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Editorial Results (free)

1. Blue Collar High School -

For all of the changes in public education Memphis has seen in the past six years, there is at least one more big one still on the way.

And it is coming from the city’s post-recession economic development effort.

2. Public School System in Shelby County Continues Evolution -

The new school year that begins Aug. 8 is four academic years since the start of the state-run Achievement School District, three academic years past the merger of public education in Shelby County and two years since the demerger into seven school systems.

3. Shelby County Seeing Low Early Voting Turnout -

At the end of the first full week of early voting in advance of the Aug. 4 election day, Shelby County Election Commission data shows Democratic and Republican primary turnout closely matched.

And overall, early voting turnout is much lower than it was for the same election cycle four years ago, but ahead of where it was eight years ago.

4. County Leaders Face New Budget Anxiety -

Shelby County commissioners meet in special session Wednesday, July 23, to cross the last “t” of the spring budget season some 27 days after the start of the new fiscal year.

That’s “t” for taxes.

5. Last Word: Return of the Balloon Note, SCS and Migrant Teens & Greensward Doubts -

One of the prime culprits in the housing bubble burst that played a role in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is back – the adjustable rate mortgage.

Numbers from Chandler Reports, the real estate information company that is part of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc, show the number of such loans has spiked in the first half of this year and are the highest they’ve been since 2008, the year after the bubble burst nationally.

6. State Moves TCAP, Shortens Testing Parts -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday, July 14, public schools across the state will have achievement tests for students in one assessment window at the end of the school year. And the tests for four subjects will be divided into shorter subparts.

7. State Moves TCAP, Shortens Testing Parts -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday, July 14, public schools across the state will have achievement tests for students in one assessment window at the end of the school year. And the tests for four subjects will be divided into shorter subparts.

8. McQueen Announces Single TCAP Testing Window At End of School Year -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday, July 14, public schools across the state will have achievement tests for students in one assessment window at the end of the school year. And the tests for four subjects will be divided into shorter subparts.

9. MSU’s Mullen Defends Simmons At Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – In another year and another circumstance, Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen might have spent all his time at SEC Media Days answering questions about having to replace Dak Prescott at quarterback.

10. Education Leaders Reboot TNReady Tests, Re-Examine Process -

The disastrous rollout of the new TNReady student achievement tests has gone from finding a new test vendor to a re-examination of the role such testing plays in public education.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Wednesday, July 6, the state has a letter of intent with the Minneapolis-based testing service Questar Assessment to develop and deliver both pen-and-paper and online student achievements tests starting in the school year that begins in August.

11. Questar Gets State Schools Testing Contract With On-Line Phase-In -

The Tennessee Department of Education intends to hire Questar Assessment of Minneapolis, to be the state’s new student achievement test vendor.

State education commission Candice McQueen announced the letter of intent Wednesday, July 6, which should be finalized by the state in a week’s time as a two-year contract at $30 million a year, with renewal options beyond that.

12. CDC Awards Tennessee Funds to Fight Zika Virus -

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded Tennessee $377,376 to support efforts to protect citizens from Zika virus infection and associated adverse health outcomes, including microcephaly and the other serious birth defects.

13. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

14. Long-Term Issues Push County Budget To Deadline -

It’s not the basics that are keeping Shelby County Commissioners from a majority vote on school funding in the new operating budget.

It is the broader questions and budget assumptions some commissioners want to change in the process.

15. Schools Funding Again Center Stage For County Commission -

Shelby County commissioners could wrap up most of the formalities Monday of their budget season.

But it will probably take a while.

The biggest issue of the season – school funding – appeared to be resolved with a compromise last week in committee sessions.

16. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

17. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

18. County Schools Funding Compromise to Be Tested -

Fragile is probably the best way to describe the compromise that emerged this week from county commissioners to fully fund the Shelby County Schools budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The plan that closes a $27.4 million gap between what the school system wants and what Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed in April had eight votes on the 13-member commission in Wednesday, June 15, committee sessions.

19. State Attorney General Says Changes in Judicial Selection Have Added Stability -

Of the state’s 29 appellate court judges, 14 of them have been appointed during the tenure of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

And this year, two of them – Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Roger Page and Tennessee Appeals Court Judge Ross Dyer – became the first appellate court appointees to be confirmed by the Tennessee Legislature.

20. Parking Was Key in ServiceMaster Deal -

Parking concerns for ServiceMaster Global Holdings’ move to Downtown Memphis have been resolved.

On June 14, the Downtown Parking Authority granted ServiceMaster access to the parking garage at 250 Peabody Place.

21. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

22. Carver High Closing Likely Not Last -

Over the last 30 years, there have been proposals to close Carver High School. The nearly 60-year-old South Memphis high school survived them all until last week when Shelby County Schools board members voted to close it effective immediately.

23. Show Time -

For the first time in years, the Peabody Place mall was packed. On June 3, hundreds of ServiceMaster employees and a handful of business and government leaders ushered in One ServiceMaster Center, a multimillion-dollar headquarters for Memphis’ fourth-largest public company.

24. More Travelers Sign Up for Airport Programs, Only to Wait -

NEW YORK (AP) – A growing number of travelers are signing up for the government's expedited airport screening programs, only to face another wait.

After angry fliers missed flights this spring because of lengthy security lines, government officials promoted the PreCheck and Global Entry systems. The number of applicants for PreCheck more than tripled in a few months, climbing to 16,000 a day in May.

25. Streetcars En Vogue, But Study Urges Use Beyond Tourists -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – As Oklahoma City prepares to break ground on its first streetcar line in seven decades, and as other cities adjust to having them again, authors of a federally backed study suggest their routes move people with a purpose – not just target the tourist trade.

26. ServiceMaster Disrupting Its Culture With Move Downtown -

ServiceMaster is converting Peabody Place into a corporate headquarters that would rival a Silicon Valley tech outfit.

On Friday, June 3, ServiceMaster laid to rest months of speculation about whether the company would relocate to a larger city like Atlanta or Dallas. Memphis’ available Class A office space can’t currently accommodate ServiceMaster’s needs, so it looked to the retail sector for its new home.

27. Editorial: Empowerment, Competition and Urgency -

The empowerment zone taking shape in six Whitehaven-area schools starting over the summer break may not work for every set of schools trying to improve.

In six years of historic change for public education in Shelby County, we’ve hopefully learned that no single, specific solution will work for every group of students.

28. ‘Critical Mass’ -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson calls it “a brave new world” after four years of unprecedented changes: the merger and demerger of the county’s public schools systems, the rise of charter schools, the formation of both the state-run Achievement School District and locally run Innovation Zone model, and declining SCS enrollment.

29. Last Word: South Main and Main, More Wheel Tax Mileage and City Hall Shark Tank -

When we talk about South Main these days and all that is happening in that area, we aren’t talking about Main Street Memphis further south of that, even though it’s the same road.

30. Snapshot: How Memphis-Based Public Companies are Faring -

Acquisitions have been a common theme among many Memphis-based public companies the past few quarters. Here is a roundup of those transactions and other business highlights from each of the companies.

31. Shelby County Schools Wraps Up a Calmer, But Still Eventful, Year -

Given the last six years of historic change in public education locally, you could be forgiven if you thought of Friday’s half day of classes for Shelby County Schools as the end of an idyllic school year.

32. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

33. ASD's Raleigh Offer Makes School Board Skeptical -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools in a possible change of plans by the ASD for its takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

34. ASD Offers To Collaborate On I-Zone School In Raleigh -

The state-run Achievement School District is offering to collaborate with Shelby County Schools on the ASD’s planned takeover of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School in August.

SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members at a Tuesday, May 24, work session that ASD leaders approached him recently about the middle school becoming an Innovation Zone School instead of an ASD school run by the Scholar Academies charter organization.

35. U of M Study Abroad Adviser Awarded Fulbright Grant -

Jonathan Holland, Study Abroad adviser for the University of Memphis, has been awarded a Fulbright grant to participate in the International Education Administrators’ 2016 Seminar in Japan. Holland is a two-time Fulbright recipient; he taught English and American studies in Ukraine during the 2010-2011 academic year through the Fulbright program.

36. New Daisy Planning 74th Birthday Bash -

The New Daisy Theatre is celebrating its 74th birthday in a few weeks and is inviting the public to celebrate it with George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic.

37. Pearson Education to Score Tenn. Achievement Tests -

After terminating its contract with Measurement Inc. in April, the Tennessee Department of Education has hired Pearson Education of New York City to score student assessments for the 2015-16 academic year, state Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Monday, May 16.

38. City Sells Old Police Building to NCE Realty -

The company that had the only bid Tuesday, May 17, on the old Central Police Building at 128 Adams Avenue still has to close on the deal with the city of Memphis.

39. Council Sells Former Police HQ for $2 Million -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 17, the sale of the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. for $2 million to NCE Realty and Capital Group LLC for development as a boutique hotel.

