA health policies for the calendar year 2017, and the increases were higher than anticipated.

9. Renewed Effort Underway to Bring Bike Share to Knoxville -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Knoxville officials want to bring a bike share program to the city that is home of the state's flagship public university.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports (http://bit.ly/2bLcF4X) that Councilman George Wallace says the idea for a bike share program has enthusiastic support, but will require a lot of work to get accomplished.

10. Toast to the Achievement School District -

Somebody forgot to tell the Achievement School District it had to follow a few simple rules when the Legislature formed it a few years ago to save failing schools: Primarily, don’t party with the money.

11. Thrill-Ride Accidents Spark New Demands for Regulation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

12. DeafConnect Gets New Director, Website -

A local nonprofit dedicated to deaf, deaf-blind and hard of hearing resources, is welcoming some big changes this month with a new executive director and a fresh website platform.

De Linda Brite steps in as DeafConnect of the Mid-South’s new executive director, succeeding Teresa Wilson, who spent five years leading the organization.

13. Why Does Tennessee Start Its School Year So Dang Early? -

For almost all public school students in Tennessee, the dog days of August aren’t spent at the swimming pool or summer camp, but back at school.

Many Tennesseans remember school days when they returned to class on the first day after Labor Day. But beginning in the 1980s, the average start date has crept from early September to closer to July as districts search for ways to boost academic outcomes, as well as to address educational inequity.

14. SBA Loans Available in Some Tenn. Counties Due to Drought -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Some businesses and groups affected by drought this summer in Tennessee have disaster loans available to them.

The U.S. Small Business Administration said in a news release that federal economic injury disaster loans are available to small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and private nonprofit organizations as a result of the drought that began May 31.

15. Jordan Takes Leading Role At Child Advocacy Center -

Mark Jordan has joined the Memphis Child Advocacy Center as development director, responsible for connecting people in a meaningful way to the critical services MCAC provides to vulnerable children. In his new role, Jordan will create and administer a comprehensive development plan to both enhance connections and build new relationships with volunteers and the philanthropic community to grow fundraising, donor relations and public engagement. 

16. Last Word: Using the ACT, Murmuration and We Grow -

The superintendents of the Bartlett and Germantown school systems say they have a remedy to the testing complaints state education officials are grappling with.

David Stephens and Jason Manuel, of Bartlett and Germantown respectively, tell us on WKNO's Behind The Headlines that they support using the college ACT test for high school students in place of the end-of-course exams.

17. TAG Truck Center to Occupy Mall of Memphis Land -

4430 American Way

Memphis, TN 38118

Permit Amount: $28 million

Application Date: July 2016

18. Demonstrations Raise Interest in Pending Bike Share Program -

A demonstration bike share station set outside of High Cotton Brewery signaled what Memphis could expect early next year when 60 bike share stations are up and running.

The three B-Cycle bikes, developed by Wisconsin-based Trek Bicycle, were available for impromptu rides in the Edge District. At the event hosted by nonprofit Explore Bike Share, the public was invited to click through the station’s touch screen to sign up for a temporary membership, then swipe an identification card to release a bike from the station and take it for a spin.

19. Feds Investigate Shelby County Schools Over Migrant Bias -

The largest public school district in Tennessee is under a federal civil rights investigation into bias allegations surrounding district officials' treatment of migrant children from Central America and their parents, U.S. Department of Education officials said Wednesday.

20. Last Word: Return of the Balloon Note, SCS and Migrant Teens & Greensward Doubts -

One of the prime culprits in the housing bubble burst that played a role in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is back – the adjustable rate mortgage.

Numbers from Chandler Reports, the real estate information company that is part of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc, show the number of such loans has spiked in the first half of this year and are the highest they’ve been since 2008, the year after the bubble burst nationally.

21. Last Word: The Greensward Deal, Pulpit to Protest Call and Leader Federal's HQ -

There is nothing quite like a deadline to produce results.

