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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: The Bucc Falls, Lakeland Demolition and Crossing The Year Mark -

Late word Sunday that Bernal Smith II, the president and publisher of the New Tri-State Defender, died at his home Sunday. Smith was a part of the reporters roundtables we do from time to time on "Behind The Headlines." He brought back the city's legacy African-American-owned newspaper and in that role over the last seven years was a big voice in the reshaping of Memphis as a media market. He put reporters back on the streets of this city to cover Memphis and its issues in an independent way that make this a much richer and more competitive media market than it has been in quite some time. Editorially, he was a strong voice on numerous issues and he spoke from the experience of growing up in this city. He was 45 years old and here at The Daily News, those of us who came to know him and work with him on the show express our condolences to his family.

2. Tigers Basketball Picked 9th in AAC -

American Athletic Conference coaches don’t expect the University of Memphis men’s basketball team to be much of a factor this season, based on results of the preseason coaches’ poll released Monday, Oct. 16, at AAC Media Days in Philadelphia.

3. Events -

The Big River Crossing Half Marathon and 5K, benefiting Peer Power Foundation, will be held Saturday, Oct. 21. The half-marathon will be the first to allow participants to cross the Arkansas-Tennessee state line via the Big River Crossing, while the 5K will run a course through Downtown Memphis. Both races with start at Tom Lee Park, with the 5K beginning at 8 a.m. and the half-marathon at 8:30 a.m. Visit runsignup.com/Race/TN/Memphis/BigRiverCrossing for details and registration.

4. Events -

The Big River Crossing Half Marathon and 5K, benefiting Peer Power Foundation, will be held Saturday, Oct. 21. The half-marathon will be the first to allow participants to cross the Arkansas-Tennessee state line via the Big River Crossing, while the 5K will run a course through Downtown Memphis. Both races with start at Tom Lee Park, with the 5K beginning at 8 a.m. and the half-marathon at 8:30 a.m. Visit runsignup.com/Race/TN/Memphis/BigRiverCrossing for details and registration.

5. Fix This Ticket -

HARD MADE HARDER, THAT’S THE TICKET. Growing up, I felt deprived because I occasionally had to ride the bus. In college, I felt deprived because I didn’t have a car. When I got married, I felt deprived because we had only one.

6. Not Worried About Bama? Just Wait Until Kickoff -

Tennessee’s football team will make history Saturday against No. 1-ranked Alabama (7-0, 4-0 SEC), no matter what happens with the game.

The Vols (3-3, 0-3 SEC) were 34-point underdogs early in the week for the 3:30 EDT game (TV: CBS) in Tuscaloosa. The 34-point spread is the largest ever in the UT-Alabama series.

7. Uncertainty Reigns Ahead of New Health Care Sign-Up Period -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – Jason Sanford has heard so many rumors about the changing health care landscape that every few weeks he dials a local information desk, seeking just a rough estimate of what his diabetes medication will soon cost him.

8. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

9. Fincher ‘Very Close’ to Entering Race for Corker’s Senate Seat -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

10. City Lays Out Numerous Paths to Statue Removal -

City officials laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

11. Fincher Says 'Very Close' To Senate Run -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up starting with the 2018 Republican primary.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

12. Medicare Open Enrollment Season is Here -

If you are a Medicare enrollee, you should know that open enrollment takes place from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2017. Any changes you make to your coverage will take effect on Jan. 1, 2018. Since your health care priorities are likely to change over time, you might find it beneficial to review and make alterations to how you structure your Medicare solution.

13. Last Word: Bredesen's Note, Serious Sewer Talks and Protest Vs. Process -

Another lively week in state politics as former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen says he is considering a run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up. This came Monday in a note to the Associated Press in which Bredesen said he will make his decision quickly about an entry into the Democratic primary.

14. Tigers Basketball Picked 9th in AAC -

American Athletic Conference coaches don’t expect the University of Memphis men’s basketball team to be much of a factor this season, based on results of the preseason coaches’ poll released Monday, Oct. 16, at AAC Media Days in Philadelphia.