40. Council Sells Former Police HQ for $2 Million -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 17, the sale of the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. for $2 million to NCE Realty and Capital Group LLC for development as a boutique hotel.

41. U of M Study Abroad Adviser Awarded Fulbright Grant -

Jonathan Holland, Study Abroad adviser for the University of Memphis, has been awarded a Fulbright grant to participate in the International Education Administrators’ 2016 Seminar in Japan. Holland is a two-time Fulbright recipient; he taught English and American studies in Ukraine during the 2010-2011 academic year through the Fulbright program.

42. PFM Group Promotes Lowe To Managing Director -

Lauren Lowe has been promoted to managing director of The PFM Group, a leading provider of independent financial and investment advisory services to state and local governments and not-for-profit institutions. Based in PFM’s Memphis office, Lowe serves the firm’s municipal advisory clients. Her areas of expertise include debt transactions and structuring, strategic planning, pricing and cash flow analysis as well as advising many of her local government clients on policy development.

43. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

44. Ag-Focused Startup Accelerator Launching Cohort -

The community of startup founders launching companies in Memphis keeps getting bigger.

AgLaunch Accelerator, which will incubate six agriculture and food innovation startups in the city, is launching a new cohort in August. The program is a collaboration among the Memphis Bioworks Foundation’s Ag Innovation Development Group, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, EPIcenter, Start Co. and a variety of other partner organizations.

45. New Daisy Planning 74th Birthday Bash -

The New Daisy Theatre is celebrating its 74th birthday in a few weeks and is inviting the public to celebrate it with George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic.

46. Pearson Education to Score Tenn. Achievement Tests -

After terminating its contract with Measurement Inc. in April, the Tennessee Department of Education has hired Pearson Education of New York City to score student assessments for the 2015-16 academic year, state Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Monday, May 16.

47. Council Auctions Old Police Building -

The city holds a rare auction at the Tuesday, May 17, session of the Memphis City Council, selling the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. to the highest bidder.

48. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

49. Shelby County Schools Board Eyes Wheel Tax to Bridge Budget Gap -

Shelby County Schools board members are looking at the county wheel tax to bridge some, but not all of the $27 million gap in their still tentative budget for the new fiscal year.

The specific solution they are looking at is the half of the $32 million in annual revenue from the wheel tax that Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has proposed go instead to capital projects across all seven public school systems in Shelby County. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

50. Last Word: Humdingers, Gangster Disciples Paper Work and Underground Day -

Sometimes you think you know what is going on and then something happens like Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies, grabbing a bite to eat Monday at Humdingers out east with former Grizz coach Lionel Hollins. Next thing you know there’s another possibility for the next Grizz coach – a return engagement that would be exceedingly rare.

51. Resurrection Health Merges With Larger System -

Resurrection Health, a faith-based, evangelical health service organization that’s opened a handful of Memphis-area clinics since launching in December 2014, has merged with a larger health system.

52. Tennessee Campus Carry Becomes Law Without Haslam Signature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill allowing staff and faculty at Tennessee's public colleges and universities to be armed on campus became law Monday without the Republican governor's signature.

53. Fisher & Phillips Adds David Jones -

Attorney David S. Jones has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP as a partner in the firm’s Memphis office. Jones has more than 15 years’ experience in immigration and employment law, most recently serving as a partner at Jackson Lewis P.C. In his new role, he represents corporate clients in complex matters relating to both immigration benefits and enforcement, as well as export control compliance under the Export Administration Regulations and International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

54. TNReady Contract Cancellation Deepens Complexity -

When Measurement Inc. told state officials earlier this week that the company couldn’t get several million paper versions of its online student achievement tests shipped, the state went to Memphis-based FedEx to work around shipping limits.

55. Memphis Banking Market Finding Renewed Equilibrium -

It took about 10 minutes for First Tennessee Bank’s parent company to wrap up its annual meeting of shareholders this week.

56. A Look at the Winning And Losing Legislation in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — As the Tennessee General Assembly worked to adjourn for the year on Friday, a look at some of the winning and losing legislation from this year's session.

WINNERS:

57. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

58. City Budget Season Begins With the Basics -

The Memphis City Council Budget Committee begins its work next week with afternoon sessions that lead to a goal of a June 7 council vote on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s first budget proposal.

59. Strickland Defines 'Brilliant at the Basics' $667M Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took a $667 million operating budget proposal to Memphis City Council members Tuesday, April 19, that keeps the property rate stable at $3.40.

60. Legislature Passes Online Voter Registration Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The General Assembly passed legislation Tuesday that would allow Tennesseans to register to vote online.