I’m not talking about this job, although it is more than a coincidence that the closer a deadline gets the more you start to figure out how to write something.

22. How safe is our food? -

It’s not easy being a food inspector in Tennessee, dealing with an updated statewide food code to protect the public from foodborne illnesses and educating restaurateurs, many with their own ideas about their cuisine, on following the rules.

23. Elkington Promoted At ABO Marketing -

Jamie Elkington has been promoted to director of communications at ABO Marketing & Communications. In this position, she will direct and implement public relations plans for the nonprofit and business organizations the firm serves.

24. Apple Urges Organ Donation via New iPhone Software -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple wants to encourage millions of iPhone owners to register as organ donors through a software update that will add an easy sign-up button to the health information app that comes installed on every smartphone the company makes.

25. Is Your Nonprofit Legit? -

Passion for mission is at the heart of a nonprofit, but don’t forget your “business” requirements. Nonprofits must comply with many of the same regulations as businesses, and additional ones that are specific to the sector. As an executive or board member you need to be aware of these, and operate within the law.

26. Former Titan Dyson Finally Reaching His Goal -

When is it too late to go back to school and prepare for a new career? Most experts and older students who’ve returned to school at 30, 40, 50 – or even 60 and beyond – will tell you there’s really no limit as long as an older student is motivated and focused.

27. Nonprofit for School Equity To Start Operations -

The Campaign for School Equity (CSE), a new nonprofit organization focused on addressing academic achievement disparities between low-income and affluent students in Tennessee, will soon begin operations.

28. Nonprofit for School Equity To Start Operations -

The Campaign for School Equity (CSE), a new nonprofit organization focused on addressing academic achievement disparities between low-income and affluent students in Tennessee, will soon begin operations.

29. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

30. Frayser Targeted as Pilot Area for Citywide Fight Against Blight -

Last week, a wrecking team demolished a single-family home in the Washington Heights neighborhood in South Memphis. The effort, organized by United Housing Inc. and backed by the U.S. Department of Treasury, was the first of its kind to take place.

31. Last Word: ServiceMaster Details, Loflin Yard Changes and Bridge Lighting -

The ServiceMaster local incentives for the new Peabody Place headquarters have cleared the first hurdle.

That was the Center City Revenue Finance Corporation’s Tuesday meeting. It’s on to the Center City Development Corporation Wednesday and then EDGE.

32. THDA Director Elected To National Board -

Ralph Perrey, executive director of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency, has been elected to service on the National Housing Conference’s board of trustees by the nonprofit organization’s membership.

33. Health Care Hindrances: Money and Politics -

Adam Nickas, the new executive director of Tennesseans for a Responsible Future, is looking for a sweeping plan to catch some 280,000 people who fall into a health care coverage gap across the state.

34. THDA Director Elected To National Board -

Ralph Perrey, executive director of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency, has been elected to service on the National Housing Conference’s board of trustees by the nonprofit organization’s membership.

35. First Tennessee Eyes More Regional Business With Executive Promotions -

First Tennessee Bank has made a few changes to its Memphis-area leadership team that give new and expanded responsibilities to a pair of longtime bank executives.

36. Local Families Provide Loving, Temporary Homes for Children in Crisis -

“There’s no way I can do that. I’m not that kind of hero.” David Jordan often hears that response when he talks to people about the possibility of becoming a foster parent.

37. U of M Receives Grant From Urban Child Institute -

The Urban Child Institute has awarded the University of Memphis a $2 million grant to support the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Prevention Project.

Through the project, the U of M will build on relationships with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital to create a culture of health for vulnerable children in Memphis. The university and its partners will tackle issues such as child neglect and abuse, housing, asthma and breastfeeding.

38. U of M Receives Urban Childhood Institute Grant -

The Urban Child Institute has awarded the University of Memphis a $2 million grant to support the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Prevention Project.

