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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Mike McLean's Campaign, Jimmy Carter and Beyond Disparity Studies -

Mike McLean is running one heckuva campaign for Clerk of the Courts. Some of you are thinking, “Why haven’t I heard of that position before?” “Who is the incumbent?”

2. Arkansas Court Asked to Block Measure on Medical Lawsuits -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A group opposed to a ballot proposal that would place limits on damages in medical lawsuits is asking Arkansas' highest court to block voting on the proposed constitutional amendment in November.

3. Study Leads to Broader Call for Business Ties -

Rodney Strong, CEO of the Atlanta law and public policy firm Griffin and Strong that authored city government’s latest disparity study on minority contracting, didn’t come to talk about the study last week when he spoke to a room of 40 African-American civic and business leaders.

4. State Bonds Sell For Record Low Interest Rate -

The state of Tennessee has completed the sale of approximately $366 million of general obligation bonds for the lowest interest ever negotiated in the state’s history, according to the Comptroller’s Office.

5. US Wants to Force Lower Speeds on Truck and Bus Drivers -

DETROIT (AP) — The U.S. is seeking to forcibly limit how fast trucks, buses and other large vehicles can travel on the nation's highways.

A new proposal Friday would impose a nationwide limit by electronically capping speeds with a device on newly made U.S. vehicles that weigh more than 26,000 pounds. Regulators are considering a cap of 60, 65 or 68 mph, though that could change. Whatever the speed limit, drivers would be physically prevented from exceeding it. The proposal does not force older heavy vehicles to add the speed-limiting technology, but regulators are still considering it.

6. The Week Ahead: August 29-September 4 -

Are you ready for some football, Memphis? The Tiger Blue faithful will welcome new coach Mike Norvell and new starting quarterback Riley Ferguson Saturday at the Liberty Bowl. Several other late-summer events precede the big gridiron season opener, including a concert fundraiser that starts Friday and a big 5K race on Labor Day. OK, that’s next Monday – so it’s a long week – better get those seersucker suits ready.      

7. The World at your Doorstep -

There is nothing you can’t get delivered these days. If you can imagine owning it, it’s only a matter of time before it can be in your possession, brought to your front door within minutes, hours or days from the first moment you even conjured the thought of having it.

8. Bursting the Bubble -

Graceland is in Memphis. But the two have tended to coexist, rather than being part of each other, since Elvis Presley’s home opened as a commercial enterprise in 1982.

That is starting to change as a $137 million expansion of Graceland – a $92 million hotel resort opening in October and a $45 million, 200,000-square-foot entertainment complex west of the mansion to open in the spring of 2017 – begins to overlap with a renewed emphasis on Whitehaven as the home of many of the city’s middle class.

9. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

10. Graceland Holdings to Manage Prince’s Home, Paisley Park -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – Paisley Park, the private estate and studio complex of the late rock superstar Prince, will open for daily public tours starting Oct. 6, the trust company overseeing his estate announced Wednesday, and the company that runs Elvis Presley's Graceland will manage it.

11. State Bonds Sell For Record Low Interest Rate -

The state of Tennessee has completed the sale of approximately $366 million of general obligation bonds for the lowest interest ever negotiated in the state’s history, according to the Comptroller’s Office.

12. Morgan Tate Promoted At River City Land Co. -

Morgan Tate has been named principal property manager of River City Land Co.’s property management division. A fourth-generation real estate professional, Tate joined the team at River City Land Co. in 2008 and began working for the firm’s property management division in 2012. 

13. New Voting Machines on Shelby County's Political Horizon -

The end is near for the touch-screen voting machines Shelby County voters have been using for 18 years.

This November could be the last presidential general election for the Diebold machines.

14. The Week Ahead: August 22-28 -

This week, Habitat for Humanity gets a hand from some famous friends, the City Council talks marijuana, and TEDxMemphis returns with more "ideas worth sharing." And that's just a taste of what's in store in the week ahead...

15. Defining Transparency -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was finally ready to tell the public who he was appointing as Memphis’ next police director – the culmination of one of the most consequential decisions he’s faced so far during his more than seven months in office – the first word of that choice didn't come via a news outlet. Nor did the mayor call a press conference, at least not immediately.