15. Sewer Cut-Off Aligns With Developing Densely -

When the city decided in August to end all new connections to the sewer system by developments outside of the Memphis city limits effective immediately, it was about much more than the sewer system.

16. Last Word: Tigers Make Top 25, Pfizer's Next Tax Break and Shepherds Creek -

The Tigers make the top 25 ESPN Power Rankings for college football with the Liberty Bowl victory Saturday over Navy 30 – 27. And Tigers coach Mike Norvell responds to the pre-game arrest of a player on a rape charge.

17. Cory Christmas Gives Access to Opportunities -

Cory Christmas describes himself as risk-averse. But while he was growing up on the Gulf Coast, in Mobile, Alabama, he dreamed of being the sort of news reporter who broadcasts live during a hurricane.

18. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

19. School Board in Tennessee Votes to Keep LGBT Protections -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee county's school board has voted to keep protections for LGBT students and employees in place.

News outlets report Knox County school board members who were to vote Wednesday on a proposal to eliminate specific protections for gender identity and sexual orientation instead passed a substitute motion to keep existing language.

20. Events -

The Ben F. Jones Chapter of the National Bar Association will host a continuing legal education seminar titled “Celebrating 51 Years of the Ben F. Jones Chapter of the National Bar Association” Thursday, Oct. 12, from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St. The CLE will examine the state of the bar by analyzing cases handled by Ben F. Jones Chapter members from 1966 to the present. Expert panel discussions include “How to Maintain Your Law License” and “How to Save Your Reputation.” Tickets are $85 in advance or $100 at the event. Register at eventbrite.com.

21. Trump’s Bluster Cascades Through State Politics -

The chaos emanating from President Donald Trump’s administration is changing the landscape of Tennessee politics, setting the stage for upheaval within the dominant Republican Party.

“This is a really big moment for the Tennessee Republican Party,” with the Trump wing or far-right wing “firmly in control,” says Kent Syler, Middle Tennessee State University political science professor.

22. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

23. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

24. UT QBs, Receivers, Coaches Struggling So Far -

Tennessee’s football players are on fall break this weekend during the open date. You’ve got to wonder how many players fifth-year UT coach Butch Jones will get back after the break.

Fallout from last Saturday’s 41-0 loss to No. 5 Georgia is massive. Fans were leaving Neyland Stadium by halftime with the Vols trailing 24-0. Jones took a beating from fans on social media and sports talk radio all week.

25. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

26. Memphis Readies Red Carpet to Land Amazon -

With 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in capital expenditures at stake, it stands to reason that cities hoping to land Amazon.com’s second U.S. headquarters will do whatever it takes to close the “once-in-a-lifetime” deal.

27. Memphis Officials Lay Out Initial Pitch for Amazon HQ -

With 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in capital expenditures at stake, it stands to reason that cities hoping to land Amazon.com’s second U.S. headquarters will do whatever it takes to close the “once-in-a-lifetime” deal.

28. Gay Marriage Advocates Want Mississippi Law Struck Down -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Advocates of same-sex marriage said Monday that they will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a Mississippi law that lets government workers and business people cite their own religious objections to refuse services to gay couples.

29. Paying Beale Street Security Costs Raises Lease Questions -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, on whether the city should start using some of the $378,000 in Beale Street cover charge funds the Downtown Memphis Commission has been holding in two bank accounts since June.

30. Last Word: Corker on Meet The Press, Summer School and Crosstown Cautions -

The Slider Inn’s second location to come in South Main is an indication that investment and other activity just below the radar continue to come to the surface in an area known for lots of apartment construction recently. The second location is in a brick building that was a place to store and service vintage cars. Look for a public art element and a back patio as well. All of those plans recently clearing the Landmarks Commission.

31. Corker Says He 'Struggled' With Decision To Leave Senate -

No further clues from U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee about his political plans after he leaves the Senate, during an interview Sunday, Oct. 1, on “Meet The Press.”

But Corker said on the NBC news program that he “struggled” since January with the decision on whether or not to go for a third term in the Senate.