Through the project, the U of M will build on relationships with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital to create a culture of health for vulnerable children in Memphis. The university and its partners will tackle issues such as child neglect and abuse, housing, asthma and breastfeeding.

39. Hardy Makes Art Accessible for Millennials -

Whitney Hardy is a woman on the move. The day we meet, she’s supervising 200 tons of soybeans as they make their way from hopper trucks onto train cars. Then she’s off to the premier of “Genesis,” a collection of new works presented by Collage Dance Collective.

40. Nonprofit Community Foundation Enjoys Record-Setting Year -

The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis announced record numbers for fiscal year 2016 at its annual meeting recently at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

During fiscal 2016, which closed at the end of April, $195.2 million in new gifts were given to the Community Foundation. The agency granted $143.4 million to nonprofits, compared to $114.2 million in fiscal year 2015. Of the grants coming out of the Community Foundation, 84 percent stay local.

41. Opera Memphis: If You Sing – Anywhere – They Will Listen -

For everything else opera might be, Ned Canty has made it his business to see opera as opportunity.

The general director for Opera Memphis, when Canty came to town five years ago the company was in decline.

42. Last Word: GMF Aftermath, Cop Counts and Budgets and Richardson Towers' Fall -

More on the move by Bank of New York to have a receiver appointed for the Warren and Tulane Apartments currently owned by Global Ministries Foundation.

GMF CEO Rev. Richard Hamlet responded Wednesday to the filing in Memphis federal court saying he agrees that a receiver for the property is a good idea. But he doesn’t agree – and in fact, strongly disagrees with the claims and reasoning behind the bank’s call for the receiver.

43. Fisher & Phillips Adds David Jones -

Attorney David S. Jones has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP as a partner in the firm’s Memphis office. Jones has more than 15 years’ experience in immigration and employment law, most recently serving as a partner at Jackson Lewis P.C. In his new role, he represents corporate clients in complex matters relating to both immigration benefits and enforcement, as well as export control compliance under the Export Administration Regulations and International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

44. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

45. Archimania Leads 2016 Architecture Awards -

Memphis architecture firm archimania was the biggest winner Saturday night at the 2016 AIA Memphis Design Awards, an annual bash that honors the city’s top architecture firms.

Also singled out for honors by the four members of the design awards jury - which this year was comprised of nationally recognized, award-winning architects from Raleigh, N.C. - were the firms designshop, Haizlip Studio and Self+Tucker Architects as part of a joint venture with archimania. There were 11 winners in all, and the honors were presented during the event at Clark Tower’s Tower Center by the awards’ jury chair Erin Sterling Lewis of Raleigh’s in situ studio.

46. Artspace Lofts Gets $25,000 State Boost -

The Tennessee Arts Commission has donated $25,000 to support the South Main Artspace Lofts.

The $17 million project will convert a South Main warehouse into 58 affordable apartments for working artists. Rents will range from $450 to $770, and artists will have access to studios and shared gallery space.

47. Memphis Health & Ed Board Can Resume Issuing Bonds -

The Memphis Health, Education and Housing Facility Board is back in business. In a letter sent Wednesday, April 20, Tennessee Housing and Development Agency executive director Ralph Perrey told the Health & Ed board that it may immediately resume issuing bonds.

48. State Lifts Memphis Health & Ed Board Bond Moratorium -

The Memphis Health, Education and Housing Facility Board is back in business.

In a letter sent Wednesday, April 20, Tennessee Housing and Development Agency executive director Ralph Perrey told the Health & Ed board that it may immediately resume issuing bonds.

49. FDA Campaign Takes Aim at Chewing Tobacco Use by Rural Teens -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government health officials will team up with minor league baseball as part of a new $36 million campaign to discourage rural teenagers from using chewing tobacco.

Baseball stadiums will feature the campaign's central message this summer – "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" – via advertising and promotions with players. Ads will also run on local television, radio and online in 35 markets across the U.S., including cities in Michigan, Montana, South Carolina and Tennessee.