The House unanimously passed a bill that the Senate had earlier approved. The measure allows Tennesseans to go online to register to vote or update their registration records. Applicants would be directed to apply on paper if their name, date of birth or other identifying information could not be confirmed with the Department of Safety.

61. Dyer Confirmed to State Court of Criminal Appeals -

Shelby County Attorney Ross Dyer became a state appellate court judge Monday, April 18, as members of both chambers of the Tennessee Legislature met in a joint session to confirm Dyer’s appointment as a judge on the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals.

62. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

63. It’s April – How is Your Year-End Fundraising? -

Have you considered “front loading” your year-end fundraising? Start now. Plan now. Put your systems in place. Mark your calendar. Build your team. Identify your prospective donors. You may think we’re joking, but we’re not.

64. Simon Upgrades Lighting In Wolfchase Parking Lot -

Wolfchase Galleria's owner is upgrading the mall's current parking lot lighting.

The Simon property group said the enhancements began in March and will impact all parking lots at the mall. The traditional 1000-watt halide lights in each parking lot will be replaced with state-of-the-art LED lights to help facilitate the management of traffic and parking.

65. Simon Upgrades Lighting In Wolfchase Parking Lot -

Wolfchase Galleria’s owner is upgrading the mall’s current parking lot lighting.

The Simon property group said the enhancements began in March and will impact all parking lots at the mall. The traditional 1000-watt halide lights in each parking lot will be replaced with state-of-the-art LED lights to help facilitate the management of traffic and parking.

66. Gaskins Leads Engineering Office -

Wain Gaskins has joined consulting engineering firm Cannon & Cannon Inc. as manager of the company’s new Memphis office as well as director of West Tennessee operations and business development. 

67. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

68. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

69. Federal Officials Monitoring Sewage Spill in Memphis’ Cypress Creek -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A broken sewage line is dumping up to 50 million gallons of untreated wastewater per day into a Mississippi River tributary in Tennessee, and federal environmental officials said Friday they are monitoring the situation.

70. Federal Officials Monitoring Sewage Spill in Memphis’ Cypress Creek -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A broken sewage line is dumping up to 50 million gallons of untreated wastewater per day into a Mississippi River tributary in Tennessee, and federal environmental officials said Friday they are monitoring the situation.

71. Federal Officials, Advocates Push Pill-Tracking Databases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's top health officials are stepping up calls to require doctors to log in to pill-tracking databases before prescribing painkillers and other high-risk drugs.

72. Tigers Sports Notebook: Woodson to Transfer, Football Team Works Out in Pads -

As is often the case these days, news of a player’s intention to transfer was delivered by the player himself via social media. So it was that Avery Woodson informed all, through a post on Twitter, that he would be leaving the University of Memphis basketball program.

73. Commission Takes Second Vote on Term Limits Referendum -

Shelby County Commissioners take up the second of three readings Monday, March 28, of an ordinance that would ask voters to do away with term limits for the commission, the office of Shelby County Mayor and five other countywide elected positions.

74. Alzheimer’s Association Exec Seeks Congressional Support -

Alzheimer’s families in Tennessee have a champion in Washington, D.C.! I would like to thank Congressman Steve Cohen for co-sponsoring the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act. This move shows true understanding that Alzheimer’s is an unavoidable reality for families, as well as a budget-breaker for state and federal governments.

75. Graduate Memphis Putting College Degrees Within Reach for More Adults -

Imagine a company coming to Memphis promising to add $140 million annually into the local payroll. This company was not asking for tax breaks or free rent, just the opportunity to come to Shelby County and pump this money into our economy and pay taxes.

76. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

77. Area Colleges Ramp Up Security in a World of Growing Violence -

Five years ago, a police officer with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center shot and killed a man. The man, who had just pulled out a gun at Regional One Health, was making his way down Dunlap Street to the UTHSC campus.

78. Dyer Farmer John Butler to Lead Agricenter -

John R. Butler has been selected as the new president of Agricenter International, officially beginning his position on July 1 of this year. Butler, a fifth-generation farmer who also held various management roles at Cargill, Inc., will succeed retiring president John Charles Wilson.

79. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

80. CDC Guidelines Aim to Curb Painkiller Prescribing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin.

81. Robotics Expert: Self-Driving Cars Not Ready for Deployment -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A robotics expert is warning against a rush toward widespread deployment of self-driving cars, saying they are "absolutely not" ready.

The director of Duke University's robotics program, Missy Cummings, told the Senate's commerce committee the cars aren't yet able to handle driving in bad weather, including standing water, drizzling rain, sudden downpours and snow. She says they certainly aren't equipped to follow a policeman's directions.

82. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

83. Keeping Customer Service up to PAR: Plan, Act, Review -

Delivering quality service is vital to ensuring repeat business from loyal customers. Customer service is fluid, changing not only from industry to industry but also from business to business within each industry. However, whether you’re a restaurant manager or hardware store operator, or you work in the industrial sector, some things never change when it comes to quality service. 

84. Automation Plus Computer Services Takes Pride in South Memphis Roots -

When it comes to computers, Luster Williams is an old pro. He started in computers 42 years ago while in the U.S. Air Force. He spent six years as a trouble shooter for NATO and another three years tracking satellites for NASA.

85. Up, Up and Away -

The modern-day drone is both a high-tech military tool and a safer way to play humanitarian and deliver medicine and supplies to the suffering people of war-torn Syria.

The drone is everything from a stalking device to track poachers creeping through the South African bush hunting rhinos to the impetus for a potential commercial growth industry right here in Memphis.

86. Haslam Unveils Outsourcing Details Amid Capitol Protests -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is unveiling its "business justification" for a proposal to outsource building maintenance at state colleges and universities.

87. State Systems Acquires Columbia Fire Equipment -

Memphis-based State Systems Inc. has acquired Columbia Fire Equipment, a fire safety company that provides extinguishers, alarms and suppression systems in Columbia, Tenn. It is the third acquisition for State Systems in less than a year.

88. State Systems Acquires Columbia Fire Equipment -

Memphis-based State Systems Inc. has acquired Columbia Fire Equipment, a fire safety company that provides extinguishers, alarms and suppression systems in Columbia, Tenn. It is the third acquisition for State Systems in less than a year.

89. Parent Leaders are the ‘Voice’ for Their Children and the Community -

Parents take on many different roles in the lives of their children: cheerleader, counselor, teacher, friend, and so many more. A role we don't hear about as often though is advocate. What exactly does that mean?

90. Thanks, But Go Save Someone Else -

COMING TO SAVE US IS STARVING US. We recently dodged the state Legislature’s latest effort to save us from ourselves, reaching into Shelby County to raise our poor and pitiful children from the depths of despair – Shelby County Schools.

91. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

92. Big Tech Companies Join Apple in Its Encryption Fight -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry is starting to line up with Apple in its fight against the federal government over the encryption it uses to keep iPhones secure.

Earlier this week, a U.S. magistrate ordered Apple to help investigators break into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino mass shooters. Apple was given until Tuesday to challenge that ruling, but a person familiar with the case says Apple has been granted an extension until next Friday.

93. Haslam, Colleges Agree to Outside Review of Outsourcing Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's administration announced Wednesday that it has agreed with higher education leaders to have an outside group review the Republican's privatization plan for building maintenance at Tennessee's public colleges and universities.

94. McQueen Defends TNReady Tests Following Delays -

When school systems across the state began logging onto the state of Tennessee’s site for the first wave of TNReady math and language arts achievement tests Monday, Feb. 8, the network that connected all of those local servers was “saturated” doing other things, according to state education officials.

95. New Superintendent Says ASD Not Monolithic -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District says critics of the district for the state’s lowest-performing schools don’t understand that the organization doesn’t operation conventionally.

96. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

97. Q&A: U of M’s Dan Pallme Points to Shipping Changes, Challenges in 2016 -

Dan Pallme is heavily involved in the University of Memphis’ logistics industry departments. He runs the Freight Transportation Leadership Academy, a program that consists of technical tours, sessions with industry experts, and overviews of historic and current trends to encourage leadership in Memphis’ primary modes: rail, river, road and runway.
He is also the senior associate director and freight industry liaison for the U of M’s Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute and the private-sector coordinator for the Southeast Transportation Workforce Center. He has worked with air, rail and trucking companies over the past 25 years.

98. SCS Board Authorizes More Discussions On Crosstown High -

Shelby County Schools board members have authorized superintendent Dorsey Hopson to continue discussions about a Crosstown High School.

The board approved a resolution Tuesday, Jan. 26, that also sets some parameters for the talks with the developers of Crosstown Concourse and Christian Brothers University about the collaboration.

99. The Week Ahead: Jan. 25, 2016 -

We hope everyone survived Snow Terror ‘16 and is looking forward to a fun, productive week ahead that’s free of milk and bread runs. (Saturday’s high temp is 60 degrees – woohoo!) Here’s your weekly rundown of events and happenings worth paying attention to…

100. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.