32. Week Ahead: Oct. 2-9 -

Hey, Memphis! Prepare to rock out this week as the Mempho Music Festival hits Shelby Farms Park and Wilco plays The Orpheum. Plus, Beale Street memorializes one of its own, Memphis legal pros discuss the Confederate monuments issue, and much more in The Week Ahead…

33. Shaky Start Exposes Raw Nerves as Dawgs Roll In -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones had more than Georgia on his mind this week. Rumors on message boards and reports on sports talk radio flamed the fires around Jones and the Vols after last Saturday’s 17-13 victory over Massachusetts at Neyland Stadium.

34. Haslam Less Clear Than Usual On Run for US Senate -

Gov. Bill Haslam usually gives an answer to every question, even if his subjects and verbs don’t agree. But when it comes to a potential run for the U.S. Senate, he stumbles.

In fact, his response was almost inaudible just a week before his pal U.S. Sen. Bob Corker said he wouldn’t seek another term at the end of 2018.

35. City’s Legal Path to Statue Removal Complex -

The administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is setting the stage for a critical Tennessee Historical Commission hearing next month in its bid to remove a statue of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest from a city park.

36. Memphis Independent Schools Offer Varied Approaches to Early Childhood Learning -

Research has shown show early childhood education sets the foundation for academic success in elementary school, and Memphis’ independent schools boast a number of high-quality preschool programs with expert educators, innovative approaches and state-of-the-art technology.

37. New Headmasters Take the Helm At Hutchison, Memphis University School -

Kristen Ring, the new head of school at Hutchison School, dispels the notion that data on student achievement is only a function of state and federal requirements for public school systems.

38. Enhanced Athletic Facilities Significant Part of Independent School Draw -

Over the last decade or so, Memphis-area independent schools have made major improvements in their athletic facilities – to the point it sometimes looks like an athletics arms race mimicking what is happening across college campuses.

39. Inside Voice -

The advertisement moves fast, even for 30 seconds. It’s got hip-hop artist Marco Pave with Grammy Award-winning producer Carlos Broady. And the message is to the point as the camera comes in close on the face of a man who says emphatically, “Don’t lose your head, use your head.”

40. Epidemic at Work? Businesses Forced to Deal With Drug Abuse -

NEW YORK (AP) – After a troubled youth himself, Phillip Cohen made it a practice to hire people at his woodworking business who have also struggled with addiction and mental health issues. But when an employee died from a drug overdose, he adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

41. Are Achievement Schools a Problem or the Solution? -

Forgiveness or farewell: What should be the fate of the Achievement School District?

Among Memphis legislators, it just depends.

State Rep. Mark White calls the task to pull Shelby County’s poorest performing schools out of the state’s bottom 5 percent a “heavy lift.”

42. New Gannett Cuts Eliminate Two More Commercial Appeal Employees -

The effects of another companywide restructuring at newspaper publisher Gannett Co. Inc. – which owns USA Today as well as The Commercial Appeal – have touched the newsroom in Memphis, following an even deeper round of local cuts earlier this year.

43. Gannett Cost-Cutting Again Trims Commercial Appeal Headcount -

The effects of another companywide restructuring at newspaper publisher Gannett Co. Inc. – which owns USA Today as well as The Commercial Appeal – have touched the newsroom in Memphis, following an even deeper round of local cuts earlier this year.

44. Last Word: Doubling Down at City Hall, Karl Dean in Collierville & Your Credit Report -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd doubling down right at the start of a Monday morning meeting of the Beale Street Task Force on that conflict of interest issue involving his company’s contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association. Meanwhile, it is council day at City Hall Tuesday and lots to discuss on several fronts including the Bicentennial Gateway and Convention Center projects and the move of Golden India just off Overton Square.

45. Dean: Economic Development More Difficult in Memphis -

It’s a story that former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean tells just about every place in the state he goes in his campaign to be the state’s next governor.