16. Tennessee Athletic Director Dave Hart to Retire in June 2017 -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee athletic director Dave Hart will retire next summer after a tumultuous tenure that included consolidation of the men's and women's athletic departments, improvements in fundraising and facilities and the settlement of a Title IX lawsuit.

17. Cemetery Mess, Unidentified Bodies Stump Tennessee Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – More than two years after the state closed a troubled Tennessee cemetery whose owner was accused of losing bodies and burying multiple people in single plots, it appears that efforts to determine exactly who is buried where have failed.

18. ASD Financial Control Shifts to Nashville -

A performance audit report on the Achievement School District by Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson released this week is critical of the financial controls in place at the state-run school system for the lowest-performing schools in the state.

19. Last Word: Malco in South Main, Suburban Deadline and Chiwawa -

The Malco movie theater in South Main is to begin construction in September, the latest piece of the Central Station development where construction of apartment units on the Front Street side of the property has been underway for some time.

20. Westminster Names Sparks Head of Upper School -

Amanda Sparks has joined Westminster Academy as the head of upper school for the 2016-17 school year. Sparks, who previously was principal of Haw River Christian Academy in Pittsboro, N.C., will lead the upper school faculty and staff in providing classical academics and a Christian culture for grades 7-12.

21. Last Word: School Is In, It's Rallings and Looking At Our Reflection -

The school year begins Monday across Shelby County – for students.

Teachers have been back for the last two weeks in one way or another preparing for the year. School administrators longer than that including some new principals at several schools.

22. Memphis Property Hub Using Micro-Level Data to Drive Solutions -

The effects of blight, like boarded-up windows and overgrown lawns, are clear to see. While the methods used to track blight are less apparent, an effort is underway to streamline property data so that government agencies and community development groups can tailor solutions at a neighborhood level.

23. Game-Changer -

So as it turns out, the FedEx St. Jude Classic in June was a missed opportunity. No one in the gallery shouted, “University of Memphis – Big 12!” The tournament’s “Hush Y’all” signs were obeyed and to no good end.

24. Events -

Another Broken Egg will celebrate its new location at 65 S. Highland St. with pre-opening charity events Friday, Aug. 5, and Saturday, Aug. 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. All proceeds from Friday’s event will go to Ronald McDonald House Charities-Memphis, and Saturday’s proceeds will go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Reservations are required and can be made for up to four guests at newatabe.com.

25. Do Titans Finally Have Their Offensive Line? -

New Tennessee Titans coach Mike Mularkey’s stated desire to play “exotic smashmouth” football – especially on offense – requires a good offensive line. But if there’s one thing the Titans have not had in recent years it’s a good offensive line.

26. Live-Streamed Eye Surgeries Benefit Memphis Optometry Students -

Eye Specialty Group (ESG) is teaming up with Southern College of Optometry (SCO) to provide another way of educating the area’s young doctors, helping them to better understand the latest surgery techniques. Late last week, three Lasik eye surgeries took place at the ESG Collierville medical offices and were live-streamed to students at SCO in the Medical District, marking the first of what is hoped will be many live-streamed collaborations.

27. Last Word: The One Before November, Defining The Outsider and Stock Exchange -

Election Day arrives in Shelby County.

And this election cycle, in the shadow of the November Presidential general election, has turned out to be pretty interesting.

28. Events -

Metal Museum will host its Pokemon Go-themed Whet Thursday on Aug. 4 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can enjoy free museum admission, food, live music and a hands-on activity while catching all the Pokemon they can find. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

29. Lawmaker Jailed in Campaign Sign Theft Bailed Out by Victim -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee political candidate didn't want his rival to be behind bars when the two square off at the polls – even if the jailed lawmaker is accused of taking his campaign signs.

30. Les Passees ‘Stock Exchange’ Enters 30th Year -

During World War I, members of Les Passees Inc. made bandages and did knitting for soldiers. Today the oldest women’s volunteer organization in Memphis is about to celebrate the 30th year of its “Stock Exchange” upscale consignment shop.

31. Last Word: Curry Todd, Crosstown Brewing and Cursive Comeback -

A word at the top of Last Word about campaign signs and what happens to some of them during a campaign.

There are a couple of sayings – bits of political wisdom by the judgment of some – that are uttered numerous times during every election season.