50. Artspace Lofts Gets $25,000 State Boost -

The Tennessee Arts Commission has donated $25,000 to support the South Main Artspace Lofts.

The $17 million project will convert a South Main warehouse into 58 affordable apartments for working artists. Rents will range from $450 to $770, and artists will have access to studios and shared gallery space.

51. Shadyac Takes Over Soulsville Project With ‘Different Type of Model’ -

Tom Shadyac wants to pump $10 million into the heart of Soulsville. That’s the initial ask for his community center concept, One Family Memphis.

In September, the Hollywood filmmaker-turned-University of Memphis professor purchased for $1.9 million the bankrupt New Towne Center, a 77,000-square-foot community anchor that a local community development corporation tried to develop during the economic downturn.

52. Arts Grant Workshop To Be Held April 12 -

A free grant workshop for organizations seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community will be held Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St.

53. First Tennessee Launches $50M Community Fund -

First Tennessee has launched a $50 million Community Development Fund that the bank says will award up to $3 million annually in grants to community and nonprofit organizations serving low- to moderate-income people and neighborhoods.

54. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

55. United Housing Gets $1.1M Boost From Banks -

United Housing Inc. has gotten a boost from area financial institutions in recent days to the tune of $1.1 million.

56. Daughter of Duality, Gibbs is Building a Better Justice System -

Say you stole a television worth $300. How long should you be punished? A year? Five years? Whatever you answered, it probably wasn’t “for the rest of your life.” But that’s how the U.S. legal system currently treats many people who have been convicted of felonies.

57. Arts Grant Workshop To Be Held April 12 -

A free grant workshop for organizations seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community will be held Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St.

58. First Tennessee Launches $50M Community Development Fund -

First Tennessee has launched a $50 million Community Development Fund that the bank says will award up to $3 million annually in grants to community and nonprofit organizations serving low- to moderate-income people and neighborhoods.

59. Former Tenn. Senate Majority Leader Crutchfield Dead At 87 -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – Ward Crutchfield, a former Tennessee Senate Majority leader who served in the General Assembly for 31 years before he was convicted of bribery, has died.

His wife Joan "Bunny" Crutchfield said her husband died Sunday at a Chattanooga hospital. He was 87.

60. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

61. Tennessee Comptroller Investigates 2 Food Program Agencies -

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Comptroller's Office is questioning the spending of one agency and the reimbursements claimed by another that participate in food programs to feed low-income children.

62. Crocker Repairing Urban Child Institute’s Reputation, Reviving Mission -

As a vice president for Bank of America, Jill Crocker has witnessed the upheaval that can occur when one financial institution takes over another.

63. Proponents of Insure TN Enlist Billboards in Fight -

An effort to put pressure on the Tennessee General Assembly to consider Insure Tennessee has made its way to billboards across the state, including three in Shelby County.

The billboards are meant to pressure Tennessee Speaker Beth Harwell, R-Nashville, to use her “political clout” to send Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal through the House.

64. Bills To Freeze Tuition At Colleges, Universities Defeated -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Bills that would have frozen tuition rates at Tennessee's public colleges and universities have been defeated.

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, R-Blountville, said at the beginning of the session Wednesday that he was in favor of the idea. The University of Tennessee in particular was a vocal opponent, complaining that steep tuition hikes were the result of dramatic decreases in state funding and increasing education costs.

65. Tuition Freeze Bill Dies In Subcommittee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would have frozen tuition rates at Tennessee's public colleges and universities appears to be dead after failing to make it through a House subcommittee.

66. ‘Spotlight’ Defends Open Access to Public Records -

There’s a great scene about public records in the movie “Spotlight,” which is based on the true story of The Boston Globe’s investigative reporting of child sex abuse by Catholic priests.

67. Healthy Tennessee Fair Slated for Saturday -

The nonprofit Healthy Tennessee is holding its first health fair in Memphis Saturday, March 12, from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m. at Raleigh Assembly of God, 3683 Austin Peay Highway.