46. Juvenile Court Outcomes Still Questioned -

Rev. Keith Norman says just about every time federal monitors in the settlement agreement with Juvenile Court come to Memphis they meet with him and want to hear from a broad cross section of Memphians with no filtering of those they encounter.

47. The Week Ahead: Sept. 18-24 -

Hello, Memphis! Autumn officially arrives this Friday, and it’s bringing along a spate of happenings this week – from the Metal Museum’s Repair Days to the Memphis Japan Festival and the Mid-South Fair. Check out our top event picks and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

48. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

49. Equifax Victims May Face Another Hassle in Buying an iPhone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple fans who froze their credit after the Equifax data breach may end up with another hassle on their hands if they try to get one of the new iPhones that can cost more than $1,000. People who did so and want to make any big purchase may find the same.

50. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

51. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

52. Opioid Committee on Right Track, Obstacles Remain -

Smyrna Police Chief Kevin Arnold can remember the first time his detectives brought a heroin case to him three or four years ago.

“Of course, my reaction immediately was, ‘I thought that went away in the late 70s.’ But we’re seeing it. In fact, we are averaging approximately five heroin overdoses a month just in the town of Smyrna,” adds Arnold, whose city about 10 miles southeast of Nashville has a population of nearly 48,600.

53. Last Word: Midtown Moves, A Spike in Chandler Numbers and Old School Expo -

The Brooks looking for a place outside of Overton Park is a huge story that broke Tuesday evening. And it is one of those stories that has a lot of dominoes you might say. Our story looks at some earlier options the museum developed mid recession, which is what delayed fuller consideration of this whole question.

54. Senate GOP Struggles With Deficit in Work on Budget, Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans are struggling with how many billions of dollars President Donald Trump's tax code overhaul will add to the deficit as they work on a GOP budget plan that's a prerequisite to any far-reaching change in the nation's tax system.

55. Irma Evacuees in Tenn. Can Seek Unemployment Benefits -

Hundreds of residents from states impacted by Hurricane Irma escaped the storm by seeking refuge in cities across Tennessee. Many are staying with family or at local hotels and campgrounds and are not able to work.

56. Monuments Controversy May Mean Long Haul of Lawsuits, Negotiations -

When the Tennessee Historical Commission votes Oct. 13 on a waiver that would permit the city of Memphis to remove Confederate monuments from two city parks, it won’t be anywhere near the last word on the matter.

57. Does Memphis Have Right Mojo for Amazon HQ? -

Amazon.com’s announcement last week that it is actively searching for a second headquarters location caught the attention of governors, mayors and development officials from all over the country hoping to hit the jackpot.

58. Last Word: Southern Heritage Recap, Funky Week Ahead and the Amazon Contest -

The 28th annual Southern Heritage Classic is in the books with a close game at the Liberty Bowl Saturday and the kind of attendance that if sustained through our civic football season – Southern Heritage, Tigers home schedule and AutoZone Liberty Bowl – promises continued growth and changes in our development. Whether there is that growth or not, 47,407 came, tailgated and saw Tennessee State beat Jackson State 17-15.

59. The Week Ahead: Sept. 11-18 -

Hey, Memphis! This week we’re gearing up for the Cooper Young Festival and a packed house at the Tigers vs. UCLA game. Plus, Uptown Funk heads Downtown and The Joker hits East Memphis. Here’s what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

60. Anderson Leaving As ASD Superintendent -

Malika Anderson is stepping down as superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District effective at the end of September after being with the turnaround school district for the state’s lowest-performing schools since its inception in 2012 and as superintendent since January 2016.

61. Memphis Small Business Landscape Stable Amid Slow Economic Growth -

While the local small-business landscape mirrors the national environment of a slowly growing economy keeping things stable, the lack of population growth is holding the Memphis area back from truly breaking out.

62. Editorial: Historical Commissions Must Be Run by Pros -

At some point, the question of what becomes of our city’s Confederate monuments will be resolved. Whenever that is, there are still some critical and arguably larger issues that should be addressed.