32. State Rep. Curry Todd Arrested on Theft Charge -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Authorities say state Rep. Curry Todd has been arrested on a theft charge after he failed to respond to requests to be interviewed by sheriff's officials about accusations that he stole a rival's campaign signs.

33. Events -

Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be at the Millington Public Library on Wednesday, Aug. 3, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at 4858 Navy Road. Career Coach staff will help people create resumes and register with jobs4tn.gov, where more than 200,000 jobs are available.

34. Willmarth to Lead Facilities Management at Trezevant -

Brian Willmarth has joined Trezevant as director of environmental operations. In that role, he oversees maintenance, housekeeping and plant operations at the continuing care retirement community. He also oversees Trezevant’s construction and renovation projects. 

35. Last Word: Using the ACT, Murmuration and We Grow -

The superintendents of the Bartlett and Germantown school systems say they have a remedy to the testing complaints state education officials are grappling with.

David Stephens and Jason Manuel, of Bartlett and Germantown respectively, tell us on WKNO's Behind The Headlines that they support using the college ACT test for high school students in place of the end-of-course exams.

36. First of 3 Old Forest Gateways in Place at Overton Park -

It was about two years ago that Yvonne Bobo began the creative process that brought her last week to Overton Park with a welding rig in the worst heat of the summer.

37. Municipal Districts Tout ACT for Testing -

The superintendents of at least two of Shelby County’s suburban school systems say the state should use the ACT college entrance exam to gauge the achievement levels of high school students.

“We have universities who are giving full-ride scholarships based on their ACT scores,” said Germantown Municipal School District superintendent Jason Manuel on the WKNO/Channel 10 program Behind The Headlines. “Let’s use that test. It has a math component. It has a science, a reading and social studies component. Let’s use that as a measure.”

38. Senator Seeks Reconvening of Congress Over Zika Virus -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the Zika virus in Florida (all Eastern times):

4 p.m.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson is asking Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to reconvene Congress so lawmakers can pass an emergency spending bill to fight the spread of the Zika virus.

39. The Week Ahead: August 1-7 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! It’s the first week of August and last week before the kids return to school, so try to enjoy it. Here are just a smattering of recreational outings planned this week at venues like the Metal Museum, Levitt Shell and on Broad Avenue, in addition to more official events on the agenda. And don’t forget to vote on Thursday; it’s your civic duty. 

40. Public School System in Shelby County Continues Evolution -

The new school year that begins Aug. 8 is four academic years since the start of the state-run Achievement School District, three academic years past the merger of public education in Shelby County and two years since the demerger into seven school systems.

41. Red State, Blue Mayors -

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, a Democrat in Tennessee’s sea of red, finds herself adapting to the control Republicans hold over the state Legislature.

42. Gannett to Restructure Commercial Appeal -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

43. Gannett Plans Restructure of Commercial Appeal Newsroom -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

44. County Leaders Face New Budget Anxiety -

Shelby County commissioners meet in special session Wednesday, July 23, to cross the last “t” of the spring budget season some 27 days after the start of the new fiscal year.

That’s “t” for taxes.

45. Last Word: Substation 68, Akbari's Convention Slot and Heartbreak Hotel -

Relief came on Sunday for Memphis Light Gas and Water customers in Arlington, Lakeland and a part of Bartlett who have been enduring the possibility of rolling blackouts and voluntary conservation measures in the worst heat of the summer for just shy of two weeks.

46. The Week Ahead: July 25-31 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! We’re wrapping up July with an eclectic mix of local happenings, from political campaigning to a celebration of all things Harry Potter. Plus, what you need to know about Tennessee sales tax holiday and much more…

47. Last Word: A Robust 2nd Quarter, Marshall and Union and the Code Crew -

Last Word is more like First Word because of a blink of the computer overnight at around 11 p.m. that left us able to create and report but not to post. But not to worry, we will resume our night owl habits Sunday into Monday after this brief reminder of the way things used to be when the deadline was when the presses stopped.

48. ‘Why Don’t We Start Our Own?’ -

The diner-style restaurant planned for 2657 Broad Ave. is a bit unique as far as commercial real estate projects go.