The statewide group focused on health training and preventive care is providing medical tests and screenings as well as broader medical advice aimed to keeping chronic conditions under control, said Dr. Manny Sethi, the founder of the four-year-old organization and a Nashville surgeon.

68. Healthy Tennessee Fair Slated For Saturday -

The nonprofit Healthy Tennessee is holding its first health fair in Memphis Saturday, March 12, from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m. at Raleigh Assembly of God, 3683 Austin Peay Highway.

The statewide group focused on health training and preventive care is providing medical tests and screenings as well as broader medical advice aimed to keeping chronic conditions under control, said Dr. Manny Sethi, the founder of the four-year-old organization and a Nashville surgeon.

69. First Tennessee Continues Strong Giving Efforts in 2015 -

2015 was another banner year for First Tennessee's volunteer efforts.

In addition to hundreds of employees volunteering thousands of service hours to area nonprofit organizations, the First Tennessee Foundation donated almost $6 million to nonprofits in the bank’s communities.

70. The Week Ahead: February 29, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? We know what you’ll be doing Tuesday (voting, of course!), but plenty of nonpolitical happenings grace this week’s calendar too – from a trio of Grizzlies games to a fundraiser supporting fair housing.

71. First Tennessee Continued Strong Giving Efforts in 2015 -

2015 was another banner year for First Tennessee’s volunteer efforts.

In addition to hundreds of employees volunteering thousands of service hours to area nonprofit organizations, the First Tennessee Foundation donated almost $6 million to nonprofits in the bank’s communities.

72. West Cancer Center Arms Up in Fight Against Brain Cancer -

West Cancer Center has a new tool in its arsenal with which to treat brain cancer and to, in the cancer treatment center’s description, “significantly” extend the rate of patient survival.

73. ArtsMemphis Joins National Economic Impact Study -

As one of Tennessee’s leading arts organizations, ArtsMemphis will participate in a national study designed to reveal how nonprofit and cultural organizations impact the local economy.

In partnership with the Tennessee Arts Commission and Americans for the Arts, ArtsMemphis will spearhead the local effort to collect data from nonprofit arts and cultural organizations that will measure the impact of arts and culture spending on local jobs, income paid to local residents and revenue generated to local and state governments.

74. Urban Treasure -

They were at the 2007 National Recreation and Park Association conference in Indianapolis and they had been dutifully attending the seminars and taking notes. But one day this two-woman contingent from Memphis and the newly formed Shelby Farms Park Conservancy skipped out of the afternoon workshops.

75. ArtsMemphis Joins National Economic Impact Study -

As one of Tennessee’s leading arts organizations, ArtsMemphis will participate in a national study designed to reveal how nonprofit and cultural organizations impact the local economy.

In partnership with the Tennessee Arts Commission and Americans for the Arts, ArtsMemphis will spearhead the local effort to collect data from nonprofit arts and cultural organizations that will measure the impact of arts and culture spending on local jobs, income paid to local residents and revenue generated to local and state governments.

76. United Housing Gets Grant from First Tennessee -

First Tennessee Bank has made a $5,000 grant to United Housing Inc. to support the nonprofit organization’s financial counseling programs.

77. New Superintendent Says ASD Not Monolithic -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District says critics of the district for the state’s lowest-performing schools don’t understand that the organization doesn’t operation conventionally.

78. United Housing Gets Grant from First Tennessee -

First Tennessee Bank has made a $5,000 grant to United Housing Inc. to support the nonprofit organization’s financial counseling programs.

79. The Week Ahead: Feb. 1, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? The good news is you officially made it through January. Here’s a look at what’s happening this week, from a frigid swim to a FedExForum double-header…

80. Highland Heights CDC Rehabs Five More Homes -

On his desk at Treadwell Middle School, Jared Myers keeps a colorful map marked by green, red and blue shapes.