63. Last Word: The Amazon Competition, Millington Shelters and Grizz Ownership Drama -

With a social media post Thursday morning, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the city is ready to compete in a very public competition for the $5-billion second North American headquarters Amazon.com announced earlier Thursday. Some context here. The $5 billion investment by Amazon in what it calls HQ2 compares to the $9 billion St. Jude is investing in its expansion including about $1 billion in capital costs and the rest research, technology and other development costs included in what is more than a physical expansion.

64. Anderson Leaves ASD Bound By More Rules and With Different Role -

When the state-run Achievement School District began in the summer of 2012 there weren’t a lot of rules for how it would operate.

The superintendent of the turnaround model for schools in the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement could unilaterally take over any school on the list even if the local school district objected.

65. Anderson Leaving as ASD Superintendent -

Malika Anderson is stepping down as superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District effective at the end of September after being with the turnaround school district for the state’s lowest-performing schools since its inception in 2012 and as superintendent since January 2016.

66. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

67. Bluff City High School Another First in Educational Transition -

Following a lull in historic firsts in public education in Shelby County – the launch of the state-run Achievement School District, school consolidation and then the demerger into seven school districts – another historic event took place last month in Hickory Hill that flew well under the radar.

68. Memphis Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares Confederate statues on city-owned property public nuisances and sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

69. City Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares “all Confederate statues and artifacts … on City-owned property public nuisances” and also sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

70. Drivers Whose Cars Were Flooded by Harvey Can't Find Rentals -

BEAUMONT, Texas (AP) – His three vehicles flooded by Hurricane Harvey, Jason Bell checked at one car-rental office only to find about 2,500 people ahead of him on the waiting list. When he tried a more out-of-the-way location, the reservations still numbered about 300.

71. Events -

The 2017 Delta Fair & Music Festival continues through Sept. 10 at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Enjoy live music, festival food, carnival rides, a petting zoo and special events like lawnmower races and the “redneck yacht pull.” Visit deltafest.com for hours and tickets.

72. The Week Ahead: Sept. 4-10 -

Hello, Memphis – and Happy Labor Day! Hopefully the promise of an exciting football season and Memphis Redbirds playoff games will help ease you back into work mode after the three-day weekend. Both are in store – along with Goat Days and much more – in The Week Ahead...

73. Events -

The 2017 Delta Fair & Music Festival continues through Sept. 10 at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Enjoy live music, festival food, carnival rides, a petting zoo and special events like lawnmower races and the “redneck yacht pull.” Visit deltafest.com for hours and tickets.

74. Nathan Bedford Forrest Bust to Stay in Capitol -

The Tennessee Capitol Commission blocked Gov. Bill Haslam’s request Friday, Sept. 1, to move the embattled Nathan Bedford Forrest bust out of the State Capitol to the Tennessee State Museum.

75. Events -

The Mid-South Coalition for Comfort Care and Bioethics will hold a community meeting presentation titled “Everyday Ways to Practice Integrative Medicine” Tuesday, Sept. 5, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Trezevant Terrace, 3437 Waynoka Ave. Joanna Lyman, palliative care coordinator at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, will discuss how integrative medicine combines conventional medicine and complementary therapies to help children with chronic illnesses and other conditions. For more information, contact Emily Fox-Hill at efoxhill@aol.com or 901-626-4233.

76. Juvenile Court Judge Calls Federal Oversight and Monitors a ‘Distraction’ -

Five years ago when the U.S. Justice Department concluded years of review with a scathing report about due process and equal treatment issues in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, then Judge Curtis Person Jr. and his staff had to make a decision.

77. Wizards Return -

The past couple of years has seen the return of pinball tables across the Mid-South, with groups like Memphis Pinball hosting weekly gatherings at places like Memphis Made Brewing and the new pinball arcade in Millington, The Retro.

78. Council to Weigh Statues, Funding Projects -

Memphis City Council members have a busy agenda Tuesday, Sept. 5: continued discussion regarding bypassing a Tennessee Historical Commission waiver process to remove Confederate monuments and a recently enacted ban on sewer connections to properties outside the city limits.