Yes, it’s of a piece with the rest of the groundswell of redevelopment and commercial activity that’s transformed Broad into a people-packed arts, retail and restaurant scene. One of those hotspots along the street is the combination coffee shop and retailer City & State, the owners of which have signed a lease at 2657 Broad for their next venture.

49. Will Mariota’s Second Season Resemble Luck or RG3? -

The Tennessee Titans’ offensive playbook has been rewritten. The verbiage for calling plays has been edited. The line has been revamped with three new starters.

Why? The team’s ownership and coaches desperately want to get the most out of quarterback prodigy Marcus Mariota.

50. Leadership Allowed Durham Sleaze To Fester for Too Long -

The Tennessee attorney general’s sexual harassment investigation of Republican Rep. Jeremy Durham dragged halfway through the summer. Now we know why.

51. Oklahoma City Districts Worth A Visit -

Sitting under an umbrella at a little pizza joint in the Paseo Arts District it’s hard to imagine I’m in Oklahoma City.

With a locally brewed F5 Ale in hand, the ultra-hoppy beer feels more Pacific Northwest than American Heartland. But the scorching heat and hints of Southwest architecture places me in Oklahoma.

52. Zoo and OPC Reach Compromise in Greensward Controversy -

The Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy reached agreement Monday, July 18, on a compromise to end the zoo’s overflow parking on the Greensward that fills in some of the blanks left in Mayor Jim Strickland’s proposal and changes some of the terms.

53. Boyle Expanding Schilling Farms Development -

Construction is nearing completion on several new projects at Schilling Farms on an 11-acre site at the corner of Schilling and Winchester boulevards.

A new 50,000-square-foot Class A office building opens at 255 Schilling Blvd. Half of the space is pre-leased to Helena Chemical Co. and the other 25,000 square feet of ground-floor space is available for office or retail uses.

54. How safe is our food? -

It’s not easy being a food inspector in Tennessee, dealing with an updated statewide food code to protect the public from foodborne illnesses and educating restaurateurs, many with their own ideas about their cuisine, on following the rules.

55. Too Big To Ignore: The SEC and Its Ever-Growing Football Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – The SEC football preseason always has been loud. More than 30 years ago, the noise came via the Skywriters Tour and the rattle and roar of a DC-3 propeller plane carrying rumpled, hardworking – and often hard-drinking – sports writers to the 10 Southeastern Conference campuses for essentially unfettered access to the league’s coaches and players.

56. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

57. Darrius Stewart Family Sues City, Police For $17 Million -

The family of Darrius Stewart, killed a year ago this month by Memphis Police Officer Conner Schilling, has filed a $17 million lawsuit against the city of Memphis, former Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong and Schilling.

58. Schism Among State Republicans Hits Critical Point With Resignation -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican Party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

59. Last Word: At The Gates of Graceland, Domestic Violence at SEC Days and October -

Black Lives Matter at Graceland on Tuesday – the latest chapter in a story arc that is moving fast.

60. Elkington Promoted At ABO Marketing -

Jamie Elkington has been promoted to director of communications at ABO Marketing & Communications. In this position, she will direct and implement public relations plans for the nonprofit and business organizations the firm serves.

61. Boyle Completes Office, Starts Multi-Family Expansion -

Construction is nearing completion on several new projects at Schilling Farms on an 11-acre site at the corner of Schilling and Winchester boulevards.

On Thursday, July 21, a new 50,000-square-foot Class A office building will open at 255 Schilling Blvd. Half of the space is pre-leased to Helena Chemical Co. and the other 25,000 square feet of ground-floor space is available for office or retail uses.

62. The Week Ahead: July 11-17 -

Time to get your week started, Memphis! Our look at the week ahead includes several chances to indulge your inner art patron – from hanging out with a local comic book artist to being on stage at the Orpheum – plus other need-to-know happenings you’ll want to check out…

63. Editorial: What Is and Isn't on Shelby County's August Ballot -

Elections are never just about the names on the ballot. Less-obvious factors always come into play, and when it comes to primary matchups – like many of the races on the August ballot – more decisions lie ahead in the general election.