81. County Commission Forms OPEB Committee -

Shelby County Commissioners have created an ad hoc committee to talk over the health insurance benefits liability of the former Memphis City Schools system and who is responsible for it.

Commission chairman Terry Roland announced Monday, Jan. 25, he had formed the committee, which includes leaders of the Shelby County Schools system and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration.

82. Hospital Group Takes Longer Approach to Insure Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Hospital Association, a key supporter of Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's unsuccessful effort to expand Medicaid in the state, is planning a new push to pass the measure once this year's presidential election is over.

83. Blight Authority of Memphis Convenes to Tackle Problem Properties -

“This is historic,” attorney Steve Barlow said at the inaugural meeting of the Blight Authority of Memphis, held Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Downtown Memphis Commission’s office.

84. Walmart Foundation Seeks Tennessee Grant Applicants -

The Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program is now accepting applications from Tennessee nonprofits with programs that focus on hunger relief, healthy eating or career opportunities. Grants through the program begin at $25,000 and can go up to $200,000.

85. Walmart Foundation Seeks Tennessee Grant Applicants -

The Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program is now accepting applications from Tennessee nonprofits with programs that focus on hunger relief, healthy eating or career opportunities. Grants through the program begin at $25,000 and can go up to $200,000.

86. New UCI Board Chair Pledges More Grants, Transparency -

Jill Crocker, new board chairman of The Urban Child Institute, says the organization is essentially starting with a clean slate.

87. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

88. St. Louis Cardinals Manager To Speak in Jackson, Tenn. -

Mike Matheny, manager of the St. Louis Cardinals, will speak at a fundraiser for Special Needs Athletics at 7 p.m., Friday, Jan. 8, at the Carl Perkins Civic Center in Jackson, Tenn.

89. The Week Ahead: Jan. 4, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? 2016 has kicked off with a full calendar – from an Elvis birthday celebration to a haunted pub crawl. So whether you’re still making your New Year’s resolutions or already have broken a few, here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about...

90. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

91. WGU Tennessee Awarding $100,000 in Scholarships -

WGU Tennessee is awarding 10 Tennesseans $10,000 scholarships as the state-endorsed nonprofit university celebrates its 2015 successes, including a 50 percent growth in student enrollment.

The enrollment increase “says a lot about the renewed commitment to higher education in this state,” WGU Tennessee chancellor Kimberly K. Estep said in a statement.

92. Under Pressure -

The Urban Child Institute’s research produces data. That data provides guidance for making decisions about how to best help Memphis children age 3 and younger. And The Urban Child Institute’s assets, around $150 million in 2013, offer a means to that end.

93. WGU Tennessee Awarding $100,000 in Scholarships -

WGU Tennessee is awarding 10 Tennesseans $10,000 scholarships as the state-endorsed nonprofit university celebrates its 2015 successes, including a 50 percent growth in student enrollment.

The enrollment increase “says a lot about the renewed commitment to higher education in this state,” WGU Tennessee chancellor Kimberly K. Estep said in a statement.

94. United Housing Has $2M Economic Impact for 2015 -

In fiscal year 2015, affordable housing agency United Housing Inc. made a direct economic impact of more than $2 million in West Tennessee.

95. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

96. United Housing Has $2M Economic Impact for 2015 -

In fiscal year 2015, affordable housing agency United Housing Inc. made a direct economic impact of more than $2 million in West Tennessee.

97. State Urges Caution With Crowdfunding Efforts -

The Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance’s Consumer Affairs Division is warning Tennesseans about crowdfunding cons and charitable solicitation scams as they become increasingly prevalent during the holiday season.

98. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

99. State Urges Caution With Crowdfunding Efforts -

The Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance’s Consumer Affairs Division is warning Tennesseans about crowdfunding cons and charitable solicitation scams as they become increasingly prevalent during the holiday season.

100. Baptist Memorial Health Care Taps New Finance Chief -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. has tapped Bill Griffin to replace the organization’s current chief financial officer, Don Pounds, who’s retiring at year’s end.