79. Events -

The 28th Southern Heritage Classic takes place Thursday, Sept. 7, through Saturday, Sept. 9. The three-day cultural festival features 10 events – including concerts, a college and career fair, the Classic Parade and more – all culminating in the annual football game between Tennessee State and Jackson State Saturday at 6 p.m. at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. Visit southernheritageclassic.com for a schedule.

80. Vols, Jackets Each Eager to Make Statement -

Enough of the talk. Enough of the speculation. Let’s play some football.

Tennessee starts its fifth season of the Butch Jones coaching era on Monday night against Georgia Tech at the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. Kickoff is 8 p.m. (TV: ESPN).

81. Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to an $11 million, two-year contract with two one-year renewal options with Aetna.

82. Frayser Battle Renewed -

A plan to expand a construction landfill near Whitney Elementary School is drawing a lot of resistance from many Frayser stakeholders in advance of its Sept. 7 meeting with the Land Use Control Board.

83. County Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to Aetna in an $11 million two-year contract with two renewals of one year each.

84. Gov't Probe: Abuse in Nursing Homes Unreported Despite Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police, says a government audit that faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law requiring immediate notification.

85. Statue of Martin Luther King Jr. Unveiled in his Hometown -

ATLANTA (AP) – The daughter of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. stood beside her father's newly unveiled statue Monday, just a few blocks from where he grew up, handing out hugs and telling each well-wisher: "It's about time."

86. After Returning to a Bowl Game, Vanderbilt Looks to Go Higher in SEC East -

It’s always good to know who you are. Gives you a foundation. A starting place.

“We know the academics is a huge piece of our identity as a Vanderbilt football player,” said senior Oren Burks, who has moved from safety to linebacker. “But at end of the day, it’s about winning. That’s why you play.”

87. A Different Body of Work Emerges For The Hereafter -

With the cost of traditional casket funerals rising to an average of $9,000 or more, many people are choosing less expensive options like cremation and donating their bodies to science. Numerous “green” options for cremated remains such as biodegradable urns or even using ashes for tree planting, use in rebuilding coral reefs, for stones for jewelry or for tattoos and portraits are gaining popularity.

88. What Memphis Parents Should Know About How Schools Share Student Information -

The sharing of student information is at the center of the latest squabble between Shelby County Schools and state-authorized charter schools — making it more important than ever for Memphis parents to know what’s at stake.

89. Yellen Defends Bank Regulations Passed After 2008 Crisis -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday emphatically defended the web of regulations the Fed helped enact after the 2008 financial crisis, saying it helped restore the banking system's health and disputing criticism that the rules have hurt lending.

90. Bullets and Books: Shoppers Get Discounts in Mississippi -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Shoppers in Mississippi can save money this weekend based on some constitutional rights.

The Second Amendment weekend takes place Friday through Sunday. Guns, ammunition, archery equipment and many other hunting supplies are exempt from the state's 7 percent sales tax.

91. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

92. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

93. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

94. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

95. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments. -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized, to maintain public order or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

96. Officials Say Trump's Afghan Plan Involves 3,900 More Troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to end America's longest war and eliminate Afghanistan's rising extremist threat involves sending up to 3,900 additional U.S. troops, senior officials said Tuesday. The first deployments could take place within days.

97. The Latest: University Barricades Confederate Statue -

The Latest on efforts to remove Confederate monuments and the nationwide fallout from a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (all times local):

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2:30 p.m.

Workers in a Florida city have started taking down a memorial to Confederate soldiers at a city-owned cemetery.

98. UTHSC Readies New Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility -

UTHSC is putting the final touches on its new $20 million Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems, a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility at the site of a former warehouse at 208 S. Dudley St. in the Memphis Medical District.

99. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

100. Events -

The Downtown Neighborhood Association will meet Tuesday, Aug. 22, at 6 p.m. on Pembroke Square’s rooftop deck, 125 S. Main St. Riverfront Development Corp. president Benny Lendermon and vice president Dorchelle Spence will present the “State of our Riverfront.” Cost is free for DNA members and $10 for visitors. Visit memphisdna.org for details.