64. Education Leaders Reboot TNReady Tests, Re-Examine Process -

The disastrous rollout of the new TNReady student achievement tests has gone from finding a new test vendor to a re-examination of the role such testing plays in public education.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Wednesday, July 6, the state has a letter of intent with the Minneapolis-based testing service Questar Assessment to develop and deliver both pen-and-paper and online student achievements tests starting in the school year that begins in August.

65. No Charges Recommended in Clinton Email Probe, FBI Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The FBI won't recommend criminal charges against Hillary Clinton for her use of a private email server while secretary of state, agency Director James Comey said Tuesday, lifting a major legal threat to her presidential campaign. But Comey called her actions "extremely careless" and faulted the agency she led for a lackadaisical approach to handling classified material.

66. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

67. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

68. TDOT Suspends Road Work Fourth of July Weekend -

There’s some good news for motorists who will be driving through the flyover of interstates 40 and 240 in Memphis this weekend.

The state Transportation Department is shutting down road construction projects for the busy Fourth of July holiday weekend.

69. The Week Ahead: July 4-10 -

Happy Fourth of July, Memphis! We hope you’re enjoying a long weekend – and if you do have to work today, we hope you’re able to sneak out early enough to watch some of the local fireworks displays tonight. Here are details on a few of them, plus other local happenings you need to know about this week…

70. Strickland Unveils Greensward Solution, Zoo Not Happy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has put forth his plan to end parking on the Overton Park Greensward.

71. Is Your Nonprofit Legit? -

Passion for mission is at the heart of a nonprofit, but don’t forget your “business” requirements. Nonprofits must comply with many of the same regulations as businesses, and additional ones that are specific to the sector. As an executive or board member you need to be aware of these, and operate within the law.

72. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

73. Events -

Riverfront Fireworks Spectacular will take place Monday, July 4, at Mud Island River Park, 125 N. Front St. The park opens at 3 p.m., live music and children’s activities begin at 6 p.m., and the fireworks display will launch from the southern tip of Mud Island at 9:15 p.m. Visit memphisriverfront.com.

74. Former Titan Dyson Finally Reaching His Goal -

When is it too late to go back to school and prepare for a new career? Most experts and older students who’ve returned to school at 30, 40, 50 – or even 60 and beyond – will tell you there’s really no limit as long as an older student is motivated and focused.

75. Events -

The second annual On Location: Memphis Shorts Festival will kick off with a screening of live-action shorts Tuesday, July 5, at 7 p.m. at Hard Rock Cafe, 126 Beale St. At the end, the audience will vote on their favorites, with the winner granted access to the OL:M International Film & Music Festival in August. Cost is free. Visit onlocationmemphis.org.

76. TDOT Suspends Road Work Fourth of July Weekend -

There’s some good news for motorists who will be driving through the flyover of interstates 40 and 240 in Memphis over the holiday weekend.

The state Transportation Department is shutting down road construction projects for the busy Fourth of July holiday weekend.

77. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

78. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

79. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

80. First State-Backed Blight Demolition Completed -

The first demolition sponsored by the state’s Blight Elimination Program took place June 22.

Memphis-based United Housing Inc. sent a wrecking crew to 1370 Mississippi Blvd. to demolish an abandoned home and make way for a green space.

81. Kicker Jake Elliott Earns All-America Third Team -

University of Memphis senior place-kicker Jake Elliott has been named to the Athlon Sports All-America Third Team.

Elliott returns to Memphis this fall after finishing last season as a finalist for the Lou Groza Collegiate Place-Kicker Award, and as the two-time, defending American Athletic Conference Special Teams Player of the Year.

82. Pop the Cork -

On Nov. 4, 2014, voters in six of Shelby County’s seven municipalities approved wine sales in food stores effective July 1, 2016. The next day, Josh Hammond, president of Buster’s Liquors & Wines, put the gears in motion to acquire the restaurant adjacent to his Highland Street spirits store.

83. Time Running Out to Save Aretha Franklin’s Birth Home From Demolition -

A local business owner has stepped up with $15,000 to save Aretha Franklin's birth home, but the effort may be too little too late.

The dilapidated house at 406 Lucy Ave. is headed for demolition unless a realistic and fully-funded plan emerges within the week, said Steve Barlow, an attorney with blight-fighting law firm Brewer & Barlow PLC.

84. Census: Asians Remain Fastest-Growing Racial Group in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Asians remain the fastest-growing racial group in the United States, according to new information from the Census Bureau.

The nation's Asian population grew at 3.4 percent between July 2014 and 2015, with migration responsible for the majority of the growth, government officials said Thursday. There are now 21 million Asians in the United States, with Hawaii as the nation's only majority Asian state.

85. Memphis Kicker Jake Elliott Earns All-America Third Team -

University of Memphis senior place-kicker Jake Elliott has been named to the Athlon Sports All-America Third Team.

Elliott returns to Memphis this fall after finishing last season as a finalist for the Lou Groza Collegiate Place-Kicker Award, and as the two-time, defending American Athletic Conference Special Teams Player of the Year.

86. Memphis’ ‘Rampage’ Jackson Fights On -

“I’m not a psychic, but I’m gonna predict I’m gonna whup his ass.” No, this was not LeBron James speaking of Draymond Green late in the NBA Finals – after feelings had been hurt with the B-word.

87. New For-Profit Medical Schools Springing Up Across US -

BOISE, Idaho (AP) – For-profit medical schools are starting to pop up around the country, promising to create new family doctors for underserved rural regions.

Rural states like Idaho need more general practitioners, with the baby boom generation aging and expanded insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act making health care more accessible. But critics of the new schools question whether companies can properly train the nation's next crop of doctors.

88. First Fed-Backed Blight Demolition Takes Place in South Memphis -

The first demolition sponsored by the state’s Blight Elimination Program took place Wednesday, June 22. Memphis-based United Housing Inc. sent a wrecking crew to 1370 Mississippi Blvd. to demolish an abandoned home and make way for a green space.

89. Last Word: Farewell Northside, Roland's Stand and Wayne Jackson -

Northside High School is no more. The Klondike-Smoky City institution graduated its last class last month.

The Shelby County Schools board had voted that same month to give the high school one more school year.

90. Airport Didn’t Help, But Didn’t Derail ServiceMaster -

When ServiceMaster began its search for a new corporate headquarters nearly two years ago, it focused on Southern hub cities that could support a growing tech-focused company. In ranking Memphis alongside other cities, Memphis International Airport came up short.

91. Regional One Health Continues Building Out New East Campus -

One of the first indications that Regional One Health’s 50,000-square-foot East Campus does things a little differently is the digital map near the nurse’s station with rooms lit up in different colors and names moving around the image.

92. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

93. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

94. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

95. Walker's Advice: ‘Don’t Let Go of the Dream’ -

To see the soul of founding principal Todd Walker’s architecture firm, you need only step into the offices of archimania, located – for now – in a low-slung former retail strip on South Main.

96. ServiceMaster Lands EDGE Incentive Package -

The final piece of ServiceMaster’s local incentive package fell into place Wednesday, June 15, at a Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine board meeting.

The residential- and commercial-services company, which plans to move its headquarters into the former Peabody Place mall in Downtown Memphis, received a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive to offset its $9.3 million personal property investment for items such as furniture, fixtures, computers and equipment.

97. Last Word: The Fragile Compromise, Late by Train and NY Times on Chips Moman -

It looks like there is a deal to fully fund the Shelby County Schools system’s budget. But don’t look at the deal too long because it is very fragile.

It unraveled a bit within an hour after this got thrashed out in marathon Wednesday committee sessions by the Shelby County Commission.

98. Parking Was Key in ServiceMaster Deal -

Parking concerns for ServiceMaster Global Holdings’ move to Downtown Memphis have been resolved.

On June 14, the Downtown Parking Authority granted ServiceMaster access to the parking garage at 250 Peabody Place.

99. ServiceMaster Tax Incentive Package Approved -

The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. approved a tax incentive package Tuesday, June 14, to support ServiceMaster Global Holdings’ conversion of Peabody Place mall into a multimillion-dollar headquarters.

100. Last Word: Chips Moman, ServiceMaster Incentives and Crosstown High -

Chips Moman has died. Word of his death Monday at a hospice in Georgia came two years after Moman was honored for his contributions to Memphis music and the city's history.

Those contributions were substantial and for quite a while they were overlooked – even while he was running the definition of a hit factory at American Sound Studios, a non-descript recording studio on Danny Thomas Boulevard at Chelsea Avenue in North Memphis.